Category: Massachusetts

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – 14 Oct 2014

Sorry for the large gap. I’m in the process of doing some experimental performance of this site which has demanded much of my attention in the past couple of weeks. Finally, though, here are the FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to October 14, 2014.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions
Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

Australia

Belgium

Canada

Colombia

Ghana

India

Indonesia

Italy

New Zealand

Slovakia

Spain

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Australia

Bermuda

Canada

Hungary

Netherlands

United Kingdom

United States

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – 11 Sep 2014

Following are the Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions for the week ending September 11, 2014.

 

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – 11 Sep 2014

FamilySearch.org

Brazil

Canada

Colombia

Ghana

India

Italy

Mexico

Netherlands

Philippines

Portugal

Russia

South Africa

Spain

United Kingdom

United States

 

Ancestry.com

Canada

United States

photo credit: wundercapo via photopin cc

My ‘must have’ list of top 10 genealogy websites.

This list of top 10 genealogy websites is a bit different than others because I have evaluated them based on the sheer quantity of data and sources I have found for my own personal research, regardless whether they are paid or free.
will of Richard Chatterton found on the UK Archives site.

17th century will of Richard Chatterton found on the UK Archives site, #9 on my top 10 genealogy websites list.

I will only subscribe to a site if I’m sure it’s worth it as I can usually find most other information on free sites with some effort.

It just so happens though, that my favorite site to conduct research is a paid site, while all the rest except one are free.

Ancestry ($)

Although this site requires a paid subscription, it is the one and only site I do pay for as I find I truly do get my money’s worth. No matter what location, type of record, or time period, I can usually find something of value on this site. The search feature is rather confusing and cumbersome. Just keep in mind it’s better to be as specific as possible and use the filters appropriately and you will get fairly accurate results.

Family Search

Over the past few years, Family Search has been quickly catching up to Ancestry because of the sheer quantity of transcriptions, images, and collections they continue to make available online. They have a very accurate and intuitive search.

Library and Archives Canada

I am Canadian, with roots in both French Canada (Quebec) and Acadia (Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia). Anytime I am researching a Canadian line, this is the first site I go to – even before Ancestry and Family Search.

Nova Scotia Archives

My Acadian ancestors form a rather specialized area of research, and the Nova Scotia Archives genealogy research site is the first place I go. Original records are available for a per unit price, but I’m quite happy just printing the transcribed records for the most part.

Internet Archive

My husband’s Welsh Quaker, British, royal and new world ancestors are the largest part of my research and this is the one site I go to when I’m unable to find original records or even transcriptions of records elsewhere. I’ve found numerous genealogy studies, articles, and books; history books, etc. that have provided detailed information. It is important to remember, however, that errors were not uncommon in these publications, and I do continue to try to find more concrete sources.

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy

I am fascinated by my husband’s medieval and royal ancestry and this site is a well-researched site. Any suspect information is clearly identified and there is a clear explanation of why. Original medieval sources are cited in detail, supporting all facts and conclusions.

University of Hull Royal Database

This is also a very well researched site providing invaluable information about the royal lineages of Britain and Europe. I usually consult this site in tandem with the Foundation for Medieval Genealogy site above. This helps to confirm some information to a certain degree.

National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)

About 1750, my husband’s Welsh and British ancestors started arriving in the new world and the branches that took root there flourished to impact all areas of American life. Next to Ancestry, I find this site valuable for actual military files and numerous other archived documents. All requests, however, must be done by snail mail, in which case I try to avoid this site a lot. I’m definitely an instant gratification kind of person. Hopefully one day they’ll set up online access, even if it is paid. I’d certainly subscribe to this one.

UK Archives ($)

I have found some of the more interesting documents on this site, including numerous scans of original wills from the 16th to the 19th century. There is something about the old English script that I find very beautiful and it’s a suitable challenge for my puzzle oriented mind to transcribe them. There is a per unit price to download documents, but the price is very reasonable and I have no problem paying it, considering the high quality of the document scans.

World GenWeb

No one individual GenWeb site in this network is used all that much in my research, but if you consider all research found on any of the GenWeb sites, it definitely warrants a top ten position. I have listed the main World GenWeb site, which links through to the full network of other sites from other locations. By using the links, it is possible to drill down from the global and country levels to county and indeed township sites in some cases.

 

Transcription – Obituary for Lillian Active Paradis-Auclair

The following is my transcription of the obituary for Lillian Active Paradis-Auclair.
Lillian Activ Paradis and Thomas Auclair in July 1929.

Lillian Active Paradis and Thomas Auclair in July of 1929.

Mrs. Lillian A. Auclair

Mrs. Lillian A. Auclair, widow of Thomas Auclair died Tuesday at a Manchester hospital after a long illness.

Mrs. Auclair was born in Franklin, daughter of Joseph and Delia (Seney) Paradis and had resided in Manchester the greater part of her life. She was an attendant of Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church.

Obituary for Lillian Activ Paradis-Auclair

Obituary for Lillian Active Paradis-Auclair.

Members of the family include three sons, Joseph Auclair of West Hartford, Conn., Lester Auclair, Miami, Fla., and Arthur Auclair of Manchester; three daughters, Mrs. Ella LaPalme, and Mrs. William (Rita) Quinn, both of Manchester, and Mrs. Joseph (Lida) Bellefeuille of Bedford; two brothers, Oscar Paradis of Billerica, Mass., and Adolphus Paradis, of Lowell, Mass.; 22 grandchildren, 33 great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.

The funeral will be held from the J. N. Boufford & Sons Funeral Home, 110 Bridge St. Saturday morning at 8:45, followed by a high mass of requiem in Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church. Burial will be in Mt. Calvary Cemetery.

Relatives and friends may call at the funeral home Thursday and Friday from 2 to 5 and 7 to 10.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – 21 Aug 2014

Following are the FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com updates and additions for these sites over the past two weeks.
FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

I must apologize for taking so long this time. Although I don’t have a set schedule, I do normally do this post about once a week. Because I have to process each link individually, it’s very time consuming and with other maintenance tasks I’ve had to do, this post was delayed.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

Argentina

Brazil

Colombia

Ghana

Italy

Jamaica

Mexico

Netherlands

New Zealand

Spain

Sweden

United States

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Australia

United Kingdom

photo credit: meddie / aka Gramps via photopin cc

The Science of Husbandry on a Human Scale

We’ve all heard of the centuries old practice and science of husbandry. The definition according to “The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language” is:

hus·band·ry (hzbn-dr)

  1. The act or practice of cultivating crops and breeding and raising livestock; agriculture.
  2. The application of scientific principles to agriculture, especially to animal breeding.
  3. Careful management or conservation of resources; economy.
practice and science of husbandry

The practice and science of husbandry on a human scale.

For the purposes of this article, I am referring to the most well known and specialized area of husbandry – the planning, tracking, and monitoring of the breeding of all varieties of livestock.

At one time, I read an article in “The Globe and Mail” which described a current practice in Iceland for monitoring the pairing and breeding of the population. Theirs is such a small, isolated population surrounded by a vast expanse of ocean, this database has become a part of their culture that is heavily relied upon to ensure there is no accidental ‘inbreeding’ or, heaven forbid, “incest.”

The citizens of Iceland consult with a web-based database called “The “Book of Icelanders”, or “Islendingabok,” which tracks the genealogies of all the country’s citizens. This database serves a key purpose separate from the most obvious one of tracking genealogies. It allows Icelanders to check to see if they may be unknowingly about to date a relative.

After several years of research into our family genealogy, I have become aware that “husbandry” has been practiced throughout our own history as well.

Two examples are the Quakers, which are my husband’s ancestors, and the Acadians, my own ancestors.

practice and science of husbandry on a human scale

The practice and science of husbandry on a human scale via a Quaker clearing meeting.

Quakers, or members of the Society of Friends, as they were also known, had to be cleared by a group of select members, called a “clearness committee,” during a meeting for clearness, prior to the marriage. It was during the clearing that the issue of blood relationship would be addressed.

The Acadians (and the Catholic Church at large) had a similar custom, where the pair wishing to marry would petition the church for the right if they were known to be blood related. The church would make a decision whether to approve the marriage, based on the ‘degree of consanguinity’ or the closeness of the blood relationship. The standard was that any couple within the fourth degree of consanguinity were not permitted to marry. A request could be made for a dispensation, or permission from the Catholic Church to marry. The closer the blood relationship, the harder it was to obtain dispensation. It was very rare for first cousins to be permitted to marry.

Sources:

  1. BBC: Religion: Quakers; http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/christianity/subdivisions/quakers_1.shtml#h7.
  2. Wikipedia.org; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quakers.