Tag: ancestry.com

Descendants of honor: Ancestry.com opens records for Veterans Day.

Descendants of honor: Ancestry.com opens records for Veterans Day.

Ancestry.com is honoring customers who are descendants of US Medal of Honor recipients, as the country prepare for Veterans Day.

The Ancestry campaign makes its collection of more than 250 million military records available for free to the public through November 12. The collection includes draft cards, service records, and prisoner and casualty lists for military heroes worldwide.

“Ancestry is committed to honoring and sharing the stories of America’s heroes, who come from all over the world,” said Vineet Mehra, executive vice president and chief marketing officer at Ancestry.

“We encourage everyone to discover the military heroes in their family, which is why we have provided free access to our unparalleled collection of military records this Veterans Day. Through these records people can uncover the incredible stories that lie in their family’s past, and honor those heroes this Veterans Day.”

Of the 72 living recipients of the Medal of Honor, four earned the award in World War II, five in the Korean War, 51 in the Vietnam War, and 12 in the War in Afghanistan.

Two earned their medal while serving in the US Air Force, 50 in the US Army, 12 in the US Marine Corps, and eight in the US Navy.

It’s been 157 years since the Medal of Honor was created.

“The President, in the name of Congress, has awarded more than 3,400 Medals of Honor to our nation’s bravest Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen since the decoration’s creation in 1861 . . .”

Read on . . . 

Source: brandchannel: Descendants of honor: Ancestry.com opens records for Veterans Day.

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Ancestry.com is in cahoots with public records agencies, a group suspects.

Ancestry.com is in cahoots with public records agencies, a group suspects.

A nonprofit claims its request to obtain genealogical records from state archives was brushed aside in favor of Ancestry’s request.

I know that Michael Peck, my great-great-great-grandfather, died on July 14, 1922. I know this because last October I visited the cemetery in Cornwall, New York, to find the date on his headstone. I had been searching for information on Michael for almost a decade on Ancestry.com, but never found any information about his death. Had I waited until a few weeks ago, I could have saved myself the trip upstate. Ancestry finally added the New York State Death Index for 1852–1956 to its collection, and I would have found Michael’s date of death with a few clicks of a mouse.

This new archive on Ancestry, however, was added under questionable circumstances, one genealogist claims. Brooke Schreier Ganz, the founder of the nonprofit group Reclaim the Records, has filed a lawsuit against the New York state agency handling the records, calling into question whether it engages in backroom dealings or preferential treatment with Ancestry.

According to the lawsuit, “although the same Records Access Office at [the Department of Health] handled both [Freedom of Information Act] requests, the timeline and procedures followed throughout the process for Ms. Ganz and Reclaim the Records was different than it was for Ancestry.com.”

Read on . . .

Source: Ancestry.com Is In Cahoots With Public Records Agencies, A Group Suspects

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The Mormons are making major changes to their genealogy database to recognize same-sex families / LGBTQ Nation

The Mormons are making major changes to their genealogy database to recognize same-sex families / LGBTQ Nation

During Pride Month in June, LGBT people interested in family history received interesting news. Beginning next year, the world’s largest genealogy organization, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, will release a redesigned website that will include same-sex families.

FamilySearch.org, sponsored by the Mormons, first said in 2015 that it would add a feature for same-sex relationships, the Deseret News reported. Now, the major overhaul to the website’s system should be ready by 2019.

There are several other family history sites – Ancestry.com is probably the best known – that already allow same-sex recognition. In addition to Ancestry, other major sites are Israel-based MyHeritage and England-based Findmypast. FamilySearch is the only one that is totally free for all of its databases.

For LGBT genealogists, the FamilySearch news was a pleasant surprise . . .

Read on . . .

Source: The Mormons are making major changes to their genealogy database to recognize same-sex families / LGBTQ Nation

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Did your Ancestry.com DNA results change dramatically? Here’s why | CBC News

Did your Ancestry.com DNA results change dramatically? Here’s why | CBC News

Some customers saw as much as a 10 to 20 per cent change to DNA results.
Some Ancestry customers who have taken the DNA test, which involves spitting in a tube, may have noticed a dramatic change in their results.

When Katy Jean of Dartmouth, N.S., sent in a sample of her DNA to Ancestry.com a year ago, she was hoping the genealogy website would tell her more about her background and maybe fill in gaps on her family tree.

Once the results came in, Jean said she wasn’t too surprised by the outcome — except for an unexplained one per cent result from Central Asia.

But then things changed.

“There was a significant change in my DNA results,” Jean said.

Jean went from having 75 per cent ancestry from Great Britain and 12 per cent Iberian Peninsula (Portugal & Spain) to 53 per cent England, Wales and Northwestern Europe, 31 per cent Ireland and Scotland. Iberian Peninsula and Central Asia disappeared.

The Ancestry results on the left are Katy Jean’s old results, the results on the right are her latest results. (Submitted by Katy Jean)

What changed? . . .

Read on . . .

Source: Did your Ancestry.com DNA results change dramatically? Here’s why | CBC News

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How much it costs to research your family tree | AOL Finance

How much it costs to research your family tree | AOL Finance

 

Money doesn’t grow on trees, which is too bad, because it would make researching your family tree a lot easier.
If you aren’t careful, or even if you are, you could end up spending a small fortune while researching your family history.
Just ask Lana Rushing, who owns a public relations firm in Los Angeles. In the spring of 2014, she was on a vacation in Ireland and stopped by the library in Dublin, hoping to learn more about her mother’s side of her family tree. She came away inspired to learn more, soon after subscribing to a genealogy website, getting her DNA tested and traveling in order to search for clues about her past. It’s a hobby that can get costly.

 

“All told, I have spent about $4,800 so far, but it has been worth every penny,” says Rushing, who isn’t including in her tally the cost of that vacation to Ireland.

Most people who spend money researching their family probably do feel that the expense is worth it. After all, looking at genealogy isn’t something one has to do, like paying for car repairs. People do it because they want to. Still, if you’re looking for ways to research your family tree and want to know what you’re in for, or if you want to spend more money in order to dig up more roots, you have a number of things you can spend money on.

 

Genealogy sites.

 

Ancestry.com is likely the best-known of these sites; an annual subscription starts at $189 ($99 for six months). For the money, you’ll receive access to a seemingly limitless amount of historical data, including census and military records as well as birth, marriage and death certificates.

But there are other genealogy sites you may want to check out, such as FamilySearch.org (which is free and a good place to start), FindMyPast.com (starts at $9.95 a month; aimed at people with British and Irish heritage) and Afrigeneas.com (free, and for people researching African-American roots).

You can also use genealogy services without paying for them.

“Most public and state libraries subscribe to one or more genealogy services. These are available [online] at no cost to anyone with a library card, though Ancestry’s library collection can only be accessed from the library [building],” says Stacy Harris, a publisher and editor in Nashville, Tennessee.

 

Genealogy DNA testing services.

 

You know you are part Native American, Pakistani or Italian but are wondering, just how much? You could use companies like MyHeritage DNA, Family Tree DNA, AncestryDNA and 23andMe. Their prices generally range from $79 to $199, with sales sometimes popping up throughout the year.

That can get expensive, though, if you and a spouse or other family members are interested in your ancestry. For instance, over the holidays, Dana Freeman, a travel journalist in Burlington, Vermont, bought DNA kits for herself, her husband, her sister and brother-in-law for a total of $260.

She also purchased a six-month membership to Ancestry.com and is contemplating becoming a paid member to other ancestry websites and doing some travel-related research. She says that she has been interested in genealogy for some time, collecting information from relatives and keeping track of it in a hand-written family tree book she bought 20 years ago for nine bucks. Only recently did she begin spending money to learn more about her past.

“I fear though going forward this endeavor is going to be a lot more expensive,” Freeman says.

Read on . . .

 

Source: How much it costs to research your family tree – AOL Finance

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Security breach shuts down RootsWeb site | Ancestry Blog

Security breach shuts down RootsWeb site | Ancestry Blog

 

Last Wednesday, December 20, Ancestry’s Information Security Team received a message from a security researcher indicating that he had found a file containing email addresses/username and password combinations as well as user names from a RootsWeb.com server.

 

Our Information Security Team reviewed the details of this file, and confirmed that it contains information related to users of Rootsweb’s surname list information, a service we retired earlier this year.

 

For those of you who are unfamiliar, RootsWeb is a free community-driven collection of tools that are used by some people to host and share genealogical information. Ancestry has been hosting dedicated RootsWeb servers as a favor to the community since 2000. Importantly, RootsWeb does not host sensitive information like credit card numbers or social security numbers, and is not supported by the same infrastructure as Ancestry’s other brands. We are in the process of informing all impacted customers and will also be working with regulators and law enforcement as appropriate.

We also reviewed the RootsWeb file to see if any of the account information overlapped with existing accounts on Ancestry sites. We did confirm that a very small number of accounts – less than one percent of our total customer group – used the same account credentials on both Rootsweb and an Ancestry commercial site. We are currently contacting these customers.

In all cases, any user whose account had its associated email/username and password included on the file has had their accounts locked and will need to create a new password the next time they visit.

 

What happened.

 

Immediately after receiving the file containing the RootsWeb surname list user data, the Ancestry Information Security Team commenced its analysis of the file and its contents, and started a forensic investigation of RootsWeb’s systems to determine the source of the data and identify any potential active exploitation of the RootsWeb system.

As a result of that analysis, we determined that the file was legitimate, although the majority of the information was old.

Though the file contained 300,000 email/usernames and passwords, through our analysis we were able to determine that only approximately 55,000 of these were used both on RootsWeb and one of the Ancestry sites, and the vast majority of those were from free trial or currently unused accounts.

Additionally, we found that about 7,000 of those password and email address combinations matched credentials for active Ancestry customers. As part of our investigation, our team also uncovered other usernames that were present on the RootsWeb server that, though not on the file shared with us, we reasonably believe could have been exposed externally.

We are taking the additional step of informing those users as well.

 

Read on . . .

 

Source: Security breach shuts down RootsWeb site – Ancestry Blog

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Your genealogy research could land your DNA results in a criminal investigation | KIRO-TV

Your genealogy research could land your DNA results in a criminal investigation | KIRO-TV

 

by: Alison Grande Updated:

 

If you submit DNA to a genealogy website, KIRO 7 discovered law enforcement may have access to the results.

So far more than 5 million people have submitted DNA to search their genealogy on Ancestry.com.
Customers send in a sample of their saliva to companies like Ancestry.com and 23andMe.com.

The websites allow customers to find out where their ancestors came from, and where they settled in the United States.

But we found law enforcement could get access to your DNA profile to solve a violent crime.

Idaho Falls police turned to Ancestry.com to try to solve the cold-case murder of Angie Dodge — which “48 Hours” investigated.

Dodge was 19 years old in 1996; detectives say the killer left his DNA behind.

In 2014 police decided to try something new, and searched a public DNA database owned by Ancestry.com. When there was a hit, police used a warrant to get the name of the man.

His age didn’t match the killer, so they zeroed in on his son, Michael Usry.

Usry was cleared of the crime after his DNA did not match the DNA at the crime scene. The case is still unsolved.

Ancestry.com told us this case is unique because it involved a public database it owned and it has now made that database private.

We wanted to see if genealogy databases could be used to solve any local cold cases, so we sat down with Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist.

“As prosecutors we are always going to want DNA — it is powerful and unique evidence. You’re going to get the right person with DNA. We just want to make sure law enforcement has played by the rules and obtained a warrant where necessary before we use that DNA,” said Lindquist.

As the popularity of genealogy databases grows, so does the amount of DNA that’s available to investigators.

“There are constant advances in DNA technology and this is just another example of how the reach is expanding,” said Lindquist.

Privacy statements posted on Ancestry.com and 23 and Me both confirm your genetic profile could be shared with law enforcement if they have a warrant.

A privacy officer for 23 and Me says they try not to make it easy.

“When and if we do receive a request, we’ll continue to do everything we can to fight that request and protect the information of our customers,” said 23 and Me Chief Privacy Officer Kate Black.

Read more . . . 


Source: Your genealogy research could land your DNA results in a criminal investigation | KIRO-TV

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Apr.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Apr.

 

The following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Apr.

Featured image: Flag of Argentina.

FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 1 Apr.

 

Argentina

Canada

France

Germany

Italy

Netherlands

New Zealand

Peru

Poland

Portugal

United States

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com updates and additions to 1 Apr.

 

Australia

Czech Republic

Germany

Netherlands

Poland

Russia

United Kingdom

United States

 

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RootsMagic users to soon be able to search Ancestry.com directly via hints.

RootsMagic users to soon be able to search Ancestry.com directly via hints.

Well, it’s finally happening folks!

 

Ancestry.com and RootsMagic are teaming up, setting the stage for RootsMagic users to soon be able to search Ancestry.com directly via hints.

 

RootsMagic
RootsMagic users to soon be able to search Ancestry.com directly via hints.

This is a brand new announcement and as eager as we may be to get to use the new features it’s going to be several months before the updates are implemented in RootsMagic.

According to RootsMagic, the estimated date of the release of the update with the new features is toward the end of 2016.

Up to this point, I’ve been in the habit of using RootsMagic and Family Tree Maker in tandem in order to make use of the hints leading to Ancestry.com databases and information.

Although it has worked for me, it has been very slow and cumbersome because I have to constantly create gedcoms in RootsMagic for importation into Family Tree Maker to keep it updated.

I have taken a close look at other software programs but none seems to measure up – not offering some of the key features that have long been available in RootsMagic.

This will have a huge impact on my research and the time it takes.

It will be an absolute treat to be able to access Ancestry.com information and databases through hints in RootsMagic software.

I can’t wait!

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Free access to new US wills and probate records – plus…

Free access to new US wills and probate records – plus…

…all US birth, marriage, and death records. I had heard about the free access to new US wills and probate records, but upon visiting their site, I discovered they are also offering free access to the US birth, marriage and death records through Monday, September 7, 2015.

 

Ancestry.com has provided the following descriptions of what is contained in the wills and probate records.

What Are Wills?

Before he died, Jonathan Stark (the “testator”) provided instructions on how he wanted his estate distributed. His 1919 will describes his land and property, and includes names of heirs, witnesses, and guardians.

Wills in your family story can reveal the same kinds of rich details.

What Are Probate Records?

A variety of records are created when the court deals with handling the property and affairs of the deceased. For Mr. Stark, it started with proving the will’s accuracy.
These “probate records” give insight into his life—with lists of his personal possessions, information about property and residences, and even relationship details.

Probate records for your ancestors can yield similar gems of information.

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 29 Aug 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 29 Aug 2015.

The following lists are of the Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 29 Aug 2015.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 29 Aug 2015.
Argentina

Brazil

Germany

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 29 Aug 2015.
Ancestry.com and Family Search.org Updates and Additions to 29 Aug 2015.

United Kingdom

United States

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 29 Aug 2015.
Canada

Israel

Poland

Slovakia

United Kingdom

United States

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Gannett newspapers are to be digitized: Color, detail of ancestors’ lives.

Gannett newspapers are to be digitized: Color, detail of ancestors’ lives.

One of my favorite sources for my genealogy research has been Newspapers.com. Now I learn that all Gannett newspapers are to be digitized by Newspapers.com, which is owned by Ancestry.com.

 

I also use books and e-books for the same purpose, but I do trust old newspaper articles much more because for the most part, they are timely and likely more accurate, come by through interviews with actual individuals involved.

This may not be the case with books, especially those written decades or even centuries after the fact.

Some of what I feel are my best articles on this site were possible because of some information I found during my research from old newspapers.
These include:

Gannett newspapers are to be digitized
Gannett newspapers are to be digitized.

 

According to the Daily Blog:

America’s local newspapers are a unique historical resource, providing a window into the daily doings, attitudes and prejudices of ordinary people across the decades, in some cases as far back as the mid-19th century. However this archival resource typically haven’t been available to most people outside the newspapers’ own offices and a few select libraries — until now.

Gannett is joining forces with Ancestry, a service that allows users to trace their genealogy back in some cases for centuries, to digitize the archives for over 80 daily newspapers owned by Gannett across the U.S. The digital archives, consisting of over 100 million pages, will be available for viewing on Newspapers.com, another Web site owned by Ancestry. […read more]

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 25 Jun 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 25 Jun 2015.

The following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 25 Jun 2015.

 

FamilySearch Updates and Additions

Brazil

France

Ireland

Italy

Peru

Spain

United States

Worldwide

 

Ancestry Updates and Additions

United States

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Millions of digitized records from Virginina are now available on Ancestry.com.

Millions of digitized records from Virginina are now available on Ancestry.com.

Thank heavens there are now millions of new digitized records from Virginia available to be searched on Ancestry.com.

 

Tombstone of Robinson C. Jones and Emily (Shelby) Jones.
Millions of digitized records from Virginina are now available on Ancestry.com.

My genealogy research on my husband’s ancestry has resulted in several brick walls, but the biggest brick wall is that of the ancestry of Robinson Coke Jones of Virginia. I have exhausted all available records to date and have been unable to find anything concrete to connect him to the man I believe is his father – Richard Cannon Jones. If I can make this connection, I believe I will have confirmed that Mark’s ancestry leads to the Chastain family of Virginia.

This morning, I read a welcome announcement on the WDBJ7 website stating that Governor Terry McAuliffe announced a project to digitize over 16 million documents has been completed.

As a result of the two year collaboration between Ancestry.com and the Virginia Department of Health, the records are now digitized and indexed.

The final digital, scanned documents are available through Ancestry.com. The indexed information of the records can be accessed for free via the Division of Vital Records of VDH and websites of the Library of Virginia.

Records that have not yet reached the legal time for release are available in a limited index. The information in the index includes names, dates and locations. The records that are now being released include marriage records from 1936, divorce records from 1918, and birth and death records from 1912.

These records are listed and linked in today’s Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions post.

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 15 May 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 15 May 2015.

The following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 15 May 2015.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 15 May 2015.

Australia

Canada

China

Germany

India

Peru

Philippines

United States

 

Ancestry.com.

Australia

Brazil

Canada

Germany

Italy

Mexico

Norway

Poland

Sweden

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

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Family history resources to be brought to classrooms by DAR and AncestryK12.

Family history resources to be brought to classrooms by DAR and AncestryK12.

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3 Atlanta women charged for a $2 million tax fraud scheme after mining data on Ancestry.com.

3 Atlanta women charged for a $2 million tax fraud scheme after mining data on Ancestry.com.

I remember well the debate when there was talk that death record information might be limited because of concerns over the availability of Social Security numbers (SSN) on the certificates.

 

Tax fraud.
Tax fraud.

Like most other genealogists, my defense hackles immediately started to rise, and I looked at this possibility with some indignation.
How dare they refuse us access to information about deceased individuals that should be available to the public?
In light of this story of three women profiting from a $2 million tax fraud operation using the popular website Ancestry.com, I am changing my mind. Perhaps these certificates could be released with the SSN numbers vetted (blacked out)?

As quoted on the WSBT News site “The tax returns contained false and fraudulent information, including false income amounts and dependent information. The individuals whose names were used on these tax returns often were deceased,” according to the criminal indictment filed in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia.

The fraudulent tax refunds were sent to addresses associated with the women involved.
Arrest warrants were issued for Shawuana Sanders, Monica Person and Tania Zelada.
As one who uses Ancestry.com regularly, it’s very easy to access this information in death certificates available on the site.
[read more…]
 

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Canadian firm DNA Genotek sues Ancestry.com over DNA testing kit patent infringement .

Canadian firm DNA Genotek sues Ancestry.com over DNA testing kit patent infringement .

The readily available and highly promoted $99 DNA test kit from Ancestry.com are the focus of a law suit filed by DNA Genotek. 

 

DNA.
DNA helix.

The service is promoted as a simple and relatively inexpensive means of DNA testing with a few drops of saliva.
DNA Genotek and its attorney David Doyle of Morrison Foerster are alleging that Ancestry.com has infringed on DNA Genotek’s patent, having contravened an agreement not to reverse engineer kits DNA Genotek sold to Ancestry.com and create their own kits.

According to the BioSpace website, “U.S. Patent No. 8,221,381, entitled “Container System for Releasably Storing a Substance,” issued on July 17, 2012. The patent protects a novel container system which consists of a lid that stores a nucleic acid stabilization chemistry and a vial for receiving a biological sample. After providing a sample, the user closes the container lid and the stabilization chemistry is safely and automatically released. The patented technology is currently implemented in the Oragene® and OMNIgene® families of products, which are widely known for easy and non-invasive self-collection of high-quality nucleic acids from saliva. Corresponding patents have also been granted in Europe, Mexico, China and Hong Kong and patent applications are still pending in numerous other countries around the world.”

[read more about DNA Genotek’s original patent…]

____________________
Source: Reuters.com
Photo credit: “PCR tubes” by Madprime – Own work. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 20 Apr 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 20 Apr 2015.

The following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 20 Apr 2015.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

 

find free genealogy databases
Finding free genealogy databases.

Canada

Belgium

Brazil

Czechoslovakia

England

Indonesia

Jamaica

Philippines

South Africa

United States

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

 

Canada

England

United States

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Ancestry.com workers caught tossing thousands of records being archived for the U.S. government.

Ancestry.com workers caught tossing thousands of records being archived for the U.S. government.

How frightening is the thought that anyone would throw out thousands of records they were supposed to digitize and archive for the government?  This nightmare is reality, as several Ancestry.com workers were caught tossing thousands of records being archived for the U.S. government.

 

Documents.
Ancestry.com workers were caught tossing thousands of records.

Ancestry.com has performed monumental tasks like digitization and indexing of numerous historical records in cooperation with the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA).

An Ancestry.com employee working at the federal records center was laid-off for allegedly throwing out draft-card information, according to a federal administrator.

The project currently being affected was to scan millions of draft records and it has been reported that all the papers were recovered. It appears that one worker made the quota by throwing files into the nearest garbage can. The incident has prompted the office to halt contract work at several sites. This same worker had previously been warned about poor productivity.

Ancestry.com staff was also caught destroying thousands of records last year at the same location. When the previous records center building was being closed in 2011, documents were discovered in posts, and hidden in the floors and shelves.

Ancestry.com did not lose its contract. Instead, two workers were sentenced. Others were given the opportunity to resign instead of face prosecution for their actions.

The company itself is implicated in rather questionable actions. Although Ancestry.com is not the true owner of the documents and information, it has placed U.S. government records behind paywalls. Ancestry.com claims it had experienced serious security issues, so the action was taken to prevent the private information of the recently-deceased from being exploited by identity thieves. What Ancestry.com did not say in their public statements is that law-makers’ pressure had already forced the redaction of social insurance numbers, making this move unnecessary. In light of this, requiring payment for access to the records was a profitable consequence of its earlier careless exposure of private, identifying information.

Where is the oversight?

Private firms frequently perform services for the U.S. government for a much lower cost than if the government had performed the tasks in house. This is fine, but these private companies should be accountable for the quantity and quality of their work, ensuring they meet all government and legal restrictions.

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New breakthrough technology from AncestryDNA will facilitate new ancestor discoveries.

New breakthrough technology from AncestryDNA will facilitate new ancestor discoveries.

The advancements in DNA research and technology are happening so fast, it’s almost impossible to keep up with them. It appears that AncestryDNA has developed a new breakthrough technology that allows the definitive identification of our ancestors back to the 1700s using just DNA testing – no genealogy research required.
Unfortunately, the basic DNA testing they have always offered is not available, much less this new advancement. I would implore Ancestry.com to find a way to make this available in countries that provide a substantial portion of their subscription income, such as Canada and the UK.
The following is the news release issued by Ancestry.com today.
____________________
Latest Breakthrough in Consumer Genetics Connects People to Ancestors Dating Back to the 1700s Using Just Their DNA

DNA testing.
DNA testing.

PROVO, UT–(Marketwired – April 02, 2015) – AncestryDNA, the leader in DNA testing for family history, today launched a significant technological advancement that makes discovering one’s family history faster and easier than ever. Now with the easy-to-use AncestryDNA test, customers will have the unique ability to find their ancestors, who lived hundreds of years ago, using just their DNA. Only possible through the groundbreaking work of the AncestryDNA science team, New Ancestor Discoveries is a technical innovation that combines the latest in genetic science, new patent-pending algorithms, and access to AncestryDNA’s extensive database to push the boundaries of human genetics, and help people find ancestors from their past using just a DNA test, no genealogy research required.
“This is the biggest advancement in family history since we introduced our Hint feature, the Ancestry shaky leaf, which scours billions of historical records to automatically find new information about your family,” said Tim Sullivan CEO of Ancestry. “Now, through a simple DNA test, AncestryDNA is fundamentally revolutionizing the way to discover your family history, transforming the experience by making it faster and easier to go further into your family’s past, and instantly discover new ancestors you never knew you had.”
Read more…

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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 15 Mar 2015.

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 15 Mar 2015.

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 15 Mar 2015.

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

 

Archives.
Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions.

Australia

Canada

Hungary

Russia

United States

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

United States

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 7 Mar 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 7 Mar 2015.

The following are the ancestry.com and familysearch.org updates and additions up to and including 7 Mar 2015.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

<a href=
Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additons.” width=”350″ height=”234″ /> Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additons to 7 Mar 2015.

Argentina

Australia

Canada

France

Italy

New Zealand

Russia

Ukraine

United States

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Belarus

Czechoslovakia

Hungary

Romania

Sweden

United States

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 Jan 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 Jan 2015.

Following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions up to 30 Jan 2015.

 

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions” src=”http://www.emptynestancestry.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/small_288022773.jpg” alt=”Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions” width=”240″ height=”159″ /> Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

Argentina

Canada

El Salvador

Philippines

United States

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Australia

Austria

Brazil

Canada

Germany

Iceland

Italy

Mexico

Norway

South Africa

Spain

Sweden

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

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