John BOTERELL, de Botreaux

Male Abt 1200 - Bef 1230  (~ 29 years)


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  • Name John BOTERELL 
    Suffix de Botreaux 
    Born Abt 1200  England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died Bef 1230 
    Person ID I8036  BlytheGenealogy
    Last Modified 1 Feb 2019 

    Father Peter BOTTERELL,   b. 1135, Staffordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Family ID F29454  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Matilda DE NEUFMARCHÉ,   b. Abt 1205, Cadbury, Tiverton, Somerset, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1219  (Age ~ 15 years) 
    Married Abt 1219  [1, 2, 3
    Children 
     1. Hawise BOTTERELL,   b. 1215, Tenbury, Worcestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 20 Feb 2019 
    Family ID F3633  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Documents
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Russell,_knight
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Russell,_knight

  • Sources 
    1. [S3514] Foundation for Medieval Genealogy online [http://fmg.ac].

    2. [S3910] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org.
      Jump to searchSir Maurice Russell, a typecast not a portrait, display s the serious and dignified mien expected of the mediaeval knight, a s for example portrayed in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Detail from Dyr ham brass Arms of Russell of Kingston Russell & Dyrham: Argent, on a c hief gules three bezants Sir Maurice Russell1356-1416 and first wife I sabel Childrey. Rubbing from funerary brass, floor of Dyrham Church, 1 416. Note Russell & Childrey armorials in small escutcheons in gable s of canopies.[1] The brass is very similar to that of Thomas de Berke ley, 5th Baron Berkeley died 1417 at Wotton-under-Edge, Glos., suggest ing a workshop of common originSir Maurice Russell 2 February 1 356 – 27 June 1416 of Kingston Russell, Dorset and Dyrham, Glos. was a n English nobleman and knight. He was a prominent member of the Glouce stershire gentry. He was the third but eldest surviving son and heir o f Sir Ralph Russell 1319–1375 and his wife Alice died 1388. He was kni ghted between June and December 1385 and served twice as Knight of th e Shire for Gloucestershire in 1402 and 1404. He held the post of Sher iff of Gloucestershire four times, and was Coroner and Justice of th e Peace, Tax Collector and Commissioner of Enquiry. His land holding s were extensive in Gloucestershire, Somerset, Dorset, Berkshire and B uckinghamshire. He was descended from an ancient line which can be tra ced back to 1210, which ended on the death of his son Thomas, from hi s second marriage, as a young man without male issue. Most of his esta tes, despite having been entailed, passed at his death into the famili es of his two daughters from his first marriage.Contents1Famil y background1.1Newmarch Inheritance1.2Gorges Inheritance2First marriag e to Isabel Childrey3Becomes Ward on Father's Death4Inherits Assheto n Lands5Career5.1Tax Collector, Gloucestershire5.2High Sheriff of Glou cestershire5.3Coroner of Gloucestershire5.4Knight of the Shire, Glouce stershire5.5Justice of the Peace, Gloucestershire5.6Commissioner of En quiry6Second marriage to Joan Dauntsey7Succession8Dyrham Brass8.1Verse 8.2Description9Sources10ReferencesFamily background[edit]Hugo d e Rosel, the fictitious Norman ancestor of the Russells of Kingston Ru ssell invented by Le Neve, York Herald, in 1626. Woburn Abbey collecti on.In 1626 the York Herald, William Le Neve, claimed descent for the f amily of Russell of Kingston Russell from a certain Norman knight, Hug o de Rosel,[2] but this has since been shown to be fanciful,[3] and i n fact the family's earliest verifiable ancestor was living about 1200 . The family was established at Kingston Russell in the parish of Lon g Bredy, near Swyre, in Dorset, at the start of the 13th century. Abou t 1210 Sir John Russell died c. 1224 held Kingston from King John 1199 –1216 as half a hide by the serjeanty of being a marshal of the King' s buttery on Christmas Day and at Whitsuntide, a service which had ori ginated in the time of William the Conqueror.[4] The tenure was late r said to be that of telling out the King's chessmen and putting the m away when the King had finished his game.[5] Members of the family a lso held nearby Allington in Dorset from an early date, by serjeanty o f presenting to the King a cup of wine at Christmas,[6] yet it appear s in fact to have been part of the Domesday fief of Turstin FitzRolf , which later became the barony of Newmarch. John Russell was Governo r of Corfe Castle in Dorset in 1220/1 and sometime Constable of Sherbo rne Castle, Dorset. He married Rose Bardolph, a daughter of Thomas Bar dolph and Adela or Sybil Corbet.Newmarch Inheritance[edit]On th e death in 1216 of his near neighbour in Dorset, James of Newmarch,[7 ] of North Cadbury in Dorset, last of that family, John Russell had pu rchased the wardship of his two daughters and co-heiresses, Isabel an d Hawise, which transaction received the approval of King Henry III i n 1224. Isabel, the elder, he married to his son Ralph Russell in 1219 ,[8] whilst he sold the marriage of Hawise to John de Bottrell.[9] O n the death of Bottrell, Hawise married secondly Nicholas de Moels, t o whom her moiety of the property descended. Thus were the lands of th e extensive Newmarch barony, originally the Domesday Book fiefdom of T urstin FitzRolf, standard bearer to William the Conqueror at the Battl e of Hastings, then the fief of Wynebald de Ballon, a soldier friend o f King William II, split in two between the husbands of the two co-hei rs. To Moels went North Cadbury and Upton “Moels” Berks., now Oxon., w hilst to Ralph Russell went Dyrham and a moiety of Aust, Glos., Horsin gton Som., Upton “Russell” Berks., now Oxon., Hardwick & Kimble Bucks . & other estates in Wiltshire.[10] The Testa de Nevill entry for Dyrh am was : “Jame de Novo Mercato tenet in Dorham cum pertinenciis duos m ilites et dimidium” James of Newmarch held in Dyrham with appurtenance s 2 ½ knights' fees.[11]Gorges Inheritance[edit]Ancient armoria ls of Gorges, the “gurges” in Latin meaning a whirlpool New arms Gorge s modern adopted by “Russell” Gorges family, post 1347See main article : Gorges familyRalph Russell's and Isabel's son Sir William Russell di ed as a young man in 1310/11, but not without having inherited in 129 8 the lands of his two elder brothers, James who had a son Ralph, d. 1 295, s.p. and Robert died s.p. 1298. The Russell lands at Dyrham wer e in 1311 one of the largest arable demesnes in Gloucestershire, tha t is lands farmed in-hand, not let out to tenants, comprising 420 acre s arable and 60 acres of meadow.[12] William produced a male heir, The obald 1303–1349, by his wife Jane Peverell or poss. Katherine de Aul a from which family the Russells inherited Yaverland, Isle of Wight.[1 3] Thus, the infant Theobald, having lost father and grandfather, wa s granted by King Edward II in wardship to Ralph de Gorges, 1st Baro n Gorges of Wraxall & Bradpole Som., Knighton IoW, Tothill Lincolnshir e. In 1316, Theobald Russell, as a minor, was recorded as holding 8 ma nors; 2 in Glos., 1 in Wilts., 1 in Som. & 4 elsewhere.[14] Gorges ha d a son, Ralph, 2nd Baron Gorges, and 3 daughters, Elizabeth, Eleanor , and Joan. He appears to have married his second daughter Eleanor t o the young Theobald Russell. Before the death of the 2nd Baron withou t issue shortly after his father, clearly keen to see his family nam e and armorials continue, he formed the plan of bequeathing the Gorge s estates to the younger son of his sister Eleanor Russell, on conditi on, apparently, that he should adopt the name and arms of Gorges. Thi s is precisely what occurred when Theobald Russell II, 3rd son of Theo bald and Eleanor, his 2nd elder brother William having died, adopted t he name Gorges, and founded a revived Gorges line, which flourished, b ased at Wraxall, Somerset. see Gorges family and Ferdinando Gorges. Wh en, however, Theobald “Gorges” tried to adopt the Gorges arms, taken f rom the Morville heiress who had brought them Wraxall, he was challeng ed by the Warburton or Warbleton knight of Cheshire who happened to b e serving with him at the Siege of Calais in 1346, who noticed they bo th bore the same arms on their shields, Lozengy or and azure. The cas e was brought before the Earl Marshal, who adjudged on 19 July 1347 i n favour of Warburton and forced Theobald Russell Gorges to add a chev ron gules to the Morville arms as a difference. Thus the new Gorges ar ms became Lozengy or and azure, a chevron gules,[15] and one of the mo re celebrated and historic cases heard in the Earl Marshal's court wa s recorded.[16] The ancient Gorges canting arms of Argent, a gurges az ure, gurges signifying, in Latin, a whirlpool,[17] had been retained s ome generations before by the senior Gorges line seated at Tamerton Fo liot, Devon, the cadet line having married the de Morville heiress. Th e eldest son of Theobald I, described as of Carisbrooke Castle, Isle o f Wight, and Eleanor was Ralph Russell died 13 February 1375,[18] desc ribed as “of the Isle of Wight”, the father of Sir Maurice Russell< /b>, the subject of the present article.First marriage to Isabel Ch ildrey[edit]St Peter's Church, parish church of Dyrham. Next to i t has stood for many centuries the manor house of Dyrham, the presen t incarnation of which, Dyrham Park pictured, dates from the reign o f William & Mary, and is thought to incorporate some of the structur e of the ancient home of the Russells. In this church can be seen th e funerary brass of Sir Maurice Russell and Isabel Childrey. Armorial s of Isabel Childrey as impaled with arms of Russell, funerary brass o f Sir Maurice Russell, Dyrham Church, 1416 Arms of Childrey: Quarterl y 1st & 4th, on a bend a riband wavy, 2nd & 3rd, 3 concentric annulets [19]Maurice Russell, aged just 13, was married firstly in June 1369,[2 0] to Isabel Childrey, daughter of Sir Edmund Childrey died 1372or Che lrey of Frethornes Manor in the parish of Childrey, Berkshire. Frethor nes was a manor anciently held from the Newmarch family, and its tenan t prior to Edmund was the “de Frethorne” family, which held other Newm arch lands in Gloucestershire and Somerset.[21] Certainly Frethornes w as part of the Newmarch moiety which had gone to the husband of Hawise , since the Bottreaux family, eventual heirs of Nicholas de Moels, wer e the overlords to Edmund.[22] Sir Edmund was from a relatively new ge ntry family, though long resident within the parish of Childrey, whic h rose rapidly in his own person, from his profession as a lawyer. Hi s armorials in 1368, even at the height of his career, were stated i n contemporary documents to be “unknown”, pointing to his family's low ly origins.[23] These armorials can be seen on the funerary brass in D yrham church, above Isabel's figure see illustration. He began his pub lic career in 1343.[24] In 1348, he was a Commissioner of the Peace fo r Berkshire. In 1362, he was appointed a King's Serjeant-at-Law, risin g to Justice of King's Bench in 1371, whereupon he was knighted. In 13 55, he had begun to acquire property in Berkshire, at Watlingtons mano r in West Hagbourne, Frethornes manor in Childrey Parish, South Fawley , Letcomb Bassett Berks. and Balsdon. On the marriage of Maurice Russe ll and Isabel, his father, Ralph Russell, settled upon them the mano r of Dyrham.[25] His lands in the Isle of Wight, comprising three mano rs,[26] apparently were settled on the two elder brothers of Maurice w ho died without male issue,[27] but do not appear to have descended t o Maurice. Edmund Childrey's connection with Gloucestershire, and thu s with Maurice Russell's father, may have developed as a result of hi s having been granted, in 1362, the wardship of the lands of William F itzWarin at Whityngton, Glos.[28] In 1388, Sir Maurice Russell sold hi s ex-Newmarch Berkshire manor of Upton “Russell” to John Latton, who s old it in 1401[29] to Thomas Childrey c. 1350-1407, MP for Berkshire i n 1390 and 1406, brother-in-law to Maurice Russell[30] and steward o f the estates of Bishop William of Wykeham of Winchester .Becomes W ard on Father's Death[edit]Maurice's father, Ralph Russell, died o n 13 February 1375, while Maurice was still a minor, aged 19, two year s from his majority. He was granted in wardship to Sir Robert Assheto n died 1384, his father's cousin, soon to be appointed Treasurer of th e Exchequer. Having reached his majority, in December 1377, Maurice to ok possession of his inheritance, following the early deaths of his tw o elder brothers, Theobald and Johnboth fl. 1341,[31] excepting the cu stomary 1/3 dower share retained by his mother Alice, whose family nam e is unknown, apparently resident at Kingston Russell, who died on 1 6 March 1388. In 1382, Maurice leased the reversion of Kingston Russel l, from his mother's death, to Walter Clopton for 20 marks p.a. Mauric e also had a sister, Alice, who married into the Haket family, produci ng a son John Haket died 1498.Inherits Assheton Lands[edit]Si r Robert Assheton senior of Pitney, Somerset, had married Elizabeth d e Gorges, eldest daughter of the first Baron Gorges. On the death of t heir son, Sir Robert Assheton junior [32]; without issue, in 1384,[33 ] Maurice Russell inherited the former Gorges manors of Bradpole, an d the hundred courts of Redhone and Beaminster Forum, in Dorset. Asshe ton's manor of Litton and Combe in Dorset were split, after some argum ent, between Russell and Sir Ralph Cheyne died 1400, of Brooke in West bury, Wilts., whose father, Sir William Cheyne, of Poyntington, Somers et, had married, as his second wife, Joan Gorges, the youngest daughte r of the 1st Baron Gorges.[34]Career[edit]Maurice Russell's car eer began in December 1385 in connection with the administration of Gl oucestershire, when he was appointed, aged 29, tax collector for Glos. , and again in March 1388. In the same year of 1385 he sold the forme r Newmarch manor of Hardwick, Bucks. to William of Wykeham, Bishop o f Winchester, for the purpose of the founding of New College, Oxford , and also granted the Bishop an annual rent of £10 from the manor o f Aust, Glos., during his wife's lifetime. Later, in 1400, his brother -in-law Thomas Childrey would become steward to the estates of Wykeham .[35] He also sold the ancient Russell manor of Allington to John Roge r I died 1441, of Bridport and Bryanston, Dorset.[36] Russell remaine d a very wealthy man as the assessments made in 1412 for the purpose s of taxation make clear. His estates in Hampshire, Somerset, and Glou cesterhire were then said to be severally worth £40 p.a., whilst thos e in Dorset apparently gave him an annual income of £122 5s, makin g a total, no doubt under-declared, of over £242.[37] In 1394, he wa s removed from the post of Coroner of Glos. for the reason that “He dw ells not in the county”, although most of his official positions relat ed to that county. He made a loan of £40 to King Richard II in Augus t 1397.[38] He was clearly a supporter of King Richard, as he had marr ied off his younger daughter to Richard le Scrope, 1st Earl of Wiltshi re, one of the King's staunchest supporters, who was beheaded at Brist ol, only 7 miles from Dyrham, by Henry Bolingbroke, in 1399. Russell , however, continued to serve in official positions in Gloucestershir e after the usurpation of the throne, in 1399, by Henry IV. Indeed, h e served as Knight of the Shire in 1402 and 1404. In 1403, he was amon g the prominent figures of Gloucestershire commissioned by the new Kin g to select the best fighting men of the region to join the royal arm y in fighting the Welsh rebels under Owen Glendower, and, in the sam e year, he was appointed feoffee, by Sir John Luttrell, of the Somerse t manor of East Quantoxhead. In 1408, he was involved in a dispute, o f unknown cause, with the influential Sir Walter Hungerford, as a resu lt of which both men were required to enter into recognizances for 1,0 00 marks each as surety that they would abide by the award of the Chan cellor Thomas Arundel, Archbishop of Canterbury.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Russell,_knight
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Russell,_knight


    3. [S3910] Wikipedia: The Free Encyclopedia Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org.
      Jump to searchSir Maurice Russell, a typecast not a portrait, display s the serious and dignified mien expected of the mediaeval knight, a s for example portrayed in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. Detail from Dyr ham brass Arms of Russell of Kingston Russell & Dyrham: Argent, on a c hief gules three bezants Sir Maurice Russell1356-1416 and first wife I sabel Childrey. Rubbing from funerary brass, floor of Dyrham Church, 1 416. Note Russell & Childrey armorials in small escutcheons in gable s of canopies.[1] The brass is very similar to that of Thomas de Berke ley, 5th Baron Berkeley died 1417 at Wotton-under-Edge, Glos., suggest ing a workshop of common originSir Maurice Russell 2 February 1 356 – 27 June 1416 of Kingston Russell, Dorset and Dyrham, Glos. was a n English nobleman and knight. He was a prominent member of the Glouce stershire gentry. He was the third but eldest surviving son and heir o f Sir Ralph Russell 1319–1375 and his wife Alice died 1388. He was kni ghted between June and December 1385 and served t
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Russell,_knight
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maurice_Russell,_knight