Category: pension

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – 14 Oct 2014

Sorry for the large gap. I’m in the process of doing some experimental performance of this site which has demanded much of my attention in the past couple of weeks. Finally, though, here are the FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to October 14, 2014.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions
Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

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Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

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Hungary

Netherlands

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Are free genealogy databases a thing of the past?

In almost twenty years of genealogy research, I have found a considerable amount of the sources, data and images on free genealogy databases online. They still exist in large numbers and can be very valuable.
find free genealogy databases

Finding free genealogy databases.

The tough part in some cases is finding them, as most sites created by amateur genealogists and website owners are not optimized for the internet and therefore may not rank well in Google searches.

Be sure to sift through as many links as you can. If the site entered from a Google search result links to other sites, then by all means check them out. It’s important to bookmark any sites you find valuable as it’s very likely that days, weeks, months or even years down the road, you may never be able to find it again.

One tool I find very helpful for finding free genealogy databases is the Google Genealogy Search Tool at the Ancestor Search website. Scroll to the very bottom for the search tool, just one of many on the page. This tool incorporates most of all the search types above it. Just proceed to the next search results once you’ve waded through a set. This is very quick, easy and fruitful.

It is also important to search by other means than just names, such as location, topical sites (i.e. military service, war records, births, deaths, etc.) and dedicated surname websites.

When you begin to study genealogy, the resources that you have are few and far between. Most of us don’t go out and purchase expensive books or buy memberships in larger sites to get the information that we want. We tend to rely more on our own experiences and family members, but the truth is that those resources, while good, won’t carry you back through too many generations before you need some additional help.

Frustration can be an integral part of genealogy research. When it gets to the point where I’m very frustrated and feeling blocked, I create a ‘to do’ note on the person’s record in my genealogy software and turn to a different item. I find when I return later, either with a fresh, clear mind, or having given the database time to make updates, I will find something useful.

While you’re working online on your family tree, the free genealogy database will very often be a life saver. Those of us who don’t, or can’t buy the online access to the many paid databases, use the free ones religiously to find our way through family members. While you may not find all of the things that you want to know, you will find a great deal of information that will point you in another direction you weren’t even aware that you had to explore.

Even paid genealogy sites offer some specific databases for free access. These sites include Ancestry.com, and Fold3.com, amongst others. To search for free records on any given paid genealogy site, find the search link, go to advanced search, and enter the keyword ‘free.’ Most sites will produce a list of all free databases on the site. Also, try a general ‘free database’ keyword search on Google. Be prepared for thousands of search results, but at least it’s a place to start.

It is also important to subscribe to the blogs or newsletters to learn of any time limited free database promotions that may be coming up.

For all of you who thought the free genealogy search was a thing of the past, and that nothing worth having was free any more, take heart. There are literally thousands of free genealogy database sites out there that are waiting for you to come and pick through them and get what you can for your own genealogy.

photo credit: shindoverse via photopin cc

Transcription: Affidavit of Alanson and Mitty Adams

Affidavit of Alanson and Mitty Adams

Affidavit of Alanson and Mitty Adams of March 31, 1869.

Below is my transcription of the affidavit of Alanson and Mitty Adams regarding the War of 1812 service of William B. Coon and David Coon.

Written in left margin of document:

Sworn to and subscribed before me and [verify] that I know affidavits to be credible to [??] and that I am disinterested and [??] dep??s are respectable and credible persons

M W Carlen
Clerk Circuit Court

Stamp in upper right corner of document:

Department of [??]
March 14 187?
Pension Office

Main document text:

State of Wisconsin
Fond du Lac County

On this 31st day of March AD 1869 before me personally came Alanson Adams & Mitty Adams his wife & are known personally, aged respectively 77 years and 78 years, who being sworn say each each for himself and herself personally, that they reside at the City of Fond du Lac in said County, that they knew in his lifetime David Coon, who was a Private in Company               Regt Wis Vols, who died while in the service that they also know Herbert W. Coon son of the said David by Mary Ann Coon his wife, that said Herbert Coon was born in Alexandria, Licking Co. Ohio, July 29th 1848. That neither of affiants were present at the birth of said Herbert, but resided at [??] in an adjoining house and knew the fact of his mothers accouchment and were present with her from time to time during the days succeeding the birth of said Herbert and are fully satisfied that the said Herbert was the child there born to the said Mary Ann Coon. That they have ever since known the said Herbert. That said Mary Ann Coon and previous to her said husband, and these affiants were present at the wedding of said Mary Ann & David. That at the time of her death, she lived as the wife of said David & had the charge of his household and children & that said Herbert had not been adopted out or otherwise changed the relation of child to his said parents & that affiants have no interest in any matter [??] with said Herbert.

Alanson Adams
Mitty Adams

Notation in lower left corner of main document:

4

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

 

Alanson and Gardner Adams, Brothers in Arms in the War of 1812

I mentioned in a previous post about William B. Coon, who served as a soldier for the United States in the War of 1812 and was the father of Civil War casualty David Coon, that I would be writing about Alanson Adams (fifth great grandfather to my kids) who was father to David Coon’s first wife Mary Ann Adams. Alanson and Gardner Adams both fought in the War of 1812.
Alanson Adams

Alanson Adams

Alanson was born April 16, 1792 to Joseph Adams (born 1756) in Williston, Vermont, United States and was the brother of Gardner Adams.

Alanson and Gardner Adams - Muster Roll

Alanson and Gardner Adams – War of 1812 Muster Roll.

Alanson worked as a farmer until he enlisted along with his brother Gardner on January 28, 1813 for service as soldiers for the United States in the War of 1812, both as Privates with Captain Samuel R. Gordon and Captain (later Lieutenant) Valentine R. Goodrich’s Company of the 11th Infantry Regiment in Vermont.

On February 28, 1814, Alanson’s brother Gardner was recorded to be sick in hospital at Brownsville. He had been shot in the leg, and as a result of this injury, he received a military pension after his discharge on January 28, 1818, just one day following the discharge of his brother Alanson.

Submit Hall

Submit (Mitty) Hall

Alanson married Submit “Mitty or Malinda” Hall in 1840 and they had the following children: Elam Dennis Adams (1821-1897), Martha Marie Adams (1827-1861) and Mary Ann Adams (1824-1859), first wife of Civil War veteran David Coon (fourth great grandfather to my kids). Throughout his life, he worked as a farmer (early years), labourer in manufacturing and as a shoemaker.

Sometime between 1840 and 1844, Alanson and his family relocated to Licking County, Ohio, living there until after 1860, when they are recorded in the census at Fold du Lac, Wisconsin, where he is shown living near his son Elam Dennis Adams.

The wealth of Alanson and his family appears to have fluctuated considerably. In 1850, he owned $600 value in real estate, yet in 1860 his wealth had reduced to just $100 in personal goods (no real estate), and then in 1870 he owned $1,000 in real estate. It is unknown whether Alanson had any personal wealth in 1880 as he is showing in the Canadian census to be living with the family of his son Elam Dennis Adams, while still in Fold du Lac, Wisconsin.

Alanson and his family were members of the Baptist Church.

Alanson died April 23, 1881 while living in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. The following obituary was published in the Fond du Lac Daily Commonwealth of Tuesday, April 26, 1881, on page 4.

Retrospective

The death of Mr. Alanson Adams of our city on the 23rd instant, is an event of more than ordinary interest. Born in the year 1792, in the third year of Washington’s first term, his life covers nearly the whole period of our constitutional history. We are fairly startled at the rapidity of our country’s development, as compared with other countries, when we contemplate its history being crowded into the lifetime of one man. During this period the small circle of States bordering the Atlantic coast, few in population and impoverished by war, has been enlarged until it now engirdles the continent. A great nation, ranking among the first in power, wealth and influence has been developed within this comparatively short space of time. Human life can no longer be said to be short, if we measure it by the achievements comprehended within its.limits.

Mr. Adams is identified with the history of our country in one of the most endearing relations. Every country venerates the memory of its soldiers. Especially is this true of a republic, which must depend very largely on the valor and patriotism of its volunteer soldiers for defense. The deceased belongs to that noble band whom our nation delights to honor. In early manhood, at the call of his country, he entered her service in the war of 1812. He was in several engagements during this war, among which were the battles of Chippewa and Lundy’s Lane. At the latter place he was wounded. Thus another one of the few surviving heroes of this war has been laid away to that rest which no battle call, or shock —–will ever disturb.

But in still another and not less important cause was the deceased identified with the history and progress of our country. He belonged in the class of pioneers peculiar to our country, and yet sometimes overlooked, and underestimated in making our estimates of the elements entering late American progress. To this class of our population, essentially nomadic in its character, does our country owe very much of its greatness to-day. By it has been laid the foundations of that grand super-structure of American nationality which has no parallel in history. Reared in central Vermont he became identified with the early struggles of that State. In 1818 he was married. The union thus formed continued some fifty-four years. In 1844 with his family, consisting of one son and two daughters, he removed to Ohio. Here he remained until 1860, when he moved to Wisconsin, where he has since resided. Since the death of his wife, some ten years ago, he has made his home with his son, E.D. Adams, of our city, where he died.

The deceased was a devoted Christian, having been a member of the Baptist church nearly sixty years. He will be deeply mourned by the church to which he had endeared himself, and the circle of friends how knew him best. The sympathies of its many friends are extended to the bereaved family, with the assurance that our loss is his gain.

Sources:

  1. Payroll of a Company of Infantry Commanded by Lt. Valentine R. Goodrich, the Eleventh Regiment of the United States, for the Months of January and February, 1813, online [], accessed.
  2. Emily Bailey, “Mary Ann Adams,” e-mail message to Christine Blythe, 20 Nov 2006.
  3. Coon, David, death certificate no. Widow’s Claim to Pension – Emma and Hiram Coon (1864).
  4. Affidavit of Alanson and Mitty Adams (31 Mar 1869).
  5. Adams, Alanson obituary, Fond du Lac Commonwealth, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, Tuesday, April 26, 1881, Pg. 4.
  6. 1840 US Census, , (Burlington, Chittenden, Vermont); 541, Roll: 48; Page: 541; Image: 101, Family History Library Film: 0027439, 48, Original data: Sixth Census of the United States, 1840. (NARA microfilm publication M704, 580 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29, National Archives, Washington, D.C..
  7. 1870 US Census, , (Fond du Lac Ward 3, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin); Page: 285B, Roll: M593_1713; Page: 285B; Image: 577, Family History Library Film: 553212, Roll: M593_1713, Image: 577, National Archives and Records Administration, n.d., Washington, D.C..
  8. 1880 US Census, , (Fond du Lac Ward 3, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin); 212A, Roll: 1425; Page: 212A; Enumeration District: 41, Family History Film: 1255425, 1425, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, USA, Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
  9. 1800 US Census, , (Williston, Chittenden, Vermont, USA); 350, Roll: 51; Page: 350; Image: 195, Family History Library Film: 218688, 51, Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C..
  10. Adjutant-General, “Adjutant-General’s Report,” jpg, Roll of Capt. V. R. Goodrich’s Company (: accessed ).
  11. “William B. Coon Family,” e-mail message to Christine Blythe, 20 Nov 2006.

Now’s your chance to check out Ancestry.com’s free DNA kit.

Ancestry.com free DNA kit with 6 month subscription.

Ancestry.com gives a free DNA kit valued at $99 with a 6 month subscription.

If you’ve ever considered a subscription at Ancestry.com, now’s your chance to buy the 6 month subscription, and you’ll get a bonus of a free DNA kit valued at $99.

That’s the same value as the Ancestry.com subscription, so you’re essentially getting everything at half price.

My tough luck is that I’m already subscribed so I don’t qualify, because I’ve always wanted to get the DNA kit.

I’m a dedicated Ancestry.com World Subscription user as my research spans numerous continents, countries, counties and cities. No one comes even close to the broad range of geographical areas and document and source types offered by Ancestry.com.

There are a few points in our genealogy where doing a DNA test would be very helpful by confirming some connections for which it has been difficult to find reliable sources – at least this test could confirm that there is a connection, or not. It may also help us solve some family genealogy mysteries.

Oh well, I guess I’ll just have to let my subscription lapse and wait until they offer the free DNA kit again in the future???

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – June 5, 2014

Following are the Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions as of June 5, 2014.
Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

Brazil

Korea

Mexico

Netherlands

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Australia

Sweden

United Kingdom

United States