Category: Eras

Remains of four WWI Canadian soldiers have been identified.

Of the recovered remains of eight Canadian soldiers of the 78th who were MIA during the Battle of Amiens in France in August 1918, four of the WWI Canadian soldiers have been identified to date by the Canadian Department of National Defence.
WWI soldiers' remains identified.

Remains of four WWI Canadian soldiers have been identified.

Those identified include:

Pte William Simms of Russell, Manitoba was one of two brothers who died in the first world war.

Lance Sgt John Lindell, born in Sweden, immigrated to Canada and settled in Winnipeg in about 1904.

Pte Lachlan McKinnon was born in Scotland and immigrated to Canada in 1913. Pte McKinnon had previously been seriously wounded during the Battle of the Somme.

Lt Clifford Neelands, born in Barrie, Ontario, moved to Winnipeg with his family where he worked in real estate.

More details about these four men and the four remaining who have yet to be identified can be found in the CBC’s article “WWI Canadian soldiers’ remains identified.

I have previously written about my two relatives – one reported MIA during the Battle of Courcelette and the second MIA from Vimy Ridge during advance preparation and hostilities.

I would like nothing more than to have one, or ideally both of my relatives found and identified. My family’s military and war history means so much to me.

The links below are to my posts about my own relatives.

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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates – 20 Sep 2014

Following are the latest FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com additions and updates since my last update post of September 11, 2014.

 

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates – 20 Sep 2014

FamilySearch.org

Argentina

Belgium

Brazil

Canada

Colombia

Czechoslovakia

Indonesia

Italy

Peru

Philippines

Spain

United Kingdom

United States

 

Ancestry.com

Canada

United Kingdom

United States

Are free genealogy databases a thing of the past?

In almost twenty years of genealogy research, I have found a considerable amount of the sources, data and images on free genealogy databases online. They still exist in large numbers and can be very valuable.
find free genealogy databases

Finding free genealogy databases.

The tough part in some cases is finding them, as most sites created by amateur genealogists and website owners are not optimized for the internet and therefore may not rank well in Google searches.

Be sure to sift through as many links as you can. If the site entered from a Google search result links to other sites, then by all means check them out. It’s important to bookmark any sites you find valuable as it’s very likely that days, weeks, months or even years down the road, you may never be able to find it again.

One tool I find very helpful for finding free genealogy databases is the Google Genealogy Search Tool at the Ancestor Search website. Scroll to the very bottom for the search tool, just one of many on the page. This tool incorporates most of all the search types above it. Just proceed to the next search results once you’ve waded through a set. This is very quick, easy and fruitful.

It is also important to search by other means than just names, such as location, topical sites (i.e. military service, war records, births, deaths, etc.) and dedicated surname websites.

When you begin to study genealogy, the resources that you have are few and far between. Most of us don’t go out and purchase expensive books or buy memberships in larger sites to get the information that we want. We tend to rely more on our own experiences and family members, but the truth is that those resources, while good, won’t carry you back through too many generations before you need some additional help.

Frustration can be an integral part of genealogy research. When it gets to the point where I’m very frustrated and feeling blocked, I create a ‘to do’ note on the person’s record in my genealogy software and turn to a different item. I find when I return later, either with a fresh, clear mind, or having given the database time to make updates, I will find something useful.

While you’re working online on your family tree, the free genealogy database will very often be a life saver. Those of us who don’t, or can’t buy the online access to the many paid databases, use the free ones religiously to find our way through family members. While you may not find all of the things that you want to know, you will find a great deal of information that will point you in another direction you weren’t even aware that you had to explore.

Even paid genealogy sites offer some specific databases for free access. These sites include Ancestry.com, and Fold3.com, amongst others. To search for free records on any given paid genealogy site, find the search link, go to advanced search, and enter the keyword ‘free.’ Most sites will produce a list of all free databases on the site. Also, try a general ‘free database’ keyword search on Google. Be prepared for thousands of search results, but at least it’s a place to start.

It is also important to subscribe to the blogs or newsletters to learn of any time limited free database promotions that may be coming up.

For all of you who thought the free genealogy search was a thing of the past, and that nothing worth having was free any more, take heart. There are literally thousands of free genealogy database sites out there that are waiting for you to come and pick through them and get what you can for your own genealogy.

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My ‘must have’ list of top 10 genealogy websites.

This list of top 10 genealogy websites is a bit different than others because I have evaluated them based on the sheer quantity of data and sources I have found for my own personal research, regardless whether they are paid or free.
will of Richard Chatterton found on the UK Archives site.

17th century will of Richard Chatterton found on the UK Archives site, #9 on my top 10 genealogy websites list.

I will only subscribe to a site if I’m sure it’s worth it as I can usually find most other information on free sites with some effort.

It just so happens though, that my favorite site to conduct research is a paid site, while all the rest except one are free.

Ancestry ($)

Although this site requires a paid subscription, it is the one and only site I do pay for as I find I truly do get my money’s worth. No matter what location, type of record, or time period, I can usually find something of value on this site. The search feature is rather confusing and cumbersome. Just keep in mind it’s better to be as specific as possible and use the filters appropriately and you will get fairly accurate results.

Family Search

Over the past few years, Family Search has been quickly catching up to Ancestry because of the sheer quantity of transcriptions, images, and collections they continue to make available online. They have a very accurate and intuitive search.

Library and Archives Canada

I am Canadian, with roots in both French Canada (Quebec) and Acadia (Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia). Anytime I am researching a Canadian line, this is the first site I go to – even before Ancestry and Family Search.

Nova Scotia Archives

My Acadian ancestors form a rather specialized area of research, and the Nova Scotia Archives genealogy research site is the first place I go. Original records are available for a per unit price, but I’m quite happy just printing the transcribed records for the most part.

Internet Archive

My husband’s Welsh Quaker, British, royal and new world ancestors are the largest part of my research and this is the one site I go to when I’m unable to find original records or even transcriptions of records elsewhere. I’ve found numerous genealogy studies, articles, and books; history books, etc. that have provided detailed information. It is important to remember, however, that errors were not uncommon in these publications, and I do continue to try to find more concrete sources.

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy

I am fascinated by my husband’s medieval and royal ancestry and this site is a well-researched site. Any suspect information is clearly identified and there is a clear explanation of why. Original medieval sources are cited in detail, supporting all facts and conclusions.

University of Hull Royal Database

This is also a very well researched site providing invaluable information about the royal lineages of Britain and Europe. I usually consult this site in tandem with the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy site above. This helps to confirm some information to a certain degree.

National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)

About 1750, my husband’s Welsh and British ancestors started arriving in the new world and the branches that took root there flourished to impact all areas of American life. Next to Ancestry, I find this site valuable for actual military files and numerous other archived documents. All requests, however, must be done by snail mail, in which case I try to avoid this site a lot. I’m definitely an instant gratification kind of person. Hopefully one day they’ll set up online access, even if it is paid. I’d certainly subscribe to this one.

UK Archives ($)

I have found some of the more interesting documents on this site, including numerous scans of original wills from the 16th to the 19th century. There is something about the old English script that I find very beautiful and it’s a suitable challenge for my puzzle oriented mind to transcribe them. There is a per unit price to download documents, but the price is very reasonable and I have no problem paying it, considering the high quality of the document scans.

World GenWeb

No one individual GenWeb site in this network is used all that much in my research, but if you consider all research found on any of the GenWeb sites, it definitely warrants a top ten position. I have listed the main World GenWeb site, which links through to the full network of other sites from other locations. By using the links, it is possible to drill down from the global and country levels to county and indeed township sites in some cases.

 

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – 21 Aug 2014

Following are the FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com updates and additions for these sites over the past two weeks.
FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

I must apologize for taking so long this time. Although I don’t have a set schedule, I do normally do this post about once a week. Because I have to process each link individually, it’s very time consuming and with other maintenance tasks I’ve had to do, this post was delayed.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

Argentina

Brazil

Colombia

Ghana

Italy

Jamaica

Mexico

Netherlands

New Zealand

Spain

Sweden

United States

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Australia

United Kingdom

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Genealogy news bites to August 5, 2014.

The following are the most recent genealogy news bites and genealogy and ancestry headlines up to and including August 5, 2014.

Genealogy news bites to August 5, 2014.

Genealogy news bites and headlines to August 5, 2014.

The National Archives

Loan to Maritime Museum of the Atlantic in Halifax

Last week, the Maritime Museum of the Atlantic in Halifax opened the exhibition “Prize and Prejudice: Nova Scotia’s War of 1812.”   It is a companion to the War of 1812 exhibit organized by the Canadian War Museum…

FamilySearch Blog

Magnifying Volunteers’ Gifts: A Progress Report

FamilySearch recently reached a significant milestone: one billion images of historical documents are now viewable on FamilySearch.org. That’s one billion pictures of documents. Of those images, how many would you say are indexed and searchable by name? All of them? Half of them? Would you believe less than 22 percent…

GulfLive.com

Hattiesburg woman’s passion for genealogy helps area families

Genealogy — the study of family histories — started out as a hobby for Hattiesburg resident Helen Clunie. It soon grew into a passion and has become a way that Clunie makes a difference by preserving the records of area families for generations to come…

Library and Archives Canada Blog

William Redver Stark, the Soldier and the Artist

Canada’s experience of the First World War was captured by officially commissioned artists such as A.Y. Jackson and David Milne from 1916 onwards through the Canadian War Memorials Fund. However, many other artists—amateur and professional…

KimKomando

Essential free genealogy family tree site

The Internet provides an abundance of sites to help you with genealogical searches. But it would be tedious to search them all individually. Fortunately, you don’t have to do this. Instead, head over to Family Search. This site combs through public records to find the information you need…

Daily Digest News

Skull analysis reveals insights into human ancestry

Scientists recently concluded that humans experienced a relatively sharp drop in testosterone about 50,000 years ago, which aided in the cultivation of modern human civilization, by looking at human skulls.

Times-Herald.com

Facebook leads to genealogy discovery

Recently, playing around on Facebook really paid off in a big way! Lindy Hayes posted a picture of a tombstone her sister Ashley had discovered in the crawlspace of her home. The inscription read, “Joseph E. MOORE, born June 1, 1853, died Oct. 8, 1868.”…

Green Valley News and Sun

Genealogy Today: Great vintage photos at Shorpy site

If you love to look at old photographs, or if historic images of where and how your ancestors lived 100 or so years ago interest you, you will love Shorpy, http://www.shorpy.com/…

Agabond

DNA ancestry tests and Black Americans

Unlike other Americans, Blacks had their ethnic identity and history taken from them. Even Native Americans know which tribes they come from. DNA tests can help to recover some of that missing information. There are two kinds of tests: admixture tests and lineage tests…

Olive Tree Genealogy

Nursing Sister Constance Philips WW1 Photo Album – A Bio

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5″ by 5.25″) kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One…

FindAGrave Volunteer Accidentally Damages Tombstones

One of Tennessee’s oldest church cemeteries had several tombstones permanently damaged recently. A FindAGrave volunteer is suspected of damaging several historic graves with a wire brush  at the New Providence Presbyterian Church on Stoney Point Road in Surgoinsville…

Ancestry.com Blog

AncestryDNA Matching Update Impacts Jewish Ancestry

AncestryDNA customers with significant Jewish ancestry have witnessed the challenges that we and other genetic genealogy testing companies have faced when predicting genetic relatives…

Be The Star of Your Own Who Do You Think You Are? Show

Have you watched Who Do You Think You Are? and wished you could travel the world to discover more about your own ancestors’ past? Then we have a giveaway for you! We are picking one lucky winner for the ultimate Who Do You Think You Are? experience…

Long-Lost Sisters United After 60 Years Apart

Long-lost sisters Carol and Amy went most of their lives never knowing of one another until their passion for genealogy brought them together in 2013.Veteran genealogist Carol Moss was adopted 60 years ago and only last year decided to research her birth mother’s history…

Irish Independent

Princess Charlene of Monaco’s Irish ancestry revealed

New research has traced Princess Charlene of Monaco’s ancestors back to the 1520s and a prominent Dublin family called the Fagans.
The research, carried out by genealogy researchers Eneclann for Tourism Ireland, shows that Princess Charlene descends from one of the most successful gentlemen-merchant families in Dublin in the 16th and 17th centuries…

Express

Julie Walters discovers murderous ancestor on genealogy show

Veteran actress JULIE WALTERS was left stunned while tracing her family history on genealogy show WHO DO YOU THINK YOU ARE? when she discovered her great-grandfather was once accused of murder…

Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter

The Master Genealogist to be Discontinued

Sad news! The following announcement was made today by Bob Velke, the owner of Wholly Genes, Inc.: I am sad to report that the decision has been made to discontinue The Master Genealogist (“TMG”). While thousands of TMG users appreciate the program’s many powerful features that are unmatched in other software…

The Future of Second Site, a Program for Publishing Genealogy Data

Yesterday’s announcement that Wholly Genes Software would discontinue development and support of The Master Genealogist (TMG) has created all sorts of questions. Some of the questions concern the future of Second Site, a popular …

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