Category: Ancestry.com

Owning a home: Military least likely and fire fighters more likely to own.

New analysis from Ancestry.com reveals surprising connections between occupation and owning a home today and since 1900.
Owning a home and home ownership.

Owning a home: Military members least likely and fire fighters more likely to.

I found some of the findings described in the following press release by Ancestry.com surprising except for one – the statistic showing that military members are less likely to own a home.

Having been raised in a Canadian military family, economics was never the first consideration for military families when it came to buying a home, although it was very important. Considering the transient nature of military postings and transfers, it often made more sense to rent either from the military itself or private landlords because we never knew how long we would live somewhere before being transferred yet again.

Changing housing markets always were a major factor, making buying a home while in the military a huge gamble. Although a member may be able to buy a home in one location within their financial means, there was a huge risk of having to sell at a loss at a later date since the time to sell was never the choice of the home owner because they remained at the mercy of the military and were governed by their assignments and transfers.This loss could be greatly compounded if the new transfer location was a higher value housing market, pretty much eliminating the possibility of home ownership in the new location.

The possibility of inheriting property was made much more difficult, possibly resulting in the sale of the family property because of the inability of military families to live on their own property and support their homes near their bases.

The volatility of military living circumstances made it almost impossible to make the investment in a home until nearer the time of retirement, when plans were being made for the future outside military service.

PRESS RELEASE by Ancestry.com

PROVO, UT

(Marketwired – October 15, 2014)

Members of the armed services are among the least likely to own a home in the United States, according to a new analysis by Ancestry, the world’s largest online family history resource. Ancestry recently analyzed 112 years of U.S. Federal Census data to better understand the connection between occupation and owning a home across the nation over the last century. As of 2012, optometrists have the clearest line of sight to home ownership at 90%, while dancers and dance instructors have the lowest home ownership rate at just 23%.

Occupation has had a major impact on home ownership rates since 1900. While the typical size of a profession’s paycheck is an important factor in the rankings, it’s not the only one. There are many instances of a profession having a higher rate of home ownership than another that typically pays more. Some interesting findings from 2012:

Public service often pays off in terms of home ownership rates, except if you are in the armed forces. Fire fighters ranked #7 at 84%, and police officers and detectives #12 at 79%, compared to lawyers and judges who ranked #20 at 78%. Teachers were higher than economists (#45 at 74% versus #97, 64%).
Janitors and sextons had a rate about double that of waiters and waitresses (54% versus 27%).
It turns out that all artists are not starving. Sixty-three percent of artists and art teachers own homes, which is almost twice as high as dancers and dance teachers, which have the lowest rate of home ownership among any profession. Higher rates of home ownership were also seen among musicians and music teachers (62%), entertainers (57%) and authors (63%).
Some skilled professions that include many unionized workers had fairly high rates of home ownership, such as electricians at 73%, plumbers at 70% and power station operators at 87%.
Sixty-two (62) percent of editors and reporters owned homes in 2012, which is higher than almost every other analyzed decade.

Home ownership rates were at just 32% in 1900 and have doubled since then, but nearly all that growth came by 1960. “This kind of historical context is extremely valuable information for people researching their family history,” said Todd Godfrey, Head of Global Content at Ancestry. “Home ownership, occupation, and location are often key bits of information that can help bring the stories of our ancestors to life and greater illumination to the times in which they lived.”

With the stability of the housing market and the economy fluctuating drastically in recent years, occupations with specialized skills and heavy ties to the community fared the best. According to the analysis by Ancestry, top occupations for home ownership in the United States for 2012 are as follows:

Optometrists: 90%
Toolmakers and Die Makers/Setters: 88%
Dentists: 87%
Power Station Operators: 87%
Forgemen and Hammermen: 84%
Inspectors: 84%
Firemen: 84%
Locomotive Engineers: 84%
Airplane Pilots and Navigators: 83%
Farmers: 81%

“Firemen, dentists and farmers all play integral roles in their local community, so perhaps the need to root in the communities they serve has played a role in home ownership,” Godfrey said. “Firefighters have a deep love for the community they serve, farmers are tied to the land and optometrists and dentists have spent their careers building a clientele list tied to the community. It could also be a case of raising their families in the same homes they were raised in and their parents before them.”

Lower rates of home ownership.

From a list of nearly 200 occupations, the rate of home ownership in 2012 is as low as 23% for certain job types. While the professions with the very highest rate of home ownership weren’t necessarily those with the biggest paychecks, the majority of the professions with the worst rates of home ownership have a mean hourly wage of $13 or less. Job stability and job security also played a large role in how likely those in a given profession were to own a home.

As expected, many of the lowest ranking occupations don’t require higher education including cleaners, waiters, counter workers and cashiers–and have lower job stability. Though surprising at first, members of the armed forces are less likely to own a home due to ability/requirement to live on base, possible deployment or the average age skewing younger. The following are occupations with the lowest rate of home ownership in 2012:

Dancers and Dance Teachers: 23%
Motion Picture Projectionists: 27%
Waiters and Waitresses: 27%
Counter and Fountain Workers: 28%
Members of the Armed Forces: 33%
Service Workers (except private households): 34%
Bartenders: 35%
Charwomen and Cleaners: 35%
Cashiers: 36%
Cooks (except private households): 36%

Owning a home has been the dream of working men and women in the United States from the nation’s founding. For people from tool makers to optometrists to dancers, home ownership continues to be part of the American dream. To learn more about the Ancestry analysis of home ownership and occupation, visit http://ancstry.me/1ywaIkB.

____________________

SOURCE: Ancestry.com Operations Inc.

photo credit: MarkMoz12 via photopin cc

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – 14 Oct 2014

Sorry for the large gap. I’m in the process of doing some experimental performance of this site which has demanded much of my attention in the past couple of weeks. Finally, though, here are the FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to October 14, 2014.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions
Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

Australia

Belgium

Canada

Colombia

Ghana

India

Indonesia

Italy

New Zealand

Slovakia

Spain

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Australia

Bermuda

Canada

Hungary

Netherlands

United Kingdom

United States

My top ten: Best world-wide genealogy and ancestry websites.

After almost twenty years of genealogy research, there are certain sites that have become my ‘go to’ sites for certain aspects of my genealogy research. I thought it might be helpful for me to post my list of my top ten genealogy and ancestry websites.
Internet Archive

Internet Archive Search

I have also included a description of the reasons why these sites have proved invaluable to me. If you’re looking for information in these areas, be sure to check out these sites.

The headings are links to the sites described and paid sites are indicated by ($) following the heading.

1.  FamilySearch.org

Maintained and updated by the LDS (Latterday Saints) Church, this site has been invaluable for all of my time researching my family’s genealogy. In the past few years in particular, the databases have expanded substantially as the LDS organization works to digitize more and more information. Recently, the search feature has become much more effective and accurate. No matter what country, region or time frame you are researching, this is a wonderful site. Best of all, it is free.

2.  Ancestry.com ($)

Ancestry.com is a favorite for all of the reasons listed for FamilySearch.org, the only difference being that a paid subscription is required. Although I do use Ancestry.com a great deal, I plan my research so I don’t have to remain subscribed all of the time. As I research and find gaps, I keep a ‘to do’ list and when it is large enough to warrant the cost, I will subscribe for as long as I think is necessary, tackle my list, and cancel the subscription when I have completed my list. It has been almost a year since I last subscribed because I’ve been finding a substantial amount of information elsewhere. I am due to subscribe pretty soon to tackle my current ‘to do’ list.

If you’re looking for one paid site that provides extensive data from around the world, this is the one.

3.  Cyndi’s List

Cyndi’s List is the largest site that offers extensive links to genealogy sites and resources on the internet. Cyndi has worked tirelessly for decades creating this site of over 300,000 links – sorted, categorized and constantly updated to maintain currency and functionality.

Recently, however, Cyndi’s List has been the target of a hacker who stole her entire site, making minor changes to ‘make it their own’ and attempting to divert revenue to themselves. Be sure the site you’re visiting is actually Cyndi’s List and help protect her extensive investment and our valuable resource.

4.  Olive Tree Genealogy

Olive Tree Genealogy is an extensive portal of links to valuable data and genealogy research information around the world. Although I do find this site somewhat confusing and difficult to navigate, my investment of time and effort has proved valuable as I have found wonderful, obscure data that I was unable to find elsewhere.

5.  Foundation for Medieval Genealogy

You should have seen my surprise when my husband’s ancestry connected directly to nobles and royalty in the medieval period. For the longest time this was a vast brick wall for me as there is very little quality data available online for researching this time.

I can’t remember how I found this site, but it’s an amazing resource as it’s extensively researched and sourced. The sources are described in detail and where there are questions about the data, they make it clear so we can note these gaps and questions in our own research. Where they have drawn conclusions from the existing evidence they examine the evidence and describe their conclusions.

6.  Directory of Royal Genealogical Data: University of Hull

This is another well researched site about royal genealogy from the University of Hull in England that also covers the medieval period, but they are not as clear about the quality of their sources, the evidence they’ve used to form their conclusions and the reasons they formed the conclusions leading to the published genealogy.

7.  Internet Archive

Besides finding and sourcing dates and events, I also enjoy finding the details of the lives of our ancestors through written accounts. Access to these publications has helped immensely with writing this blog by enabling me to understand the circumstances and times in which our ancestors lived.

Internet Archive tops Google E-Books on this list because it is totally free.

8.  Google E-Books

Google E-Books is essentially a site offering paid and free access to public domain written materials and books with a very accurate, intuitive search feature. If you use the link in the heading, however, it is possible to search only titles available for free access and download. To find free titles, be sure to check ‘Full View’ when conducting a search.

9.  Rootsweb

This is a free site offered by Ancestry.com. It’s a valuable resource for providing free access to user input data and family trees. Although I don’t entirely trust the data offered on this site for the simple reason that it is made up from ‘user input’, it has been very valuable to me when encountering those frustrating brick walls. I use the information here as ‘clues’ which have helped me break through those brick walls.

This data is recognizable in my Blythe Database because I do not enter sources or indicate very poor quality sources. Those using my database should interpret these facts as questionable at best.

10.  GeneaBloggers

GeneaBloggers was the genius idea of offering a directory of genealogy blogs. When I have some time on my hands and just want to explore what others are doing and saying, I start at GeneaBloggers.

Have fun checking out these sites!

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates – 29 Sep 2014

The following is the list of FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates to date, September 29, 2014.

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates

FamilySearch.org Additions and Updates

Belgium

China

Finland

France

Czechoslovakia

India

Indonesia

Italy

Korea

Nicaragua

Portugal

Spain

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

Ancestry.com Additions and Updates

Canada

England

photo credit: WA State Library via photopin cc

Sign of the times: Ancestry.com killing local genealogy societies?

To me, the new article I discovered today on the Simcoe Reformer website illustrates a disturbing trend in which the larger, conglomerate sites such as Ancestry.com are killing local genealogy societies.
online genealogy websites killing local genealogy societies?

Are large online genealogy websites killing local genealogy societies?

I must admit, I’ve never been one to do physical research. As one whose personal income depended on computers, the internet and their use on the job, I began my genealogy research twenty years ago using the internet almost exclusively. My timing was just right as there was an influx of information being indexed online and I was able to take advantage as I progressed in my research.

Admittedly, I would hit frequent brick walls, but the scope of my research was so extensive, I would just shelve that brick wall, move on to something else, and come back to it later with the hope something had been put online that would allow me to break down that brick wall.

According to the above mentioned article, the Norfolk chapter of the Ontario Genealogical Society will be holding a sad but important meeting to discuss the organization’s chances of survival into the future. With a membership that has dropped by almost 50% over several years, and this is easily attributed to the mass availability of genealogy data online with large sites such as Ancestry.com. There’s no longer much reason to do physical research in local repositories, libraries and genealogy societies.

As sad as this seems, it is a sign of progress and global accessibility to all information, which is as it should be – giving everyone with computers and internet connections equal access.

The only part about this that bothers me is, what will happen to the collections held by these organizations? My hope is that there will still be regional organizations in the larger city centers and these collections can be transferred, care for and made available to the general public at these venues.

Living in Chilliwack, British Columbia, I would have no problem traveling to Vancouver if the local collections were transferred to the larger city. For those times when we have to research areas not indexed online, it would be well worth making the periodic trip.

photo credit: agahran via photopin cc

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates – 20 Sep 2014

Following are the latest FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com additions and updates since my last update post of September 11, 2014.

 

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates – 20 Sep 2014

FamilySearch.org

Argentina

Belgium

Brazil

Canada

Colombia

Czechoslovakia

Indonesia

Italy

Peru

Philippines

Spain

United Kingdom

United States

 

Ancestry.com

Canada

United Kingdom

United States