Category: Tips

Icelandic Ancestry: the Icelandic genealogy database is now available online.

Icelandic Ancestry: the Icelandic genealogy database is now available online.

Iceland entry.Previously, I wrote about the Incest Prevention App called ‘Sifjaspellsspillir’ or ‘Incest Spoiler’. It was created by University of Iceland students for a contest by the Íslendingabók database and its purpose is to alert two people of a possible familial connection when they tap their phones.

Today, in a related story, the “Icelandic Roots: Genealogy, Heritage, & Travel” website is announcing its release of the Icelandic genealogy database through their site.

The database is available with a monthly or yearly subscription. Access is also available to organizations and researchers by contacting them.

While continuing to add names and other great features, the database also links you to events, dates, occupations, cemetery records and burials, photos and more.

They will assist with your genealogy research by helping you find your family tree, connecting you with family members, and  providing ancestry charts and reports. All this is possible through their popular “Cousins Across the Ocean” project or you can complete their online request form for more information.

If you’re interested in finding out more, there are tips for using the database, and they also explain its history. If you have Icelandic research to do, this site and database are well worth checking out.

photo credit: Paul Miller via photopin cc

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Transcription: Sworn Statement regarding the Birth of Matthew Coon

Transcription: Sworn Statement regarding the Birth of Matthew Coon

The following is my transcription of the Sworn Statement regarding the birth of Matthew Coon.

State of Wisconsin
County of Waushara

Mrs. Mary Russell & Sarah Bradway being duly sworn upon their oaths say that they reside in said County and state that are acquainted with Isabel A. Coon widow of David Coon of Co A Batt Regt Wis Vols, and was acquainted with the said David in his lifetime.

That they were present at the births of Matthew E. Coon child of the said David and Isabel A. and know that he was born on the 3 day of November 1861 at the town of Bloomfield in said County and State.

They further say that they have no intent in any application in which this may relate.

Mary Russell

Sworn and subscribed before me this 27th day of February 1867 and I certify the affiants to be credible persons and that I have no intent in the claim of said Isabel A. for increase of pension  the word Poysippi erased & Bloomfield enten????? before signing —

James Russell  Justice of the Peace

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

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Vintage watches and vintage photographs make a wonderful combination.

Vintage watches and vintage photographs make a wonderful combination.

The old, hackneyed saying of “a picture’s worth a thousand words” couldn’t be more true than with this image I stumbled across on Pinterest this morning of vintage watches repurposed as portrait frame bracelets.

Luckily, that’s all that’s needed in this case as this blog seems to be in Swedish – which I totally don’t understand at all. I could use Google Translate or some other translation service to read the post, but why bother? The picture truly is self-explanatory.

Then I started thinking of other time pieces that could be converted this way, especially if they’re broken.

Here are the possibilities brought to mind:

  • Grandfather clock.

  • Pocket watch.

  • Mantle clock.

  • Watch pendant.

  • Wall clock.

While rummaging through garage sales and thrift stores in the past, I never would have thought to look at old clocks, watches, etc. Seeing this post (oops! I should say image as I couldn’t read the post) has changed that completely – and I’m going to start looking out for such items to use as frames for family photos and vintage images from my family tree research.

Sometimes the best ideas are other people’s ideas!

photo credit: practicalowl via photopin cc

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Transcription: Tombstone of Zotique Cloutier, Rosa Kingsberry, Raymonde Cloutier, Rene Cloutier, Ronald Cloutier, Rollande Labelle

Transcription: Tombstone of Zotique Cloutier, Rosa Kingsberry, Raymonde Cloutier, Rene Cloutier, Ronald Cloutier, Rollande Labelle

Transcription of the family tombstone of Zotique Cloutier, Rosa Kingsberry, Raymonde Cloutier, Rene Cloutier, Ronald Cloutier, and Rollande Labelle.

 

Cloutier Family Tombstone
Cloutier Family Tombstone

 

CLOUTIER

1891     Zotique Cloutier     1972

epoux de

1902     Rosa Kingsberry     1994

1932     Raymonde Cloutier

1944     Rene Cloutier     1994

1938     Ronald Cloutier

epoux de

1941     Rollande Labelle

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

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Sometimes it pays to look to the present for information about the past.

Sometimes it pays to look to the present for information about the past.

It’s amazing what information about the past including people and events can be found by searching through online newspapers, magazines, etc. – even if they are in a foreign language.

I’m routinely having to read, translate and understand documents written in their original language such as French, German, Swedish, and so on. My go to method for getting started is accessing ‘Google Translate’. To have a web page translated, just type the complete original language url in the Google search box, press ‘search’, find what you’re looking for in the search results list and click on ‘Translate this page’.

El Economista TranslatedOne such site I’ve recently accessed was ‘El Economista’ a Mexican, Spanish language online newspaper. On this particular day, the headlines were dominated by news of Javier Duarte de Ochoa and his handling of the crisis created by the recent tropical storm. Javier Duarte is the Governor of Veracruz, Mexico.

Above is a clip from the Google translated site mentioned and as you can see the text in the first paragraph is quite understandable, although not quite grammatically correct. I would always suggest finding independent confirmation elsewhere to confirm your understanding, if possible.

I routinely search through newspapers in the areas in which I’m researching and I have stumbled upon some real ‘gems’ related to my research, including a rooming house arson fire a recent ancestor escaped from, another ancestor whose name was published as a deserter in WWI, and most recently news of a tragic train crash in a community from which my own father’s French Canadian family originates. It was particularly heartbreaking to read the names of the deceased in the online French language news sites, and to recognize many of them as distant relatives.

Using Google translate  is also a useful tool if transcribing documents from their original language. Go to the main Google translate page, type the text in question in the left box, making sure it’s labeled with the correct language and click ‘Translate’. The English translation will appear to the right if English is the selected language. Text can be translated to and from numerous languages.

photo credit: Augie Schwer via photopin cc

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New Link: Online Newspapers Archive

New Link: Online Newspapers Archive

Learning of this online newspapers archive site was very exciting to me. Some of the most valuable information we can find in our genealogical search comes from newspaper accounts because they provide a more detailed reflection of the lives of our ancestors – not just facts and figures. I have added this link to the main ‘Genealogy Links’ page in the top menu.

 

Online newspapers archive.
Online newspapers archive.

The Online Newspapers Archive site endeavours to centralize the thousands of historical newspapers from various sources in one location.

The first newspapers I looked for were those in the Acadian territories of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick before, during and after the expulsion. My family names do show in the papers available after 1850, but it will take some time to sift through them.

The newspapers for Pennsylvania, New York, Illinois and Kentucky also look promising as a great deal of our family history took place in these states.

One great disappointment, though is that there is nothing yet for the United Kingdom.

Although there are great gaps in the newspapers available for some geographical regions, what is available could provide that ‘gem’ one or more of us have been seeking.

I definitely intend to investigate this site further.

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Unravelling the mysteries behind one of Canada’s oldest cemeteries.

Unravelling the mysteries behind one of Canada’s oldest cemeteries.

I had to post this article as soon as I saw it. Visiting this graveyard was one of the best family experiences we’ve ever had – and it was a great opportunity to explore our own family history.

As a matter of fact, the tour guide, Alan Melanson and I are 7th great grandchildren of Charles Mellanson and Marie Dugas (Charles was a son of the original Melanson couple – Pierre and Priscilla.)

Stuart, Erin and Alan Melanson in graveyard.
My children, Erin and Stuart, sit through an enthralling tale told by fellow ‘Melanson’ cousin, Alan Melanson, the very informative and entertaining tour guide.
It’s been a century since Fort Anne became Canada’s first administered national historic site, but much of the history surrounding the once hotly contested grounds in Annapolis Royal, N.S., is still shrouded in mystery.

On Monday, a team of researchers hope to use new technology to unlock some of the old secrets buried within Fort Anne’s Garrison Graveyard, which is one of the oldest English cemeteries in Canada.

“To understand where we’re going, we need to understand where we’ve been,” said Ted Dolan, Parks Canada’s site and visitor experience manager for historic sites in southwestern Nova Scotia.

“Any additional information that we have as to what happened on our landscape in the past is really going to inform us as to who we are and where we come from.”

Dolan describes Fort Anne as “the most fought-over piece of land in Canadian history since European colonization.” Originally fortified by the Scots as early as 1629, the site was later taken over by the French, before it fell to British troops in 1710. It would remain a regular battle scene for another 50 years.

While over 200 British headstones still stand in the Garrison Graveyard, Dolan said researchers believe there could be more than 2,000 people buried at the site whose wooden markers have since decayed over time.

In addition, prior to 1710, Dolan said French soldiers and Acadians from the region were buried at the nearby St. Jean-Baptiste parish, which had a cemetery located close to the fort.

While researchers aren’t completely sure where the French and Acadian cemetery is, he said they have a “pretty good idea. . .”

Read on . . .

Source: Unravelling the mysteries behind one of Canada’s oldest cemeteries | CTV News Atlantic

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Dec 1918.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Dec 1918.

The following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Dec 1918.

You may have noticed that the usual FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com updates post from mid-October did not appear. This was due to a much reduced quantity to list. The few between October 1st and October 31st have been included in the list below.

In future, the only scheduled updates and additions posts will be the ones on the first of the month. However, if the quantity of links warrant it, there could be an additional post at the mid-month.

 

FamilySearch.org updates and additions.

Canada

Costa Rica

Honduras

Germany

New Zealand

Peru

Portugal

South Africa

United Kingdom

United States

 

Ancestry.com updates and additions.

Canada

Germany

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

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Remembrance Day: A civilian’s responsibility?

Remembrance Day: A civilian’s responsibility?

Today being Remembrance Day, I was thinking about a recent post in which I quoted an article exploring how Canadians need to do more for Remembrance Day.

Since then, while watching all the usual Remembrance Day coverage on television, I saw a news report about the increasingly troubled Canadian Legions. Several have closed or are slated to close because of low memberships and revenue.

What really surprised me, was to learn that civilians can become members and reap the same benefits enjoyed by military members and veterans.

Acccording to Toronto.com, “The legion has been losing members at a rate of about 8,000 a year. Part of that is due to death – the largest cohort of members are veterans of the Second World War, a conflict that ended more than 70 years ago – but it has been a challenge to attract and retain veterans of more recent conflicts.”

The Royal Canadian Legion was founded in 1926 to lobby for the needs of veterans returning from the first world war.  That service expanded to include other veterans, including those who’ve never been to war.

Some believe the Canadian Legion has become outdated and no longer represents the military and veterans as they exist in today’s world.

Mark and Stuart in Remembrance Day Parade.
Mark and Stuart in Remembrance Day Parade. c 2000.

A discussion on the subject between my husband, Mark and I caused me to immediately say, “Why don’t we register and get memberships for the kids as Christmas gifts?”

Mark is a veteran, but the others would be civilian memberships.

Then, while researching the subject, I discovered this Global News article about how the veterans themselves feel. I was shocked at how out of touch I have been, especially being the wife and daughter of military veterans.

According to those interviewed for the article:

One of the biggest complaints they have is the number of civilians who are now members. Though most of them mean well, they’re not making the Legion enough of a home for those who’ve served Canada because they don’t understand the military culture.

“There’s a very strict disconnect between what they do, and what we do …”

Also, because of this disconnect, they don’t always provide the services that veterans need — like enough support for those who suffer from PTSD.

Erin in her Air Cadet Uniform
Erin in her Air Cadet Uniform c 2007.

Surely there are ways to include civilians in some of the programs, increasing understanding on both sides? Although a civilian, I am a sufferer of PTSD and a program I could access that is separate from the woefully inadequate mental health system might be a place to start.

I never considered myself out of touch because of my background in the military and veteran cultures. However, as different as veterans and civilians are, there are indeed common circumstances and obstacles we all struggle with.

These articles caused me to doubt my idea of giving civilian memberships as gifts.

Then again, isn’t that a good place to start?

Civilians becoming members would enable learning more about our veterans, and increasing our understanding of each other.

At the very least, some if not all of the endangered legion branches may be saved. This could actually buy time for the legions to update and adapt to today’s veteran and their families.

My genealogy research into the extensive military history of both sides of our family has taught me a great deal and enabled me to become aware of how important it is for civilians to support our veterans – and never forget the sacrifices made in all conflicts, including World War I and World War II.

Related articles:

 

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Nov 2018.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Nov 2018.

The following are the Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Nov 2018.

Featured image: House in Lesotho.

FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Nov 2018.

 

Canada

Chile

Dominican Republic

France

French Polynesia

Germany

Iceland

Ireland

Italy

Lesotho

Liberia

New Zealand

Peru

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com updates and additions to 1 Nov 2018.

Yet again, there is nothing new over the past two weeks.

I will keep checking to see if Ancestry.com starts showing these additions and updates to their site.

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A primer on cemetery research to find ancestors.

A primer on cemetery research to find ancestors.

I’ve always loved gravestone and cemetery research to find ancestors.

Although I do most of my genealogical research via the internet, and in a very small amount via snail mail, there is something visceral about visiting the actual graves of our ancestors and recording the information about them (and their families if in family plots).

In previous posts, I related the story of my family’s genealogical driving tour of Nova Scotia a few years ago. The first was about our exploring a community cemetery and the other was regarding our experience taking the Fort Anne graveyard tour.

When you’re working on researching distant generations of ancestors, cemetery research is one of the most satisfying, hands on forms of genealogical exploration you can do. It’s one way to connect with a tangible reminder of particular ancestors, which is often an elusive feeling.

Finding a tombstone or other sign of the resting place of an ancestor can give you insights into who they were.

Is their tombstone humble or grand?

Does it contain an inscription that speaks of a simple life, of one that hints at a great love story, or a somber and religious disposition?

What dates are inscribed?

The information source is rich, yet locating cemeteries and navigating the research process isn’t always straightforward. Here’s how to get started with genealogical cemetery research.

 

What can I expect to learn from a cemetery?

 

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 22 Aug 2015.

 

It’s important to note that cemeteries and grave markers can be excellent sources of information about the deceased. While they are not primary information sources, they can clarify details such as:

  • an ancestor’s name, including obscure details like maiden names and middle names or even occasionally pet names;
  • date of birth;
  • date of death;
  • names of family members including parents, spouses, and children;
  • religion;
  • military service; and
  • fraternal order membership.

Cemeteries are a wonderful source of information that can confirm what you’ve learned from earlier research. In other cases, you’ll garner information that you didn’t know.

For example, there may be symbolism on a tombstone suggesting that your ancestor was a member of the Masonic Lodge or perhaps they are buried in a Catholic burial ground. Each of these small clues can open up new avenues for research and exploration.

 

How to find out where someone is buried?

 

There are many ways to find where your ancestors are buried.

The first is to look at any records associated with their death, including certificate of death, obituaries, church notices, and other funerary documents. Consulting similar information for spouses, siblings, children, and parents can also sometimes lead you to the right information.

If you know your ancestor’s religious affiliation, it’s possible to find out if there’s a church or community cemetery. Consult local records and histories.

Finally, there are a number of cemetery guides online that can help you locate an ancestor’s gravesite.

You might also want to try billiongraves.com and findagrave.com. They can be very helpful in locating family members and their information.

 

Making the most of a cemetery visit.

 

Whether you’re already near a cemetery where an ancestor is buried or you’re making a special trip, there are several things you’ll want to do to make the most of your visit.

The first is to bring a copy of any information you have about the ancestors, such as names and dates of birth. If you have a map or details of the cemetery, bring those as well, as large burial grounds can be difficult to navigate.

To document as much information as possible, bring paper and writing implements or electronic devices to record information and make any notes.

Consider bringing a digital camera with you to document the cemetery, individual headstones, and the relationship between specific stones that may be useful later.

Avoid taking grave rubbings, if possible. It’s a source of conflict but most people today feel that the risk of damage to the stone is too high. A high resolution camera now yields a wonderful degree of detail.

A final note on the logistics of cemetery visits: dress appropriately for being outdoors, and think ahead to things like bug spray and sunscreen. Wear a hat, and bring plenty of water as your visit may be a lengthy one.

If the cemetery you’re visiting is on private property, get permission first.

If the cemetery in question has a caretaker and you’re able to find them, spend a moment saying hello and explaining your mission. They may have valuable information.

Finally, if you’re headed into a cemetery that’s overgrown, isolated, or in an unknown area, consider bringing a companion for both company and safety.

A professional genealogist can help you with all types of genealogical issues, from completing all your research to answering specific questions about cemetery research.

____________________

Jillynn Stevens is a writer and researcher. She is the Director of Digital Content Marketing for Be Locally SEO where she enjoys helping clients expand and improve their businesses through articles, blogs, website content and more.

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The Mormons are making major changes to their genealogy database to recognize same-sex families / LGBTQ Nation

The Mormons are making major changes to their genealogy database to recognize same-sex families / LGBTQ Nation

During Pride Month in June, LGBT people interested in family history received interesting news. Beginning next year, the world’s largest genealogy organization, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, will release a redesigned website that will include same-sex families.

FamilySearch.org, sponsored by the Mormons, first said in 2015 that it would add a feature for same-sex relationships, the Deseret News reported. Now, the major overhaul to the website’s system should be ready by 2019.

There are several other family history sites – Ancestry.com is probably the best known – that already allow same-sex recognition. In addition to Ancestry, other major sites are Israel-based MyHeritage and England-based Findmypast. FamilySearch is the only one that is totally free for all of its databases.

For LGBT genealogists, the FamilySearch news was a pleasant surprise . . .

Read on . . .

Source: The Mormons are making major changes to their genealogy database to recognize same-sex families / LGBTQ Nation

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Trials and tribulations of being a genealogy and history blogger.

Trials and tribulations of being a genealogy and history blogger.

Regular readers may have noticed a problem with several posts from the beginning of September.
August 28th I purchased a plugin and theme that were supposed to streamline the curation of content of interest to my readers and myself. However, within about a week I noticed that it was bringing up a lot of ‘junk’ and I deleted it. (I’m still waiting for a refund.)

Today, I was doing the final tweaks of setting up this lovely new site theme and happened to notice that the links and videos from some or all of the posts placed by this plugin had broken.

I wasted no time and today I spent the time necessary re-linking and fixing the videos in the posts.

This selection of articles was the result of my cherry picking from the dozens suggested by the plugin. They are of great interest to me – and hopefully you too.

If you had trouble accessing the full articles and media or videos, please do check them out now they’re working.

…and thank you for your patience!

 

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How ancient DNA is transforming history | IT

How ancient DNA is transforming history | IT

Over the past 10 years, a new field has emerged which is revolutionizing our understanding of human history and anthropology. Ancient DNA, the analysis of DNA from human remains, is beginning to unravel some of the mysteries of the past, like the migration of people and the spread of culture, through periods of time from hundreds to tens of thousands of years.

Until recently, our reconstruction of the past relied on archaeology and tentative hypotheses, but now the hard science of genetics is beginning to take a leading role in understanding the population patterns we see across the globe today. At Trinity College Dublin, Prof Dan Bradley is a world leader in this emerging field – he has been trying to understand the human past from DNA for the past 25 years.

“For years, we had been looking at modern genetic data and trying to understand how population patterns may have come about,” he says. “But compared to ancient human DNA, the problem with modern data is that it can only bring us so far.”

Bradley explains it was the case of Ötzi the ice man, one of the first ancient Europeans to have their genome sequenced, which made him realize the power of ancient DNA.

Read on . . .

Source: How ancient DNA is transforming history

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Common mistakes in genealogy | Ancestry

Common mistakes in genealogy | Ancestry

It doesn’t matter if you are new to genealogy or have been doing this for a while, we’ve all made them — mistakes and assumptions as we climb up our family tree.

Crista will share some of the common family history research mistakes and give tips about how to avoid them.

Start Your Journey Today:
http://www.ancestry.com/s89750/t38352/rd.ashx

Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsc0AQkAh_2cQmxqwD6VWRw?sub_confirmation=1

About Ancestry:

Bringing together science and self-discovery, Ancestry helps everyone, everywhere discover the story of what led to them. Our sophisticated engineering and technology harnesses family history and consumer genomics, combining billions of rich historical records, millions of family trees, and samples from almost 10 million people in the AncestryDNA database to provide people with deeply meaningful insights about who they are and where they come from.

We’ve pioneered and defined this category, developing new innovations and technologies that have reinvented how people make family history discoveries. And these discoveries can give everyone a greater sense of identity, relatedness, and their place in the world.

https://www.youtube.com/user/AncestryCom

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Tips for using Google Goldmine for Genealogy | BYU

Tips for using Google Goldmine for Genealogy | BYU

James Tanner of Brigham Young University Library (BYU) teaches us how to use the all features Google has to offer to help you do your family history using the Google Goldmine for Genealogy.

With this advice, you can make the most of and get the greatest results from all of your genealogy and ancestry research online.

For more information on upcoming webinars visit his website.

Read on . . .

http://sites.lib.byu.edu/familyhistory/classes-and-webinars/online-webinars/

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Genealogy Jargon Defined | Ancestry

Genealogy Jargon Defined | Ancestry

When you first take a DNA test or start building a family tree, it can feel like you are trying to learn a new language. Join Crista Cowan for a quick look at some common genealogy and family history words, phrases, and acronyms. Learn their meanings so you can continue your family history journey with confidence.

Subscribe: http://po.st/AncestrySubscribe

About Ancestry:
Bringing together science and self-discovery, Ancestry helps everyone, everywhere discover the story of what led to them. Our sophisticated engineering and technology harnesses family history and consumer genomics, combining billions of rich historical records, millions of family trees, and samples from almost 10 million people in the AncestryDNA database to provide people with deeply meaningful insights about who they are and where they come from.

We’ve pioneered and defined this category, developing new innovations and technologies that have reinvented how people make family history discoveries. And these discoveries can give everyone a greater sense of identity, relatedness, and their place in the world.

Connect with Ancestry:
Visit Ancestry’s Official Site: https://www.ancestry.com/
Like Ancestry on Facebook: http://po.st/AncestryFacebook
Follow Ancestry on Twitter: http://po.st/Ancestry_Twitter
Follow Ancestry on Instagram: http://po.st/AncestryInstagram

Genealogy Jargon Defined | Ancestry
https://www.youtube.com/user/AncestryCom

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Secret son: Mum was a Catholic nun and Dad was a priest | Newcastle Herald

Secret son: Mum was a Catholic nun and Dad was a priest | Newcastle Herald

JOHN Smith’s* mother was a nun, his father was a priest, and their very Catholic secret about the baby they gave up for adoption would have gone with them to the grave except for DNA, science and Ancestry.com.

Mr Smith has added his voice to calls for the Catholic Church to make celibacy voluntary for clergy and end the “trauma and extreme pain experienced by many because of the ridiculous rules of the church”.

“If it wasn’t for the DNA link we’d never have found the truth. I’m not angry but I just feel sorry for all the people who’ve been caught up in the secrets, lies and hypocrisy of the Catholic Church,” said Mr Smith, who was in his 40s when he discovered his mother was a nun.

He confirmed his biological father was a Catholic priest following investigations and a DNA sample . . .

Read on . . .

Source: Secret son: Mum was a Catholic nun and Dad was a priest | Newcastle Herald

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Transcription: Sarah Biddle (Shreve), Last Will and Testament of 31 Aug 1807.

Transcription: Sarah Biddle (Shreve), Last Will and Testament of 31 Aug 1807.

388

[. . .]

Sarah Biddle’s Will.

Be it remembered that I, Sarah Biddle of the township of Springfield, in the County of Burlington, and State of New Jersey, widow, being in a weak state of body, but, through Divine favour, of sound mind and memory do make and publish this for my last will and testament, hereby revoking all others – First to my dear and affectionate daughter, Beulah Sansom, I give and bequeath all my wearing apparel – I also give to my said daughter the use of my household goods during the term of her natural life, and at her decease the same to my nephew James Shreve his heirs and assigns – Second, I bequeath to my executors and the survivor of them, her or his executors and administrators, two thousand pounds, Intrust nevertheless to loan out the same, at interest in this State on good and sufficient land security at their discretion and to pay the interest thereof coming due, annually to my aforesaid daughter during her life, and at her decease, if she leaves issue, I give to such issue the said principal sum of two thousand pounds, to be paid to him, her or them, as the case may be, together with whatever interest shall have arisen thereon after the decease of my said daughter; when he she or they shall arrive to lawful age; but in case there shall not be ssue of my said duaghter living to lawful age as above siad to receive the same I dispose of it in the following manner – To my two nephews Alexander Shreve and Charles Shreve, and to my four nieces Theodocia Earl, Leah Burr, Sarah Hulme and Rebecca Hulme, I give and bequeath

Sarah Biddle (Shreve): Her Last Will and Testament. Pg 387.
Sarah Biddle (Shreve): Her Last Will and Testament

388

eighteen hundred pounds, that is three hundred pounds to each of them and to my nephew James Shreve, I give two hundred pounds, which alltogether covers the said two thousand pounds, and should there be interest that has arisen thereon after the decease of my said daughter and before a division of the principal may take place, my will is that such interest shall be divided in the same proportions as is directed for the principal – Third, all the residue of my estate which I estimate at about three thousand pounds, after payment of my debts and funeral expenses I give and devise to my aforesaid nephew James Shreve on the following conditions: – during the lifetime of my aforesaid daughter, he my said nephew is to pay to her annually six per cent interest on the appraised value thereof, and at her decease to pay to his brother Alexander Shreve, one hundred pounds – to Sarah Biddle Hulme, the daughter of his sister Sarah Hulme, one hundred pounds, and in case the last named legatee shall not have arisen to the age of eighteen years at the decease of my said duaghter, I direct that her legacy be paid into the hands of her mother who is to have the use and profit of the same during her said child’s minority, at the end whereof her said child is to receive the said one hundred pounds to her own use – And to such person or perso s as the monthly meeting of friends held at Upper Springfield in the County of Burlington shall by a minute of said meeting certified by their Clerk authorize to receive the same on their behalf, the sum of fifty pounds; The said meeting to hold it in trust and to distribute the same at their discretion or at the discretion of a committee occasionally appointed thereby for the purpose in sums not exceeding five pounds to one individual amongst the aged or infirm members of said meeting who are not chargable to the said monthly meeting for a maintenance – Fourth In case that any or either of the legatees in perpetuity herein named should die befoer me, the legacy or legacies of such is not to lapse, but to descend to his, her or their heirs in the same way as it would have descended had such legatee been in possession thereof and died intestate – Lastly, I appoint my aforesaid dughter Beulah Sansom, executrix, and my aforesaid nephew James Shreve, executor of this my testament and last will – In witness whereof  have hereto set my hand and seal this thirty first day of the eighth month in the year one thousand eight hundred & seven.

Sarah Biddle {SEAL}

Signed, sealed, published and declared by the said Sarah Biddle to be her testament and last will in the presence of us XXXX The word “Sarah”

Sarah Biddle (Shreve): Her Last Will and Testament
Sarah Biddle (Shreve): Her Last Will and Testament Pg 388.

____________________

The complete original scans of the documents clips above can be accessed by clicking the images.

To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the top menu.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.

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Don’t whitewash history | Sundre Roundup

Don’t whitewash history | Sundre Roundup

I chose to publish an excerpt to this letter to the editor of the Sundre Roundup because of how well the author described exactly how I feel.

Removing statues, plaques and other commemorations of historical figures makes it too easy to forget mistakes of the past, in addition to remembering the true achievements. 

WE MUST REMEMBER.

________________

LETTERS

Don’t whitewash history

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

SEP 19, 2018

Re: “Statues are symbols, not history” on page 4 of the  Aug. 28 Sundre Round Up

Claiming that removing statues of historically controversial figures is not removing reminders of our history is frankly, highly disingenuous.

Removing a statue whitewashes the subject. Without statues, what would remind people to look up a person’s history.

Who would know that as soon as John A. Macdonald’s parents could afford to, they sent him to a residential (boarding) school, as it provided a better education than he could receive in a rural area.

We cannot judge historical figures by today’s standards; every famous person from more than 60 years ago held at least one idea we would find repugnant today.

If you want people to be educated, put a plaque outlining the person’s accomplishments, both good and bad, in front of the statue. Don’t whitewash it so that we forget it . . .

Read on . . .

Source: Don’t whitewash history | Sundre Roundup

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Did your Ancestry.com DNA results change dramatically? Here’s why | CBC News

Did your Ancestry.com DNA results change dramatically? Here’s why | CBC News

Some customers saw as much as a 10 to 20 per cent change to DNA results.
Some Ancestry customers who have taken the DNA test, which involves spitting in a tube, may have noticed a dramatic change in their results.

When Katy Jean of Dartmouth, N.S., sent in a sample of her DNA to Ancestry.com a year ago, she was hoping the genealogy website would tell her more about her background and maybe fill in gaps on her family tree.

Once the results came in, Jean said she wasn’t too surprised by the outcome — except for an unexplained one per cent result from Central Asia.

But then things changed.

“There was a significant change in my DNA results,” Jean said.

Jean went from having 75 per cent ancestry from Great Britain and 12 per cent Iberian Peninsula (Portugal & Spain) to 53 per cent England, Wales and Northwestern Europe, 31 per cent Ireland and Scotland. Iberian Peninsula and Central Asia disappeared.

The Ancestry results on the left are Katy Jean’s old results, the results on the right are her latest results. (Submitted by Katy Jean)

What changed? . . .

Read on . . .

Source: Did your Ancestry.com DNA results change dramatically? Here’s why | CBC News

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 15 Sep 2018.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 15 Sep 2018.

Most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 15 Sep 2018.

Featured image: Naples, Italy

FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 15 Sep 2018.

 

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Ancestry.com updates and additions to 15 Sep 2018.

 

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Genealogy goldmine Church of Ireland Parish Registers to go online.

Genealogy goldmine Church of Ireland Parish Registers to go online.

Does your Irish family have links to the Church of Ireland?
You could find out more about their past with the help of soon-to-be digitized records.

One of the wonders of the digital age is how the ability to digitize records has made it easier than ever to explore your genealogy no matter where in the world you are and now it’s set to become even easier if your Irish family was within the Church of Ireland.

On September 10, Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Josepha Madigan TD announced that over $110,000 (€100,000) has been granted toward the digitization of Church of Ireland parish registers, held in the Representative Church Body Library, as part of the Department’s digitization scheme.

The register records date back as far as 1619 and include the Church of Ireland parish registers for baptism, marriage, and burial; 1,110 sets of parish records in total and approximately 840 of which contain varying quantities of public records which have not yet been digitized.

Making the announcement Minister Madigan stated: “I am delighted to provide funding for the Representative Church Body Library’s project to digitise Church of Ireland Parish Registers, as part of the wider cultural digitisation scheme.

“This digitisation project will make it possible for people all over Ireland and indeed the world to access these unique records as they represent an important body of evidence about the Church’s history . . .

Read on . . .

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‘I can feel my ancestors…’ says Lorna Dyck of the Papaschase Band.

‘I can feel my ancestors…’ says Lorna Dyck of the Papaschase Band.

How the Papaschase band is fighting to be recognized as an official First Nation.

For Mill Woods homeowner Lorna Dyck, the history of Papaschase First Nation is all around her.

Eighty pages outlining her family tree, dating back to the 1700s, sit on her living room table, along with a pamphlet from the First Nation that lists the names of some of the earliest band members.

Her ancestor, Catherine L’Hirondelle, a medicine woman, is the earliest example of her ties to the First Nation that used to live on the land that is now Mill Woods.

“I am proud to be from Papaschase and proud to be Métis,” Dyck said.

She has spent decades searching for family connections to the band, a role she has taken over from her parents, who were both Papaschase descendants.

Like many other band members, that family history can be difficult to track.

The Mill Woods area was once part of the land occupied by the Papaschase First Nation, after they signed an adhesion to Treaty 6 in 1877.

Many band members scattered after their land was taken away a decade later, according to Chief Calvin Bruneau. But some remained in Edmonton, including Dyck, who has lived in Mill Woods for 42 years.

She said it was important for her to stay in the area her ancestors once called home. Stories passed down to her recall a time when her great-grandparents picked berries in what is now Mill Woods, a memory she has cherished over the years.

“I have really good feelings [about the area]. If I’m feeling down, I can go for a walk or take a drive and I can feel my ancestors around me,” she said . . .

Read on . . .

Source: CBC News

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