Category: Location

Transcriptions: John P. Keefer; Biographical Annals of Franklin County

Transcriptions: John P. Keefer; Biographical Annals of Franklin County

The following is a transcription of the biographical data and ancestry of John P. Keefer from the Biographical Annals of Franklin County.

BIOGRAPHICAL ANNALS OF FRANKLIN COUNTY.

184

Biography of John P. Keefer
Biography of John P. Keefer

JOHN P. KEEFER. Few men of Franklin county have been more actively identified with the mercantile interests of Chambersburg than Mr. John P. Keefer, a leading dry goods merchant of this city, born in Guilford township, Sept. 7, 1833, a son of John (II) and Hannah (Price) Keefer, deceased, and grandson of Jacob Keefer (I).

  1.   JACOB KEEFER (who was among the very early settlers of Franklin county, was of German ancestry, and had the following family:1.   JACOB.
  1. CHRISTIAN.
  2. DANIEL.
  3. JOHN (II).
  4. CATHERINE married John Snively.
  5. NANCY married John Stauffer.

The old Keefer family was brought up in the faith of the German Baptist Brethren Church.

2.    JOHN KEEFER, father of John P. Keefer, was born ih Guilford township, in 1800, and spent his life farming in his native township. In 1827, he married Hannah Price, who was born, reared and educated at Waynesboro, and they became the parents of four children:

  1. ELIZABETH, deceased, married Franklin Reed.
  2. HENRY married Elizabeth Strickler, and both are deceased.
  3. JOHN P. (III).
  4. DANIEL, deceased.

3.    JOHN P. KEEFER was reared on his father’s homestead and attended the public schools until he was fifteen years of age, when he came to Chambersburg and entered the academy of this city, remaining one year. He then became clerk in a general merchandise store, owned by H. H. Hutz, and so continued until he was twenty-

185

one years of age. He was then made a partner, and the firm continued until after the war, when Mr. Keefer embarked in business for himself, since which time he has steadily grown in public favor, until he ranks among the leading merchants of Chambersburg. He enjoys the distinction of having been in business for forty-eight years, the longest term of any merchant here.

Mr. Keefer married Miss Rebecca Seibert of Chambersburg, daughter of Samuel and Agnes (Grove) Seibert, old settlers of Franklin county. Mr. and Mrs. Keefer became the parents of the following children:

  1. GEORGE G., of York, Pa., married Bertha Mumper, of York county, and they have three children: John, Samuel and Paul.
  2. ALICE married Dr. H. B. Creitzman, of Welsh Run, Pa., and they have one daughter: Mildred.
  3. CHARLES W. is assistant manager of his father’s dry goods business at Chambers-“bur g.
  4. MAURICE W., of Steelton, Pa., married Rose Stewart, and has one son: Stewart.
  5. ANNIE is at home.
  6. FLORENCE is at home.

In politics, Mr. Keefer is a sound Republican, and always supports the platform and candidates of his party, but has been too much occupied with his business affairs, to seek public office, although he is so popular in the city, that there is no doubt but that he could obtain almost any office within the gift of his fellow townsmen. In religious affiliations he is an earnest member of the Lutheran Church of Chambersburg, of which he has been deacon and trustee for many years. His fraternal associations have been of the most pleasant, he being an honored member of the I.O.O.F., and one of the most active supporters of that lodge.

Beginning many years ago, when commercial conditions were so essentially different from those of today, Mr. Keefer built up a business of which any man might well be proud; established a credit for his house that could not be shaken, and has gradually changed his policy to meet changed circumstances. Upon his books can be found names which were written there at the start, for once he gains a customer, it is seldom he loses him. Although he is somewhat advanced in years, Mr. Keefer is as energetic as ever, and superintends every detail of his large business, and ensures the same honorable treatment of all, which has been one of the leading characteristics of the house since its inception.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

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Historical Vital Statistics website of Nova Scotia Archives is searchable in French and English.

Historical Vital Statistics website of Nova Scotia Archives is searchable in French and English.

I have a few favorite, go-to sites that I use much more than any others, and the Nova Scotia Archives site is one. Considering the substantial Acadian ancestry of my family, it’s no surprise that the majority of vital records for the majority of my ancestors are available on this site.

The searchable database of the Nova Scotia Archives contains almost one million names, each of which is linked to a corresponding vital registration, including births, baptisms, deaths and marriages. The records date from the mid-1700’s to the 1960’s, are all digitized and available online, and are searchable in French.

The records can be searched in both French and English on the Historical Vital Statistics website.

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 17 Feb 2019.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 17 Feb 2019.

The following are the most recent updates and additions on the Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org sites.

You will likely have noticed that these posts ceased over the past two months. Aside from the fact that Ancestry.com seemed to have stopped updating, my own health was an issue and I made the ‘executive’ decision to take time off.

You can consider this post to be me ‘dipping my toe in the water’ once again.

I do intend to keep this up to the best of my ability, so be sure to look for the next updates at the end of February

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 17 Feb.

 

Argentina

Australia

Brazil

Canada

Chile

Costa Rica

Czech Republic

Dominican Republic

El Salvador

France

Germany

Italy

Paraguay

Peru

South Africa

Spain

Sweden

Ukraine

United Kingdom

 

United States

Uruguay

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 17 FebAncest.

 

Canada

Germany

Poland

Sweden

United Kingdom

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Genealogy Mystery: Who were Christian W. Keefer’s parents?

Genealogy Mystery: Who were Christian W. Keefer’s parents?

Christian W. Keefer (Chester) is an important figure in one of the main branches of my husband’s and children’s ascendancy. He married Mary Ann Jacques and they eventually settled and raised a family in Dodge County, Wisconsin.

After numerous years of research, however, I’m still left scratching my head at the mystery of the identity of Christian W. Keefer’s parents.

As can be seen in the list of sources I’ve found and logged for Christian (below), you would think that at least one of them would provide some concrete information about his parentage and place of birth, but that turns out to not be the case.

Here’s what I know for sure:

Christian W. Keefer was born October 1, 1811 in Pennsylvania and his family originated from France.

Christian W. Keefer's parents.
Sources for Christian W. Keefer.

That’s it.

I originally took a mention of Philadelphia as Christian’s birthplace in a biography of his son Charles with a grain of salt. I do believe that people did and do tend to describe where they’ve come from by using the nearest, largest center that would be recognized outside the area. For example, although we live in Chilliwack, BC, Canada, we frequently say we’re located near Vancouver to those who are not from the area. Considering this possibility, I would not rule out any birth location in Pennsylvania.

I have considered the possibility that our Christian may be one of the Christians mentioned of the Keefer / Kiefer family in the “Biographical Annals of Franklin County”. I was able to systematically eliminate every Christian mentioned because they could not have been born on or near the birth date of our Christian (Chester), or they married into different families, etc.

Another  possibility I’ve been checking is that his father (and possibly mother as well), may have immigrated to the United States from Germany (or Switzerland), but I’ve been unable to find immigration or naturalization records that show such a connection.

However, the same biography previously mentioned states that he was of French origin.

Through all of my research over the years, every Keefer family is of Germanic origin – except one.

The only family that shows of French origin in the time period is (lo and behold!) actually living in Philadelphia and is that of Anthony and Sarah (Shillingford) Keefer.

At the time, his family was very young with only mention of one brother born in 1810 – Thomas. The earlier births of the children of Anthony and his wife Sarah are about one year apart, leaving a gap just where Christian’s would be.

Keefer, Anthony; family pedigree chart
Family pedigree chart of Anthony Keefer, showing Christian, as I’ve entered it in my database (see http://blythegenealogy.com).

I would love to find proof beyond that of coincidence and speculation of Christian W. Keefer’s parentage. I’d like nothing better than to continue further back in time and expand on this huge Keefer family

If you or anyone you know has any documentation, images, etc. of this Christian Keefer showing his parents and brothers and sisters (or parts thereof), I would dearly love to see them, or better yet, get copies.

Sources:

  1. Biographical Sketches of Old Settlers and Prominent People of Wisconsin: Vol. I (Waterloo, Wis., Huffman & Hyer, 1899); pdf file.
  2. State of Ohio, “Ohio, County Marriages, 1790-1950,” marriage, Family Search (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZ82-6QV: accessed
  3. Death certificate; Charles Keefer;  Digital Folder No.: 4008297; Image No.: 1576; Film Number: 1674527; Certificate No.: cn 23384. (7 June 1933), Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947, State of Illinois; https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQCW-SP5.
  4. FamilySearch.org, “Wisconsin Deaths and Burials, 1835-1968,” database, FamilySearch.org, FamilySearch.org (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XL3P-121: accessed ).
  5. Rootsweb, “Wisconsin Death Records,” database, Rootsweb, Rootsweb (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~keffer/deaths/Wisconsin.htm: accessed ).
  6. Keefer, Christian W., Beaver Dam Argus, Beaver Dam, Dodge County, Wisconsin, , Obituary.
  7. Obituary of Mary Ann (Jaques) Keefer.
  8. 1880 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, Beaver Dam, Dodge, Wisconsin, enumeration district (ED) Enumeration District: 004, Page: 47A, Year: 1880; Census Place: Beaver Dam, Dodge, Wisconsin; Roll: 1422; Family History Film: 1255422, Keefer Christian W.; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com : Internet 13 July 2013).
  9. 1870 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, year: 1870; census place: elba, dodge, wisconsin; roll: m593_1710; page: 165a; image: 338; family history library film: 553209, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, enumeration district (ED) Roll: M593_1710; Image: 337; Family History Library Film: 553209, Page: 164B, Roll: M593_1710; Image: 337; Family History Library Film: 553209, Keefer Christian W; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  10. 1860 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, roll: m653_1405; page: 303; image: 308, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, Page: 303, Roll: M653_1405; Image: 308; Family History Library Film: 805405, Keefer Christian W.; dgs no.: 4298900; image no.: 0038; nara no.: m653, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  11. 1850 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, roll: m432_996;  image: 209, , Page: 104A, Roll: M432_996; Page: 104A; Image: 209, Keefer Christian W.; digital image, Family Search ((http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  12. 1840 US Federal Census, Painesville, Lake, Ohio; digital image, Ancestry.ca, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : accessed ).
  13. 1830 US Federal Census, Antrim, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, age: 395; nara series: m19; roll number: 151; family history film: 0020625; digitalk image, Ancestry.com (http://blythegenealogy.com  : accessed ).
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Transcription: Newbury Marriages; Jaques

Transcription: Newbury Marriages; Jaques

Transcription: Newbury Marriages; Jaques

Newbury Marriages

The following is my transcription of the pages concerning variations of the Jaques / Jacques surname marriages in Newbury, Massachusetts.

Page 256

…(other names)…
JAQUES (see also Jacques), Ann, and Robert Adams, jr., Oct. 29,  1725.*
Benjamin, and Apphia Coffin, May20, 1725.*
Benjamin, and Mary Noyes, Dec. 5, 1727.*
Benjamin, and Mary Adams ofRowley, at Rowley, Mar. 25, 1760.*
Benjamin (jr. int.), and Judith Noyes, Mar. 4, 1762.*
Betsey, and Jacob Hidden, int. Mar. 14, 1812.*
Charles, and Marcy Thurlo, Feb. 5, 1821.*
Daniell, and Mary Williams, Mar. 20, 1692-3.
David, and Dolley Richards of Newburyport, int. Nov. 24, 1804.
Deborah, and Cutting Lunt, Dec. 10, 1735.*
Deborah, and Capt. Israel Adams, Nov. 11, 1779.*
Deborah, and True Brown, jr. of Deerfield, N. H., Feb. 5, 1825.*

Newbury Parish Church
Newbury Parish Church

Page 257

Jaques, Eleanor, and James Noyes, May 7, 1747.*
Eleanor, and Benjamin Short, Dec. 16, 1813.*
Eliphalet, and Lydia Adams, Jan. 3, 1737-8.*
Elisabeth, and Enoch Knight, Nov.11,1736.*
Elisabeth, and Moses Moodey, June 12, 1744.*
Elisabeth, andAmos Knight of Newburyport, Jan. 12,  1797.*
Ellanor, and Benjamin Short, Dec. –, 1808 ? C. R. 1.
Enoch, and Mary Hale, int. Jan.  8, 1772.
Enoch, and Joanna Plumer, Feb. 9, 1797.*
Enoch, jr., and Sally Williams Tilton of Newburyport, May 26, 1811.*
Eunice, and Samuel Pearson, int.Dec. 5,  1767.
Eunice, and Jacob Haskell of Newburyport, Dec. 23, 1819.*
Florence, and James Safford, Apr.  5, 1763.*
Hanna, and Ephraim Plumer, Jan. 15, 1679.
Hannah, and  Ephraim B. Horn, Sept.  21, 1815.*
Henry, and Anne Knight, Oct. 8, 1648.
Henry, and Mrs. Rebecca Pikering of Portsmouth, int. Apr. 10, 1706.
Henry, and Mary Coffin, Jan. 24, 1711-12.*
Henry Cromwell, andPolly Follansbee of Newburyport, int. May9, 1807.
John, and Sarah Jaques, June 12, 1746.*
Joseph, and Martha Brown, Mar. 4, 1756.*
Judeth,  and William Dole, Apr.3, 1755.*
Judith, and Abraham Mace (jr. int.)of Newburyport, Apr. 16, 1795.*
Love, and Robert Adams, 3d, Sept 6m 1738.*
Lydia, and  Capt. Kindal Pearson of Wilmington, Jan. 30, 1737-8.*
Lydia, and Tristram Lunt, Feb. 20, 1799.*
Martha, and Enoch Thurston of Newburyport, May 28, 1794.*
Mary, and Richard Brown, May 7, 1674 (1675. CT. R.)
Mary, and  Parker  Greenleaf, Nov. 24, 1715.*
Mary, and  Samuel Peirce, Oct. 19, 1738.*
Mary, and James Greenough of Bradford, Dec. 13, 1759.*
Mary, of Gloucester, and Simon Thorla, int. Mar. 15, 1770.
Mary, and John Knight, Jan. 12, 1809.*
Mary, and Stephen Adams, jr., Jan. 27, 1814.*
Mary A., of West Newbury, and William Giddings, int.Aug.1, 1846.

Page 258

Jaques, Mehetabel, and Richard Smith, Oct. 11, 1779.*
Moses, and Sarah Woodman, Nov. 4, 1778.*
Moses, and Abigail Hale, Aug. 15, 1782.*
Moses, and Rebekah Hills, July –, 1792.*
Moses, jr., and HannahChase, int. Oct. 27, 1804.
Parker, jr., and Sarah Adams, Dec. 1, 1767.*
Phebby, and Joseph Ilsley, Sept. 3, 1798.*
Prudence, and Edmund Knight, June 11, 1751.*
Rebeckah, and John Dodge of Newburyport, int. Sept. 22, 1804.
Rhoda, and John Loud Tilton, Jan. 25, 1814.*
Richard, and Ruth Plumer, Jan. 18, 1681.
Richard, and Elisabeth Knight, Feb. 25, 1713-14.*
Richard, jr., and Mrs. Judith Noyes, Feb.  19, 1722-3.*
Richard, of Gloucester, and Mary Ilsley, Jan. 13, 1785.*
Richard, and Polly Emerson of Hampstead, N. H., int. May 15, 1792.
Richard, Lt., and Eunise Thurston, Nov. 28, 1799.*
Richard T., and Caroline Noyes, Aug. 20, 1837.*
Ruth, and Stephen Emery, Nov. 29, 1692.
Ruth, and JamesShort, Apr. 19, 1737.*
Sally, of Bradford, and Samuel Jewett, int. Mar. 5, 1814.
Samuel, and Mary Noyes, May  8,  1750.*
Samuel (jr. int.), and Eunice Chase, Aug. 12, 1779.*
Samuell, and Lydiah Pike, Dec. 12, 1717.
Sarah, Mrs. and Moses Little, jr., Feb. 12, 1716-17.*
Sarah, and John Jaques, June 12, 1746.*
Sarah, and Somersby Chase, Apr. 16, 1777.*
Sarah, and Dudley Rogers, jr., of Newburyport, int. Aug. 25, 1798.
Sarah B., and JohnEngland,Dec. 3, 1818.*
Sophia, and John Ladd, Aug. 25, 1814.*
Stephen, jr., and Mrs. Thankfull Taylor of Yarmouth, int. Feb. 21,  1712-13.
Stephen, and Mary Bartlett, July 6,1783.*
Stephen, and Mehitabel Hovey, Nov. 15, 1792.*
Steven, and Debora Plumer, May 13,  1684.
Susanah, and Moses Noyes(jr. int.), May 21, 1738.*
Susannah Newman, and Benjamin Rolf of Portland, int. Apr. 30,  1803.
Theophilus, and Sarah Wood of Newburyport, int. Mar. 14, 1795.

Page 259

Jaques, William, and Lydia Bartlet of Newburyport, int. Mar. 11, 1815.
William, andE lizabeth Savory, May 3,  1815.*
…(other names)…

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

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Transcription: Baptism Register of St. Michael’s Parish, Bassingshawe, London; 1565-1568

Transcription: Baptism Register of St. Michael’s Parish, Bassingshawe, London; 1565-1568

The following is my transcription of the baptism register of St. Michael’s Church parish in Bassingshawe, London England for the dates between 1565 and 1568.

 

Anno

1565

Bassingshawe St. Michaels pishe
Month Dayes Christenings
March 2 was baptized Anne Cotton the Daughter of John Cotton
1565 8 was baptized ???????? Binghame the Daughter of Willm Binghame
30 was baptized Richard Sharbrough the Sonne of Robert Sharbrough
1566
Aprill 7 was baptized Francis Fuller the Sonne of John Fuller mercer
1566 7 was baptized John Myllet the Sonne of John Myllet hos???
10 was baptized Emanuell Nicolles the Sonne of James Nicolls
10 was baptized Allysse Merret the Daughter of John Merrett
25 was baptized Sara Morgan the daughter of St. John Morgan Parson
27 was baptized Marck Horne the Sonne of Robert Horne Grower
28 was baptized Sara Humfrey the daughter of Anthonye Humfrey
Maye 26 was baptized Jone Lodge the Daughter of Thomas Lodge
1566
June 2 was baptized William Baron the Sonne of Richard Baron
1566 2 was baptized James Erithe the Sonne of Robert Erith
2 was baptized Mathewe Pryme the Sonne of William Pryme
23 was baptized Katheryn Bromefeild the daughter of Lanncelott Bromefeild  coryer
30 was baptized Gregorye Caltroppe the Sonne of John Caltroppe tyler
Julye 25 was baptized Katheryn Johnson the daughter of ?orneline Johnson
1566
August 4 was baptized Marye Harbye the daughter of John Harbye
1566 25 was baptized William Hoodson the Sonne of Thomas Hoodson
September 8 was baptized Henrye Smytth the Sonne of John Smyth
1566 8 was baptized Robert Brooke the sonne of Symon Brooke
October 6 was baptized Thomas Nicholle the Sonne of Richard Nicholle
1566 8 was baptized Margarett Lambart Daughter of John Lambart
November 1 was baptized Charles Morton the sonne of Thomas Morton
1566 17 was baptized Anne Holyman the daughter of Richard Holyman
24 was baptized John Sturdyvant the Sonne of John Sturdyvant
December 5 was baptized Andrewe Caltroppe the Sonne of Anthonye Caltroppe
1566 8 was baptized William Smyth the Sonne of Franncis Smyth
26 was baptized MargaretDerham the daughter of Baldwin Derham
Januarye 5 was baptized Alice Ferhar the daughter of Robert Ferhar
1566 19 was baptized Margaret Lowrike the daughter of Thomas Lowrike
Februarye 2 was baptized Martha Carington the daughter of Jarrard Carington
1566
Marche 2 was baptized Thomas Warnar the Sonne of John Warnar
1566 2 was baptized John Addames the Sonne of John Addames
2 was baptized Elizabeth Mayeton the daughter of John Mayeton
23 was baptized Thomas Wyatt the Sonne of Richard Wyatt
24 was baptized Andrewe Sharpe the Sonne of Robert Sharpe mercer
Anno

1567

Bassingshawe St. Michaels pishe
Monethes Dayes Christenings
Aprill 13 was baptized Anne Willemson the daughter of Robert Willemson pewterer
1567 27 was baptized William Wollett the sonne of John Wollett Draper
Maye 4 was baptized John Merest the sonne of John Merest habdasher
1567
June 20 was baptized Marye Humfrey the daughter of Anthonye Humfrey
1567
Julye 16 was baptized John Corke the sonne of Richard Corke Charmdeler
1567 20 was baptized Elizabeth Horne the daughter of Robert Horne
October 5 was baptized Maryte Tanner the daughter of John Tanner mason
1567 19 was baptized Leonard Lemyngton the sonne of John Lemington
19 was baptized Barbara Follow the daughter of John Follow mercer
23 was baptized Franncis Sturdevant the sonne of John Sturdevant
26 was baptized Elizabeth Lane the daughter of George Lane woollcomber
December 30 was baptized Margerye Holyman the daughter of Richard Holyman mercer
1567
Januarye 1 was baptized Clement Lambard the sonne of John Lambard groc.
1567 6 was baptized Alice Caltrope the daughter of Anthonye Caltrope mercer
6 was baptized Edward Brock the sonne of Simon Brock goldsmythe
11 was baptized Richard Hodson the sonne of ??ma? Hodson Shomaker
18 was baptized Margarett Davies the daughter of Roger Davies weaver
Februarye 8 was baptized Roberta Brotton the daughter of Richard Brotton cobler
1567
Marche 21 was baptized Franncis Battman the sonne of Robert Battman minstrell
1567
1568 25 was baptized Thomas Dorant the sonne of Baldwin Dorant mercer
27 was baptized Thomas Loo the sonne of John Loo Grocer
27 was baptized Josephe Lockson the sonne of William Lockson pointmaker
27 was baptized Anne Carington the daughter of Garrard Carington taylor
Aprill 11 was baptized John Evans sonne of Thomas Evans laborer
1568 25 was baptized William Wilde the sonne of Thomas Wilde freemason
25 was baptized Robert Redwood the sonne of John Redwood Brewer
27 was baptized Richard More the sonne of John More Girdler
Maye 9 was baptized John Sutton the sonne of John Sutton Draper
1568 23 was baptized Katheryn Beingam the daughter of William Beingam servingman
June 6 was baptized Jone Truffell the daughter of Gyles Truffell clothworker
1568 6 was baptized Margarett Humfrey the daughter of Anthonye Humfrey clothworker
August 15 was baptized John Erith the sonne of Robert Erith millworker
1568 15 was baptized Martha Dellestone the daughter of William Delleston laborer
September 5 was baptized Samuell Baylye the sonne of Richard Baylye woolcomber
1568 5 was baptized Samuell Batt the sonne of James Batt barber
October 17 was baptized Elizabeth Cranefort the daughter of Thomas Cranefort mchant
1568 24 was baptized Samuell Allingson the sonne of Henrye Allingston carman
November 21 was baptized Thomas Alberye the sonne of Henrye Alberye taylor
1568
December 21 was baptized John Morest the sonne of John Morest merchant
1568 26 was baptized Edward Hollyman the sonne of Richard Hollyman mercer
Januarye 9 was baptized Samuel Warner the sonne of John Warner capper
1568 30 was baptized Richard Delanyver the sonne John Delanyver joyner

 

Horne, Elizabeth; baptism 20 Jul 1567; St. Michael, Bassishawe, London, England
Baptism Register; St. Michael’s Parish, Bassishawe, London, England

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

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Transcription: Andreas Keefer (Andrew Keefer), Will and Testament

Transcription: Andreas Keefer (Andrew Keefer), Will and Testament

The following is my transcription of the Will of Andreas Keefer.

Andrew Keefer – Will

IN the name of God Amen. I Andrew Keefer of Hanover Township Lebanon County State of Pennsylvania being weak in body but of sound mind and disposing mind memory and understanding calling to mind the uncertainty of this transitory life and knowing that it is appointed to all men once to die have hereby made my last will and testiment in manner and form following to wit whereas I have already given to my sons George Keefer, Frederich Keefer & Andrew Keefer Twenty Two hundred and Forty four dollars and twenty two cents as charged against them. It is my will and I do order that they shall receive no more of my estate till each of my other children to wit Jacob Keefer, John Keefer, Elizabeth intermarried with John Bamgardner, Eve intermarried with Casper Dasher, Catherine intermarried with Philip Johannes and Sarah or their legal representatives shall have each have received a like sum of Two Thousand Two Hundred and Fourty four and Twenty Two cents. I give and bequeath to my daughter Sarah the plantations piece of land whereon I now live building and improvements together with the wood land which I reserved off my son Frederich’s place supposed to contain in the whole fifty acres or there abouts to her heirs and assignees forever she allowing therefore forty dollars per acre but of it should not amount to her equal share she must have it made up to her out of my other estate. It is my will and I do order that the residue of my estate both real and personal and mixed after each of my said children or their legal representataives shall have the aforesaid sum of Two Thousand two hundred and Forty four dollars and twenty two cents shall be equally distributed to and amongst all my children or their legal representatives share and share alike. It is further my will that my daughter Sarah shall have her choice in iron Pots and Kettles. I do order and direct that the share of my estate which is due or will be  due coming to my daughter Eve intermarried with Casper Dasher the said Eve shall have the one half of share the other half to Eve’s children which Eve and Dasher will have. I do order that after there is money due beginning at the one that has the ? Siste now and so on but not till after my death. It is my will and I do order that in addition to what I have willed to my daughter Sarah I give her one full years living out of my estate that is to say all the household and kitchin furniture that she may want together with wheat rye and other grain which she may want for her own use for and during the term of one year she shall have the stove and one bed which ever she uses besides her own ?—- in her own right as also her choice of one cow of mine for her own use. It is further my will that all the bonds from my children wich? is in my  ____ ____ ____ ____  time shall bear no interest till after my decease. As lastly I do hereby nominate my beloved son Frederich Keefer and my Son in law John Baungardner?  to be the executive of this my last will and testiment declaring that no other my last will and testiment. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this nineteenth day of May One Thousand Eight Hundred and Twenty-Seven.

Signed sealed published and pronounced by the testaor as his last will and testiment in the presence of us who in his presence and at Ihis request have hereunto set our names.

jacob Unger     John Snyder

Further it is my will and I do order that my son Jacob Keefer children shall have his legal share but no more when they arrive to their legal age.

Recorded Jan 25th 1828     Peter Lineweaver      Registrar

Andreas Keefer’s Will

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

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Transcription: Baptism Record for Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois

Transcription: Baptism Record for Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois

The following is my transcription and translation of the baptism certificate for Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois.

ORIGINAL FRENCH

Extrait du régistre de baptémes, marriages, sépulture. De la paroisse de St. Hughes du Lac Saguay, from l’année mil neuf cent quinze.

Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois baptism certificate.
Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois baptism certificate.

Le trente et un octobre mil neuf cent quinze, nous frétre, soussigné, arons baptisé Marie Marguerite Yvette, née le quatre aout,fille légitimé de Émile Bourgeois, cultivateur, et de Marie-Anne Turmel de cette paroisse. Le frarraine a été Gédéon Grondines et la Marraine Antoinette Sauvéles quels ont déclaré ne savoirsigner. Le frère é tait présent et a signé avec nous Lecture faite.

Émile Bourgeois
Josephat Cossette

Lequel extrait conforme a l’original ce 31 mars 1931.

E. Brousseau
Lac Saguay

ENGLISH TRANSLATION

Extract from the register of baptisms, marriages, and burials. The parish of St. Hughes Saguay Lake, from the year one thousand nine hundred and fifteen.

On 31 October, nineteen hundred and fifteen frétre we hereby arons named Yvette Marie Marguerite, born August 4, legitimate daughter of Emile Bourgeois, farmer, and Marie-Anne Turmel of this parish. The godfather was Gédéon Grondines and godmother Antoinette Sauvéles who swore as such and signed. The priest was present and signed after reading.

Emile Bourgeois
Josephat Cossette

Extract which conforms to the original March 31, 1931.

E. Brousseau
Saguay Lake

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

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Transcription: Obituary for Alanson Adams

Transcription: Obituary for Alanson Adams

Transcription of an obituary for Alanson Adams.

Fond du Lac Daily Commonwealth, Page 4

Tuesday, April 26, 1881

Alanson Adams
Alanson Adams

Retrospective

The death of Mr. Alanson Adams of our city on the 23rd instant, is an event of more than ordinary interest.  Born in the year 1792, in the third year of Washington’s first term, his life covers nearly the whole period of our constitutional history.  We are fairly startled at the rapidity of our country’s development, as compared with other countries, when we contemplate its history being crowded into the lifetime of one man.  During this period the small circle of States bordering the Atlantic coast, few in population and impoverished by war, has been enlarged until it now engirdles the continent.  A great nation, ranking among the first in power, wealth and influence has been developed within this comparatively short space of time.  Human life can no longer be said to be short, if we measure it by the achievements comprehended within its.limits.

Mr. Adams is identified with the history of our country in one of the most endearing relations.  Every country venerates the memory of its soldiers.  Especially is this true of a republic, which must depend very largely on the valor and patriotism of its volunteer soldiers for defense. The deceased belongs to that noble band whom our nation delights to honor.  In early manhood, at the call of his country, he entered her service in the war of 1812.  He was in several engagements during this war, among which were the battles of Chippewa and Lundy’s Lane.  At the latter place he was wounded.  Thus another one of the few surviving heroes of this war has been laid away to that rest which no battle call, or shock —–will ever disturb.

But in still another and not less important cause was the deceased identified with the history and progress of our country.  He belonged in the class of pioneers peculiar to our country, and yet sometimes overlooked, and underestimated in making our estimates of the elements entering late American progress.  To this class of our population, essentially nomadic in its character, does our country owe very much of its greatness to-day.  By it has been laid the foundations of that grand super-structure of American nationality which has no parallel in history.  Reared in central Vermont he became identified with the early struggles of that State.  In 1818 he was married.  The union thus formed continued some fifty-four years.  In 1844 with his family, consisting of one son and two daughters, he removed to Ohio.  Here he remained until 1860, when he moved to Wisconsin, where he has since resided.  Since the death of his wife, some ten years ago, he has made his home with his son, E.D. Adams, of our city, where he died.

The deceased was a devoted Christian, having been a member of the Baptist church nearly sixty years.  He will be deeply mourned by the church to which he had endeared himself, and the circle of friends how knew him best.   The sympathies of its many friends are extended to the bereaved family, with the assurance that our loss is his gain.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

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Tugs at the heartstrings – foundling swatches tell a story.

Tugs at the heartstrings – foundling swatches tell a story.

Foundling swatches are ‘bits and pieces’ such as cloth scraps, mementos, jewelry or any other identifying objects that were left with abandoned children upon admittance to the foundling hospital. These swatches were sometimes helpful in reuniting the child and mother at a future time.

Foundling swatches tell a story.
Foundling swatches tell a story.

Numerous such foundling swatches were rediscovered approximately 250 years after they had been left with the children. They were long forgotten as they were wrapped in paper that was folded numerous times and filed away in books at the Foundling Hospital opened by Captain Thomas Coram in 1741 by charter from King George II.

Among these sad ‘scraps’ were a needlework sampler found with a boy later named William Porter in December of 1759, who sadly died on May 27, 1760; a patchwork scrap with an embroidered heart that had been cut in half (presumably the mother kept the other half) left with a boy later named Benjamin Twirl by those at the hospital and who was later reclaimed by his mother Sara Bender on June 10, 1775; a swatch of linen painted with an array of playing cards left with a boy named Joseph Floyd and apprenticed in 1769; a red wool heart cut from a garment and left with a girl named Isabel Crane on November 22, 1758, who died on December 16, 1758 .

The opening of this foundling hospital was an innovative idea at the time and provided some hope for the children who might otherwise have been abandoned, neglected, or have died of disease and/or malnutrition..

Periodically, these foundling swatches helped to achieve a happy ending, as in the case of Benjamin Twirl and Sara Bender.

photo credit: limaoscarjuliet

 

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Pioneer Database at FamilyLink.com

Pioneer Database at FamilyLink.com

familylink.com

Check out the list of updated and/or added pioneer databases at FamilyLink.com for information about your ancestral pioneers.

  • Photos from Pioneers and Prominent Men of Utah
  • Pioneer History Stories of the Mississippi Valley
  • Queensland [Australia] Early Pioneers Index 1824-1859
  • Pioneer Catholic History of Oregon
  • Historic Background and Annals of The Swiss and German Pioneer Settlers of Southeastern Pennsylvania
  • History of Custer County, Nebraska

A link to the search of the pioneer databases is below:

http://plus.familylink.com/contentview.aspx?cat=pioneer

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New Link: Online Newspapers Archive

New Link: Online Newspapers Archive

Learning of this online newspapers archive site was very exciting to me. Some of the most valuable information we can find in our genealogical search comes from newspaper accounts because they provide a more detailed reflection of the lives of our ancestors – not just facts and figures. I have added this link to the main ‘Genealogy Links’ page in the top menu.

 

Online newspapers archive.
Online newspapers archive.

The Online Newspapers Archive site endeavours to centralize the thousands of historical newspapers from various sources in one location.

The first newspapers I looked for were those in the Acadian territories of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick before, during and after the expulsion. My family names do show in the papers available after 1850, but it will take some time to sift through them.

The newspapers for Pennsylvania, New York, Illinois and Kentucky also look promising as a great deal of our family history took place in these states.

One great disappointment, though is that there is nothing yet for the United Kingdom.

Although there are great gaps in the newspapers available for some geographical regions, what is available could provide that ‘gem’ one or more of us have been seeking.

I definitely intend to investigate this site further.

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Transcription: Parish Registry of Births and Baptisms of Lytham, Lancaster 1822.

Transcription: Parish Registry of Births and Baptisms of Lytham, Lancaster 1822.

The following is my transcription of the Parish Registry of Births and Baptisms of Lytham, Lancaster for 1822.

A true and perfect copy of the Parish Registry of Lytham in the County of Lancaster from the first day of January to the thirty first day of December 1822.

Children and parents names     place of abode     profession     When born     When baptized     By Whom

Sarah Daughter of Isaac and Betsey Teeling     Lytham     Sailor     Decr 17th 1821     Jany 13th 1822     P. J. Lister
Agnes Daughter of John and Sarah Corwen      Do     Labourer     Decr 8th 1821     Jany 13th 1822     P. J. Lister
James Son of Thos and Alice Whiteside     Lytham     Weaver     Decr 18th 1821     Jany 27th 1822     P. J. Lister
Isabelle Daughter of Thos and Betty Greenbank     Lytham     Labourer     Oct 14th 1821     Jany 10th 1822     P. J. Lister
Willm & Ellen Son & Daughter of Robt and Magdalene Fox     Lytham     Bricklayer     Jany 11th 1822     Feby 17th     P. J. Lister
Sarah Daughter of George and Sarah Pearson     Lytham     Shoemaker     Jany 25th     Feby 24th P. J. Lister
James Son of Thomas and Margaret Fox     Lytham     Joiner     Jany 30th     March 17th     P. J. Lister
Thomas Son of Richard and Mary Wilking     Lytham     Labourer     Feby 9th     March 17th     P. J. Lister
Willm Son of Robert and Ellen Knowles     Do     Sailor     Feby 13th     March 17th     P. J. Lister
Margaret Daughter of James and Betty Atkinson     Lytham     Labourer     March 14th     April 14th      Wm Barton
John Son of John and Mary Fell     Do     Sailor     Feby 25th     April 21st     P. J. Lister
Robt Son of Richd and Betty Webster     Lytham     Farmer     March 16th     April 21st     P. J. Lister
Alice Daughter of Christn and Betty Whiteside     Do     Sailor     April 6th     April 28th Wm Barton
James Son of Alice Jamison and John Kirk     Lytham     Labourer     April 14th     May 5th     P. J. Lister
Jane Daughter of James and Betty Ormond     Lytham     Husbandman     April 11th     May 19th     Wm Barton
Betty Daughter of Robert and Marjery Singleton     Do     fisherman     April 19th May 19th Wm Barton
Emmelin Daughter of Barnaby and Alice Whiteside     Lytham      Weaver     May 30th     June 23d     Wm Barton
Maryanne Daughter of James and Betty Cortmell     Do     Mariner     May 31st     June 23d     Wm Barton
Ellen Daughter of Joseph and Sarah Cortmell     Lytham     fisherman     May 24th     June 30th     Wm Barton
John Son of Willm and Ann Marshall     Do     Gentleman     May 30th     June 3d     P. J. Lister
Carolina Daughter of Jane Cookson & Wm Moorehouse     Do     Butcher     June 27th Augt 11th     P. J. Lister
Jane Daughter of Willm and Grace Wade     Lytham     fisherman     June 23d     Augt 11th     P. J. Lister
Jane Daughter of Francis and Margaret Fox     Do     Bricklayer     July 12th     Augt 11th     P. J. Lister
Peggy Daughter of Thomas and Mary Rimmer     Lytham     Sailor     Augt 18th     Sept 8th     P. J. Lister
Hannah Daughter of John and Ellen Breckall     Lytham     Weaver     Sept 14th     Sept 22d     G. L. Spencer
Cornelius Son of John and Magdalane Cordwell     Peel     Farmer     Sept 7th     Oct 6th         P. J. Lister
Thomas Son of George and Ellen Miller     Lytham Husbandman     Sept 15th     Oct 13th     Wm Barton
Sarah Daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Ditchfield     Do     Innkeeper     Sept 3d     Sept 5th     P. J. Lister
James Son of Richard and Jane Worthington     Lytham     Labourer     Oct 2d     Oct 27     P. J. Lister
Charles Frederick Clifton Son of Thomas Joseph Clifton Esqr of Lytham Hall Lancashire and Hetty his wife was born at Hatch Court in the County of Somerset     June 17th     June 25th     Samuel Fisher
Betty Daughter of Robert and Sarah Hesketh     Lytham    Labourer     Sept 19th     Nov 3d     Wm Barton
Jenny Daughter of Thos and Jane Wade     Peel        Husbandman    Sept 14th     Nov 17th     Wm Barton
Thomas Son of John and Margaret Cookson     Lytham     Husbandman     Nov 15th     Dec 15th     Wm Barton     Offitg Minister

 

 

____________________

The complete original scans of the documents clips above can be accessed by clicking the images.

To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search linkand the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the top menu.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.

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Transcription: Last Will and Testament of Johannis Blythe of 1605.

Transcription: Last Will and Testament of Johannis Blythe of 1605.

The following is my transcription of the Last Will and Testament of Johannis Blythe of 1605. By looking at the number of question marks in the texts it’s apparent how difficult transcribing from ‘ye olde Englishe’ is. Any input as to the missing text would be appreciated.

 

____________________

 

The seventh daie of November one thousand six hundred and five.

Last Will and Testament of Johannis Blythe
Last Will and Testament of Johannis Blythe (Click on image for full size view.)

In the name of God I, John Blyth of Denton in the Countie of Lincolne gentleman being sick in bodie but in perfect memory thankes be given to almightie god, doe ordaine and make this my last will and testamente in manner and forme following: Ffirst and principalie I give and bequeath my soule to almightie god who gave it me, hoping onelie to be ?????? by the profound death and ??? ????? ??eeding of Jesus Christ my mercifull Saviour and ???????, ffor my bodie to be buried in the ???????oll of the parish church of Denton, ffor my manner of Stranson alias Stranxton in the Countie of Lincolne with the landes ffeifments and heredit??????? thereto . Thereto ??????? ???? the ?????? or parsonage of Stranxton aforesaide I give to William Blyth, my sonne ffirst ??? ???? and to his heires and assignes for ?????. Item I give and bequeath unto Margaret my own wife for term of her life ffortie pounds ?????? out of my ?????? ?? Stranson alias Stranxton for the term of her life, which is allotted unto her already for a ????????? and ?????? I give her without condition. Item I give unto my saide wife my manor of Denton, with the purtenances and all my lands tenements and heredit?????? ?????? in the farms and fields of Denton and Harlaxton, for longe as she keepeth herself unmarried and my widow. Item I give and bequeath my mannor of Denton with the appurtenances and all my lands tennements and hered???????? in the ??????? and fields of Denton and Harlaxton to William Blith my sonne ffirst and to his heires and assignes forever, to enter to the same at the death or marriage of Margaret my ????? wief which shall first happen. Item I give to John Blith my second sonne five hundred markes to be paid unto him within one yere after my death by my Executors. Item I give unto Robert Blith my third sonne five hundred markes to be paid unto him within one yere after my death by my Executors, Item I give unto Anne Blith my oldest daughter five hundred markes, to be paid unto her within one yere after my death by my Executors, Item I give unto Katherine Blieth my second daughter five hundred markes, to be paid unto her within one yere after my death by my Executors. Item I give unto Marie Blith my youngest daughter five hundred markes, to be paide unto her within one yere after my death by my Executors, Item I give unto William Blithe my brother, William Blithe his oldest sonne twentie poundes to be paide unto him by my Executors when he shall accomplish the age of twentie and one yeres, and if the said Willm dye before he come to the saide age of one and twentie yeres, then I give ten poundes thereof John Blith brother to the said William, and the other ten poundes to be divided to his????? of the whole blood, Item my will is if either of my children without John Blith or Robt Blith dye before they come to the age of one and twentie yeres, that their parte or portion for ?????? shall goe to the survivor, Item my will is that if ???? ????? daughters ??????? Anne, Katherine and Marie shall departe this world before they accomplish the age of eightene yeres, that then either of them soe dying their portons to be divided to them that shall happen to outlive and accomplsih the age of eightene yeres. Witnessed hereunto, Anthony Thorolde, Willm Blith, Thomas Musson. I doe give to Thomas Musson fortie shillings, Item I gie unto Willm loved friend Thomas Elly of Grantham in the Countie of Lincolne esquire twentie shillings ????? till my sonne and heire accomplish the age of twentie and one yeres, to be paide by my Executors. Item I give and bequeath unto the poore of Grantham Harlaxton Denton and Stranson three pounds six shillings eight pence a piece, to be employed unto their ????? ????? Item I give to to every of my ???? housholde servants five shillinges a peece, Item I doe ???? ??????? and ordaine my wellbeloved wife Margaret Blithe and my sonne and heire William Blithe my Executors of this my last will and tstamente, And I will that the ?????????? of my goodes shalbe equaly devided betwixt them, Item I doe make Anthonye Thorolde of Louth on the hill in the Countie of Lincolne gentleman my brother in law and my brother William Blith of Stranson in the saide Countie gentleman my Supervisors of this my last will and testament, h????ly des???? them to ??? my will performed, and my ?????? th?? will, And I give to either of them a ???? of tenn shillinges ?????, ???????? shalbe ????? John Blieth their brother, Item my will is that ??? my ????? marrye my ????????? shall have the porton of my sonnes and daughters, and be accountable to them for their ???? thereof for longe as they have the same after ???? in the hundred, And ???? ?????? goods ??? saide Anthonie Thorolde shall have, to putt in two ??????????? ???????? more for every five hundred markes he shall ???????, And the saide William Blith to doe the like, Item I give my soule ???? to my father. ?????? ??? hereunto Anthony Thorold, William Blithe, Thomas Musson.

Probatum

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

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Unravelling the mysteries behind one of Canada’s oldest cemeteries.

Unravelling the mysteries behind one of Canada’s oldest cemeteries.

I had to post this article as soon as I saw it. Visiting this graveyard was one of the best family experiences we’ve ever had – and it was a great opportunity to explore our own family history.

As a matter of fact, the tour guide, Alan Melanson and I are 7th great grandchildren of Charles Mellanson and Marie Dugas (Charles was a son of the original Melanson couple – Pierre and Priscilla.)

Stuart, Erin and Alan Melanson in graveyard.
My children, Erin and Stuart, sit through an enthralling tale told by fellow ‘Melanson’ cousin, Alan Melanson, the very informative and entertaining tour guide.

It’s been a century since Fort Anne became Canada’s first administered national historic site, but much of the history surrounding the once hotly contested grounds in Annapolis Royal, N.S., is still shrouded in mystery.

On Monday, a team of researchers hope to use new technology to unlock some of the old secrets buried within Fort Anne’s Garrison Graveyard, which is one of the oldest English cemeteries in Canada.

“To understand where we’re going, we need to understand where we’ve been,” said Ted Dolan, Parks Canada’s site and visitor experience manager for historic sites in southwestern Nova Scotia.

“Any additional information that we have as to what happened on our landscape in the past is really going to inform us as to who we are and where we come from.”

Dolan describes Fort Anne as “the most fought-over piece of land in Canadian history since European colonization.” Originally fortified by the Scots as early as 1629, the site was later taken over by the French, before it fell to British troops in 1710. It would remain a regular battle scene for another 50 years.

While over 200 British headstones still stand in the Garrison Graveyard, Dolan said researchers believe there could be more than 2,000 people buried at the site whose wooden markers have since decayed over time.

In addition, prior to 1710, Dolan said French soldiers and Acadians from the region were buried at the nearby St. Jean-Baptiste parish, which had a cemetery located close to the fort.

While researchers aren’t completely sure where the French and Acadian cemetery is, he said they have a “pretty good idea. . .”

Read on . . .

Source: Unravelling the mysteries behind one of Canada’s oldest cemeteries | CTV News Atlantic

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Dec 1918.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Dec 1918.

The following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Dec 1918.

You may have noticed that the usual FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com updates post from mid-October did not appear. This was due to a much reduced quantity to list. The few between October 1st and October 31st have been included in the list below.

In future, the only scheduled updates and additions posts will be the ones on the first of the month. However, if the quantity of links warrant it, there could be an additional post at the mid-month.

 

FamilySearch.org updates and additions.

Canada

Costa Rica

Honduras

Germany

New Zealand

Peru

Portugal

South Africa

United Kingdom

United States

 

Ancestry.com updates and additions.

Canada

Germany

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Scientists confirm world’s oldest natural mummy is Native American ancestor.

Scientists confirm world’s oldest natural mummy is Native American ancestor.

Researchers recently concluded that a 10,000-year-old skeleton in Nevada, believed to belong to the world’s oldest naturally preserved mummy, represents that of an ancestor of a modern-day Native American tribe.

According to SlashGear, the so-called “Spirit Cave mummy” was originally thought to be the skeleton of an individual that belonged to the “Paleoamerican” group that predated Native Americans in North America. However, that theory was disproven by the scientists behind the new research, who extracted DNA from the prehistoric skull and concluded, based on analysis of the DNA, that the mummy was actually an ancestor of the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone tribe in Nevada.

A report from the Guardian further noted that the Spirit Cave mummy, which was first discovered in 1940, was the skeleton of an adult male who died at around 40-years-old. The individual, who was wearing moccasins at the time he was buried, was wrapped in reed mats and a rabbit-skin blanket. The research on the mummy was conducted with the assistance and approval of the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone tribe, which reburied the skeleton this summer after a “decades-long legal dispute” with scientists over whether it should be kept in a museum or given a proper reburial.

“[It] confirms what we have always known from our oral tradition and other evidence – that the man taken from his final resting place in Spirit Cave is our Native American ancestor,” the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe said in a statement.

University of Cambridge evolutionary geneticist Eske Willerslev, who led the team that performed DNA sequencing on the Spirit Cave mummy, attended the reburial ceremony earlier this year and recalled to the Guardian that there was a lot of “crying, singing, and prayers” involved, as well as the placing of farewell gifts. He described the experience as being similarly emotional as burying a close relative, even if the mummy was originally buried about 10,000 years ago.

Willerslev also said that his team’s analysis proved that it’s too simplistic to base ancestry on the shape of one’s skull, given that the aforementioned theory that the Spirit Cave mummy was Paleoamerican was based on how its skull had a different shape than that of Native Americans.

“Looking at the bumps and shapes of a head does not help you understand the true genetic ancestry of a population – we have proved that you can have people who look very different but are closely related.”

The above research was part of a broader, multinational project on the ancestry of modern-day North and South Americans, which was documented in separate studies published in the journals Science, Science Advances, and Cell. Aside from determining that the world’s oldest natural mummy shares DNA with an existing Native American tribe, the project also revealed that there were two migrations into South America that were not documented in previous studies.

Likewise, the researchers discovered some proof of Australasian ancestry in native South Americans, but found no such traces in native North Americans. Both the Guardian and SlashGear pointed out that this could suggest modern humans arrived in the Americas about 30,000 years ago, far earlier than originally thought.

Read on . . .

Source: Scientists Confirm World’s Oldest Natural Mummy Is Native American Ancestor

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Study reveals common ancestry for all Native Americans.

Study reveals common ancestry for all Native Americans.

The indigenous people of North and South America are collectively known as Native Americans. Despite the European invasion occurring several centuries ago, Native Americans are still subjugated and are yet to find a voice of their own.

One of the reasons for that is a lack of scientific evidence that manages to bring forth their cultural heritage and upbringing in front of the world. While previous anthropologic studies have focused on the timing and number of initial migrations, the subsequent spread of people within the two continents have garnered lesser attention.

As scientists could only describe the peopling of the Americas in broad strokes, plenty of mysteries regarding when and how they spread across still remains a mystery – and is critical to understand their historical lineage.

Two independent studies, one being published in the journal Science and the other in Cell, have sequenced 15 and 49 ancient human genomes, dating back around 10,000 years. Prior to these studies, only six genomes older than 6000 years from the Americas had been sequenced, leading to oversimplification of genetic models that were used to explain the peopling of the Americas.

The genomes of the current study spanned from Alaska in North America to Patagonia in South America. The teams worked with government agencies and indigenous people to identify the samples, extract powder from skeletal material, and extract the DNA necessary to create double-stranded DNA libraries.

The results from the genome sequencing have spawned some very interesting results. The study published in Science, called “Early Humans dispersals within the Americas”, provides evidence of rapid dispersal and early diversification as people moved south, as early as 13,000 years ago. The study sequenced an “Ancient Beringian,” a 9000-year-old remains from Alaska’s Seward peninsula to come to the conclusion that first migrants that entered the Americas from the Bearing strait split into two groups – “Southern Native Americans” and “Northern Native Americans” (also sometimes called Ancestral A and B lineages), who went on to populate the continents . . .

Read on . . .

Source: Study Reveals Common Ancestry for all Native Americans

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Remembrance Day: A civilian’s responsibility?

Remembrance Day: A civilian’s responsibility?

Today being Remembrance Day, I was thinking about a recent post in which I quoted an article exploring how Canadians need to do more for Remembrance Day.

Since then, while watching all the usual Remembrance Day coverage on television, I saw a news report about the increasingly troubled Canadian Legions. Several have closed or are slated to close because of low memberships and revenue.

What really surprised me, was to learn that civilians can become members and reap the same benefits enjoyed by military members and veterans.

Acccording to Toronto.com, “The legion has been losing members at a rate of about 8,000 a year. Part of that is due to death – the largest cohort of members are veterans of the Second World War, a conflict that ended more than 70 years ago – but it has been a challenge to attract and retain veterans of more recent conflicts.”

The Royal Canadian Legion was founded in 1926 to lobby for the needs of veterans returning from the first world war.  That service expanded to include other veterans, including those who’ve never been to war.

Some believe the Canadian Legion has become outdated and no longer represents the military and veterans as they exist in today’s world.

Mark and Stuart in Remembrance Day Parade.
Mark and Stuart in Remembrance Day Parade. c 2000.

A discussion on the subject between my husband, Mark and I caused me to immediately say, “Why don’t we register and get memberships for the kids as Christmas gifts?”

Mark is a veteran, but the others would be civilian memberships.

Then, while researching the subject, I discovered this Global News article about how the veterans themselves feel. I was shocked at how out of touch I have been, especially being the wife and daughter of military veterans.

According to those interviewed for the article:

One of the biggest complaints they have is the number of civilians who are now members. Though most of them mean well, they’re not making the Legion enough of a home for those who’ve served Canada because they don’t understand the military culture.

“There’s a very strict disconnect between what they do, and what we do …”

Also, because of this disconnect, they don’t always provide the services that veterans need — like enough support for those who suffer from PTSD.

Erin in her Air Cadet Uniform
Erin in her Air Cadet Uniform c 2007.

Surely there are ways to include civilians in some of the programs, increasing understanding on both sides? Although a civilian, I am a sufferer of PTSD and a program I could access that is separate from the woefully inadequate mental health system might be a place to start.

I never considered myself out of touch because of my background in the military and veteran cultures. However, as different as veterans and civilians are, there are indeed common circumstances and obstacles we all struggle with.

These articles caused me to doubt my idea of giving civilian memberships as gifts.

Then again, isn’t that a good place to start?

Civilians becoming members would enable learning more about our veterans, and increasing our understanding of each other.

At the very least, some if not all of the endangered legion branches may be saved. This could actually buy time for the legions to update and adapt to today’s veteran and their families.

My genealogy research into the extensive military history of both sides of our family has taught me a great deal and enabled me to become aware of how important it is for civilians to support our veterans – and never forget the sacrifices made in all conflicts, including World War I and World War II.

Related articles:

 

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Canadians need to do more for Remembrance Day | Toronto Sun

Canadians need to do more for Remembrance Day | Toronto Sun

Sunday marks the 100 year anniversary of the Armistice that ended the First World War.

The ceasefire was signed in November 1918 and news of the war’s end was quickly and widely celebrated throughout the British Empire.

World War One was known at the time as “the war to end all wars” and when the Germans finally surrendered, British Prime Minister Lloyd George optimistically stated, “I hope we can say that thus, this fateful morning, came an end to all wars.”

We celebrate Armistice Day, now known as Remembrance Day, to honour the brave men who fought and died to preserve our freedom and our way of life. This despite the sad truth that WWI — a devastating war that left some 40 million dead, including approximately 61,000 members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force — was far from the end of all war.

Less than two decades later, the world found itself engulfed in another catastrophic world war that required millions more to make the ultimate sacrifice to stop the spread of fascism and to protect freedom and democracy worldwide.

In 1921, the Royal British Legion created a campaign called the Poppy Appeal, based on John McCrae’s 1915 poem ‘In Flanders Fields,’ to raise money in support of injured veterans and their families.

The bright red poppy was seen as a symbol of inspiration; the blood-red wildflower grew in the French and Belgian fields that were ripped apart by tanks and artillery and devastated by human carnage during the war.

The poppy represented new life and hope.

My great-grandfather was killed in these fields in 1915, leaving behind his wife and young children in Vancouver, B.C.

The poppy lives on, as a small token of our appreciation to those who did not hesitate to risk everything to protect the things they loved the most.

Read on . . .

Source: MALCOLM: Canadians need to do more for Remembrance Day | Toronto Sun

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The US Midterm elections have made history with these notable firsts | NPR

The US Midterm elections have made history with these notable firsts | NPR

Voters elected the country’s first Muslim congresswomen, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota (left) and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan, both Democrats.

Featured image: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

America’s 116th Congress is going to include some prominent firsts — and several governors’ races also made history in these midterms.

The U.S. has ushered in its first Native American and Muslim congresswomen, its first lesbian mom in Congress and the first openly gay man elected as a governor. South Dakota and Maine elected their first female governors, Tennessee and Arizona sent their first women to the Senate, and Massachusetts and Connecticut elected their first black women to the House.

As NPR has previously reported, record numbers of Native Americans, Muslim Americans and women, including many women of color, ran for office in 2018. A “rainbow wave” of LGBTQ candidates also sought office. And after the ballots were cast, all those groups notched notable firsts.

No, voters did not elect the first Native American governor (Paulette Jordan lost in Idaho) or the first openly transgender governor (Christine Hallquist lost in Vermont). And in Georgia, Stacey Abrams’ bid to be the country’s first black female governor is still up in the air — Secretary of State Brian Kemp has a slim lead, but Abrams has not conceded and is pushing for a runoff.

But here are some of the winning candidates who made history on Tuesday:

First openly gay man elected governor, Colorado Democrat Jared Polis defeated Walker Stapleton.

“We proved that we’re an inclusive state that values every contribution regardless of someone’s sexual orientation or gender identity,” Polis said during his victory speech, according to Denver’s CBS4 TV station. “For the LGBTQ pioneers … who endured so much hardship and hurt to make it possible for so many of us, myself included, to live and to love openly and proudly, and to the people in this room, I want to say I am profoundly grateful for all the work we’ve done to overcome.”

New Jersey’s former Gov. Jim McGreevey came out as gay as he resigned.
Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, who is bisexual, became the first openly LGBT governor elected when she won her office in 2016.

Polis’ partner, Marlon Reis, and two children, Caspian and Cora, will be moving into the governor’s mansion.”

Polis made millions in e-commerce and backs single-payer health care, set a goal of 100 percent renewable energy by 2040, supports greater distances between oil and gas drilling operations and homes and schools, and wants the state to fund preschool and full-day kindergarten,” writes Bente Birkeland of Colorado Public Radio.

Polis is also Colorado’s first Jewish governor.

Sharice Davids of Kansas (left) and Debra Haaland of New Mexico are the first Native American women elected to Congress.

Davids, a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation, won a competitive race to represent Kansas’ 3rd District. Davids is a lawyer and a former MMA fighter (one of her ads featured her attacking a punching bag).”We have the opportunity to reset expectations about what people think when they think of Kansas,” Davids said in her victory speech, according to The Kansas City Star.

She is also the first openly gay congresswoman from Kansas. “She really feels like the voice for all the LGBT folks in the Midwest,” one LGBT activist told the Star.

Read on . . .

Source: The Midterm Elections Have Made History With These Notable Firsts : NPR

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Wabanaki Collection launched to educate about Maritime Indigenous peoples | CBC News

Wabanaki Collection launched to educate about Maritime Indigenous peoples | CBC News

‘We are all treaty people,’ says curator of a portal aimed at better mutual understanding.

David Perley is the ‘visionary’ First Nations education specialist and Mi’kmaq-Wolastoqey Centre director behind the inception of the Wabanaki Collection, a web portal of Indigenous educational resources. (University of New Brunswick)

The Wabanaki were New Brunswick’s first peoples, but David Perley says many students in the province are graduating from high school without knowing much about them.

“My ancestors identify themselves as Wabanaki people,” Perley said.

“In my language, that means people of the dawn.”

The Wabanaki Confederacy was around long before contact with European settlers, said Perley.

“They were dealing with other Indigenous nations, such as the Mohawks and so on. It was always discussing boundary lines, for example, or the need to have alliances against a common threat, political discussions on what they had to do in terms of internal governance and so on.”

After contact, said Perley, “It became a strong confederacy because of the need to have unity in terms of dealing with settler society.”

One of the resources in the Wabanaki Collection is an interactive map with legends about the formation of various geographical features. It was contributed by the Abbe Museum in Bar Harbor, Maine. (The Abbe Museum)

The director of the Mi’kmaq-Wolastoqey Centre at the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton said textbooks make barely a reference to Wabanaki history, let alone the culture and traditions that have been passed down for thousands of years.

The centre has launched a new online resource to try to rectify that.

It’s available to anyone looking for information about Indigenous peoples of the Maritimes.

Perley said the project was spawned by the many requests he used to get — dating back to the 1990s — from students and teachers looking for reliable reference material.

At the time, there was little to be found.

“And especially not any resource that was written by or produced by Wabanaki people — the Wolostoqiyik, the Mi’kmaq, the Passamaquoddy and the Abenakis,” Perley said during an interview with Information Morning Fredericton . . .

Read on . . .

Source: Wabanaki Collection launched to improve education about Maritime Indigenous peoples | CBC News

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Descendants of honor: Ancestry.com opens records for Veterans Day.

Descendants of honor: Ancestry.com opens records for Veterans Day.

Ancestry.com is honoring customers who are descendants of US Medal of Honor recipients, as the country prepare for Veterans Day.

The Ancestry campaign makes its collection of more than 250 million military records available for free to the public through November 12. The collection includes draft cards, service records, and prisoner and casualty lists for military heroes worldwide.

“Ancestry is committed to honoring and sharing the stories of America’s heroes, who come from all over the world,” said Vineet Mehra, executive vice president and chief marketing officer at Ancestry.

“We encourage everyone to discover the military heroes in their family, which is why we have provided free access to our unparalleled collection of military records this Veterans Day. Through these records people can uncover the incredible stories that lie in their family’s past, and honor those heroes this Veterans Day.”

Of the 72 living recipients of the Medal of Honor, four earned the award in World War II, five in the Korean War, 51 in the Vietnam War, and 12 in the War in Afghanistan.

Two earned their medal while serving in the US Air Force, 50 in the US Army, 12 in the US Marine Corps, and eight in the US Navy.

It’s been 157 years since the Medal of Honor was created.

“The President, in the name of Congress, has awarded more than 3,400 Medals of Honor to our nation’s bravest Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen since the decoration’s creation in 1861 . . .”

Read on . . . 

Source: brandchannel: Descendants of honor: Ancestry.com opens records for Veterans Day.

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Transcription: The marriage of Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys.

Transcription: The marriage of Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys.

The following is my transcription of the written record of the marriage of Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys on May 19, 1693 at Merion Monthly Meeting in Pennsylvania.

48

37   Whereas Abel Thomas of Meirion in the County of Philadelphia Bathelor and Elizabeth Humphreys of the aforesaid Township and County sign for having declared their intention of Marriage with each other before several meetings of the ???? of God called Shakers m Haveford according to good order ???? amongst them whose proceedings hereing a deliberate confedration there of consent of part as in Relations Concerned, being Clear of all others there aproved of by the sd meetings Now these are to Certify all whom it may Concern that for the full accomplishment of theirs Intentions this Nineteenth day of the third month vulgarly called May in the year according to ye English account one thousand six hundred neinty and three, They, the said Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys appeared in a solemn publick assembly of the aforesaid people ???? to go therfor that and a purpose in their publick meeting plans at meirion and in a solemn manner according to example of the Holy men of God ???????? in the scripture of ????? He ye is Abel Thomas taking the Elizabeth Humphreys by the hand, did solemnly declare as followeth viz I do heare in the presence of God and this Asembly I do take Elizabeth Humphrys to be my wife and do promise to be ??? my ???? towards her as becometh a Loving ?? in all Conditions till death separate us And then and there in sd assembly those assem??? Elizabeth Hmphreys did declare as followeth viz In the presence of God and this asembly I do take Abell Thomas to my Husband I do promise to be he?? ???? kind Loving wife till deat separate us

And the to Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphrys as further Confirmation thereof in then and there to those prents so? their And in witness whereof have hereunto subscribed our Names

Abell Thomas

Tho. markd

Elizabeth Thomas

The marriage of Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys on May 19, 1693.
The marriage of Abell Thomas and Elizabeth Humphreys on May 19, 1693.

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