Gospatrick DUNBAR, II, Earl of Dunbar and March[1, 2, 3, 4]

Male Abt 1062 - 1138  (~ 76 years)


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  • Name Gospatrick DUNBAR 
    Suffix II, Earl of Dunbar and March 
    Nickname Cospatrick 
    Born Abt 1062  Dunbar. East Lothian, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 23 Aug 1138  Northallerton, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I6115  Blythe Genealogy
    Last Modified 3 Oct 2019 

    Father Gospatrick, Earl of Northumberland,   b. Abt 1040, Allerdale, Cumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1085  (Age ~ 45 years) 
    Mother Ethelreda, of England,   b. 1042, Wessex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married Bef 1065  [5
    Family ID F2853  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Sybil MOREL,   b. Abt 1074, Beanley, Alnwick, Northumberland, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown  [4, 5
    Married Aft 1074 
    Children 
     1. Gospatrick DUNBAR, III, Earl of Dunbar,   b. Abt 1090, Dunbar. East Lothian, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1166, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 76 years)
     2. Uchtred DUNDAS,   b. Abt 1100, Dundas, West Lothian, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     3. Margaret DUNBAR,   b. Abt 1105, Dunbar. East Lothian, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     4. Edgar DUNBAR,   b. Abt 1107, Dunbar. East Lothian, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1139  (Age ~ 33 years)
     5. Juliana DUNBAR,   b. Abt 1115, Dunbar. East Lothian, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 20 Jan 2020 
    Family ID F2852  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • GOSPATRIC DE DUNBAR, EARL [SCT], 3rd son being younger brother of Dolfin (expelled 1092 from Carlisle), was apparently one of the nine signatories to the charter of Scone (circ. 1115), as also, about a year later (under the style of Gospatricus, frater Dolfini), to the Inquisitio Davidis. He appears to have held the position of an EARL, though there is no record of the title of the Earldom, nor is he ever called Earl in any known document in his lifetime. In a charter, confirmed 16 August 1139 (after his death), to the monks of Durham, he is styled "Gospatricus Comes, frater Dolfini," being, in the heading thereof, called "Gospatricus secundus Comes frater Dolfini." This Earl is doubtless the summus dux Lodonensium (the leader of the men of Lothian) slain at the battle of the Standard 22 August 1138, fighting against the English at Cowton Moor, near Northallerton. [Complete Peerage IV:504-5, (transcribed by Dave Utzinger)]
      Gospatric, who in one place calles himself Earl, and certainly held the rank and place of Earl or ruler of Lothian, does not appear on record until after 1100, the year of the accession of King Henry I of England, and his earliest mention in Scottish writs is in 1119. Another peculiarity about his designation is that during his lifetime he is never but once, by himself, in a charter to the monks of Coldingham, styled Earl in Scottish charters. He is referred to, whether as a witness to charters, or a granter or recipient of charters, in nearly every case, as Gospatric, brother of Dolfin. In 1119 he is a witness to the charter to the monks of Selkirk, and to the Inquisition of the see of Glasgow, as well as later, to the foundation charter of Scone. He had also the same designation in the first grant to Holyrood. These are the chief references to him during his life in Scottish records, and while he evidently held a high position, he is never styled Earl until after his death.
      King Henry I, also in a charter of unknown date, but certainly some time after 1100, conferrred upon him, as Gospatric, brother of Dolfin, a large tract of land lying between Wooler and Morpeth, in Northumberland. This extensive grant, which was confirmed at York about 1136, was held, not by knight's service or other service ususal from a barony, though it is sometimes described as the barony of Beanley. It was held in grand sergenty, the Earl and his descendants being bound to be 'inborwe' and 'uthorwe' between England and Scotland; that is, they were to be security for persons passing to and fro between the two countries, who would not be allowed to travel north or south without permission of the lords of Beanley, a fact which practically gave to the Earls of Dunbar the important position of Wardens on both sides of the East March.
      From another important English writ it appears that Gospatric, besides the lands named, held the adjoining territories of Berwick and Eglingham, of which he received a grant in feufarm from the abbot of St Albans, by a special contract dated between 1097 and 1119, and which were afterwards held by Edgar, a son of Gospatric.
      Earl Gospatric granted, probably towards the close of his life, the lands of Ederham, or Edrom, and Nisbet, to the monks of Coldingham, imprecating spiritual penalties on any who shoulc interfere with the grant. He also gave the church of Edlingham in alms to the Abbey of St Albans. He endowed the church of St Nicholas of HOme, in Berwickshrie, his wife and family consenting to the gift. He joined his kinsman King David I in the latter's invasion of England in 1138, and commanded themen of Lothian at the battle of Cowton Moor, near Northallerton, otherwise called the battle of the Standard, fought on 23 August 1138. At least no other person could be described as the 'summus Dux Lodonensium' who led them to the field. The Scots were defeated, and the leader of the Lothian men was slain or severely wounded by an arrow. Whether this were Earl Gospatric or not, he was certainly dead before 16 August 1139, when King David I confirmed the grant of Edrom to the monastery of Coldingham. The seal attached to his charter of Coldingham is round, one inch in diameter; an equestrian figure holding a sword slanting over his shoulder in his right hand. The legend is broken and defaced, but enough remains to show that it must have read, 'SIGILLUM GOSPATRICI FRATRIS DOLFINI.'
      The name of the Earl's wife has not been ascertained. [The Scots Peerage III:246-247]

  • Sources 
    1. [S581] Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists (Reliability: 2).

    2. [S6326] Burke's Peerage (Reliability: 2).

    3. [S475] Fitzalan, John; 1223-1267; Dictionary of National Biography, Volumes 1-20, 22 (Reliability: 2).

    4. [S5509] de Montgomerie, Roger II; North America, Family Histories, 1500-2000., de Montgomerie, Roger II; bio (Reliability: 2).

    5. [S582] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy (Reliability: 2).