Category: Newspapers Archive

Cool gadgets and gifts on every Genealogist’s wish list !

Over time, I have developed this list of my favorite and most wished for cool gadgets and gifts on every genealist’s wish list whether the occasion is Christmas, birthday, graduation, or any of life’s other milestones.

Apple – iPad with Retina Display 4th Generation 9.7″ 16 GB Wi-Fi Black Tablet – 2013 Model (iOS 6, LCD Touchscreen, 2048×1536, 10 Hours, Lightning Connector)

genealogist's wish list

Apple iPad with Retina Display 4th Generation 9.7 on the genealogist’s wish list.

Although in the past, I always used a laptop for portability, I find that I’m home all the time now and have replaced my old laptop with an all in one desktop with 23″ touch screen that I absolutely love.

Since I learned the lovely news that RootsMagic, my favorite genealogy software, has now released Mac and iOS compatible versions, I have decided that my next purchase will be the Apple iPad for portability – for those rare occasions when I do travel away from home.

Wizcom – QuickLink Pen Handheld Scanner (Infrared)

genealogist's wish list

Wizcom QuickLink Pen Handheld Scanner (Infrared) on the genealogist’s wish list.

I have an OCR conversion software for converting pdf and image files to be editable. This is an absolute must for my transcription efforts.

Although I don’t own a pen scanner, this is the next item on my list for my ‘portable pack.’

VuPoint Solutions – Magic Wand II Portable Photo + Document Scanner with Wi-Fi (Pewter) with 32GB Card + Reader + Case + Cloth

genealogist's wish list

Magic Wand II Portable Photo + Document Scanner with Wi-Fi and 32GB Card is on every genealogist’s wish list.

I did own this handheld scanner until my daughter knocked over my working table one day and broke it. I do intend to get another as it was great for scanning individual pages, open books, etc.

Couragent, Inc. – Flip-Pal mobile scanner

 on every genealogist's wish list.

Flip-Pal mobile scanner is on every genealogist’s wish list.

This is another scanner I don’t yet own, but I’m toying with purchasing this solely because of its portability and ability to ‘stitch’ images together. This is essential for scanning large documents, certificates, photos, charts, and diagrams.

WD – My Passport Slim BGMT0010BAL-NESN Portable External 1 TB Hard Drive (USB 3.0)

WD - My Passport Slim BGMT0010BAL-NESN Portable External 1 TB Hard Drive (USB 3.0)

My Passport Slim BGMT0010BAL-NESN Portable External 1 TB Hard Drive is on every genealogist’s wish list.

I swear by my portable, external hard drive. Using this in conjunction with SkyDrive, my genealogy data is always duplicated and secure. This is by far the best method I’ve found for safeguarding years of hard work and investment.

NMicro – NMicro 1TB USB 3.0 tiny mini micro Pen DRIVE Blue Series actual 28.8GB Free Space

on every genealogist's wish list

NMicro 32GB tiny mini micro Pen DRIVE Blue Series is on every genealogist’s wish list.

For those occasions when I don’t want to lug around the portable external hard drive, the micro pen drive is the answers. It is great for storing those scanner images, photos, etc. until I can get home and transfer them to my main system.

Magnabrite – 64mm Magnabrite® Light Gathering Magnifier

is on every genealogist's wish list

Magnabrite® 64mm Light Gathering Magnifier is on every genealogist’s wish list.

I haven’t been doing a lot of research in dimly lit, dusty old libraries, archives, etc., this is an amazing gift as it gathers and magnifies the ambient light to direct it at specific documents, books, etc. and making them more readable.

Nuance – Dragon NaturallySpeaking v.9.0 Preferred (Voice Recognition Mini Box – PC – English)

 is on every genealogist's wish list

Nuance – Dragon NaturallySpeaking v.9.0 Preferred is on every genealogist’s wish list.

I love my NaturallySpeaking software and use it all the time. It doesn’t work well when there are people around all the time, but for someone like me who is home alone during the weekdays, this software enables easy verbal transcription of documents, and then it’s just a matter of editing and formatting. Such a time saver!

I also swear by this because I like my blogs to have a more conversational tone, so I dictate my blog posts directly into the software for easy editing and formatting. If you’re a blogger with plenty of quiet time on your own, you really must try this.

NOTE: There is some ‘training’ required to increase accuracy, but except for a few ‘glitchy’ instances, I find it amazingly accurate.

Great Plains – WOW 4-in-1 Combo Stylus for Touchscreen Tablets

 is on every genealogist's wish list.

Great Plains 4-in-1 Stylus for Touchscreen Tablets is on every genealogist’s wish list.

Since I just purchased my very first touch screen computer – my new all in one – my next purchase will be a decent stylus for on screen actions and activities – and just for fun!

Antenna Shop – Antenna Shop Brief Bag with Stylish Carrying Case for Tablets and Gadgets (ASBBNB)

 is on every genealogist's wish list.

Antenna Shop Carrying Case for Tablets and Gadgets on every genealogist’s wish list.

I don’t think I have to say much about this one. Once I’ve purchased all of the items on my list above that I don’t already own, this would be an ideal case for carrying around the iPad and extraneous gadgets required to keep my genealogy research and blogging life simple – believe it or not!

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – 14 Oct 2014

Sorry for the large gap. I’m in the process of doing some experimental performance of this site which has demanded much of my attention in the past couple of weeks. Finally, though, here are the FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to October 14, 2014.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions
Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

Australia

Belgium

Canada

Colombia

Ghana

India

Indonesia

Italy

New Zealand

Slovakia

Spain

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Australia

Bermuda

Canada

Hungary

Netherlands

United Kingdom

United States

Transcription: Draft Board Delinquents, Arlington Heights Herald, January 29, 1943

Following is the transcription of a newspaper article listing draft board delinquents printed in the Arlington Heights Herald on January 29, 1943.
Clayton William Blythe Newspaper Column

Newspaper article listing draft board delinquents printed in the Arlington Heights Herald on January 29, 1943.

Arlington Heights Herald

Volume 16, Number 23

Friday, January 29, 1943

 

List more delinquents of draft board

The following men, registered with Selective Service Local Board No. 1, are classified as suspected delinquents. Any person whose name appears upon the list should report immediately to this board, for correction of records. Failure to do so will cause the board to turn the name over to the United States Attorney for investigation.

John Paul Gasior, 255 N. Brockway, Palatine, Ill.

Walter Wilbert Simila, 634 Brainard st., Detroie, Mich.

John Jack Greschner, 33 N. W. 9th st., Miami, Florida.

Fred Edward Weaver, R. 1, Elgin, Ill.

Robert Loyd Wilt, Wheeling, Ill.

Peter Bose, Bartlett, Ill.

Walter Ladislaw Simo, Box 31, Clearfield, Utah.

Richard Eugene Mosher, General Delivery, Milton Jct., Wisc.

Herman Henry Kleeberg, R. 1, Box 2707, Des Plaines, Ill.

Clayton William Blythe, Palatine rd., Box 471, Arlington Heights, Ill.

Stephan Fritz, R. 1, Roselle, Ill.

Paul August Peske, R. 1, c/o Magnus, Arlington Heights, Ill.

George F. H. Rieckenberg, 3960 Elston ave., Chicago, Ill.

Roy E. Wilson, 502 S. Wapella ave., Mt. Prospect, Ill.

Martin Edward Nelson, R. 4, Elgin, Ill.

Thomas Parker, R. 1, Box 153, Dundee, Ill.

Herbert David James, R. 2, Otis rd., Barrington, Ill.

Ed. W. Hayes, R. 2, Palatine, Ill.

Carl Mendelsky, Karsten Farm, Arlington Heights, Ill.

Henry Mores Johnson, 15 N. State st., Elgin, Ill.

Joseph J. Hajny, R. 4, Box 4298, Elgin, Ill.

Joe Lapsansky, R. 1, Bartlett, Ill.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


US obituaries project to be made searchable online.

Press Release: Massive Online US Obituaries Project Will Help Find Your Ancestors
October 1, 2014
obituary project to be made searchable online.

US obituary project to be made searchable online.

Volunteers making over a billion names from US death records searchable online.

Salt Lake City, Utah —October 1, 2014

In celebration of Family History Month, FamilySearch International (FamilySearch.org) and GenealogyBank (GenealogyBank.com) today announced an agreement to make over a billion records from historical obituaries searchable online. It will be the largest—and perhaps most significant—online US historic records access initiative yet. It will take tens of thousands of online volunteers to make GenealogyBank’s vast U.S. obituary collection more discoverable online. Find out more at FamilySearch.org/Campaign/Obituaries.

The tremendous undertaking will make a billion records from over 100 million US newspaper obituaries readily searchable online. The newspapers are from all 50 states and cover the period 1730 to present. The completed online index will be fairly comprehensive, including 85% of U.S. deaths from the last decade alone. The death collection will easily become one of the most popular online genealogy databases ever, detailing names, dates, relationships, locations of the deceased, and multi-generational family members.

Family history information from obituaries are being indexed by volunteers and made searchable online.

Obituaries can solve family puzzles, tell stories, dispel myths, and provide tremendous help with family history research. A single obituary can include the names and relationships of dozens of family members. For example, Alice E. Cummings’ obituary (See above) sheds light on where she lived during her lifespan, her personal history, and it provides information connecting five generations of ancestors and descendants in her family tree—14 people in all.

Dennis Brimhall, CEO of FamilySearch, explained that obituaries are extremely valuable because they tell the stories of our ancestors’ lives long after they are deceased. He invites online volunteers to help unlock the “treasure trove” of precious family information locked away in newspaper obituaries.

“Billions of records exist in US obituaries alone,” Brimhall said. “The average obituary contains the names of about ten family members of the deceased—parents, spouse, children, and other relatives. Some include much more. Making them easily searchable online creates an enormously important source for compiling our family histories. The number of people who will benefit from this joint initiative is incalculable.”

GenealogyBank has over 6,500 historical U.S. newspapers and growing, spanning over 280 years. The death notices in these publications go beyond names and dates. They can provide insightful first-hand accounts about an ancestor that simply are not available from censuses or vital records alone.

“Obituaries, unlike any other resource, have the ability to add incredible dimensions to an individual’s family history research. They contain a wealth of information including facts and details that help capture the legacy of those who have passed on,” said Dan V. Jones, GenealogyBank Vice President. “The unique life stories written, dates documented, and generations of family members mentioned are often only found within an obituary, which makes them such an invaluable resource. Obituaries have the unique power to both tell a story and enable individuals to learn more about their family relationships. GenealogyBank is proud and excited to partner with FamilySearch in bringing these obituaries to researchers all over the world.”

Volunteers Are Key

The success of the massive US obituary campaign will depend on online volunteers. The obituaries are fairly simple to read, since they are digital images of the typeset, printed originals, but require human judgment to sort through the rich, historic data and family relationships recorded about each person. Information about online volunteering is available at FamilySearch.org/indexing. A training video, indexing guide, detailed instructions, telephone and online support are available to help new volunteer indexers if needed.

FamilySearch.org volunteers have already indexed over one billion historic records online since 2006, including all of the available U.S. Censuses, 1790 to 1940. In 2012 volunteers rallied in a record-breaking effort to index the entire 1940 U.S. Census in just four months. Today, the US censuses, 1790 to 1940, are the most popular online databases for family history research. Indexed obituary collections can be searched online at FamilySearch.org and GenealogyBank.com.

____________________

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,600 family history centers in 132 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

About GenealogyBank

GenealogyBank.com is one of the largest exclusive collections of newspapers and historical documents for family history research. It provides information on millions of American families from 1690–today. Over 6,500 newspapers provide first-hand accounts of your ancestors’ lives that simply can’t be found in other genealogy resources: obituaries, birth and marriage notices, photographs, hometown news and more. Over 380,000 historical books and documents from 1749-1994 include military records, widow’s claims, orphan petitions, land grants, casualty lists, funeral sermons, biographies and much more. Discover the stories, names, dates, places and events that have shaped your family story at GenealogyBank.com.

photo credit: rosefirerising via photopin cc

Sign of the times: Ancestry.com killing local genealogy societies?

To me, the new article I discovered today on the Simcoe Reformer website illustrates a disturbing trend in which the larger, conglomerate sites such as Ancestry.com are killing local genealogy societies.
online genealogy websites killing local genealogy societies?

Are large online genealogy websites killing local genealogy societies?

I must admit, I’ve never been one to do physical research. As one whose personal income depended on computers, the internet and their use on the job, I began my genealogy research twenty years ago using the internet almost exclusively. My timing was just right as there was an influx of information being indexed online and I was able to take advantage as I progressed in my research.

Admittedly, I would hit frequent brick walls, but the scope of my research was so extensive, I would just shelve that brick wall, move on to something else, and come back to it later with the hope something had been put online that would allow me to break down that brick wall.

According to the above mentioned article, the Norfolk chapter of the Ontario Genealogical Society will be holding a sad but important meeting to discuss the organization’s chances of survival into the future. With a membership that has dropped by almost 50% over several years, and this is easily attributed to the mass availability of genealogy data online with large sites such as Ancestry.com. There’s no longer much reason to do physical research in local repositories, libraries and genealogy societies.

As sad as this seems, it is a sign of progress and global accessibility to all information, which is as it should be – giving everyone with computers and internet connections equal access.

The only part about this that bothers me is, what will happen to the collections held by these organizations? My hope is that there will still be regional organizations in the larger city centers and these collections can be transferred, care for and made available to the general public at these venues.

Living in Chilliwack, British Columbia, I would have no problem traveling to Vancouver if the local collections were transferred to the larger city. For those times when we have to research areas not indexed online, it would be well worth making the periodic trip.

photo credit: agahran via photopin cc

Transcription: Obituary for Marieanne Turmel Bourgeois

The following is my transcription of the newspaper article or obituary for Marieanne Turmel Bourgeois.
Obituary for Marieanne Turmel-Bourgeois.

Obituary for Marieanne Turmel Bourgeois.

Emile Bourgeois

Mrs. Marieanne Turmel Bourgeois, 82, widow of Emile Paul Bourgeois, formerly of 1200 Elm St., died Friday night at a Manchester nursing home after a long illness. She was born in St. Agnes, County Beauce, Que., the daughter of Jean and Reberra (Thivierge) Turmel and had been a resident of Manchester since 1912.

Mr. Bourgeois was an attendant of St.-George Church.

Members of her family include two daughters, Mr. Roland (Antoinette) Marois of Manchester, and Mrs. Margaret Ducharme, of Goffstown; two sons, Albert Bourgeois and Edouard Bourgeois, both of Manchester; 12 grandchildren, great-nieces.

Relatives and friends may call at the Lambert Funeral Home, 1799 Elm st., corner of North Street. Visiting hours are from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. today.

A mass of Christian burial will be celebrated Monday morning at 9 in St. George Church. Burial will be in Mt. Calvary Cemetery.

_____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.