Category: History

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 17 Feb 2019.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 17 Feb 2019.

The following are the most recent updates and additions on the Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org sites.

You will likely have noticed that these posts ceased over the past two months. Aside from the fact that Ancestry.com seemed to have stopped updating, my own health was an issue and I made the ‘executive’ decision to take time off.

You can consider this post to be me ‘dipping my toe in the water’ once again.

I do intend to keep this up to the best of my ability, so be sure to look for the next updates at the end of February

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 17 Feb.

 

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Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 17 FebAncest.

 

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Transcription: Parish Registry of Births and Baptisms of Lytham, Lancaster 1822.

Transcription: Parish Registry of Births and Baptisms of Lytham, Lancaster 1822.

The following is my transcription of the Parish Registry of Births and Baptisms of Lytham, Lancaster for 1822.

A true and perfect copy of the Parish Registry of Lytham in the County of Lancaster from the first day of January to the thirty first day of December 1822.

Children and parents names     place of abode     profession     When born     When baptized     By Whom

Sarah Daughter of Isaac and Betsey Teeling     Lytham     Sailor     Decr 17th 1821     Jany 13th 1822     P. J. Lister
Agnes Daughter of John and Sarah Corwen      Do     Labourer     Decr 8th 1821     Jany 13th 1822     P. J. Lister
James Son of Thos and Alice Whiteside     Lytham     Weaver     Decr 18th 1821     Jany 27th 1822     P. J. Lister
Isabelle Daughter of Thos and Betty Greenbank     Lytham     Labourer     Oct 14th 1821     Jany 10th 1822     P. J. Lister
Willm & Ellen Son & Daughter of Robt and Magdalene Fox     Lytham     Bricklayer     Jany 11th 1822     Feby 17th     P. J. Lister
Sarah Daughter of George and Sarah Pearson     Lytham     Shoemaker     Jany 25th     Feby 24th P. J. Lister
James Son of Thomas and Margaret Fox     Lytham     Joiner     Jany 30th     March 17th     P. J. Lister
Thomas Son of Richard and Mary Wilking     Lytham     Labourer     Feby 9th     March 17th     P. J. Lister
Willm Son of Robert and Ellen Knowles     Do     Sailor     Feby 13th     March 17th     P. J. Lister
Margaret Daughter of James and Betty Atkinson     Lytham     Labourer     March 14th     April 14th      Wm Barton
John Son of John and Mary Fell     Do     Sailor     Feby 25th     April 21st     P. J. Lister
Robt Son of Richd and Betty Webster     Lytham     Farmer     March 16th     April 21st     P. J. Lister
Alice Daughter of Christn and Betty Whiteside     Do     Sailor     April 6th     April 28th Wm Barton
James Son of Alice Jamison and John Kirk     Lytham     Labourer     April 14th     May 5th     P. J. Lister
Jane Daughter of James and Betty Ormond     Lytham     Husbandman     April 11th     May 19th     Wm Barton
Betty Daughter of Robert and Marjery Singleton     Do     fisherman     April 19th May 19th Wm Barton
Emmelin Daughter of Barnaby and Alice Whiteside     Lytham      Weaver     May 30th     June 23d     Wm Barton
Maryanne Daughter of James and Betty Cortmell     Do     Mariner     May 31st     June 23d     Wm Barton
Ellen Daughter of Joseph and Sarah Cortmell     Lytham     fisherman     May 24th     June 30th     Wm Barton
John Son of Willm and Ann Marshall     Do     Gentleman     May 30th     June 3d     P. J. Lister
Carolina Daughter of Jane Cookson & Wm Moorehouse     Do     Butcher     June 27th Augt 11th     P. J. Lister
Jane Daughter of Willm and Grace Wade     Lytham     fisherman     June 23d     Augt 11th     P. J. Lister
Jane Daughter of Francis and Margaret Fox     Do     Bricklayer     July 12th     Augt 11th     P. J. Lister
Peggy Daughter of Thomas and Mary Rimmer     Lytham     Sailor     Augt 18th     Sept 8th     P. J. Lister
Hannah Daughter of John and Ellen Breckall     Lytham     Weaver     Sept 14th     Sept 22d     G. L. Spencer
Cornelius Son of John and Magdalane Cordwell     Peel     Farmer     Sept 7th     Oct 6th         P. J. Lister
Thomas Son of George and Ellen Miller     Lytham Husbandman     Sept 15th     Oct 13th     Wm Barton
Sarah Daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Ditchfield     Do     Innkeeper     Sept 3d     Sept 5th     P. J. Lister
James Son of Richard and Jane Worthington     Lytham     Labourer     Oct 2d     Oct 27     P. J. Lister
Charles Frederick Clifton Son of Thomas Joseph Clifton Esqr of Lytham Hall Lancashire and Hetty his wife was born at Hatch Court in the County of Somerset     June 17th     June 25th     Samuel Fisher
Betty Daughter of Robert and Sarah Hesketh     Lytham    Labourer     Sept 19th     Nov 3d     Wm Barton
Jenny Daughter of Thos and Jane Wade     Peel        Husbandman    Sept 14th     Nov 17th     Wm Barton
Thomas Son of John and Margaret Cookson     Lytham     Husbandman     Nov 15th     Dec 15th     Wm Barton     Offitg Minister

 

 

____________________

The complete original scans of the documents clips above can be accessed by clicking the images.

To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search linkand the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the top menu.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.

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Unravelling the mysteries behind one of Canada’s oldest cemeteries.

Unravelling the mysteries behind one of Canada’s oldest cemeteries.

I had to post this article as soon as I saw it. Visiting this graveyard was one of the best family experiences we’ve ever had – and it was a great opportunity to explore our own family history.

As a matter of fact, the tour guide, Alan Melanson and I are 7th great grandchildren of Charles Mellanson and Marie Dugas (Charles was a son of the original Melanson couple – Pierre and Priscilla.)

Stuart, Erin and Alan Melanson in graveyard.
My children, Erin and Stuart, sit through an enthralling tale told by fellow ‘Melanson’ cousin, Alan Melanson, the very informative and entertaining tour guide.

It’s been a century since Fort Anne became Canada’s first administered national historic site, but much of the history surrounding the once hotly contested grounds in Annapolis Royal, N.S., is still shrouded in mystery.

On Monday, a team of researchers hope to use new technology to unlock some of the old secrets buried within Fort Anne’s Garrison Graveyard, which is one of the oldest English cemeteries in Canada.

“To understand where we’re going, we need to understand where we’ve been,” said Ted Dolan, Parks Canada’s site and visitor experience manager for historic sites in southwestern Nova Scotia.

“Any additional information that we have as to what happened on our landscape in the past is really going to inform us as to who we are and where we come from.”

Dolan describes Fort Anne as “the most fought-over piece of land in Canadian history since European colonization.” Originally fortified by the Scots as early as 1629, the site was later taken over by the French, before it fell to British troops in 1710. It would remain a regular battle scene for another 50 years.

While over 200 British headstones still stand in the Garrison Graveyard, Dolan said researchers believe there could be more than 2,000 people buried at the site whose wooden markers have since decayed over time.

In addition, prior to 1710, Dolan said French soldiers and Acadians from the region were buried at the nearby St. Jean-Baptiste parish, which had a cemetery located close to the fort.

While researchers aren’t completely sure where the French and Acadian cemetery is, he said they have a “pretty good idea. . .”

Read on . . .

Source: Unravelling the mysteries behind one of Canada’s oldest cemeteries | CTV News Atlantic

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Dec 1918.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Dec 1918.

The following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Dec 1918.

You may have noticed that the usual FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com updates post from mid-October did not appear. This was due to a much reduced quantity to list. The few between October 1st and October 31st have been included in the list below.

In future, the only scheduled updates and additions posts will be the ones on the first of the month. However, if the quantity of links warrant it, there could be an additional post at the mid-month.

 

FamilySearch.org updates and additions.

Canada

Costa Rica

Honduras

Germany

New Zealand

Peru

Portugal

South Africa

United Kingdom

United States

 

Ancestry.com updates and additions.

Canada

Germany

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

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Scientists confirm world’s oldest natural mummy is Native American ancestor.

Scientists confirm world’s oldest natural mummy is Native American ancestor.

Researchers recently concluded that a 10,000-year-old skeleton in Nevada, believed to belong to the world’s oldest naturally preserved mummy, represents that of an ancestor of a modern-day Native American tribe.

According to SlashGear, the so-called “Spirit Cave mummy” was originally thought to be the skeleton of an individual that belonged to the “Paleoamerican” group that predated Native Americans in North America. However, that theory was disproven by the scientists behind the new research, who extracted DNA from the prehistoric skull and concluded, based on analysis of the DNA, that the mummy was actually an ancestor of the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone tribe in Nevada.

A report from the Guardian further noted that the Spirit Cave mummy, which was first discovered in 1940, was the skeleton of an adult male who died at around 40-years-old. The individual, who was wearing moccasins at the time he was buried, was wrapped in reed mats and a rabbit-skin blanket. The research on the mummy was conducted with the assistance and approval of the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone tribe, which reburied the skeleton this summer after a “decades-long legal dispute” with scientists over whether it should be kept in a museum or given a proper reburial.

“[It] confirms what we have always known from our oral tradition and other evidence – that the man taken from his final resting place in Spirit Cave is our Native American ancestor,” the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe said in a statement.

University of Cambridge evolutionary geneticist Eske Willerslev, who led the team that performed DNA sequencing on the Spirit Cave mummy, attended the reburial ceremony earlier this year and recalled to the Guardian that there was a lot of “crying, singing, and prayers” involved, as well as the placing of farewell gifts. He described the experience as being similarly emotional as burying a close relative, even if the mummy was originally buried about 10,000 years ago.

Willerslev also said that his team’s analysis proved that it’s too simplistic to base ancestry on the shape of one’s skull, given that the aforementioned theory that the Spirit Cave mummy was Paleoamerican was based on how its skull had a different shape than that of Native Americans.

“Looking at the bumps and shapes of a head does not help you understand the true genetic ancestry of a population – we have proved that you can have people who look very different but are closely related.”

The above research was part of a broader, multinational project on the ancestry of modern-day North and South Americans, which was documented in separate studies published in the journals Science, Science Advances, and Cell. Aside from determining that the world’s oldest natural mummy shares DNA with an existing Native American tribe, the project also revealed that there were two migrations into South America that were not documented in previous studies.

Likewise, the researchers discovered some proof of Australasian ancestry in native South Americans, but found no such traces in native North Americans. Both the Guardian and SlashGear pointed out that this could suggest modern humans arrived in the Americas about 30,000 years ago, far earlier than originally thought.

Read on . . .

Source: Scientists Confirm World’s Oldest Natural Mummy Is Native American Ancestor

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Study reveals common ancestry for all Native Americans.

Study reveals common ancestry for all Native Americans.

The indigenous people of North and South America are collectively known as Native Americans. Despite the European invasion occurring several centuries ago, Native Americans are still subjugated and are yet to find a voice of their own.

One of the reasons for that is a lack of scientific evidence that manages to bring forth their cultural heritage and upbringing in front of the world. While previous anthropologic studies have focused on the timing and number of initial migrations, the subsequent spread of people within the two continents have garnered lesser attention.

As scientists could only describe the peopling of the Americas in broad strokes, plenty of mysteries regarding when and how they spread across still remains a mystery – and is critical to understand their historical lineage.

Two independent studies, one being published in the journal Science and the other in Cell, have sequenced 15 and 49 ancient human genomes, dating back around 10,000 years. Prior to these studies, only six genomes older than 6000 years from the Americas had been sequenced, leading to oversimplification of genetic models that were used to explain the peopling of the Americas.

The genomes of the current study spanned from Alaska in North America to Patagonia in South America. The teams worked with government agencies and indigenous people to identify the samples, extract powder from skeletal material, and extract the DNA necessary to create double-stranded DNA libraries.

The results from the genome sequencing have spawned some very interesting results. The study published in Science, called “Early Humans dispersals within the Americas”, provides evidence of rapid dispersal and early diversification as people moved south, as early as 13,000 years ago. The study sequenced an “Ancient Beringian,” a 9000-year-old remains from Alaska’s Seward peninsula to come to the conclusion that first migrants that entered the Americas from the Bearing strait split into two groups – “Southern Native Americans” and “Northern Native Americans” (also sometimes called Ancestral A and B lineages), who went on to populate the continents . . .

Read on . . .

Source: Study Reveals Common Ancestry for all Native Americans

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Remembrance Day: A civilian’s responsibility?

Remembrance Day: A civilian’s responsibility?

Today being Remembrance Day, I was thinking about a recent post in which I quoted an article exploring how Canadians need to do more for Remembrance Day.

Since then, while watching all the usual Remembrance Day coverage on television, I saw a news report about the increasingly troubled Canadian Legions. Several have closed or are slated to close because of low memberships and revenue.

What really surprised me, was to learn that civilians can become members and reap the same benefits enjoyed by military members and veterans.

Acccording to Toronto.com, “The legion has been losing members at a rate of about 8,000 a year. Part of that is due to death – the largest cohort of members are veterans of the Second World War, a conflict that ended more than 70 years ago – but it has been a challenge to attract and retain veterans of more recent conflicts.”

The Royal Canadian Legion was founded in 1926 to lobby for the needs of veterans returning from the first world war.  That service expanded to include other veterans, including those who’ve never been to war.

Some believe the Canadian Legion has become outdated and no longer represents the military and veterans as they exist in today’s world.

Mark and Stuart in Remembrance Day Parade.
Mark and Stuart in Remembrance Day Parade. c 2000.

A discussion on the subject between my husband, Mark and I caused me to immediately say, “Why don’t we register and get memberships for the kids as Christmas gifts?”

Mark is a veteran, but the others would be civilian memberships.

Then, while researching the subject, I discovered this Global News article about how the veterans themselves feel. I was shocked at how out of touch I have been, especially being the wife and daughter of military veterans.

According to those interviewed for the article:

One of the biggest complaints they have is the number of civilians who are now members. Though most of them mean well, they’re not making the Legion enough of a home for those who’ve served Canada because they don’t understand the military culture.

“There’s a very strict disconnect between what they do, and what we do …”

Also, because of this disconnect, they don’t always provide the services that veterans need — like enough support for those who suffer from PTSD.

Erin in her Air Cadet Uniform
Erin in her Air Cadet Uniform c 2007.

Surely there are ways to include civilians in some of the programs, increasing understanding on both sides? Although a civilian, I am a sufferer of PTSD and a program I could access that is separate from the woefully inadequate mental health system might be a place to start.

I never considered myself out of touch because of my background in the military and veteran cultures. However, as different as veterans and civilians are, there are indeed common circumstances and obstacles we all struggle with.

These articles caused me to doubt my idea of giving civilian memberships as gifts.

Then again, isn’t that a good place to start?

Civilians becoming members would enable learning more about our veterans, and increasing our understanding of each other.

At the very least, some if not all of the endangered legion branches may be saved. This could actually buy time for the legions to update and adapt to today’s veteran and their families.

My genealogy research into the extensive military history of both sides of our family has taught me a great deal and enabled me to become aware of how important it is for civilians to support our veterans – and never forget the sacrifices made in all conflicts, including World War I and World War II.

Related articles:

 

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Canadians need to do more for Remembrance Day | Toronto Sun

Canadians need to do more for Remembrance Day | Toronto Sun

Sunday marks the 100 year anniversary of the Armistice that ended the First World War.

The ceasefire was signed in November 1918 and news of the war’s end was quickly and widely celebrated throughout the British Empire.

World War One was known at the time as “the war to end all wars” and when the Germans finally surrendered, British Prime Minister Lloyd George optimistically stated, “I hope we can say that thus, this fateful morning, came an end to all wars.”

We celebrate Armistice Day, now known as Remembrance Day, to honour the brave men who fought and died to preserve our freedom and our way of life. This despite the sad truth that WWI — a devastating war that left some 40 million dead, including approximately 61,000 members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force — was far from the end of all war.

Less than two decades later, the world found itself engulfed in another catastrophic world war that required millions more to make the ultimate sacrifice to stop the spread of fascism and to protect freedom and democracy worldwide.

In 1921, the Royal British Legion created a campaign called the Poppy Appeal, based on John McCrae’s 1915 poem ‘In Flanders Fields,’ to raise money in support of injured veterans and their families.

The bright red poppy was seen as a symbol of inspiration; the blood-red wildflower grew in the French and Belgian fields that were ripped apart by tanks and artillery and devastated by human carnage during the war.

The poppy represented new life and hope.

My great-grandfather was killed in these fields in 1915, leaving behind his wife and young children in Vancouver, B.C.

The poppy lives on, as a small token of our appreciation to those who did not hesitate to risk everything to protect the things they loved the most.

Read on . . .

Source: MALCOLM: Canadians need to do more for Remembrance Day | Toronto Sun

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The US Midterm elections have made history with these notable firsts | NPR

The US Midterm elections have made history with these notable firsts | NPR

Voters elected the country’s first Muslim congresswomen, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota (left) and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, both Democrats.

Featured image: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

America’s 116th Congress is going to include some prominent firsts — and several governors’ races also made history in these midterms.

The U.S. has ushered in its first Native American and Muslim congresswomen, its first lesbian mom in Congress and the first openly gay man elected as a governor. South Dakota and Maine elected their first female governors, Tennessee and Arizona sent their first women to the Senate, and Massachusetts and Connecticut elected their first black women to the House.

As NPR has previously reported, record numbers of Native Americans, Muslim Americans and women, including many women of color, ran for office in 2018. A “rainbow wave” of LGBTQ candidates also sought office. And after the ballots were cast, all those groups notched notable firsts.

No, voters did not elect the first Native American governor (Paulette Jordan lost in Idaho) or the first openly transgender governor (Christine Hallquist lost in Vermont). And in Georgia, Stacey Abrams’ bid to be the country’s first black female governor is still up in the air — Secretary of State Brian Kemp has a slim lead, but Abrams has not conceded and is pushing for a runoff.

But here are some of the winning candidates who made history on Tuesday:

First openly gay man elected governor, Colorado Democrat Jared Polis defeated Walker Stapleton.

“We proved that we’re an inclusive state that values every contribution regardless of someone’s sexual orientation or gender identity,” Polis said during his victory speech, according to Denver’s CBS4 TV station. “For the LGBTQ pioneers … who endured so much hardship and hurt to make it possible for so many of us, myself included, to live and to love openly and proudly, and to the people in this room, I want to say I am profoundly grateful for all the work we’ve done to overcome.”

New Jersey’s former Gov. Jim McGreevey came out as gay as he resigned.
Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, who is bisexual, became the first openly LGBT governor elected when she won her office in 2016.

Polis’ partner, Marlon Reis, and two children, Caspian and Cora, will be moving into the governor’s mansion.”

Polis made millions in e-commerce and backs single-payer health care, set a goal of 100 percent renewable energy by 2040, supports greater distances between oil and gas drilling operations and homes and schools, and wants the state to fund preschool and full-day kindergarten,” writes Bente Birkeland of Colorado Public Radio.

Polis is also Colorado’s first Jewish governor.

Sharice Davids of Kansas (left) and Debra Haaland of New Mexico are the first Native American women elected to Congress.

Davids, a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation, won a competitive race to represent Kansas’ 3rd District. Davids is a lawyer and a former MMA fighter (one of her ads featured her attacking a punching bag).”We have the opportunity to reset expectations about what people think when they think of Kansas,” Davids said in her victory speech, according to The Kansas City Star.

She is also the first openly gay congresswoman from Kansas. “She really feels like the voice for all the LGBT folks in the Midwest,” one LGBT activist told the Star.

Read on . . .

Source: The Midterm Elections Have Made History With These Notable Firsts : NPR

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Wabanaki Collection launched to educate about Maritime Indigenous peoples | CBC News

Wabanaki Collection launched to educate about Maritime Indigenous peoples | CBC News

‘We are all treaty people,’ says curator of a portal aimed at better mutual understanding.

David Perley is the ‘visionary’ First Nations education specialist and Mi’kmaq-Wolastoqey Centre director behind the inception of the Wabanaki Collection, a web portal of Indigenous educational resources. (University of New Brunswick)

The Wabanaki were New Brunswick’s first peoples, but David Perley says many students in the province are graduating from high school without knowing much about them.

“My ancestors identify themselves as Wabanaki people,” Perley said.

“In my language, that means people of the dawn.”

The Wabanaki Confederacy was around long before contact with European settlers, said Perley.

“They were dealing with other Indigenous nations, such as the Mohawks and so on. It was always discussing boundary lines, for example, or the need to have alliances against a common threat, political discussions on what they had to do in terms of internal governance and so on.”

After contact, said Perley, “It became a strong confederacy because of the need to have unity in terms of dealing with settler society.”

One of the resources in the Wabanaki Collection is an interactive map with legends about the formation of various geographical features. It was contributed by the Abbe Museum in Bar Harbor, Maine. (The Abbe Museum)

The director of the Mi’kmaq-Wolastoqey Centre at the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton said textbooks make barely a reference to Wabanaki history, let alone the culture and traditions that have been passed down for thousands of years.

The centre has launched a new online resource to try to rectify that.

It’s available to anyone looking for information about Indigenous peoples of the Maritimes.

Perley said the project was spawned by the many requests he used to get — dating back to the 1990s — from students and teachers looking for reliable reference material.

At the time, there was little to be found.

“And especially not any resource that was written by or produced by Wabanaki people — the Wolostoqiyik, the Mi’kmaq, the Passamaquoddy and the Abenakis,” Perley said during an interview with Information Morning Fredericton . . .

Read on . . .

Source: Wabanaki Collection launched to improve education about Maritime Indigenous peoples | CBC News

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Descendants of honor: Ancestry.com opens records for Veterans Day.

Descendants of honor: Ancestry.com opens records for Veterans Day.

Ancestry.com is honoring customers who are descendants of US Medal of Honor recipients, as the country prepare for Veterans Day.

The Ancestry campaign makes its collection of more than 250 million military records available for free to the public through November 12. The collection includes draft cards, service records, and prisoner and casualty lists for military heroes worldwide.

“Ancestry is committed to honoring and sharing the stories of America’s heroes, who come from all over the world,” said Vineet Mehra, executive vice president and chief marketing officer at Ancestry.

“We encourage everyone to discover the military heroes in their family, which is why we have provided free access to our unparalleled collection of military records this Veterans Day. Through these records people can uncover the incredible stories that lie in their family’s past, and honor those heroes this Veterans Day.”

Of the 72 living recipients of the Medal of Honor, four earned the award in World War II, five in the Korean War, 51 in the Vietnam War, and 12 in the War in Afghanistan.

Two earned their medal while serving in the US Air Force, 50 in the US Army, 12 in the US Marine Corps, and eight in the US Navy.

It’s been 157 years since the Medal of Honor was created.

“The President, in the name of Congress, has awarded more than 3,400 Medals of Honor to our nation’s bravest Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen since the decoration’s creation in 1861 . . .”

Read on . . . 

Source: brandchannel: Descendants of honor: Ancestry.com opens records for Veterans Day.

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Transcription: The marriage of Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys.

Transcription: The marriage of Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys.

The following is my transcription of the written record of the marriage of Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys on May 19, 1693 at Merion Monthly Meeting in Pennsylvania.

48

37   Whereas Abel Thomas of Meirion in the County of Philadelphia Bathelor and Elizabeth Humphreys of the aforesaid Township and County sign for having declared their intention of Marriage with each other before several meetings of the ???? of God called Shakers m Haveford according to good order ???? amongst them whose proceedings hereing a deliberate confedration there of consent of part as in Relations Concerned, being Clear of all others there aproved of by the sd meetings Now these are to Certify all whom it may Concern that for the full accomplishment of theirs Intentions this Nineteenth day of the third month vulgarly called May in the year according to ye English account one thousand six hundred neinty and three, They, the said Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys appeared in a solemn publick assembly of the aforesaid people ???? to go therfor that and a purpose in their publick meeting plans at meirion and in a solemn manner according to example of the Holy men of God ???????? in the scripture of ????? He ye is Abel Thomas taking the Elizabeth Humphreys by the hand, did solemnly declare as followeth viz I do heare in the presence of God and this Asembly I do take Elizabeth Humphrys to be my wife and do promise to be ??? my ???? towards her as becometh a Loving ?? in all Conditions till death separate us And then and there in sd assembly those assem??? Elizabeth Hmphreys did declare as followeth viz In the presence of God and this asembly I do take Abell Thomas to my Husband I do promise to be he?? ???? kind Loving wife till deat separate us

And the to Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphrys as further Confirmation thereof in then and there to those prents so? their And in witness whereof have hereunto subscribed our Names

Abell Thomas

Tho. markd

Elizabeth Thomas

The marriage of Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys on May 19, 1693.
The marriage of Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys on May 19, 1693.

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Nov 2018.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Nov 2018.

The following are the Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Nov 2018.

Featured image: House in Lesotho.

FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Nov 2018.

 

Canada

Chile

Dominican Republic

France

French Polynesia

Germany

Iceland

Ireland

Italy

Lesotho

Liberia

New Zealand

Peru

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com updates and additions to 1 Nov 2018.

Yet again, there is nothing new over the past two weeks.

I will keep checking to see if Ancestry.com starts showing these additions and updates to their site.

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Transkribus system makes breakthrough in understanding medieval texts | Euronews

Transkribus system makes breakthrough in understanding medieval texts | Euronews

How do you find a text in ancient manuscripts, and do it fast? Until recently, computers weren’t very good in reading handwritten scripts — but now artificial intelligence has produced a breakthrough.

The Tyrolean State Archive in Innsbruck stores countless documents dating from the 11th century onwards — mostly official records, legal documents and other important handwritten documents from the past. Transcribing these books isn’t easy. But this archive is working with scientists to automate the transcription using cutting-edge computer technologies.

“With difficult scripts I believe the new technique will have problems. But with relatively nice calligraphy, the new system has great advantages and helps us a lot,” says the Director of the archive, Christoph Haidacher.

To digitise such books, scientists working on a European research project, READ, designed a simple-to-use system based on a specially-developed smartphone application: it detects when pages are turned and automatically takes high-resolution photos of each page.

“We use, of course, a combination of low-tech and high-tech. A dark tent is a relatively simple, low-tech accessory. But it works with a high-tech app running on a smartphone that is connected to the Transkribus platform: the app uploads the images to the server that performs the recognition of the handwritten text,” says the READ project co-ordinator & Researcher in Digitalisation & Digital Preservation at the University of Innsbruck, Dr. Guenter Muehlberger.

Transkribus simplifies tasks that would often take years of work, helping scholars with complex handwritings and unusual layouts. It is currently being used to transcribe the 500-page “Hero Book“, the most significant anthology of Medieval German texts commissioned by Maximilian I in early 16th century.

Read on . . .

Source: Transkribus system makes breakthrough in understanding medieval texts | Euronews

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Researchers unveil findings of Thibodaux massacre | Houmatoday.com

Researchers unveil findings of Thibodaux massacre | Houmatoday.com

This article is of great interest to me because Henry Schuyler Thibodaux, the founder of Thibodaux, Louisiana, is my third cousin, 6 times removed.

We have numerous common ancestors resulting from the close knit nature of the Acadian and Cajun communities.

The closest of them, all being ninth great-grandparents of mine include: Vincent Brun and Marie Renée Breau, Étienne Emanuel Hébert and Marie Anne Gaudet, and François Gautrot.

________________

Researchers revealed their findings Wednesday in their efforts to unlock the mystery of an American tragedy more than 130 years in the making and said more work is needed.

On Nov. 23, 1887, at least 30 people lost their lives during a racially motivated attack carried out by a mob of white men against black sugar plantation workers protesting a wage system that effectively kept them tied to the farms where they worked.

Although no one knows for sure how many people lost their lives during what became known as the Thibodaux Massacre, historians estimate 30-60 were murdered during the day-long attack.

Laura Browning, who’s assisting in the research of the historical documents associated with the massacre, read a first-hand account of that infamous day.

“On Wednesday morning of Nov. 23, 1887, about five o’clock, I heard a shot fired,” Browning read. “A moment later I heard two more fired after the other.”

The burial site of the victims wasn’t recorded. But through oral histories, it’s believed the property of the American Legion Post 513 in Thibodaux is possibly the site of the mass burial.

John DeSantis, author of the book “The Thibodaux Massacre: Racial Violence and the 1887 Sugar Cane Labor Strike,” said much of the information we have from that time period was passed down from person to person.

“In situations like this oral history is sometimes all that you have, especially when it comes to a mass burial of people who were killed under extremely spurious circumstances,” DeSantis said.

The aim of the project is to not only locate and identify victims’ remains but hopefully give them a proper burial as well, researchers said.

Read on . . .

Related posts you might like:

Melansons and the Acadian Expulsion
A breakthrough in the mysterious Melanson genealogy?
Pierre dit Laverdure and Priscilla Mellanson – A Family Mystery
The Bourgs of Acadia
My list of the best genealogy links for Acadian research.

___________________

Data and sources for some individuals mentioned in this and related articles can be found on Blythe Genealogy – my genealogy data site.

You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

Source: Researchers unveil findings of Thibodaux Massacre

 

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How Europe’s royal families are all related, share single ancestor | Insider

How Europe’s royal families are all related, share single ancestor | Insider

Almost all the royal families of Europe are related to each other. This family tree shows how they share a single ancestor.

Royals in Norway, Sweden, Denmark, The Netherlands, and Monaco are related to each other and to the UK royal family, including Queen Elizabeth II.

Almost all of Europe’s royal families are related.

These families share a common ancestor: King George II, who was the King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1727 until 1760.

Here is how the royal families of Spain, Monaco, the UK, the Netherlands, Sweden, and more are related.

The royal families of Europe are vast and diverse, with each family possessing different titles and powers.

But one thing they do have in common is a shared ancestor.

While the family trees are complicated, and there are many ways that Europe’s royals are all related to each other, one of the simplest is to look at King George II, who was the King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1727 until 1760.

George’s ancestors now head Europe’s royal families, as his children and grandchildren married royals from around the continent.

Read on . . .

Source: How Europe’s royal families are all related, share single ancestor – INSIDER

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What does Elizabeth Warren’s ‘native’ ancestry mean?

What does Elizabeth Warren’s ‘native’ ancestry mean?

On Monday, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) released results from DNA testing, suggesting she has Native American ancestry and thrusting the issue of genetic testing and Native American identity into the spotlight.

The DNA report comes after years of political back-and-forth exchanges between Warren and Republican opponents, who accuse her of pretending to have Native American blood to further her law career. A DNA “fact check” on a political debate would have seemed like science fiction even a few election cycles ago. Even today, though, DNA ancestry testing is not as simple as it might seem, especially when it comes to the search for a Native American identity. [How Do DNA Ancestry Tests Really Work?]

“It’s important to be thinking about where community and culture is derived from,” said Matthew Anderson, a geneticist at The Ohio State University, who is of Eastern Cherokee descent. “It’s not the DNA.” . . .

Read on . . .

Source: What Does Elizabeth Warren’s ‘Native’ Ancestry Mean?

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Long after they died, military sees surge in identifications.

Long after they died, military sees surge in identifications.

Nearly 77 years after repeated torpedo strikes tore into the USS Oklahoma, killing hundreds of sailors and Marines, Carrie Brown leaned over the remains of a serviceman laid out on a table in her lab and was surprised the bones still smelled of burning oil from that horrific day at Pearl Harbor.

Featured image: Unidentified soldiers’ remains returning home.

It was a visceral reminder of the catastrophic attack that pulled the United States into World War II, and it added an intimacy to the painstaking work Brown and hundreds of others are now doing to greatly increase the number of lost American servicemen who have been identified.

It’s a monumental mission that combines science, history and intuition, and it’s one Brown and her colleagues have recently been completing at ramped-up speed, with identifications expected to reach 200 annually, more than triple the figures from recent years.

“There are families still carrying the torch,” said Brown, a forensic anthropologist with the Defence POW/MIA Accounting Agency’s lab near Omaha, Nebraska. “It’s just as important now as it was 77 years ago.”

Officials believe remains of nearly half of the 83,000 unidentified service members killed in World War II and more recent wars could be identified and returned to relatives. The modern effort to identify remains started in 1973 and was primarily based in Hawaii until a second lab was opened in 2012 at Offutt Air Force Base in the Omaha suburb of Bellevue.

With an intensified push, the identifications climbed from 59 in 2013 to 183 last year and at least 200 and possibly a few more this year . . .

Read on . . .

Source: Long after they died, military sees surge in identifications

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 17 Oct 2018.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 17 Oct 2018.

The following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 17 Oct 2018.

Featured image: Piazza Vittoria, Torino, Italy

FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 17 Oct 2018.

 

Australia

Belgium

Canada

Chile

Colombia

France

Germany

Italy

South Africa

Spain

Sweden

United States

 

Ancestry.com updates and additions to 17 Oct 2018.

  • No recent updates to date.

 

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In their honour, we publish their names | Maclean’s

In their honour, we publish their names | Maclean’s

Maclean’s has published more than 66,000 covers, each one dedicated to an individual Canadian who died in the First World War.

Featured image: The statue known as Mother Canada looks out over Vimy Ridge as part of the memorial commemorating Canadian war losses near Arras, France.

If you hold a paper version of Maclean’s, consider closing this issue for a moment to read the dedication on the cover. You’ll find the name of a Canadian serviceman or woman whose life was snuffed out more than a century ago in what became known as the “Great War.”

Where possible, we also list their rank, age and date of death. But even such tombstone details for thousands of soldiers were lost in the chaos of war or the mists of time.

This compounds the tragedy of Canada’s deadliest war, for surely we owe them this: respect for their courage, and remembrance for their ultimate sacrifice; lessons written in blood and, as history shows, too easily forgotten.

And so, you hold a name . . .

Read on . . .

Source: In their honour, we publish their names

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Hitler’s descendant, living on Long Island, says he dislikes Trump | Business Insider

Hitler’s descendant, living on Long Island, says he dislikes Trump | Business Insider

We tracked down one of Hitler’s last living family members on Long Island and found he likes Merkel and dislikes Trump
Three brothers living on Long Island, New York, are believed to be the last living family members of Adolf Hitler.The brothers rarely share details about their family or give interviews to the press.

A reporter from Bild tracked down the brothers and spoke with one of them, learning that he approves of German Chancellor Angela Merkel and dislikes US President Donald Trump.

There’s an American flag raised in the front yard of brothers Brian and Louis’ place. It’s a typical sight for this neighborhood on Long Island, New York. One difference, however, is that a 6-foot-high wooden wall, painted white, almost completely surrounds the property.

The men who live here have a secret. They are the last Hitlers.

In the town of 20,000 people, hardly anybody knows about this. The brothers keep their secret to themselves.

The family changed its name in 1946 – first to “Hiller,” later to an English double name. Brian and Louis are the great nephews of the German dictator.

Read on . . .

Source: Hitler’s descendant, living on Long Island, says he dislikes Trump | Business Insider

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A leading Holocaust historian just seriously compared the US to Nazi Germany | Vox

A leading Holocaust historian just seriously compared the US to Nazi Germany | Vox

“If the US has someone whom historians will look back on as the gravedigger of American democracy, it is Mitch McConnell.”

Usually, comparisons between Donald Trump’s America and Nazi Germany come from cranks and internet trolls. But a new essay in the New York Review of Books pointing out “troubling similarities” between the 1930s and today is different: It’s written by Christopher Browning, one of America’s most eminent and well-respected historians of the Holocaust. In it, he warns that democracy here is under serious threat, in the way that German democracy was prior to Hitler’s rise — and really could topple altogether.

Browning, a professor emeritus at the University of North Carolina, specializes in the origins and operation of Nazi genocide. His 1992 book Ordinary Men, a close examination of how an otherwise unremarkable German police battalion evolved into an instrument of mass slaughter, is widely seen as one of the defining works on how typical Germans became complicit in Nazi atrocities.

So when Browning makes comparisons between the rise of Hitler and our current historical period, this isn’t some keyboard warrior spouting off. It is one of the most knowledgeable people on Nazism alive using his expertise to sound the alarm as to what he sees as an existential threat to American democracy.

Browning’s essay covers many topics, ranging from Trump’s “America First” foreign policy — a phrase most closely associated with a group of prewar American Nazi sympathizers — to the role of Fox News as a kind of privatized state propaganda office. But the most interesting part of his argument is the comparison between Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Paul von Hindenburg, the German leader who ultimately handed power over to Hitler.

Here’s how Browning summarizes the history . . .

Read on . . .

Source: A leading Holocaust historian just seriously compared the US to Nazi Germany

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A primer on cemetery research to find ancestors.

A primer on cemetery research to find ancestors.

I’ve always loved gravestone and cemetery research to find ancestors.

Although I do most of my genealogical research via the internet, and in a very small amount via snail mail, there is something visceral about visiting the actual graves of our ancestors and recording the information about them (and their families if in family plots).

In previous posts, I related the story of my family’s genealogical driving tour of Nova Scotia a few years ago. The first was about our exploring a community cemetery and the other was regarding our experience taking the Fort Anne graveyard tour.

When you’re working on researching distant generations of ancestors, cemetery research is one of the most satisfying, hands on forms of genealogical exploration you can do. It’s one way to connect with a tangible reminder of particular ancestors, which is often an elusive feeling.

Finding a tombstone or other sign of the resting place of an ancestor can give you insights into who they were.

Is their tombstone humble or grand?

Does it contain an inscription that speaks of a simple life, of one that hints at a great love story, or a somber and religious disposition?

What dates are inscribed?

The information source is rich, yet locating cemeteries and navigating the research process isn’t always straightforward. Here’s how to get started with genealogical cemetery research.

 

What can I expect to learn from a cemetery?

 

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 22 Aug 2015.

 

It’s important to note that cemeteries and grave markers can be excellent sources of information about the deceased. While they are not primary information sources, they can clarify details such as:

  • an ancestor’s name, including obscure details like maiden names and middle names or even occasionally pet names;
  • date of birth;
  • date of death;
  • names of family members including parents, spouses, and children;
  • religion;
  • military service; and
  • fraternal order membership.

Cemeteries are a wonderful source of information that can confirm what you’ve learned from earlier research. In other cases, you’ll garner information that you didn’t know.

For example, there may be symbolism on a tombstone suggesting that your ancestor was a member of the Masonic Lodge or perhaps they are buried in a Catholic burial ground. Each of these small clues can open up new avenues for research and exploration.

 

How to find out where someone is buried?

 

There are many ways to find where your ancestors are buried.

The first is to look at any records associated with their death, including certificate of death, obituaries, church notices, and other funerary documents. Consulting similar information for spouses, siblings, children, and parents can also sometimes lead you to the right information.

If you know your ancestor’s religious affiliation, it’s possible to find out if there’s a church or community cemetery. Consult local records and histories.

Finally, there are a number of cemetery guides online that can help you locate an ancestor’s gravesite.

You might also want to try billiongraves.com and findagrave.com. They can be very helpful in locating family members and their information.

 

Making the most of a cemetery visit.

 

Whether you’re already near a cemetery where an ancestor is buried or you’re making a special trip, there are several things you’ll want to do to make the most of your visit.

The first is to bring a copy of any information you have about the ancestors, such as names and dates of birth. If you have a map or details of the cemetery, bring those as well, as large burial grounds can be difficult to navigate.

To document as much information as possible, bring paper and writing implements or electronic devices to record information and make any notes.

Consider bringing a digital camera with you to document the cemetery, individual headstones, and the relationship between specific stones that may be useful later.

Avoid taking grave rubbings, if possible. It’s a source of conflict but most people today feel that the risk of damage to the stone is too high. A high resolution camera now yields a wonderful degree of detail.

A final note on the logistics of cemetery visits: dress appropriately for being outdoors, and think ahead to things like bug spray and sunscreen. Wear a hat, and bring plenty of water as your visit may be a lengthy one.

If the cemetery you’re visiting is on private property, get permission first.

If the cemetery in question has a caretaker and you’re able to find them, spend a moment saying hello and explaining your mission. They may have valuable information.

Finally, if you’re headed into a cemetery that’s overgrown, isolated, or in an unknown area, consider bringing a companion for both company and safety.

A professional genealogist can help you with all types of genealogical issues, from completing all your research to answering specific questions about cemetery research.

____________________

Jillynn Stevens is a writer and researcher. She is the Director of Digital Content Marketing for Be Locally SEO where she enjoys helping clients expand and improve their businesses through articles, blogs, website content and more.

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Journey through centuries: An ancestral doppelganger is discovered!

Journey through centuries: An ancestral doppelganger is discovered!

My biggest fascination with my genealogy research is finding old photos of the people – especially any rare ancestral doppelganger to current family members.

An ancestral doppelganger is discovered!
Marshall Matthews Blythe (Mark’s father) c. 2004.

An ancestral doppelganger is discovered!
Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky, c. 1812 – An ancestral doppelganger!

These images bring some life to the profile created by the fact finding of my research and brings these characters closer and makes them more relatable and understandable.

A while ago, while I was researching the Shelby family which included the original Welsh Quaker immigrant Evan Isaac Shelby (8th great grandfather to my father-in-law), his son Brigadier General Evan Shelby (7th great granduncle) and Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky (1st cousin, 8 times removed, and born in 1750),

I was immediately struck by the resemblance between my father-in-law and Governor Isaac Shelby.

Considering this relationship spans seven generations, it is quite amazing!

In another instance, I was doing some research for a friend who was curious about what happened to one mysterious great great aunt who had a past around which there had been rumours. Upon researching, I discovered that she was actually the birth mother of a girl who was raised by another family member, believing this person was her own aunt.

At the time of the child’s birth, this woman worked as a domestic in the home of a wealthy entrepreneur in the late 1800’s and became pregnant, having the child out of wedlock.

Knowing how often the domestics were taken advantage of by the men of the house, I looked into it further, believing he might be the baby’s father. I was sort of surprised (but not too much) to find a picture of this gentleman’s grandson and great-grandson – and there was a definite resemblance! In this case it was not quite as striking, but was there nonetheless around the mouth and eyes.

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