After 18 months 'hard labor' updating, cleaning, and attaching missing sources we have this newly updated database. If you've checked the old database out, it would be well worth your while to look again. This is as close to 'error free' as possible. However, errors are still possible and please do let me know if you find any. Data is only as good as the quality of the sources.

In some cases, certain facts and conclusions can be disputed or debated by others, but I've made a point of digging as deep as I can and making my own conclusions - and have detailed them in the notes.

Happy genealogy hunting!

Notes


Matches 1 to 50 of 15,121

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 #   Notes   Linked to 
1


HERVE [III] de Donzy, son of GEOFFROY III Sire de Donzy & his second wife Garna de Toucy (-1187). The Historia Gloriosi Regis Ludovici VII records that "Gaufridus de Giemago…Herveus filius eiusdem Gaufridi" objected to his father granting the castle of Gien to his sister as dowry when she married "Stephano de Sancerro". Gervais abbé de Saint-Germain d'Auxerre and "Gaufredum Donziacum" reached agreements relating to Diges, with the consent of "B…uxor Gaufredi et duo filii eius, Herveus…et Gaufredus", by charter dated 1151. He succeeded his father as Seigneur de Donzy. He went on the Third Crusade. “Hugo de La Ferté cognomento Blancus, qui ex parte matris, domini Gaufridi de Donziaco” donated property to La Charité-sur-Loire, approved by “præfatus dominus Gaufridus de Donziaco…cum duobus filiis Herveo et Gaufrido” by charter dated 1151. “Herveus de Donziaco” donated property to La Charité-sur-Loire, with the approval of “Guillelmus Goet et Philippus, filii mei”, by charter dated 1187. He married firstly MATHILDE Goët, daughter of GUILLAUME [IV] Goët de Montmirail Seigneur d'Alluis & his wife Isabelle de Blois (-22 Jan ----). The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Robert of Torigny names "Herveus de Juen" as husband of "Guillermus Goeth…primogenitam filiam natam ex una sororem comitis Teobaldi". He married secondly ---. The primary source which confirms this second marriage has not yet been identified.
[http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BURGUNDIAN%20NOBILITY.htm ] 
Herve III, Seigneur de Donzy (I9029)
 
2

Alexander Filius Geroldi, brother of the chamberlain Henry fitz Gerold, in whose 'Charta' he appears holding fees 'de novo,' with Hugh fitz Gerold. Warin fitz Gerold also occurs, specifically identified as Henry's brother. Before 1156 he married Alice de Rumilly, widow of William fitz Duncan, through whome he held the honour of Skipton. Benefactor of Southwark priory, to which he granted two measures of chesse in Balking, in Kingston Lisle, Berkshire, confirmed by Alice de Rumilly his wife, who had dower there. The grant was confirmed by his sister Amice de Tresgoz, daughter of Robert fitz Gerold and Alice his wife, widow of Philip de Leyburn and then wife of John de Tresgoz, and also by his nephew Henry II fitz Gerold. Alexander and his wife Alice were also benefactors of Dunstable. Amice occurs as 'Anna' or Amy wife of John de Tresgod in Westminster documents concerning property in London to which she was coheir with Margaret, then wife of Peter de Sutton. Henry fitz Gerold made a grant to the same house for the soul of his brother Warin. He died without issue about midsummer 1178. Maurice of Boreham and Odo Burnard occur on Pipe Role 5 Richard I, 6, as heirs of Alexander fitz Gerold.
Domesday Descendants pp892-893 
FITZGEROLD, Alexander (I9328)
 
3

Annals and Antiquites of Wales has as Dolfwyn ap Rhiwallon's wife, Alice verch Cadwallon ap Madoc lord of Kerry, Montgomeryshire. 
FERCH HYWEL, Sian (I50327)
 
4

From: P L Kessler , History Files, The - The King Lists, 1999-2002, Home Publishing, homepages.tesco.net/~plk33/plk33:
The Iclingas
From c. AD 520 - this band of Angles gradmaclly moved west over the Midlands, pushing back the borders of British kingdoms such as Cynwidion and Pengwern, although the latter was a strong ally against the Northumbrians from 613-656.
AD 584 - by this time various other Anglian settlements had sprung up, and the Iclingas gradmaclly extended the range of their power, slowly amalgamating the Saxon and Anglian kingdoms around the Midlands. They eventually became know by the territory they conquered, and Mercia evolved into a major Anglo-Saxon kingdom.

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the genealogy of king Penda of Mercia as follows:
* an.DCXXVI .... penda waes pybbing . pybba creoding . creoda cynewalding . cynewald cnebbing . cnebba iceling . icel eomaering . eomaer angeltheowing . angeltheow offing . offa waemunding . waemund wihtlaeging . wihtlaeg wodening . ..... *
In the year 626. .... Penda was son of Pybba, Pybba son of Creoda, Creoda son of Cynewald, Cynewald son of Cnebba , Cnebba son of Icel, Icel son of Eomaer, Eomaer son of Angeltheow, Angeltheow son of Offa, Offa son of Waemund, Waemund son of Wihtlaeg, Wihtlaeg son of Woden .....
Penda claimed descent from the royal family of the continental Angles descended from Woden through Offa king of Angeln (in Slesvig) - one of main heroes of Germanic legend remembered as . The fact that the Mercian royal family was known as Icelingas strengthens the claim that it was Icel and his son Cnebba Iceling who came to Britain in AD 499.
The Icelingas entered Britain through the estuaries of the Wash and the Trent. They settled in navigable river valleys and areas served by Roman canals. Roman influence had wained some 100 years earlier although the network of roads and canals remained. The English settlements became part of a sophisticated and prosperous society never far away from means of communication by navigable rivers and canals or stone surfaced causeways and roads.
SOURCES: Bede: Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation, The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Roman Britain: Cllingwood and Myers, pp.356, 416-417. Anglo-Saxon England; Prof F M Stenton. Chronicon ex Chronicis; Florence of Worcester. The Lost Kingdom - Anglo-Saxon Lindsey; K Leaby and C M Coutts.
ICKELINGS OF THE PAGAN AND HEROIC TRADITION
Early pagan literature such as Beowulf, supplemented by recent archaeological discoveries, provide insight into the beliefs of the Angles which were very similar to those of some non-christian civilizations today. There was a belief in life hereafter and a profound respect for their ancestors. The more distant and admired ancestors assumed in legend the stature of gods, e.g. Tiuw, Woden, Thor and Freyr, after whom the days of the week were named in Anglo-Saxon England.
In 1997 Northamptonshire archaeologists excavated a pagan and heroic burial in the gravel plain of the Nene Valley at Wollaston. It was the grave of an Anglian nobleman at the side of a road leading to a Roman vineyard and has been dated about AD 650. The most important content of the grave was a boar-crested helmet like those so often referred to in Beowulf. The boar which symbolised strength and was associated with the goddess Freyr would have been worn by Ickeling leaders of the time.
"He was a nobleman and the boar insignia on his helmet could mean that he was a prince. He appears to have died when middle-aged, so he had probably become a war leader by fighting many bloody battles in his youth. He would have grown up in a village, living in a timber-framed long-house with a thatched roof. As an aristocrat he would have learned how to fight with a spear and sword from an early age. He would have honed his skills hunting wild boar, deer, bear and wolf in the forests that covered the country. As he grew older he would have carved out a name for himself leading bands of men into war against rival tribes. After a hard day of hunting and pillaging he would have come home to his wives and children. A goat, sheep or part of a cow would be thrown into the long-hut's cauldron and his band would drink beer, mead or wine. The prince would have led a very war-like lifestyle. Even when he died his sword was buried with hime to prepare him for a similar existence in the after-life." Prof. R Cramp of Durham University, England.
From meagre surviving records it appears that the first king of Mercia was Creoda ruling from 585 and he was an Ickeling. He was succeeded by his son Pybba in 597. The most famous Ickeling and last of the "old pagan religion" was king Penda (582-654) and his genealogy links him with Woden and his spouse Freyr. The penny coin is named after him. A formidable ruler he rivalled the power of the Christian Northumbrian kings. The rivalry between the two kingdoms was notorious. Penda had defeated and killed Edwin in 633 and Oswald in 642. Both Penda and his spouse Cyneuise remained lifelong adherents to their inherited beliefs at a time when the conversion of the English to Christianity was proceeding apace. Their eldest son Peada had been made Prince of the Middle Angles by Penda. In 653, Peada along with all the Middle Angles became Christian converts in order to marry Alchfled, daughter of Penda's rival, king Oswy of Northumbria. This did not deter Penda from continuing his campaigns against Northumbria and in the following year on 15 Nov 654, Penda was defeated and killed at the battle of the river Winwaed by Oswy and this was hailed by Bede as a victory for Christ over the pagan gods.
SOURCES: Bede: Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation, The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Beowulf. The 'Pioneer' Burial: Ian Meadows: Current Archaeology 154. Northampton Chronicle and Echo, 23 April 1997. Prof Rosemary Cramp of Durham University.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------



From: P L Kessler , History Files, The - The King Lists, 1999-2002, Home Publishing, homepages.tesco.net/~plk33/plk33:
The Iclingas
From c. AD 520 - this band of Angles gradmaclly moved west over the Midlands, pushing back the borders of British kingdoms such as Cynwidion and Pengwern, although the latter was a strong ally against the Northumbrians from 613-656.
AD 584 - by this time various other Anglian settlements had sprung up, and the Iclingas gradmaclly extended the range of their power, slowly amalgamating the Saxon and Anglian kingdoms around the Midlands. They eventually became know by the territory they conquered, and Mercia evolved into a major Anglo-Saxon kingdom.

The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records the genealogy of king Penda of Mercia as follows:
* an.DCXXVI .... penda waes pybbing . pybba creoding . creoda cynewalding . cynewald cnebbing . cnebba iceling . icel eomaering . eomaer angeltheowing . angeltheow offing . offa waemunding . waemund wihtlaeging . wihtlaeg wodening . ..... *
In the year 626. .... Penda was son of Pybba, Pybba son of Creoda, Creoda son of Cynewald, Cynewald son of Cnebba , Cnebba son of Icel, Icel son of Eomaer, Eomaer son of Angeltheow, Angeltheow son of Offa, Offa son of Waemund, Waemund son of Wihtlaeg, Wihtlaeg son of Woden .....
Penda claimed descent from the royal family of the continental Angles descended from Woden through Offa king of Angeln (in Slesvig) - one of main heroes of Germanic legend remembered as . The fact that the Mercian royal family was known as Icelingas strengthens the claim that it was Icel and his son Cnebba Iceling who came to Britain in AD 499.
The Icelingas entered Britain through the estuaries of the Wash and the Trent. They settled in navigable river valleys and areas served by Roman canals. Roman influence had wained some 100 years earlier although the network of roads and canals remained. The English settlements became part of a sophisticated and prosperous society never far away from means of communication by navigable rivers and canals or stone surfaced causeways and roads.
SOURCES: Bede: Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation, The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Roman Britain: Cllingwood and Myers, pp.356, 416-417. Anglo-Saxon England; Prof F M Stenton. Chronicon ex Chronicis; Florence of Worcester. The Lost Kingdom - Anglo-Saxon Lindsey; K Leaby and C M Coutts.
ICKELINGS OF THE PAGAN AND HEROIC TRADITION
Early pagan literature such as Beowulf, supplemented by recent archaeological discoveries, provide insight into the beliefs of the Angles which were very similar to those of some non-christian civilizations today. There was a belief in life hereafter and a profound respect for their ancestors. The more distant and admired ancestors assumed in legend the stature of gods, e.g. Tiuw, Woden, Thor and Freyr, after whom the days of the week were named in Anglo-Saxon England.
In 1997 Northamptonshire archaeologists excavated a pagan and heroic burial in the gravel plain of the Nene Valley at Wollaston. It was the grave of an Anglian nobleman at the side of a road leading to a Roman vineyard and has been dated about AD 650. The most important content of the grave was a boar-crested helmet like those so often referred to in Beowulf. The boar which symbolised strength and was associated with the goddess Freyr would have been worn by Ickeling leaders of the time.
"He was a nobleman and the boar insignia on his helmet could mean that he was a prince. He appears to have died when middle-aged, so he had probably become a war leader by fighting many bloody battles in his youth. He would have grown up in a village, living in a timber-framed long-house with a thatched roof. As an aristocrat he would have learned how to fight with a spear and sword from an early age. He would have honed his skills hunting wild boar, deer, bear and wolf in the forests that covered the country. As he grew older he would have carved out a name for himself leading bands of men into war against rival tribes. After a hard day of hunting and pillaging he would have come home to his wives and children. A goat, sheep or part of a cow would be thrown into the long-hut's cauldron and his band would drink beer, mead or wine. The prince would have led a very war-like lifestyle. Even when he died his sword was buried with hime to prepare him for a similar existence in the after-life." Prof. R Cramp of Durham University, England.
From meagre surviving records it appears that the first king of Mercia was Creoda ruling from 585 and he was an Ickeling. He was succeeded by his son Pybba in 597. The most famous Ickeling and last of the "old pagan religion" was king Penda (582-654) and his genealogy links him with Woden and his spouse Freyr. The penny coin is named after him. A formidable ruler he rivalled the power of the Christian Northumbrian kings. The rivalry between the two kingdoms was notorious. Penda had defeated and killed Edwin in 633 and Oswald in 642. Both Penda and his spouse Cyneuise remained lifelong adherents to their inherited beliefs at a time when the conversion of the English to Christianity was proceeding apace. Their eldest son Peada had been made Prince of the Middle Angles by Penda. In 653, Peada along with all the Middle Angles became Christian converts in order to marry Alchfled, daughter of Penda's rival, king Oswy of Northumbria. This did not deter Penda from continuing his campaigns against Northumbria and in the following year on 15 Nov 654, Penda was defeated and killed at the battle of the river Winwaed by Oswy and this was hailed by Bede as a victory for Christ over the pagan gods.
SOURCES: Bede: Ecclesiastical History of the English Nation, The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Beowulf. The 'Pioneer' Burial: Ian Meadows: Current Archaeology 154. Northampton Chronicle and Echo, 23 April 1997. Prof Rosemary Cramp of Durham University. 
Icel of Mercia (I3570)
 
5

In 1272, Hugh de Lacy was granted the Liberty of Meath by Henry II who sought to limit the expansionist policies of Strongbow [Richard de Clare], whom he feared might set up an independent Anglo-Norman kingdom in Ireland. Soon after his arrival at Trim, de Lacy built a wooden castle, the spike stockade mentioned in the "Song of Dermot and the Earl"--a poem of the period.
De Lacy left one of his barons, Hugh Tyrell, in charge, but when O'Connor, King of Connacht, threatened, Tyrell abandoned and burned the castle. By 1176, this wooden fortification had been replaced with a stone keep or tower. When the site was secure, the castle yard was surrounded by curtain walls and moat with a simple gate and bridge to the north. Analyses of samples of surviving structural timbers show that the keep was extended in at least two more phases and remodelled in the lifetime of Walter de Lacy, Hugh's son. Later, fore-buildings were built to protect the entrance to the keep.
[Trim Castle Visitors Guide, Duchas--The Heritage Service of Ireland] 
DE LACY, Hugh Baron de Lacy, Lord Meath (I7116)
 
6

Macbeth was said to be a grandson of Malcolm II and cousin to Thorfinn. SP states that Macbeth's mother was said to be Donada, second daughter of Malcolm, however, she was known to be Thorfinn's mother, so Macbeth's mother would have had to have been an third daughter whose name is unknown. 
Donada of Scotland (I3786)
 
7

Margaret, daughter of 6th Earl of Mar. [Burke's Peerage, p. 2716]
Marjory/Mary, widow of John de Strathbogie, 9th Earl of Atholl of the creation deemed to have been effected by 1115, and daughter of 6th Earl of Mar.
Burke's Peerage, p. 2770 
Margaret de Mar (I13585)
 
8

Morgan Mwynfawr ( d 665?), regulus of Glamorgan, was the son of Arthrwys ap Meurig ap Tewdrig, and may be the Morcant whose death is recorded in 'Annales Cambriae' under the year 665. The charters contained in the 'Book of LLandaff' include a number of grants which he is said to have made to the church of Llandaff in the time of Bishops Oudoceus and Berthguin. Other charters in the book of the time of Bertguin are attested by him, and an account is also given of ecclesiastical proceedings taken against him by Oudoceus in consequence of his murdering his uncle Ffriog. Though the 'Book of Llandaff' was compiled about the middle of the twelfth century, at a time when the see was vigorously asserting disputed claims, it nevertheless embodies a quantity of valmacble old material, and (details apart) is probably to be relied upon in the general view it gives of the position of Morgan. He appears as owner of lands in Gower, Glamorgan, and Gwent, and since the latter two districts were afterwards ruled over by his descendants, was probably sovereign of most of the region between the Towy and the Wye.
It has been very generally supposed that Morgannwg - a term of varying application, but usually denoting the country between the Wye and the Tawe - takes its name from Morgan Mwynfawr. Mr Phillimore, in a note to the Cymmrodorion edition of Owen's 'Pembrokeshre' suggests, however, that it is merely a variant of Gwlad Fogan, and that previous to the eleventh century the country was always known as Glywysing.
Morgan Mwynafawr, in common with may of his contemporaries, is a figure in the legends of the bards. He is mentioned in the 'Historical Triads' as one of the three Reddeners (i.e. devastators) of the isle of Britain; in the 'Iolo MSS' he is said to have been a cousin of King Arthur and a knight of his court, while his car was reckoned one of the nine treasures of Britain, for 'whoever sat in it would be immediately wharesoever he wished.' [Dictionary of National Biography XIII:907]
Morgan Mwynfawr (fl 730), 'the Benefactor,' or Morgan ab Athrwys, king of Morgannwg, from whom the old kingdom of Glamorgan, embracing Glywysing and Gwent, probably took its name. He was the grandson and no doubt the successor of king Meurig ap Tewdrig, the reputed husband of Onbrans, daughter of Gwrgant Mawr, last king of Erging (S. Herefordshire). Morgan's realm actually extended beyond the Wye into part of Erging, and westwards as far as the Towy. He was succeeded by his son Ithel. [Dictionary of Welsh Biography 639]
The story of Morgan Mwynfawr (the Courteous) is the nest ray of light thrown on the annals of Glamorgan. He was the son of Athrwys, whom some perilously identify with Arthur, and so great was his renown and high his character as protector of his country, bleeding from the wounds inflicted by Nordmanni and Mercian adventurers, that the territory he ruled chose to call itself after his name - Gwlad-Morgan and Morgan-wg, indifferently, - both signifying the country or land of Morgan. He is often called Morgan Mawr, the great, as well as Morgan Mwyn-fawr - the greatly gentle or courteous, and it is just possible that the latter epithet in its original uncompunded form was Mwyn Mawr - 'the great, the gentle.' In the 'history' of Glamorgan, 'out of the book that was in the possession of the Rev Mr. Gamage' of St Athan's, and which passed through the hands of Iolo, it is said that he resided at Adur and Breigan, and that he and his race, both before and after, were endued with the grace of supreme good fortune up to the time of Owain ap Morgan Hen. [Annals and Antiquities of Wales I:485-486] 
AP ATHRWYS, Morgan King of Gwent and Glywysing (I49912)
 
9

Richmond, previous creations: Alan III, a Count of Brittany, whose uncle, another Alan, was probably a companion in arms of William I (The Conqueror) at Hastings and was granted vast land holdings in Yorkshire almost immediately after the Conquest, seems to have been recognized as Earl of Richmond by 1136. There is no record of his formal investiture with the dignity, however.
His title derived from Richmond Castle in North Yorkshire, which his uncle Alan had built not long before dying in 1089 and which remained the caput or administrative centre of the honor (agglomeration of knight's fees in a single unit under the feudal system). Richmond Castle was granted to the 1st Duke of Richmond of the present creation in August 1675, the same month he was first ennobled, but the medieval hono comprised lands throughout eastern England, not just in Yorkshire. Earl Alan sided with Stephen against the Empress Maud at the time of the Anarchyl. His son Conan IV held the Dukedom of Brittany (right to which he enjoyed through his mother, Alan's wife) as well as the Earldom of Richmond.
[Burke's Peerage, p. 2402]

EARLDOM OF RICHMOND (II)
CONAN IV, DUKE OF BRITTANY and EARL OF RICHMOND, son and heir, succeeded his father in the Earldom of Richniond, being at that time under age. In 1156 he was in receipt of the third penny of the borough of Ipswich and two hundreds. In September 1156 he crossed to Brittany, besieged and took Rennes and put his stepfather Eudon to flight; shortly afterwards Eudon was taken prisoner by Ralf de Fougès and Conan was recognised as Duke of BrIttany. Between the latter part of 1156 and April 1158 he was in England, executing charters at Boston and Washingborough in Lincs, York and Richmond, and at Cheshunt in Herts, but on 22 April 1158 he was at Rennes, where he executed with the consent of his mother a charter for the abbey of St. Melaine. In July 1158 died Geoffrey, brother of King Henry II, who had the comté of Nantes, which Conan thereupon seized. The King ordered the honor of Richmond to be seized and crossed to France; Conan hastened to meet him at Avranches, where on 29 September he surrendered Nantes and made his peace. At some unascertained date after obtaining possession of the Duchy he disselsed his uncle Count Henry of Tréguier and Guingamp, which he retained till his death. He must have visited England in 1160, the year of his marriage to Margaret of Scotland. Thereafter he was probably for the most part in Brittany, executing a charter at Guingamp for Savigny on 12 March 1162 or 1163, and one at Quimper for the abbey of Ste. Croix of QuimperIé on 15 August 1162, and another for Savigny at Rennes on 2 February 1163. He was present at the Council of Clarendon in January 1164, about which time he executed at Wilton a charter for Le Mont St. Michel; this seems to be his last visit to England of which record exists. In the latter part of 1166, when Conan's only daughter and heir, Constance, was betrothed to Geoffrey, son of Henry II, he surrendered the Duchy of Brittany to the King, retaining only Guingamp and its dependencies. In the same year he executed at Rennes a charter for Savigny, and on 31 July he with the King was present at the translation of the body of the Breton saint Brieuc in the abbey church of SS. Sergius and Bacchus at Angers. He was again with the King at Angers on 24 March 1168, when he witnessed a royal charter. By a charter, of which the limits of date are 1167-1171, he gave land for the foundation of the abbey of St. Maurice de Carnoët.
He married, in 1160, Margaret of Scotland, sister of MALCOLM IV, King of Scofland, and daughter of Henry, EARL OF HUNTINGDON, by Ada or Adeline, daughter of William (DE WARENNE), EARL OF SURREY. He died 20 February 1171. His widow married, 2ndly, before Easter 1175, Humphrey DE BoHUN, Constable of England; she died in 1201, and was buried at Sawtrey Abbey, Hunts.
[Complete Peerage X:791-3, XIV:545, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)] 
Conan IV, Duc de Bretagne (I9182)
 
10

Stephen, future king of England, was born about the year 1096. His mother was Adela, daughter of William the Conqueror, and heir to all his strength of will and temper. His father was Stephen Count of Blois and Chartres, a boastful character who had made himself the laughing stock of Europe by running away from the siege of Antioch after having been made commander-in-chief there.
Adela's two favored sons, Stephen and Henry, were both to find their fortunes in England. Henry, a Cluniac monk, quickly accumulated Glastonbury, the richest abbey, and Winchester, the second richest diocese in England, and set out on his career of financial wizardry and ecclesiastical statesmanship. A man of rare power, vision and tact, he was infinitely more attuned to great responsibilities than his brother.
Stephen had a ready charm, and his gay and seemingly open nature made him a great success at court. His uncle Henry I loaded favours on him: he was given estates in England of some half a million acres, and made a favourable marriage to the rich heiress of the Count of Boulogne. Matilda was to be both a loyal and an able wife.
In 1136 Henry died, and though he had made all his barons swear fealty to his daughter Matilda before his death, Stephen now moved speedily to get himself accepted as King in England. His brother swayed the Church to his side, the Londoners were bought with a substantial grant of privileges, and the Norman barons were persmacded that a woman ruler of well-known arrogance and intractability, married to the leader of the Normans' traditional enemies, the Angevins, would be no good prospect for England.
Stephen's dash and promises carried him through for a while, but quickly enough people discovered his faults: he was tricky, changeable, often stupidly weak; he simply could not be relied upon, nor could he trust others. In 1139 Matilda landed, and her bastard brother Robert of Gloucester opened the West to her. During the next eight years she was to win defectors from Stephen's bad government.
In 1141, at Lincoln, Stephen's barons deserted him in battle, and he fell prisoner to Matilda. But she proved as unhappy a mistress as Stephen had been master, and many people were glad when Robert of Gloucester was captured by Stephen's Queen at the rout of Winchester, and Matilda was forced to release Stephen to get him back.
Many barons favoured this dmacl sitmaction in which they could bargain for their services, and live as war-lords. Castles sprung up all over the land, and in many parts a dreadful anarchy reigned, so that many people openly declared that Christ and his Saints were asleep, and the Devil ruled.
Matilda's son Henry had twice invaded and been repulsed in 1147 and 1149, but when he came again in 1153 he was backed by a tremendous accumulation of continental power. The death of Stephen's son Eustace prompted him to negotiate with the young Duke, and he was encouraged in this by the urgings of the Church and of the Norman barons who wished to regain their continental estates now under Henry's control. So Matilda's son was made heir, and for a further year Stephen ruled, in peace at last, until his death in October 1154. He was buried in his abbey of Faversham.
[Source: Who's Who in the Middle Ages, John Fines, Barnes and Noble Books, New York, 1995] 
Etienne Comte de Blois, de Chartres, de Châteaudun, de Sancerre et de Meaux (I5087)
 
11

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Onis shows as a widower in the 1678 Acadian census, living with Pierre and Marie. Speculation is that he was the father of Pierre. 
GAUDET, Denis (I34458)
 
12

ANNA ([886/88]-[901/early 904]). The basis for this betrothal is a letter written by Nikolaos Mystikos, which Settipani quotes in French translation, recalling the writer's admonishing Emperor Leon VI for his unsuitable third marriage (dated to Spring 900), excused because of "l'accord…conclu avec le Franc…tu lui destinais comme épouse ta fille unique…[au] cousin de Berta auquel il est arrive l'infortune que l'on sait". The date, the relationship with "Berta" (assuming, as Settipani proposes, that this is Berta daughter of Lothar II King of Lotharingia who married Adalbert Marchese of Tuscany), and "l'infortune" (his blinding) are consistent with "le Franc" being identified with Louis III King of Italy (his title in 900). Settipani assumes that the marriage actually took place. However, the translation only refers to a proposed marriage ("…tu lui destinais…") and provides no proof that the marriage ever happened or, if it did occur, that the bride ever left Byzantium for Provence. Anna is not named in any of the surviving charters of Emperor Louis, nor has any mention of her been found in any of the primary sources so far consulted. This would have been the first marriage between the families of the eastern and western emperors as no previous betrothal resulted in a marriage. This absence from contemporary western documentation is therefore striking. It also contrasts sharply with the extensive records which relate the Byzantine origin of Theophano, wife of Emperor Otto II, even though Theophano's precise ancestry is still a mystery. Traditional genealogies show Emperor Louis III's son, Charles Constantin, as the child of this alleged first marriage of Emperor Louis, presumably because of his grandiose name. However, another possible explanation is that the name was a symbol of the emperor's hope that his son would one day unite the two successor parts of the ancient Roman empire, in the name of his illustrious predecessors Emperors Charlemagne and Constantine I "the Great", completely independent of his mother's maternal ancestry. Anna was crowned Augusta in Constantinople in [899/900], after the death of her mother and before the third marriage of her father. Anna presumably died before the birth of her younger half-sister, also named Anna, which occurred between 11 May 903 (when the younger Anna's mother was installed in the imperial palace by Emperor Leon VI) and early 904 (given the birth of the future Emperor Konstantinos VII in 905). Betrothed ([Jun/Jul] 900) LOUIS King [of Provence, son of BOSON King [of Provence] and his second wife Ermengardis [Carolingian] (before 882-Arles 5 Jun 928). He was recognised in 900 as LOUIS III King of Italy, in opposition to Berengario I Marchese of Friulia. He was crowned Emperor LUDWIG III in 901, deposed in 902. 
Anna (I27417)
 
13

Died in infancy. 
FOULKE, Samuel (I19365)
 
14

Lot Luwddoc, King of Gododdin, (Born c.AD 470), (Welsh: Lludd; Latin: Leudonus; English: Lloyd)
Lot Luwddoc (of the Host) is the famous king of legend who married Anna-Morgause, the half-sister of the great King Arthur, and became father of Gawain. The Brut y Brenhinedd - the Welsh translation of Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain - confuses him with Llew ap Cynfarch, brother of Urien Rheged, another powerful king in Northern Britain. Lot, however, had a more obscure ancestry descending ultimately from Caradog, the pre-Roman King of the Catuvellauni tribe, who was taken as a captive to Rome in AD 43.
In Welsh tradition, the father of Gawain is called Gwyar, a confused name sometimes, mistakenly, thought to refer to Lot's wife. It seems to have been some kind of heroic title meaning 'Blood'.
Lot ruled Gododdin, in Northern Britain, from his capital at Trapain Law, near Haddington (Lothian), where a post-Roman booty, possibly from his treasury, has been uncovered; but he was also said to have held court at Din Eityn (the Castle Rock in Edinburgh). His kingdom eventually became known as Lothian in his honour.
In his early years, at least, Lot was a pagan and hagiographic tradition does not portray him in a very positive light. It is said he was so incensed by the shame, brought about by his unmarried daughter's pregnancy, that he had her thrown off a cliff! When he eventually died, he is traditionally said to have been buried at Dunpender Law in East Lothian.
Source: http://www.earlybritishkingdoms.com/bios/lotgn.html
Lot's ancestry is therefore quite muddled. However, his great grandfather's name, Decion or Decurion, may indicate descent from men given Roman military positions in the borderland buffer zone north of Hadrian's Wall. The appearance of Lleu and Gwydion would seem to show the commonly claimed descent from Celtic Gods, though their positioning is a little strange. The latter was associated with Arfon in North Wales and their presence has led to a suggestion that this line represents that of an unknown group of lords from this area. Gwydion may also represent Guiderius, Geoffrey's name for Togodumnus, Chief of the Catuvellauni tribe (from Hertfordshire) and brother of Caratacus, shown in the previous generation. Caratacus, Cunobelinus and Tasciovanus are historical pre-Roman figures recorded by Dio Cassius and Tacitus. The Roman Emperors are obviously completely misplaced and actually extend back through a long list of their twenty-nine predecessors in the Imperial office, represented as a single family.
Source: http://www.earlybritishkingdoms.com/gene/lotanc.html 
Lawdden Llydog (I49902)
 
15

Nudd Hael, King of Selcovia, (Born c.AD 530), (Welsh: Nudd; Latin: Natanus; English: Nathan)
King Nudd succeeded his father, Senyllt, to the lowland border kingdom of unknown name centred around Selkirkshire in the mid-6th century. He was called 'Hael' - the Generous - and was celebrated in Welsh poetry, along with his cousins, Riderch and Morfael, as one of the 'Three Generous Men of Britain'.
These three, with Clydno Eityn of Din-Eityn (Edinburgh), were firm allies and, during the AD 560s, they took their mighty armies south and invaded Gwynedd in revenge for the killing of their cousin, Elidyr Mwynfawr. They devastated the country around Caer-yn-Arfon (Caernarfon) but were eventually driven out by King Rhun Hir.
An early 6th century monument discovered in Yarrow in Selkirkshire may refer to this character and his two sons, though the date is not quite right and they may be otherwise unknown relations. It is inscribed: "This is the everlasting memorial: In this place lie the most famous princes, Nudus and Domnogenus; in this tomb lie the two sons Liberalis [the Generous One]."
He was also father of SS. Dingat and Llidnerth, and the lovely Teagu Eurfron, and was succeeded in his kingdom by the former.
Source: http://www.earlybritishkingdoms.com/bios/nuddhsv.html 
AP SENYLLT, Nudd (I49898)
 
16

NUÑO Laínez, son of [LAÍN Fernández & his wife ---] . The Historia Roderici names “Nuño Laínez” as the son of “Laín Fernández”[541]. The "Corónicas" Navarras does not directly name the father of "Nuyno Laniz", but the context of the narrative as a whole implies that he was the son of Laín Fernández[542]. The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "Nuño Lainez" as the son of "Lain Fernandez". He married EILO Fernández, daughter of [FERNÁN Rodríguez and his wife ---]. The "Corónicas" Navarras name "Pero Ferrandiz et una fija…don Elo" as the children of "Ferrant Rodríguiz", stating that the latter married "Nuyno Laniz" although it does not state directly the parentage of the latter. The Historia Roderici names “Pedro Fernández and a daughter named Eylo” as the children of “Fernán Rodríguez”, adding that Eilo married “Nuño Laínez”. The Nobiliario of Pedro Conde de Barcelos names "D. Fernando Rodriguez, D. Ello" as the children of "D. Fernando Rodriguez", adding in an earlier passage that "Nuño Lainez" married "D. Ello".
[http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SPANISH%20NOBILITY%20EARLY%20MEDIEVAL.htm#NunoLainezA] 
LAÍNEZ, Núño (I8235)
 
17

Robert of Bellême, 3rd Earl of Shrewsbury (1052- after 1130) was an Anglo-Norman nobleman, and one of the most promiment figures in the competition for the succession to England and Normandy between the sons of William the Conqueror.
He was the eldest son of Roger of Montgomery, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury and Mabel of Bellême.
Robert's first notable act, as a young man, was to take part in the 1077 revolt of the young Robert Curthose against William the Conqueror, an act he shared with many other Norman nobles of his generation. The rebellion was put down, and the participants pardoned. William did require that ducal garrisons be placed in the important baronial castles, which would make future rebellion much more difficult.
Robert's mother Mabel was killed in 1082, whereupon Robert inherited her property which stretched across the hilly border region between Normandy and Maine. It is due to this early inheritance that Robert has come be known as of Bellême rather than of Montgomery.
William the Conqueror died in 1087, and Robert's first act on hearing the news was to expel the ducal garrisons from his castles. Robert Curthose was the new duke of Normandy, but he was unable to keep order, and Robert of Bellême had a free hand to make war against his less powerful neighbors.
The next year in the Rebellion of 1088, Odo of Bayeux rebelled in an attempt to place Curthose on the English throne in place of William Rufus. At Curthose's request Robert went to England, where he joined in the rebels' defense of Rochester Castle. The rebels were permitted to leave after the surrender of the castle and failure of the rebellion.
Robert returned to Normandy. But Odo had preceded him, had gotten the ear of the duke, and conviced Curthose that Robert was a danger to the security of the duchy. Thus Robert was arrested and imprisoned upon his disembarkation. (The duke's younger brother Henry, who was on the same ship, was also arrested.)
Robert's father earl Roger came over from England, and, taking over his son's castles, defied Curthose. The duke captured several of the castles, but he soon tired of the matter and released Robert.
Once released, Robert returned to his wars and depredations against his neighbors in southern Normandy. He did help Curthose in putting down a revolt by the citizens of Rouen, but his motive seems to have been in large part to seize as many wealthy townspeople and their goods as possible. Curthose in turn subsequently helped Robert is some of his fights againsts his neighbors.
In 1094 one of Robert's most important castles, Domfront, was taken over by the duke's brother Henry, who never relinquished it and was to be an enemy of Robert for the rest of his life.
Later that year (1094) Robert's father earl Roger died. Robert's younger brother Hugh of Montgomery, 2nd Earl of Shrewsbury inherited the English lands and titles, while Robert inherited his father's Norman properties, which included good part of central and southern Normandy, in part adjacent to the Bellême territories he had already inherited from his mother.
In 1098 Robert's younger brother Hugh died, and Robert inherited the English properties that had been their father's, including the Rape of Arundel and the Earldom of Shrewsbury.
Robert was one of the great magnates who joined Robert Curthose's 1101 invasion of England, along with his brothers Roger the Poitevin and Arnulf of Montgomery and his nephew William of Mortain. This invasion, which aimed to depose Henry I, ended in the Treaty of Alton. The treaty called for amnesty for the participants but allowed traitors to be punished. Henry had a series of charges drawn up against Robert in 1102, and when Robert refused to answer for them, gathered his forces and besieged and captured Robert's English castles. Robert lost his English lands and titles (as did his brothers), was banished from England, and returned to Normandy.
He was one of Curthose's commanders at the Battle of Tinchebrai and by flight from the field avoided being captured as Curthose was. With Normandy now under Henry's rule, he submitted and was allowed to retain his Norman fiefs. But after various conspiracies and plans to free Curthose Robert was seized and imprisoned in 1112. He spent the rest of his life in prison; the exact date of his death is not known.
Robert married Agnes of Ponthieu, by whom he had one child, William Talvas, who via his mother inherited the county of Ponthieu.
Robert had a quick wit, was a good military leader and was perhaps the best castle designer of his generation, but had a terrible reputation as a cruel sadist.
Sources: J. F. A. Mason, "Roger de Montgomery and His Sons (1067-1102)", Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, 5th series vol. 13 (1963) 1-28; Kathleen Thompson, "Robert of Bellême Reconsidered", Anglo-Norman Studies 13 (1991) 263-284. www.wikipedia.org

Shrewsbury, Earldom of: Under the system then prevailing the Earldom passed to an elder brother, Robert de Belleme, who constructed Bridgnorth Castle and continued the family policy of harrying the Welsh. he rebelled against Henry I and in 1102 was deprived of the Earldom of Shrewsbury/Shropshire, together with his English and Welsh estates. [Burke's Peerage, p 2604
According to Winston Churchill in " A History of English Speaking People", the Montgomeries (a very great house of Norman England) sided with Robert, Duke of Normandy, against his brother Henry I, in the war of succession after William Rufus, William the Conqueror's designated heir for England was killed in a hunting accident [ in which Henry I was involved]. Henry I destroyed the power of the Montgomeries starting in September 1100. He captured Robert in Nomandy in the battle at Tinchebrai and combined England and Normandy again. 
, DE MONTGOMMERY, Robert II, Sire d'Alençon, Comte de Ponthieu, Earl of Shrewsbury (I4453)
 
18

Ruled Glywyssing and Gwent from 886- 930

_______________________________________

From: [email protected] (david hughes)
Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval
Subject: the Lougher Family
Date: 3 Jul 2003 17:11:16 -0700
[note: generations 20-42 are the Royal House of Medieval Glamorgan, and, may be found in "Early Glamorgan: Glamorgan County History" [vol. 2], edited by Hubert N. Savory (1984); "The Middle Ages: Glamorgan County History" [vol. 3], edited by T.B. Pugh (1971); &, in "Glamorgan and Gwent: A Guide to Ancient and Historic Wales", by Elizabeth Whittle. (1992). There are other books which give variant versions of the genealogy of the Glamorgan royal house. I have found that if you merge the variant versions together that it comes out a fuller genealogy and all alleged discrepancies disappear.]

20. Caradoc "Freichfras", "1st" King of Glamorgan (500), d540, son of
# 19 above
21. Meurig [II] = Dyfwn of Gwent
22. Erbic = Deurig, dau of Pebiau
23. Erp (Urban) (Erb), fl. c. 595
24. Nynnio [Nyniaw], whose bros were Idnerth and Pebiaw [Peibio]
25. Llywarch
26. Tewdrig, St.
27. Meurig [III] = Onbrawst [sister of Morgan I "Mwynfawr" (d654)
[father of Arthwys I (d663)] and Cerdic], daughter of Gwrgan[t] I
"Mawr", son of Cynfyn, son of Pebiaw [Peibio], son of Erp [# 23 above]
28. Arthwys II [Athroys] d685 [or, son of [another] Meurig [III], son
of Teudric, son of Teitfal, son of Idnerth, son of Erp [# 23 above],
his bros were Ffrioc and Idnerth I
29. Morgan II "Mawr" ["The Great"] d710, his bros were Gwaeddnerth &
Ithael I [Ithe] (d705)
30. Iudhael II [Ithel] d735, his bros were Nudd "Hael" and Idnerth II
31. Rhys I, his bros were Morgan III and Rhodri I
32. Brochwel I (d755), his bros were Howel I and Arthfael I
33. Gwriad I
34. Arthfael II "Hen"
35. Rhys II, his bros were Meurig VII (d874) and Gwrgan[t] II "Frych"
36. Howel II (d884/6)
37. Owain I (d930), his bros were Arthfael III and Morgan IV
38. Morgan V "Hen" (d974), his bros were Gruffydd I, King of Gower
(d934) and Cadwgan I (d949) 39. Idwal II [Idwallon], his bros were
Cadell II and Owain II (d1001)
40. Ithel V "Ddu", his bros were Blegywryt and Howel IV
41. Gwrgan[t] III (d1042)

-- MERGED NOTE ------------



Ruled Glywyssing and Gwent from 886- 930

_______________________________________

From: [email protected] (david hughes)
Newsgroups: soc.genealogy.medieval
Subject: the Lougher Family
Date: 3 Jul 2003 17:11:16 -0700
[note: generations 20-42 are the Royal House of Medieval Glamorgan, and, may be found in "Early Glamorgan: Glamorgan County History" [vol. 2], edited by Hubert N. Savory (1984); "The Middle Ages: Glamorgan County History" [vol. 3], edited by T.B. Pugh (1971); &, in "Glamorgan and Gwent: A Guide to Ancient and Historic Wales", by Elizabeth Whittle. (1992). There are other books which give variant versions of the genealogy of the Glamorgan royal house. I have found that if you merge the variant versions together that it comes out a fuller genealogy and all alleged discrepancies disappear.]

20. Caradoc "Freichfras", "1st" King of Glamorgan (500), d540, son of
# 19 above
21. Meurig [II] = Dyfwn of Gwent
22. Erbic = Deurig, dau of Pebiau
23. Erp (Urban) (Erb), fl. c. 595
24. Nynnio [Nyniaw], whose bros were Idnerth and Pebiaw [Peibio]
25. Llywarch
26. Tewdrig, St.
27. Meurig [III] = Onbrawst [sister of Morgan I "Mwynfawr" (d654)
[father of Arthwys I (d663)] and Cerdic], daughter of Gwrgan[t] I
"Mawr", son of Cynfyn, son of Pebiaw [Peibio], son of Erp [# 23 above]
28. Arthwys II [Athroys] d685 [or, son of [another] Meurig [III], son
of Teudric, son of Teitfal, son of Idnerth, son of Erp [# 23 above],
his bros were Ffrioc and Idnerth I
29. Morgan II "Mawr" ["The Great"] d710, his bros were Gwaeddnerth &
Ithael I [Ithe] (d705)
30. Iudhael II [Ithel] d735, his bros were Nudd "Hael" and Idnerth II
31. Rhys I, his bros were Morgan III and Rhodri I
32. Brochwel I (d755), his bros were Howel I and Arthfael I
33. Gwriad I
34. Arthfael II "Hen"
35. Rhys II, his bros were Meurig VII (d874) and Gwrgan[t] II "Frych"
36. Howel II (d884/6)
37. Owain I (d930), his bros were Arthfael III and Morgan IV
38. Morgan V "Hen" (d974), his bros were Gruffydd I, King of Gower
(d934) and Cadwgan I (d949) 39. Idwal II [Idwallon], his bros were
Cadell II and Owain II (d1001)
40. Ithel V "Ddu", his bros were Blegywryt and Howel IV
41. Gwrgan[t] III (d1042) 
AP HYWEL, Owain (I49925)
 
19

Senyllt, King of Selcovia, (Born c.AD 512), (Welsh: Senyllt; Latin: Seniltus; English: Senild)
Senyllt was a son of King Cedic of Greater Strathclyde. Upon his father's death, in the early 6th century, the kingdom was divided between his brother, Tutgual Tutclyd, and himself. Being the elder of the two, Tudwal took the greater portion of Strathclyde, whilst Senyllt appears to have become king of the region around Selkirkshire where the people were known as the Selgovae. Although the name of his kingdom is unknown, for identification purposes, the Latin 'Selcovia,' would seem appropriate. He was succeeded by his son, Nudd Hael.
Source: http://www.earlybritishkingdoms.com/bios/senylsv.html 
AP CEDIC, Senyllt (I49897)
 
20

She succeeded her father as Ctss of Menteith, suo iure. The Chronicle of John of Fordun (Continuator - Annals) records that, after the death of "Walter Comyn…Earl of Menteith", his wife "married a low-born English knight…John Russel", after which she was accused of killing her first husband. She and her second husband were kept prisoners until they agreed to transfer the earldom of Menteith to the late earl's nephew John Comyn and were later expelled from Scotland. They complained to the Pope, whose legate reversed the judgment. She married firstly ([30 Jun 1233/9 Jan 1234]) WALTER Comyn Lord of Badenoch, son of WILLIAM Comyn Earl of Buchan and his first wife Sarah FitzHugh (-Nov 1258). He succeeded as Earl of Menteith, de iure uxoris. She married secondly Sir JOHN Russell. [Foundation for Medieval Genealogy] 
MENTEITH, Isabella Countess of Menteith (I13089)
 
21

She was co-heiress of Sir Robert Harcourt. 
HARCOURT, Agnes (I52515)
 
22

Some sources state that it was Sir Thomas who married Philippa Bennet and not his father, Sir Richard. If this were the case, he would most likely be the son of Joanna de Chetwynd.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------





Some sources state that it was Sir Thomas who married Philippa Bennet a nd not his father, Sir Richard. If this were the case, he would most li kely be the son of Joanna de Chetwynd.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------

Some sources state that it was Sir Thomas who married Philippa Bennet and not his father, Sir Richard. If this were the case, he would most likely be the son of Joanna de Chetwynd.

-- MERGED NOTE ------------





Some sources state that it was Sir Thomas who married Philippa Bennet a nd not his father, Sir Richard. If this were the case, he would most li kely be the son of Joanna de Chetwynd. 
BENNET, Philippa (I15087)
 
23

St. Thaney, (Born c.AD 511), (Welsh: Ddenyw; Latin: Tania; English: Denise)
Princess Thaney was the daughter of King Lot of Gododdin. The old King was horrified to find, one day, that his unwed daughter was pregnant, and since she steadfastly refused to name the father of her unborn infant, Thaney was told she must wed a local swineherd. Refusing, she so angered her father that he had her tied into a chariot and driven over the cliff face at Trapain Law. However, the chariot floated gently to the ground and Thaney was unharmed. Picking herself up, she found that even this miracle had not deterred her persecutors in their endevour to rid themselves of such an embarrassment. They seized her, flung her into an oarless coracle, pushed it well out into the Firth, and hoped she would be carried out to sea and drowned. In the night, however, a wind blew up and the coracle was carried over to the Isle of May, where it was surrounded by a vast school of fish which magically escorted the coracle and its passenger to Culross, on the Fife shore of the Forth. Here, the exhausted woman was found by St. Serf and gently carried to safety and shelter, where her son was born.
St. Serf baptized the infant Kentigern, and he grew to be a great man in the British church. Thaney became a christian as well and, in time, she was canonized, though not before she had been reunited with Kentigern's father, King Owein of North Rheged. The dashing monarch had seduced poor Thaney, then returned to his wife. The princess, however, had fallen in love with him; and when, not long after Kentigern's birth, Owain's wife had fallen ill and died, he sent for Thaney and she gladly joined him. Much to her father's shame, the two were married with the greatest pomp and ceremony.
Source: http://www.earlybritishkingdoms.com/bios/thaneygn.html 
FERCH LLAWDDEN LLYDOG, Denyw (I49904)
 
24

The name of Robert Lloyd is on the List of Taxables for 1693 - A young man. Susquehanna List, 1696. His plantation was northward of that of Rowland Ellis of Bryn Mawr. By deed, Sept. 5, 1698, he purchased from Wm. Howell, Edward Jones, John Roberts, Griffith Owen and Daniel Humphrey, 409 acres of land that had been part of the Thomas Ellis tract. In Feb. 1709, Robert Lloyd and Lowry his wife, conveyed 154 1/2 a. to Thos. bro. of Robert. 
LLOYD, Robert (I19405)
 
25
After Halfdan Whitleg's death, according tot he sagas, his son Eystein ruled Vestfold until a rival king named Skjold used his magic powers to have Eystein knocked overboard during a sailing expedition. Eystein's body was recovered from the sea and buried with great ceremony. Royal Families of Medieval Scandinavia, Flanders and Kiev
Ruled Vestfold 750-780
Eystein Halfdansson (Old Norse: Eysteinn Hálfdansson) was the son of Halfdan Hvitbeinn of the House of Yngling according to Heimskringla. He lived around 730, and inherited the throne of Romerike and Vestfold.
His wife was Hild, the daughter of the king of Vestfold, Erik Agnarsson. Erik had no son so Eystein inherited Vestfold.
Eystein went to Varna with some ships to pillage and carried away all livestock and other valuables. However, the king of Varna was king Skjöld who was a great warlock. Skjöld arrived at the beach and saw the sails of Eystein's ships. He waved his cloak and blew into it which caused a boom of one ship to swing and hit Eystein so that he fell overboard and drowned. His body was salvaged and buried in a mound.
Eystein was inherited by his son Halfdan the Mild. 
HALFDANSSON, Eystein King of Vestfold (I17586)
 
26
Hamo Dapifer
Torigny-sur-Vire: Manche, arr. St-Lo, cant. Torigny.
An account of Hamo, who was son of Hamo Dentatus (slain at Val-es-Dunes in 1047), and who was dapifer both to the Conqueror and William Rufus and sheriff of Kent in 1086, is given, together with an account of his sons Hamo and Robert, by D. C. Douglas in "The Domesday Monachorum of Christ Church Canterbury", pp. 55-6, where the relevant authorities are cited. That Hamo dapifer and Hamo the Sheriff were undoubtedly one and the same person is proved by the Kentish returns of 1242-3 in 'The Book of Fees', pp. 654 et seq., when the lands held by the sheriff in 1086 were held by the earl of Gloucester, who was the heir of Hamo dapifer through the marriage of Robert earl of Gloucester with the daughter and heir of Robert, son of Hamo dapifer.
Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families 
Hamo de Crevecoeur, Sire de Cruelly (I13107)
 
27
"BRAIBOC

THIS family, so called from their chief seat at Braibrock, in the county of Northampton, descended from one INGEBALD, who by Albreda, one of the daughters and heirs to Ivo de Newmarch, had issue a son, called Robert May, but afterwards Robert de Braibrock, This Robert was one of King John's council, and obtained from him the manor of Corby, in the same county. Henry his son, married Christian, daughter and heir of Wischard Ledet, and Margery, his wife, and died the 18th of Henry III. leaving issue two sons, Wyschard (who assumed the surname of Ledet, from his mother, the heiress of that family), and John, who retained his paternal name, from whom descended Sir Reginald Braibrock, who, by Joan, daughter and heir of Sir John de la Pole, of Ashby, knight, by Joan, his wife, only daughter and heir of John lord Cobham, had issue, Joan, his heir, who married Sir Thomas Brook, lord Cobham, in her right. But Wiscard was the father of Walter, who had only two daughters, his heirs; viz.Alice, who married Sir William Latimer; and Christian, Sir John Latimer, brother to the said Sir William (vid. Latimer), from the last of whom, the Griffins, barons of Braybroke, are descended. ..."
[The Dormant and Extinct Baronage of England...by Christopher Banks] 
Henry de Braybrook (I11677)
 
28
"BRAIBOC

THIS family, so called from their chief seat at Braibrock, in the county of Northampton, descended from one INGEBALD, who by Albreda, one of the daughters and heirs to Ivo de Newmarch, had issue a son, called Robert May, but afterwards Robert de Braibrock, This Robert was one of King John's council, and obtained from him the manor of Corby, in the same county. Henry his son, married Christian, daughter and heir of Wischard Ledet, and Margery, his wife, and died the 18th of Henry III. leaving issue two sons, Wyschard (who assumed the surname of Ledet, from his mother, the heiress of that family), and John, who retained his paternal name, from whom descended Sir Reginald Braibrock, who, by Joan, daughter and heir of Sir John de la Pole, of Ashby, knight, by Joan, his wife, only daughter and heir of John lord Cobham, had issue, Joan, his heir, who married Sir Thomas Brook, lord Cobham, in her right. But Wiscard was the father of Walter, who had only two daughters, his heirs; viz.Alice, who married Sir William Latimer; and Christian, Sir John Latimer, brother to the said Sir William (vid. Latimer), from the last of whom, the Griffins, barons of Braybroke, are descended. ..."
[The Dormant and Extinct Baronage of England...by Christopher Banks] 
BRAYBROOK, Wyschard (I87488)
 
29
"BRAIBOC

THIS family, so called from their chief seat at Braibrock, in the county of Northampton, descended from one INGEBALD, who by Albreda, one of the daughters and heirs to Ivo de Newmarch, had issue a son, called Robert May, but afterwards Robert de Braibrock, This Robert was one of King John's council, and obtained from him the manor of Corby, in the same county. Henry his son, married Christian, daughter and heir of Wischard Ledet, and Margery, his wife, and died the 18th of Henry III. leaving issue two sons, Wyschard (who assumed the surname of Ledet, from his mother, the heiress of that family), and John, who retained his paternal name, from whom descended Sir Reginald Braibrock, who, by Joan, daughter and heir of Sir John de la Pole, of Ashby, knight, by Joan, his wife, only daughter and heir of John lord Cobham, had issue, Joan, his heir, who married Sir Thomas Brook, lord Cobham, in her right. But Wiscard was the father of Walter, who had only two daughters, his heirs; viz.Alice, who married Sir William Latimer; and Christian, Sir John Latimer, brother to the said Sir William (vid. Latimer), from the last of whom, the Griffins, barons of Braybroke, are descended. ..."
[The Dormant and Extinct Baronage of England...by Christopher Banks] 
LEDET, Margery (I87489)
 
30
"BRAIBOC

THIS family, so called from their chief seat at Braibrock, in the county of Northampton, descended from one INGEBALD, who by Albreda, one of the daughters and heirs to Ivo de Newmarch, had issue a son, called Robert May, but afterwards Robert de Braibrock, This Robert was one of King John's council, and obtained from him the manor of Corby, in the same county. Henry his son, married Christian, daughter and heir of Wischard Ledet, and Margery, his wife, and died the 18th of Henry III. leaving issue two sons, Wyschard (who assumed the surname of Ledet, from his mother, the heiress of that family), and John, who retained his paternal name, from whom descended Sir Reginald Braibrock, who, by Joan, daughter and heir of Sir John de la Pole, of Ashby, knight, by Joan, his wife, only daughter and heir of John lord Cobham, had issue, Joan, his heir, who married Sir Thomas Brook, lord Cobham, in her right. But Wiscard was the father of Walter, who had only two daughters, his heirs; viz.Alice, who married Sir William Latimer; and Christian, Sir John Latimer, brother to the said Sir William (vid. Latimer), from the last of whom, the Griffins, barons of Braybroke, are descended. ..."
[The Dormant and Extinct Baronage of England...by Christopher Banks] 
BRAYBROOK, John (I87490)
 
31
"BRAIBOC

THIS family, so called from their chief seat at Braibrock, in the county of Northampton, descended from one INGEBALD, who by Albreda, one of the daughters and heirs to Ivo de Newmarch, had issue a son, called Robert May, but afterwards Robert de Braibrock, This Robert was one of King John's council, and obtained from him the manor of Corby, in the same county. Henry his son, married Christian, daughter and heir of Wischard Ledet, and Margery, his wife, and died the 18th of Henry III. leaving issue two sons, Wyschard (who assumed the surname of Ledet, from his mother, the heiress of that family), and John, who retained his paternal name, from whom descended Sir Reginald Braibrock, who, by Joan, daughter and heir of Sir John de la Pole, of Ashby, knight, by Joan, his wife, only daughter and heir of John lord Cobham, had issue, Joan, his heir, who married Sir Thomas Brook, lord Cobham, in her right. But Wiscard was the father of Walter, who had only two daughters, his heirs; viz.Alice, who married Sir William Latimer; and Christian, Sir John Latimer, brother to the said Sir William (vid. Latimer), from the last of whom, the Griffins, barons of Braybroke, are descended. ..."
[The Dormant and Extinct Baronage of England...by Christopher Banks] 
LEDET, Christian (I87491)
 
32
JEANde Dampierre, son of GUILLAUME [II] Seigneur de Dampierre & hiswife Marguerite II Ctss of Flanders and Hainaut (-1258).  The Genealogica Comitum Flandriæ Bertiniana names (in order) "Guillelmum Guodnem etIohannem" as the three sons of "Guillelmo domino de Dampetra [et] Margaretæ", specifying that "primo mortuo sine liberisin tornramento apud Trasegnies"[1356]. Matthew Paris specifies that his parents had "two others" when herecords the parentage of his brother Guillaume, but does not name the otherchildren[1357]. The Annales Blandinienses name "Iohannde Dampetra"as brother of Guy Count of Flanders, when recording the liberation of the twobrothers from captivity in Holland[1358]. He succeeded his father in 1231 as Seigneur de Dampierre-sur-l'Aube,de Sompuis et de Saint-Dizier, Vicomte de Troyes and Connétable de Champagne.  He was captured at the battle of West-Capelle 4 Jul 1253 by his half-brother Jean d'Avesnes Comte de Hainaut, released in early 1257.  In Jun 1256 he recognised that theofficer of Connétable de Champagne was not hereditary[1359]. 
m (9 Mar 1250) as herfirst marriage, LAURE de Lorraine,daughter of MATHIEU II Duke of Lorraine & his wife Catherine de Limbourg([1234/37]-after 3 May 1288).  She married secondly (after 29 Mar 1266) Guillaume [II] deVergy Seigneur de Mirebeau et d'Autrey, seneschal of Burgundy. 
Jean & his wife had two children.
[http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CHAMPAGNE%20NOBILITY.htm#_Toc394741403] 
Jean de Dampierre, Seigneur de Dampierre-sur-l'Aube, de Sompuis et de Saint-Dizier, Vicomte de Troyes and Connétable de Champagne (I69488)
 
33
THE SEIZURE OF "THE PEMBROOK" BY THE ACADIANS
Yarmouth Vanguard, Tuesday, January 23, 1990
There have been several seizures or attempts of seizures by the Acadians of vessels taking them into exile. In the accounts which have come down to us, tradition has at times confused one for the other. The best known of these seizures is that of the Pembroke. Its most reliable account comes from Placide Gaudet, the well known Acadian genealogist, who held it from a grandson of Pierre Belliveau, dit Piau, of Memramcook, this Pierre Belliveau being the brother of Charles Belliveau who conducted the seizure. I may note that they were brothers to Jean Belliveau, the ancestor of the Belliveaus of Belliveau's Cove; they were the sons of another Jean Belliveau and of Madeleine Melanson, of Port Royal.
While the authorities were making plans to expel the Acadians, they requested the Pembrook, a scow, to come to Annapolis Royal to pick up the Acadians to bring them into exile. On its way, it encountered a storm and broke its mainmast. Charles Belliveau, who was a ship contractor and a skillful navigator, was summoned to replace the mast as soon as possible with a new one. When he asked for his pay, he was just laughed at. He then threatened to cut the mast, that which was enough for the authorities to give him the amount of money that had been agreed upon.
Little did he know then that a few weeks later he would have to embark on that very vessel to be taken into exile. It happened on December, 8, 1755, at 5 o'clock in the morning. They were 226 Acadians in all, men, women and children, comprising 32 families. They were heading for South Carolina.
The armed sloop Baltimore escorted them up to New York. When the Pembrook was left to sail on its own, the Acadian prisoners started to make plans to seize it. It happened that they were allowed to go on deck for a short while half a dozen at a time. Six of the most capable men having taken their turn on the deck, among whom was Charles Belliveau, they were told after a while to go down the hole, when six others were asked to take their place. Instead of going down, those six who were already on deck seized their guards, and, with the help of the six others who had already come up, plus a few more who followed, it did not take them long to bound all eight members of the crew, hand and foot, the captain included.
That is when Charles Belliveau took the wheel. As there was a down wind, the vessel was turned around easily and it headed back north. The captain, in his shackles, hollered that he was going to break the mainmast, because it was weak. Charles Belliveau answered that he was lying, that he, himself, had made it and set it and that it could withstand any wind forever.
They were steering for the St. John River, N.B. A few days before they arrived, they landed the captain and the crew on the shore, probably in Maine. Luckily, all the way, they did not encounter any ships or vessels. They arrived in St. John January 8, 1756, having been on the Pembrook exactly one month.
They had been about another month in the vicinity of St. John, when, on February 9, an English vessel anchored in St. John harbour, flying the French flag. They said that they were from Louisbourg and that they were looking for a pilot to anchor further up the harbour. Notwithstanding that it was a trap, one of the Acadians fell into it. He had hardly gotten aboard the English vessel, which in reality was coming from Annapolis Royal, that the captain hoisted the English ensign and fired his cannon.
The Acadian families, who at first had taken refuge near the mouth of the river, had been sent further up where they could be more secure. When they heard the cannon, they ran to see what was taking place. That is when they noticed that the English vessel was going toward the Pembrook, surely to get hold of it. They had time to take away from it the firearms and other objects which had been left in it. They then set it on fire and started to fire on the English vessel, which was obliged to leave.
Feb. 18, 1756, Governor Lawrence wrote from Halifax to Governor Shirley of Massachusetts: "I lately sent a party of Rangers in a schooner to St. John's River. As the men were clothed like French soldiers and the schooner under French colours, I had hopes by such a deceit, not only to discover what it was doing there but to bring off some of the St. John's Indians. The Officer found there an English Ship, one of our Transports that sailed from Annapolis Royal with French inhabitants aboard bound for the Continent, but the inhabitants had risen upon the master and crew and carried the ship into that harbour, our people would have brought her off but by an accident they discovered themselves too soon, upon which the French set fire to the ship. They have brought back with them one French man, who says there have been no Indians there for some time ... he informs also that there is a French officer and about 20 men twenty-three miles up the river at place called St. Ann's," which was on the west side of what is now Fredericton. It could be that he informed Lawrence that those men were at 23 miles up the river to lead him purposely into error, because between St. John and Fredericton there are 85 miles.
Among other testimonies regarding this seizure, we have a letter dated July 31, 1756, from the "inhabitants of St. John River", sent to Father Daudin, former pastor at Annapolis, in which they tell him that they "revolted without any defense from the English, took charge of the vessel and have arrived happily at St. John River, from where we write this letter." Father Daudin did not see this letter, as he died suddenly in Paris the following month, while he was getting ready to return to Acadia.
Most of these Acadians who were on the Pembrook migrated to Quebec, where their descendants are still to be found. 
BELLIVEAU, Charles (I340)
 
34
AMEDEE de Maurienne, son of HUMBERT II "le Renforcé" Comte de Maurienne et de Savoie and his wife Gisèle de Bourgogne [Comté] (Montmélian [1095]-Nicosia 30 Aug 1148). "Amedeus comes" donated property to Saint-Jean de Maurienne, for the soul of "patris sui Uberti comtis", with the consent of "Gisla matre et fratribus eius Guillelmo atque Umberto", by charter dated 21 Oct 1104, witnessed by "Odo de Camera et frater eius Amedeus, Esmio de Camera et frater eius Bernardus, Aymo de Bocsosello, Guillelmus de Rossilione". "Amedeus…comes et fratres mei, unacum genitrice nostra Gisla" donated property to the church of Belley, for the soul of "patris nostri Humberti comitis", by undated charter. He succeeded in 1109 as AMEDEE III Comte de Maurienne et de Savoie. "Amedeus…comes et fratres mei, unacum genitrice nostra Gisla" donated property to the church of Belley "per nostros advocatos…comitem Aimonem Genevensem et Widonem de Mirabello", for the soul of "patris nostri Humberti comitis", by undated charter. The emperor recognised his title as Count of the Holy Roman Empire in 1111. Comte Amédée arranged the marriage of his sister to Louis VI King of France, consolidating the close relations established by his father with France. Lay-abbot of Saint-Maurice d'Agaune, until 1116. "Guido Viennensis archiepiscopus" (who was his maternal uncle) addressed a letter to "nepoti suo Amedeo comiti" dated [1115]. "Amedeus filius quondam Humberti comitis" confirmed the possessions of the abbey of Santa Maria di Pinerolo by charter dated 1 Mar 1131, witnessed by "Humbertus de Buzosel et Aymo frater eius, Villelmus de Camera…". He recovered the county of Turin, lost by his father. "Comes Amedeus…cum uxore sua Adeleida comitissa" confirmed the rights of the monastery of "S. Justi in villa Volveria" by charter dated 27 Jul 1134, witnessed by "Umbertus de Bocsosello, Aimo de Brianzone…". "A. comes et marchio cum uxore sua M." donated property to the monastery of Ripalta, with the support of "eorum filio Umberto", by charter dated 9 Jan 1137. "Palatinus Comes Amedeus" donated property to the monastery of Locedio "in terra Willelmi Marchionis fratris sui" [his uterine brother] by charter dated 30 Jul 1137. "Amedeus comes et marchio" donated revenue from Conflens to the archbishop of Tarantasia by charter dated 28 Feb 1139. "Dominus Amedeus comes et marchio et frater eius Raynaldus" granted rights to the archbishop of Tarantasia, with the consent of "Aymone vicecomite, fratribus suis Gunterio, Willienco, Aymerico", by charter dated to [1140]. The first known use of the white cross on a red background as the arms of the House of Savoy was in a charter dated 1143. "Amedeus comes et marchio et Maies comitissa uxor eius et Umbertus eorum filius" donated property to the monastery of Saint-Maurice by charter dated 30 Mar 1143. "Amedeus comes et marchio" confirmed donations to Saint-Sulpice en Bugey, for the soul of "filii mei Humberti", by charter dated to [1148], which also names "uxore mea Matildi", confirmed by "Aalasia comitissa de Bello Joco…cum filio meo Guichardo". "Amedeus comes et marchio et Majes comitissa uxor eius et Umbertus eorum filius" confirmed the rights of the monastery of Saint-Maurice d´Agaune by charter dated 30 Mar 1148. He accompanied his nephew Louis VII King of France on crusade but died in Cyprus. The Continuator of Sigebert records that "Amadeus comes Maurianensis" died "in Cipro insula" in 1148. He married firstly ([1120/23]) ADELAIDE, daughter of --- (-after Jul 1134). "Comes Amedeus…cum uxore sua Adeleida comitissa" confirmed the rights of the monastery of "S. Justi in villa Volveria" by charter dated 27 Jul 1134, witnessed by "Umbertus de Bocsosello, Aimo de Brianzone…". Europäische Stammtafeln shows the single marriage of Comte Amédée III, to Mathilde d'Albon, in 1123. Given the likely birth dates of Alix de Savoie, oldest daughter of Comte Amédée, and of Mathilde d'Albon (see below), it is unlikely that Mathilde was the mother of Alix. A first marriage of Comte Amédée is therefore highly probable. Palluel shows Comte Amédée III's first wife as Gertrude de Lorraine, daughter of Simon I Duke of Lorraine. This can be dismissed as incorrect. Neither Europäische Stammtafeln nor Poull refer to any such daughter of Duke Simon. In addition, bearing in mind that Duke Simon himself was probably born in 1096, it is chronologically impossible for any daughter of his to have given birth to a child in [1123/25]. Her marriage date is estimated based on the estimated birth date of the couple's supposed elder daughter, Alix de Savoie, as shown below. The origin of Adelaide is unknown. However, according to Europäische Stammtafeln, her supposed daughter Alix was Dame de Châteauneuf-en-Valromey, de Virieu-le-Grand, et de Cordon-en-Bugey. Further research to trace the ownership of these fiefdoms may provide clues about the origin of Adelaide. He married secondly ([Jul 1134/1135]) MATHILDE d'Albon, daughter of GUIGUES [V] Comte d'Albon [Viennois] and his wife Regina [Matilda] --- ([1112/16]-after 30 Mar 1148). "A. comes et marchio cum uxore sua M." donated property to the monastery of Ripalta, with the support of "eorum filio Umberto", by charter dated 9 Jan 1137. The Aymari Rivalli De Allobrogibus records that "Amedeo…secundo, Mauriennæ comiti" married "Guigona Crassi filia". The identity of her father is clarified as the passage also names "Humbertus minor Crassi filius" and his appointment ot "archiepiscopatum Viennensem". Europäische Stammtafeln shows a single marriage of Comte Amédée III, to Mathilde d'Albon, in 1123. It is more likely that Mathilde was his second wife, as explained above, especially if her likely birth date range is correct. According to Europäische Stammtafeln, Mathilde's parents were married in [1106-1110]. The same table shows that Mathilde's two brothers, Guigues and Humbert, were mentioned in 1110, indicating that the marriage must have taken place during the earlier part of this date range. A third child, Gersende d'Albon, must also have born during the early years of her parents' marriage as she herself gave birth to two sons before (or shortly after) the death of her husband in Oct 1129. Assuming all these dates are correct, the timescale is tight for the birth of a fourth child, Mathilde, before 1112 at the earliest. This would make it impossible for Mathilde to have been the mother of Comte Amédée's oldest daughter Alix. "Amedeus comes et marchio et Maies comitissa uxor eius et Umbertus eorum filius" donated property to the monastery of Saint-Maurice by charter dated 30 Mar 1143. "Amedeus comes et marchio" confirmed donations to Saint-Sulpice en Bugey, for the soul of "filii mei Humberti", by charter dated to [1148], which also names "uxore mea Matildi", confirmed by "Aalasia comitissa de Bello Joco…cum filio meo Guichardo". "Amedeus comes et marchio et Majes comitissa uxor eius et Umbertus eorum filius" confirmed the rights of the monastery of Saint-Maurice d´Agaune by charter dated 30 Mar 1148.
[http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/SAVOY.htm] 
Amadeus III, de Maurienne, Comte de Savoie (I5792)
 
35 Alan, son of Roland, as he is constantly styled, succeeded his father as Constable, and also in the lordship of Galloway, with his other large domains in Scotland and England. He is first named in 1196 in connection with lands at Teinford, co. Northampton, which apparently he held apart from his father. After his father's death in 1200, he constantly appears as a witness in royal charters, and apparently took his share in public affairs. He and his mother had, in 1212, an action relatin to Whissendine and Bosegate, lands in Northamptonshire, as to which it was disputer whether Richard de Morville was seised in 1174, and whether he was dispossessed in consequence of the war in that year. The latest act of Alan's father was to offer 500 merks to obtain an assize to settle the question, but it was only determined on 29 April 1212, or a little later, when a jury found that Richard was so seised and was disseised as stated; later Alan and his mother were called to pay so much into the treasury.
In July of the same year, partly, no doubt, as kinsman, and also as a Scottish baron holding large fiefs in England, he was asked by King John for assistance in the latter's invasion of Ireland. The King begged Alan to send as soon as possible to Chester a thousand of his best and most active Galwegians before Sunday 19 August. For this, and no doubt other services, King John granted him, in 1213, a large number of fiefs in Ireland, which were assigned to him or his agenst, by John, Bishop of Norwich, in a formal assembly at Carrickfergus. To these were added rights of forest and privileges of fairs and markets. The grants were repeated and confirmed two years later, on 27 June 1215. This was a few days after the granting, at Runnymede, of the Great Charter, Alan of Galloway being named among those present as one of the great barons of England. It is not certain what part Alan played in the war which followed later in 1215, whether he sided with the English barons who opposed King John or with the King of Scots, but the destruction of the monastery of Holmcoltram is usually assigned to the ravages of the Galwegians who followed Alexander II in his invasion of England.
It was certainly in 1215 that, according to Fordun, Alan was secured in his Constableship by the new King of Scots. Soon after the accession of King Henry III to the English throne he summoned King Alexander and also Alan of Galloway to deliver up the Castle of Carlisle, and in the beginning of 1219 Alan had a safe-conduct to do homage for his lands in England, which meanwhile were taken in King Henry's hands. Alan was present at York on 15 June 1220, and swore to observe King Alexander's oaht that he would marry Joanna, the eldest sister of King Henry, and in obedience to a letter from King Henry he made his own personal homage at the same time. The following day his lands were ordered to be restored to him, including his Irish estates. Later he was in active service with his galleys crusing off the coast of Ireland in opposition to Hugh de Lacy, then in rebellion. Lacy submitted to King Henry in 1224, and in the following year Alan was permitted to lease his lands in Ireland and place tenants on them. In October 1229 he was summoned to go abroad with King Henry. One of the latest references to him in English records is a permit to him to send a ship to Ireland to by victuals, between Candlemas and Michaelmas 1232.
His appearance in Scottish record are not so numerous, being chiefly confined to grants or other benefaction to religious houses. He died in 1234, and was buried in the Abbey of Dundrennan.
He married, first, a lady name unknown, said to be daughter of Reginald, Lord ot eh Isles, by whom he had two daughters; secondly, in 1209, Margaret, eldest daughter of David, Earl of Huntingdon, by whom he had a son and two daughters; thirdly in 1228, a daughter of Hugh de Lacy, of Ireland, by whom he had no issue. The Scots Peerage IV:139-141
Alan FitzRoland (c.1175-1234) was the last of the MacFergus dynasty of quasi-independent Lords of Galloway. He was also hereditary Constable of Scotland. He was the son of Lochlann, Lord of Galloway and Helen de Moreville. His date of birth is uncertain, but he was born in or before 1175, as he is considered an adult in 1196.
He married first an unnamed daughter of John, Baron of Pontefract and Constable of Chester; they had two daughters, one named Helen (married Roger de Quincy, 2nd Earl of Winchester) and another who died in 1213. His first wife was dead or divorced by 1209 when he married Margaret of Huntingdon, great granddaughter of David I of Scotland. By this marriage he had two more daughters: Dervorguilla of Galloway, ancestress of John Balliol, and Christina of Galloway. Alan married his last wife, Rohese de Lacy, in 1229, she being the daughter of Hugh de Lacy, 1st Earl of Ulster. By one of his marriages he had a son, Thomas, who predeceased his father (not to be confused with his illegitimate half-brother, also named Thomas).
In 1212 Alan responded to a summons from King John I of England by sending 1,000 troops to join the war against the Welsh. In this year he also sent one of his daughters to England as a hostage. She died in 1213 in the custody of her maternal uncle. Alan is listed as one of the 16 men who counseled King John regarding the Magna Carta.
Alan, like his forebears, maintained a carefully ambiguous relationship with both the English and Scottish states, acting as a vassal when it suited his purpose and as an independent monarch when he could get away with it. His considerable sea power allowed him to supply fleets and armies to aid the English King John in campaigns both in France and Ireland.
In 1228 he invaded the Isle of Man and fought a sea-war against Norway in support of Reginald, Prince of Man, who was engaged in a fratricidal struggle with his brother Olaf for possession of the island.
Alan died in 1234 and is buried at Dundrennan Abbey in Galloway. With Alan's death his holdings were divided between his three daughters and their husbands. A popular attempt was made within Galloway to establish his illegitimate son, Thomas, as ruler, but this failed, and Galloway's period as an independent political entity came to an end.
wwww.wikipedia.org: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan,_Lord_of_Galloway 
Alan of Galloway, Lord of Galloway (I9238)
 
36 The time was the early 1930's and Bud was now staying with his sister, Blanche and her husband Joseph Nemeth in Beloit, Wisconsin. Joseph was working at the Beloit Iron Works and was able to find work for Bud. Joseph then made it possible for Bud to enter into a four-year apprenticeship as a pattern and model maker there at the Iron Works.

A young fellow was always looking for a little extra cash. It was wintertime and the local town shops needed their sidewalks shoveled of snow. One of those businesses was the Beuty Shop and Bud's sister knew the owner.

Esther, having graduated from high school and then Beauty School, was a beautician at this local shop. Bud seemed like a nice young man . . . and Esther was a pretty young woman. As the story was told, Bud asked Esther if she would like to go to the movie theatre with him this one evening. She said yes!

Mom had a date that evening though with Arnie Morse, one of the town's firemen, but she told Arnie that her mother was ill and that she would have to stay home to attend to her.

As Bud and Esther were getting settled into their seats before the movie started, someone tapped on Esther's shoulder. She turned to see who was there. It was Arnie Morse . . . "Your mother must have made a miraculous recovery," he said. Arnie, with his date, Thelma, and Esther with Bud, enjoyed the fun of the evening and remained friends for the rest of their lives.

After fisishing his apprenticeship, Bud and Esther were married on September 5, 1936. Early on that Saturday, they said their vows in St. Peter's Catholic Church rectory. At that time, because Bud was not a Catholic, they could not be married in the church. They then had a breakfast reception with family and friends.

******

WHO DONE IT ?
Early Spring 1967 , Bob & Rita's apartment Las Vegas, Nevada

The cake was mixed and placed in the oven. The chocolate smelled so good as the mixture rose high and light. The frosting was blended and tasted for the right consistency. All was completed for the cooled cake, desert befitting a King, and as the evening drew late, everyone longed for that second piece before bedtime, with a tall glass of milk.

The apartment was full for the weekend. Mom and Dad were in town visiting for a few days, anxious to play with their little grand daughter and pull a few handles on those 'one arm bandits.'

Finally, as bedtime neared, we all decided to raid the refrigerator for that long awaited piece of chocolate cake. All stood with forks and plates in hand, as I opened the refrigerator door. Who would have believed it? Someone had eaten the frosting from one whole slice of cake.

There were four adult people in the house, and one little baby. Three of these people were known, notorious frosting stealers, but who did it this time? I said it was dad. Dad said it was me. Bob thought it was mom and she said it was Bob. Everyone denied being quilty. The mystery continued. . .

As we gathered each passing year, the same question would be asked, "Who ate the frosting off the cake?" Each in turn would accuse the others.

With not too many days left of my father's life, and trying to make him laugh, I asked this question once again, "Who ate the frosting off the cake?" Seventeen years had passed and still the mystery remained unsolved. He answered me with a smile and a twinkle in his eyes, "It wasn't me."

Finally, the quilty party stepped forward and admitted stealing that gooey, fudge frosting off the slice of chocolate cake, so many years ago. It was Bob Bigony. This increased the number of notorious frosting stealers now to four. Case solved . . . 
KEEFER, Harmon Godfried (I60436)
 
37 Willelm Luvel. William Lovel, lord of Ivry-la-Bataille, son of Ascelin Goel of Ivry and Isabel de Breteuil. A rebel against Henry I, he married, c 1112, Matilda sister of Waleran count of Meulan, IN 1124 he made his peace with Henry and was granted a large estate in England. He submitted to Geoffrey of Anjou and attested charters of Henry of Normandy in the 1150s. He died between 1166 and 1170. He left issue Waleran (his heir in Normandy), Robert (his heir in England), Isabel and Helisend. See Comp. Peer. viii, 208 note c. Held one fee in chief at Docking, Norfolk, in 1166. In 1242/3 John Luvel held one fee of the king in chief at Docking, Southmere and Titchwell (Fees, 912). [Domesday Descendants p1017]
WILLIAM LOVEL (Lupellus), brother and heir [of Waleran d'Ivry, who gave his English lands to William and died about 1177]. He joined the rebellion of his brother-in-law Waleran, Count of Meulan, in 1123, and took part in the unsuccessful attempt to relieve the castle of Vatteville in March 1124, but shortly after escaped from the battle of Bourgthéroulde, where the rebels were defeated. Later in the same year he made his peace with the King, and thereafter received considerable grants of land in England. A writ of Geoffrey, Duke of Normandy, is addressed to him between 1144 and 1150, and in 1150-1151 he witnessed at Rouen the charter of Henry, Duke of Normandy, for the town of Rouen. In 1153 his lands in Normandy and, those of his brother, Roger le Bègue, were overrun, and laid waste by Simon de Montfort, Count of Evreux. At some time before 1162 he, with his wife and son Waleran, gave to the abbey of Haute-Bruyère three modii of meal from the mills of his castle of Ivry.
He married Maud, daughter of Robert, and sister of Waleran, COUNT OF MEULAN, and sister also of Robert, EARL OF LEICESTER. He was living in 1166, but dead in 1170. His widow was living in 1189. [Complete Peerage VIII:211-2, XIV:454, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)] 
LOVEL, William Goel Seigneur d'Ivri et Breval (I6588)
 
38 [ERMENGARDE (-after 1018). Ernest Petit suggests that Ermengarde, wife of Milon [III] Comte de Tonnerre, was the daughter of Rainard and heiress of Bar-sur-Seine. A family connection is indicated by the charter dated to [992/1005] uner which “Milo comes Tornodorensis castri” donated property "in villa…Curtis-Secreta" to the monastery of Saint-Michel, with the consent of “coniugis mee Ermengarde et carissimorum filiorum meorum Achardi, Rainardi et Alberici”, the property being the same as the subject of the [992] charter witnessed by "…Raynardus comes…". She married MILO [IV] Comte de Tonnerre, son of --- ([950/65]-1002 or after).
[http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/CHAMPAGNE%20NOBILITY.htm#EngelbertIIIBriennedied1008B] 
Ermengarde de Bar-sur-Seine (I5423)
 
39 "Cil de Saie," mentioned by Wace in his account of the battle of Hastings, took his name from the vill of Saium or Say, about nine miles to the west of Exmes, the caput of Roger de Montgomeri's Norman Viscountcy, and held under Roger in Normandy, as he afterwards did in England. He is known as Picot de Say, for Ficot, or Picot, at first a sobriquet only, is given as his recognised appellation in Domesday; thought the son and grandson that inherited his barony were always styled De Say. There is still extant the charter by which he, with his wife Adeloya, and his two sons, Robert and Henry, bestowed lands in 1060 on the Abbey founded by his suzerain at Seez. He came over to England in Roger's train; and was one of those to whom, according to Orderic, the new Earl 'gave commands' in Shorpshire. Twenty-nine manors wre allowed to him; and Clun, as the largest of them, gave its name to his bariony. In 1083, he, with the other principal men of the country, was summoned to attend at the dedication of Shrewsbury Abbey. His son Henry succeeded him, and was followed in the next generation by Helias.
[Battle Abbey Roll III:126]

Say, Sai, of Shropshire.
Sai: Orne, arr. and cant. Argentan.
Picot, who was a substantial under-tenant of Earl Roger of Montgomery at Clun and elsewhere in Shropshire, is shown by the devolution of his lands to have been Picot de Say. Robert, Abbot of St-Martin de Sees granted the privilege of burial to Robert and Henry their sons; and in return Picot (as he is henceforth called) and his wife gave to the abbey "edificium matris Picot cum virgulto quod habebat juxta ecclesiam sancte Marie de Vrou" and confirmed a third of the church of Sai which Osmelinus de Sayo gave at the same time, giving also meadow land in the meadows "de Juvigneio"; the charter is subscribed by Earl Roger, Picot and his wife and two sons. "Vrou" is clearly Urou, the next parish to Sai, and Juvigni the parish immediately south of Sai. An agreement was made on 17 May 1086 in the court of Robert de Belleme between Picot de Saio and Droco de Coimis as to the dower which Droco's brother William had given to Adeloia his wife, who had been remarried to Picot. This is further evidence of Picot's tenure under the house of Montgomery-Belleme, and suggests that the charter to St-Martin de Sees was considerably later than 1060, the date to which it has been assigned.
[Origins of Some Anglo-Norman Families]

The first member of the family of Say mentioned by Sir William Dugdale is Picot de Say, who, in the time of the Conqueror, and living in 1083, was one of the principal persons in the co. Salop under Roger de Montgomery, Earl of Shrewsbury. The next is Ingelram de Say, one of the staunchest adherents of King Stephen in his contest with the Empress Maud, and made prisoner with the monarch at the battle of Lincoln. After this gallant and faithful solder, we come to William de Say, son of William de Say, and grandson, of William de Say, who came into England with the Conqueror. [Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 476, Saye, or Say, Barons Saye]
 
Picot de Say, Lord of Clun (I6189)
 
40 "Danby Lodge was the former residence of the Dawnay family during the shooting season. It was in 1656 that the manor of Danby came into the possession of the Dawnays, when they paid Ð4102 for it. The house did not afford accommodation for a large retinue, but merely for small parties who participated in the field sports with Lord Downe.
At one time the lodge boasted a portrait of Catherine Parr (the sixth and last wife of Henry VIII married in 1543). The portrait hung in one of the spacious rooms, but regrettably was removed from the lodge when the building was opened as a National Park Centre in 1975. Catherine Parr lived for several years at nearby Danby Castle with her second husband - Lord John Latimer. Catherine's husband died in London in 1543, and four months later on 12th July, she became Queen of England" 
William le Latimer III, Lord Latimer (I11693)
 
41 "Family of Bassett" takes Margaret verch Owain's lineage up through Jestyn ap Gwrgan, however, chronologically it seemed unlikely that Cradock ap Meredith ap Justin ap Gwrgan was the correct lineage. It seems more likely that at least one generation was missing and since names in Welsh lineages are sometime repeated, the missing generation must be Caradog (Cardoc, Cradock) ap Jestyn. It is known that Caradog had a son named Maredudd (Meredith), therefore this seems a plausable link. AP MAREDUDD, Caradog (I31184)
 
42 "Ughna daughter of the King Denmark - or Una "daughter of a legendary king of Lachlainn." Ughna of the Danes (I30150)
 
43 (1) "Know all present andc. That we Sir [Dus] Warin de Vernon and Auda Malbanc my wife have granted andc to Sir [Duo] Tho de Samford 20 messuages and 3 salt' houses with liberty of tool of salt situate in Wich Malbank in lenght between that street called 'frog rowe' and a certain cistern called 'Mistel siche' and in breadth between the wich-house of Robert Praers of Badelegh and a certain lane leading to the said street andc. Witnesses Warin de Hanywell, Richard his brother, Richard le Clerk, and others." (Harl. MSS 1967, f 111)
(2) "Ralph de Vernon grants to John de Wetenhale all his lands in Acton near Wich Malbank and all his share of the mill called 'Frogghe Mulne' andc. Witnesses, Hugh de Venables, Ricahrd de Mascy, William de Brereton, Knights, Robert de Brescy the sheriff of Chester" andc. (Ches Recog Rolls)
The above charters are undated, as was usual in deeds prior to 1300; but from the mention of Warin de Vernon, who was the second husband of Auda the daughter of William third Baron of Wich Malbank, the former granter must have been made before the year 1200; and the latter probably subsequent to that date. [Nantwich History pp4-5] 
DE VERNON, Warin Baron de Shibroc (I9622)
 
44 (c) In 1166 Roger de Ebroicis held 4 fees, and Walter de Ebroicis 3 fees of Hugh de Lacy of Ewyas and Weobley, co. Hereford. Roger is usually supposed to have been ancestor of the family of Deverois of Lyonshall, Walter of that of Deverois of Bodenham, but this conjecture is untrue: for it appears from Bracton's Note Book, #227, that Roger de Ebreicis, living in the reign of Henry II, held 2 knights' fees in Eylnarhestona and Puttelega, and d. s.p,. leaving his sisters as heirs. Stephen de Ebroicis was granted the vill of Frome Herberti by his uncle Stephen de Longchamp, in 1205, and the manor of Wilby, co. Norfolk, by the Earl of Pembroke. [Complete Peerage IV:302]
From these statements and those of the Battle Abbey roll which further states that a son of William, youngest brother of Richard, Count of Eveux married a sister of Walter de Lacy of Hereford which in turn were the ancestors of the William Devereux who died at Evesham, it seems most likely that this would be the parentage of Stephen d'Evereux. 
Walter d'Evereux (I31096)
 
45 *Tonantius Ferreolus. *VII. xii. i; I. vii. 4; II. ix. i. Grandson of the Consul Afranius Syagrius, and through his •mother, Papianilla, connected with the Aviti. An important Gallo-Roman noble, son of a Prefect of the Gauls, himself three times Prefect, and Patrician. With Avitus, he was instrumental in arranging the co-operation of the Visigoths with the Romans, which resulted in the defeat of Attila at Maurica by Aëtius. He was gifted with diplomatic powers which enabled him to save the town of Arles when besieged by the new Visigothic king Thorismond, at the trifling cost of a dinner (VII. xii), but his qualities as a strong and just |clxxxii administrator led to his selection, after his official career, as the principal accuser of Arvandus (I. vii). His tastes were cultivated; cf. the description which Sidonius gives of his country-house Prusianum (II. ix). Born about 420, he died about 485, and was thus a lifelong contemporary of his friend Sidonius. Cf. Carm. xxiv, 1. 36; Hist. Hit. de la France, iii, p. 540. [Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters. Tr. O.M. Dalton (1915) pp. clx-clxxxiii; List of Correspondents Tonantius Ferreolus (I29935)
 
46 *Tonantius. *IX. xiii; IX. xv. Son of Tonantius Ferreolus. Cf. Carm. xxiv. 34. [Sidonius Apollinaris, Letters. Tr. O.M. Dalton (1915) pp. clx-clxxxiii; List of Correspondents] Tonance Ferreol (I29933)
 
47 ...It was the execution of two Quakers denounced by the council as Loyalists that drove Benedict Arnold into open opposition to the radical Whig purges in Philadelphia and led to the largest antirevolutionary protest during the war. John Roberts was a sixty-year-old miller from Lower Merion who was suspected of Tory leanings and had felt compelled to leave behind his family and flee into Philadelphia when the British took over. There he supported himself by selling provisions to the British and raised a cavalry troop, threatening to lead it on a raid to free the Quakers in captivity in Virginia. He also served as a guide on British foraging raids into the countryside. When the British left, General Howe privately warned Roberts to go with the British to avoid reprisals, but Roberts, who also had helped many American prisoners in British hands, followed Howe's public advice to make peace with the Americans. When the supreme executive council on May 8, 1778, issued a proclamation requiring a long list of accused Loyalists to surrender themselves under pain of being attainted of high treason, Roberts left Philadelphia and surrendered himself, subscribing an affirmation of allegiance to the United States and posting bail to stand trial. He was tried on a charge of "waging cruel war against this Commonwealth." Ten of twelve jurors voted for his acquittal and only agreed to a verdict of guilty if they could petition for a pardon. Their petition asserted that Roberts had acted "under the influence of fear when he took the imprudent step of leaving his family and joining the enemy." Although Chief Justice McKean ruled that Roberts had had thirty-five jury challenges, and had only exercised thirty-three of them, the two he failed to use did him in. Despite Roberts's frequent "acts of humanity, charity and benevolence" that had saved many American lives, despite the spectacle of his wife and ten children appealing on their knees before Congress for mercy and the signatures of more than one thousand civic, military, and religious leaders on a petition for clemency, Roberts and a Loyalist gatekeeper, Abram Carlisle, were ordered hanged, their reprieve denied by Reed, who called them "a crafty and designing set of men" and who demanded in the newspapers "a speedy execution for both animals."... http://www.cooperativeindividualism.org/randall_on_benedict_arnold.html.
His residence on Mill Creek, opposite the road leading to Ardmore, afterwards became the property of the patriot, Blair Mc Clenahan. 
ROBERTS, John (I18913)
 
48 1st Lord of Grosemont Castle, Monmouth in Gwarthstello. Aeddan who was a powerfull Cheiftain of Gwent who flourished in the reigh of Henry II, took the cross from Archbishop Baldwin when in 1187 he preached the Crusade at Llandaff. Arms added by Aeddan to the ancestral coat - or a Saltire Argent. AP CEDRYCK, Aeddan Lord of Grosmont (I31320)
 
49 RAYMOND de Toulouse (Beaucaire, Gard Jul 1197-Millau, Aveyron 27 Sep 1249, bur Fontevraud).  The Annals of Burton record the birth in 1197 of “Reimundum suum primogenitum” to “Johanna comitissa de Sancto Egidio, soror Ricardi regis Angliæ”[617].  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Puylaurens records that Raymond was born in 1197 at "Beaucaire dans le diocese d´Arles"[618].  A "Chronique en Languedocien, tirée du cartulaire de Raymond le Jeune comte de Toulouse" records the birth in Jul 1197 of "R. coms de Tholosa fils de la regina Johanna"[619].  The testament of "Raymundus…dux Narbone, comes Tolosæ, marchio Provinciæ" is dated 11 Sep 1209 and names "…Raymundo filio meo…"[620].  "Raymundus...comes iuvenis Tolosæ, filius Raymundi comitis Tolosæ et reginæ Johannæ uxoris quondam eiusdem" donated property to "Raymundo de Rochafolio" by charter dated 5 Jan 1217[621].  He succeeded his father in 1222 as RAYMOND VII Comte de Toulouse.  Emperor Friedrich II granted the county of Venaissin to Comte Raymond by charter dated Sep 1234[622].  The testament of "R…comes Tholose, marchio Provincie, filius quondam domine regine Johanne", dated 23 Sep 1249, chooses burial at Fontevraud, and appoints "filiam nostram Johannam uxorem…Alfonsi comitis Pictavensis" as his heir[623].  Matthew of Paris records the death in 1249 of "comes Sancti Egidii sive Thosolanus Reimundus", specifying that he was "miles strenuus et circumspectus et domino Papæ amicissumus" and that he requested burial at Fontevrault at the feet of "regis Ricardi cuius consanguineus erat"[624].  The Annales Sancti Victoris Massilienses record the death in 1249 of "Raymundus comes Tolosanus"[625]. A manuscript chronicle records the death in 1249 of "D. Raymundus comes Tolesanus"[626].  A "Chronique en Languedocien, tirée du cartulaire de Raymond le Jeune comte de Toulouse" records the death "lo quart dia en la fi de Setembre en Dimenge" in 1249" of "R. coms de Tholosa fils de la Regina Joanna as Amihau"[627].  An early 13th century genealogy of the comtes de Toulouse written by Bernardus Guidonis records the death "1249 VI Kal Oct...apud Amiliacum" of "Raymundus ultimus comes Tolosanus" aged 52 and his burial "apud Fontem-Ebrauldum"[628].  Betrothed (Oct 1206) to Infanta doña SANCHA de Aragón, daughter of don PEDRO II King of Aragon & his wife Marie de Montpellier (1205-[1206]).  "Petrus…Rex Aragoniæ et comes Barchinoniæ et dominus Montispessulani" and "Raimundo…Duci Narbonæ, Comiti Tolosæ et Marchioni Provinciæ" arranged the marriage of "filiam meam…et dominæ Mariæ uxoris…Sanciæ" and "Raimundo filio tuo et Reginæ Joannæ", by charter dated Oct 1205[629].  Betrothed (1209, contract broken) to --- de Montfort, daughter of SIMON [IV] Sire de Montfort & his wife Alix de Montmorency.  The Historia Albigensium of Pierre de Vaux-Cernay records that "comes…Tolosanus" betrothed "filius suus" to "filiam comitis Montis-fortis" but later reneged on the promise, dated to 1209 from the context[630].  It is not known whether this daughter was the same as one of the other daughters who are named in other sources.  m firstly (Jan [1211], divorced 1241) Infante doña SANCHA de Aragón, daughter of don ALFONSO II King of Aragon & his wife Infanta doña Sancha de Castilla ([1196]-shortly after 1241).  The Gestis Comitum Barcinonensium names "Sanxa" as third of the three daughters of "Ildefonsi"[631].  The Crónica de San Juan de la Peña records that Pedro II King of Aragon arranged the marriage of his "tercera hermana Sancha" to "al hijo del conde de Tolosa", by whom she was mother of "una hija que fué mujer de Alfonso conde de Poitiers, hermano de Luis rey de Francia"[632].  The Chronicle of Guillaume de Puylaurens records that "Raymond-le-Jeune" married "dona Sancha sœur du roi Pierre d´Aragon", dated to 1211 from the context[633].  A "Chronique en Languedocien, tirée du cartulaire de Raymond le Jeune comte de Toulouse" records the marriage in Jan 1203 (although the year must be incorrect) of "Raymundum comes Tholosanus filius regine Constancie" and "sororem regis Aragonum"[634]. She was the sister of her husband's stepmother.  "Sancia soror quondam...regis Aragoniæ, et uxor Raymundi filii domini Raymundi...ducis Narbonæ, comitis Tolosæ, marchionis Provinciæ" confirmed the privileges of Nîmes by charter dated 13 Nov 1218[635].  Betrothed (1241) toSANCHA de Provence, daughter of RAYMOND BERENGER IV Comte de Provence & his wife Beatrix de Savoie (Aix-en-Provence [1225]-Berkhamstead Castle, Buckinghamshire 5 or 9 Nov 1261, bur Hayles Abbey, Gloucestershire).  A charter dated 11 Aug 1241 records the marriage contract between "R comitis Tolosæ" and "Sanciam filiam…R Berengarii Comitis Provinciæ…et…Beatrix Comitissa"[636].   m secondly (1243, non-consummated, divorced 25 Sep 1245 on grounds of consanguinity) as her first husband, MARGUERITE de Lusignan, daughter of HUGUES [XI] "le Brun" Sire de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche et d'Angoulême & his wife Isabelle Ctss d’Angoulême (-22 Oct 1288).  A charter dated 13 Jun 1245 relates to the dissolution of the marriage between “Margaretæ filiæ…Hugonis comitis Marchiæ et Engolismæ” and “Raimundum Tholosæ comitem”[637].  A charter dated 13 Jul 1245 records the enquiry into the consanguinity between “dominus Raymundus comes Tholosanus” and “Margaritam filiam domini comitis Marchie”, and states that “domina regina Constancia avia sua et dominus Petrus de Cortiniaco, avus domine Ysabellis uxoris comitis Marchie fuerunt fratres carnales”[638].  A charter dated 25 Sep 1245 confirms the dissolution of the marriage between “comiti Tholosano” and “filiam…comitis Marchie”[639].  The obituaire de Saint-Marcial records the death "XII Kal Nov" of "Margarita Engolismensis comitissa, mater Ademari vicecomitis"[640].  She married secondly Aimery [IX] Vicomte de Thouars, and thirdly as his second wife,Geoffroy [VI] Seigneur de Châteaubriand.  Comte Raymond VII & his first wife had one child. Comte Raymond VI had three illegitimate children by unknown mistresses.
[http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/TOULOUSE.htm#Albericdied1183] 
Raimond VII, Comte de Toulouse (I27227)
 
50 A knight - Sir Robert de Thweng
Held half a knight's fee in Thwing in 1164 probably of William de Percy. Gave the Church of St. Thomas in Legsby to the Gilbertian priory of Sixhills, co. Lincoln. In the chronicles call Robert FitzRobert
The family of Thwenge, anciently amongst the most distinguished in the county of York, were lords of Kilton Castle in that shire and attained the rank of nobility in the 35th of Edward I [1307], when Marmaduke de Thwenge, a celebrated soldier in the Scottish wars, was summoned to parliament as a baron.
In the 22nd Henry III [1238], Sir Robert de Thwenge was deputed by the other barons to repair to Rome and to lay at the foot of the pontiff a complaint from the nobles of England regarding an encroachment upon their ecclesiastical immunities by the holy see. He was s. by his son, Marmaduke de Thweng.
Sir Bernard Burke, Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited, and Extinct Peerages, Burke's Peerage, Ltd., London, 1883, p. 532, Thweng, Barons Thweng 
THWENG, Sir Robert (I31973)
 

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