Category: Slovakia

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – 14 Oct 2014

Sorry for the large gap. I’m in the process of doing some experimental performance of this site which has demanded much of my attention in the past couple of weeks. Finally, though, here are the FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to October 14, 2014.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions
Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

Australia

Belgium

Canada

Colombia

Ghana

India

Indonesia

Italy

New Zealand

Slovakia

Spain

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Australia

Bermuda

Canada

Hungary

Netherlands

United Kingdom

United States

Wenzel I and Boleslav “der Grausame, the Cruel”

Wenzel I, Duke of the Bohemians, by Peter Parler

Wenzel I, Duke of the Bohemians (Good King Wenceslaus), by Peter Parler.

One thing I realized very quickly after starting to research my family’s genealogy is that not all of our ancestors are ‘nice’ guys or gals. Wenzel I and Boleslave “der Grausame, the Cruel” is only one of many I have found, and I’m sure I’ll find more.

In this post, I describe my children’s 33rd great grandfather, Boleslav “der Grausame” or “the Cruel”, Duke of the Bohemians.

Boleslav, the dear boy, was the brother of Wenzel I, Duke of the Bohemians, most commonly known in our day as “Good King Wenceslaus” of the age old Christmas carol.  These two are just another example of two brothers who grow up to be the epitome of ‘good’ (Wenzel) and ‘evil’ (Boleslav).

Wenzel and Boleslav were sons of Vratislav I, Duke of the Bohemians and his wife Drahomira. They were raised at a time of religious upheaval, their own father being Christian and their mother being the daughter of a pagan chief. She was, however, baptised at the time of her marriage to Vratislav. Vratislav was killed in battle in 1921 at the rather young age of 33.

Statue of King Wenceslaus

Statue of Wenzel I, Duke of the Bohemians.

Wenzel, born about 907, although the oldest of the two boys, was only 14 when he succeeded his father upon his death. He was raised as a Christian thereafter by his grandmother, Saint Ludmila and was known as a humble, pious and intelligent young man. Ludmila was soon forced to seek sanctuary near Beroun at Tetin Castle as a result of a dispute with her daughter-in-law, Wenzel and Boleslav’s mother. This did not prove safe for Ludmila though, as her daughter-in-law Drahomira, furious at her loss of control of her son, had Ludmila strangled on September 15, 921 at Tetin.

St. Veit

St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague.

Interior of St. Vitus.

St. Vitus interior.

At about 18 years of age, Wenzel began controlling government and had his mother exiled. He founded St. Veit, Prague Castle in Prague. This still exists today as St. Vitus Cathedral.

Although at one time his father had been allied with Duke Arnulf of Bavaria, Duke Arnulf had since formed an alliance with King Henry I “the Fowler” and they joined forces to attack and force Wenzel to resume paying a tribute that had been assessed first in 895. Henry I had needed the tribute to pay tribute himself to the Magyars in 926. Another reason for the attack may have been an alliance formed between Bohemia, the Magyars and the Polabian Slavs.

Assassination of Saint Wenzels I.

Assassination of Wenzel I, Duke of the Bohemians in 935.

A group of nobles allied with Wenzel’s brother Boleslav after a quarrel between the brothers, plotting to kill Wenzel. Not suspecting a thing, Wenzel attended the feast of Saints Cosmas and Damian upon Boleslav’s invitation on September 28, 935 and three allies of Boleslav’s, Tira, Hněvsa and Čsta murdered him on his way to church, clearing the way for Boleslav to succeed as Duke of the Bohemians. Wenzel was buried at St. Veit.

Soon considered a martyr and saint, a cult of Wenzel arose in Bohemia and England. Within a few decades of his death, there were four biographies of Wenzel published and they had great influence on the perception of the ‘rex justus’ or ‘righteous king’. The common belief was that his power arose from great piety.

Boleslav became known as “der Grausame” or “the Cruel” as a result of his participation in the plot to kill his brother. His governance was a period of hostile relations with the empire until Otto I, King of Germany, forced him to pay tribute fourteen years later.

The Bohemians helped King Otto defeat the Hungarians at Lechfeld in 955, and later they crossed the Carpathian mountains and occupied Krakow and Silesia. In 965, Duke Boleslav formed an alliance with Mieszko I,  Prince of Poland. Their alliance was confirmed by Mieszko’s marriage to Dobrawa, Boleslav’s daughter.

Duke Boleslav supported the rebellion of Heinrich II, Duke of Bavaria, against Emperor Otto II. Once Emperor Otto had confiscated the duke’s territories, Heinrich II fled for refuge with Duke Boleslav in Bohemia. Boleslaw had married a woman named Biagota and died in 967.

Sources:

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy; http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#BoleslavIIdied99.
Wikipedia.org; http://www.wikipedia.org.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions, 29 July, 2014.

Following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions up to and including 29 July, 2014.
Obituaries: Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

Obituaries: Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions
Czechoslovakia
Korea
Spain
United States

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions
Australia
Canada
England

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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates to July 15, 2014.

Following are the most recent FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com additions and updates to their databases.

 

Ancestry.com Additions and Updates

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates

FamilySearch.org Additions and Updates

Brazil

Canada

Colombia

Czechoslovakia

Germany

Italy

Netherlands

Puerto Rico

Peru

Slovakia

South Africa

Spain

United Kingdom

United States

 

Ancestry.com

New Zealand

Poland

United Kingdom

United States

Venezuela

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – April 26, 2014

The following are the updates and additions for Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org between April 17 and 26, 2014.

 

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.orgFamilySearch.org

Belgium
Canada
England
France
Germany
Italy
Korea
Netherlands
Philippines
Portugal
Spain
United States

Ancestry.com

Armenia
Austria
Bahamas
Barbados
Brazil
Canada
Chile
Costa Rica
Estonia
Germany
Guatemala
Haiti
Nicaragua
Philippines
Slovakia
Slovenia
South Africa
Sri Lanka
Switzerland
United Kingdom
United States

 

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – April 1, 2014

The following are the FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

 

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and AdditionsFamilySearch.org

Austria
Belgium
Brazil
Canada
Denmark
Dominican Republic
England
Italy
Ivory Coast
Korea
Luxembourg
Mexico
Netherlands
New Zealand
Nicaragua
Peru
Philippines
Portugal
Puerto Rico
Russia
Slovakia
South Africa
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Ukraine
United States

 

Ancestry.com

Australia
Italy
South Africa
United States
Wales

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