Tag: biography

Transcription: Biography of Arie Van Gendren and his family.

Transcription: Biography of Arie Van Gendren and his family.

Transcription of the biography of Arie Van Gendren, his wife and family as taken from “Cabri, Through the Years.”

Van Gendren family
Van Gendren family

My father, Arie Robert VanGendren, was born in the U.S. in 1866. My mother, Emma Christine Jensen, was born in Copenhagen, Denmark in l876 and moved to North Dakota when she was 12 years old, along with the rest of her family.  About 1896 she married Hans Hansen and they had three children: Victor born 1900, Bertha born 1901, and Hannah born 1903 and four days after, her father passed away from a heart condition.  In those days there was no help for a lady trying and did any work she could get to support herself and her three children.

Father and Mother were married in Minnesota, U.S.A. in 1910. l was brought into this world by a mid-wife on August 17, 1911 and my brother  Robert put in his appearance on October 12, 1912  to finish off the family.

When l was four years old we started out for Canada in a covered wagon, but only got as far as lowa. It must have been quite crowded with the seven of us in that wagon. When we got to Iowa, Mother’s parents (Nels and Christine Jensen) came to live with us. Grampa spoke very little english, so in April 1917 when they wanted to come up to Cabri to live with their other daughter, Marie Peterson, my sister came with them. The War was on and they thought that they might have trouble crossing the border, as Gramma never spoke too good english either. When they did get to the border, Grampa started to say something and Gramma gave him a poke in the ribs to keep quiet. The Customs Officer asked if they were German, they said they weren’t, but they were still taken off the train and were made to stay in North Portal for 24 hours.

ln October 1917, Mother, Bertha, Robert and l arrived in Cabri by train, and about a week later Dad arrived with a box car full of settlers effects, which included two horses, some chickens, and a cat which we had for many years, along with the furniture for our house.

Victor joined the U.S. Navy in 1916 when he was only 16 years old. He couldn’t get his discharge for quite sometime after the War ended, as they were needed to bring the troops and supplies back to the States, so he didn’t arrive in Cabri until about 1920. He worked around Cabri for a few years then moved to Fort St. John, B.C. when he took a homestead, and married  Mary Pomeroy. They had five children, maybe four and Mary is now living in Mission, B.C. Their family is all living in B.C. Bertha married August Gummeson in 1921 and they lived on August’s homestead which was only a quarter of a mile south of Cabri when they were first married, then they moved into town.

They had two children while living in Cabri. Their oldest daughter passed away during an appendix operation at the age of 3 1/2 years. They moved out to Chilliwack, B.C. in the fall of 1936 where another girl and boy came along to join their family. August passed away several years ago, and Bertha passed away June 1983. Their family all live out around Chilliwack.

Hannah still lives at Cabri with husband Edwin Johnson. Robert and I attended the Kings County School for a short time. There was not any school in the district when we moved there. Mother was the one who was instrumental in getting that school started. Some of the first students to attend that school were: Ruby and Ruth Spink, Phyllis and Roy Maycock (who passed away within six weeks of each other with typhoid fever, that was such a sad thing for us all), Wilfred, Clayton and Willie Oliver, and the Humphrey children who came to school in a two wheeled cart drawn by one horse. Robert and I had about three miles to go to school  and most of the time we walked. In those days practically all children went bare foot in the summer. I remember one afternoon while attending school there, it was time for us to be dismissed for the day. The teacher happened to look out the window and saw a storm coming, so she kept us all in. I guess it was a good thing that she did, because it was a small cyclone. It didn’t seem to hit the school, but it turned the school barn one quarter of the way around. Of course, all the horses tied in the barn broke loose, and they were so frightened that they were really hard to catch. Wherever that cyclone touched down it left a big pile of weeds and dirt, so there were little knolls in the fields where there never was any before. From Kings County we moved in near Cabri and attended Cabri School. Three of the teachers I had that I remember were Mrs. Jackson, Mrs. Sullivan, and Mr. Backus. I took piano lessons from Mrs. Backus for a year or two.

During the Easter Holidays in 1926 we moved to the Gavrelle District and lived on the farm known as the Joe Pierce quarter. In June of the same year Robert, Lenora Thomas and myself went into Cabri to write our departmental exams, and we were all successful in passing. Robert and l went to school one more year, as our parents were getting on in years and needed us at home to help out. Mother was very badly crippled with arthritis. Robert and I did the janitor work at the school for a number of years.

I recall one event that might be of interest to some younger people. A dance was held at the school on Good Friday 1927. We had spring like weather for sometime, but that night it started to snow, very softly and no wind, but by the time people were ready to go home there must have been at least two feet or more of real wet heavy snow. Cars were unable to move so most of the people there had to stay the night and most of the following day at the school. Some were there until Sunday p.m. Mr. Bruce Greer stopped at our place and asked if we could spare some food for the folks at the school. That was the first we knew that people were stranded at the school, as we had no phones at that time.

I do not remember the year we left the Gavrelle District, but we moved into the Miry Creek School District, and lived there until 1943. Mother passed away in 1941 and Dad in 1943, they are both buried in Cabri Cemetery. Robert and I had a sale and left the farm. Robert went to Dawson Creek, B.C. I went to my sister’s in Chilliwack, B.C. where I worked in a cannery, also at the Boeing Aircraft Plant, and then I joined the Army in 1944.

After my discharge from the Army I returned to Chilliwack for a short time. I met and married John Johnston and moved to Wainwright, Alta. where I still live. We had three boys, Dwight, Johnie and Arie. My husband, John, passed away in 1971.

I am now married to Earl Bronson and living in Wainwright. We are retired and are enjoying our retirement.

By Irene (VanGendren) Bronson

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Transcription: Biography of Alfred Young

Transcription: Biography of Alfred Young

Biography of Alfred Young of Cabri, Saskatchewan taken from the book, “Cabri, Through the Years.”

Julie and Alfred Young photoMr. Alfred Young was born in Halifax, N.S. in 1861. He married lian Riely in Halifax. They had five boys and three girls, all born in Halifax.

Their oldest son Frederick John, came and settled out of Cabri in 1910. He then wrote and had his father come in 1911, accompanied by the second son E. Alfred Young.

Mrs. Young, Thomas, James, George, Gertrude, Mary and Dorie came out in 1913, to King’s County District.

They farmed with all the hardships and lack of machinery, so Mr. Young opened up the first paint and wallpaper store on Main Street of Cabri in 191?. He later sold it to Al Cheeseman for a bakery. Mrs. Young lived behind and above the store so George and Mary could attend school.

Fred travelled for the John Deere Company and settled in Regina and raised two boys and one girl. E. Alfred worked for Niel Brothers. He moved to Seattle. They had one girl. Thomas went to Winnipeg, where he lived the rest of his life. He had one girl and one boy. He worked for the C.P.R. James lived on the homestead, south west of Cabri. He served in the Army and later moved to Saskatoon, where he passed away. Jim and Ella had six girls and one boy. George Young, after homesteading around Cabri, went to Regina and later to Ft. William, Ont. Mary attended school in Regina, took ill and passed away at St. Josephs, Manitoba at the age of 23. Dorie (Young) Pomeroy went to school in Regina then moved to Ft. St. John, B.C. She married Dan Pomeroy and they had four boys and two girls. Dorie is widowed now and lives in Ft. St. John, B.C.

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Sir Philip Basset, Lord Basset, Justiciar of England

Sir Philip Basset, Lord Basset, Justiciar of England

 

Sir Philip Basset is 24th great grandfather to my kids, born circa 1184 in Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England.

 

Water gate to Bristol Castle.
Water gate to Bristol Castle.

He was the son of Alan Basset, Baron of Wycombe, and Aline de Gai.

In 1227, Philip married his first wife, Hawise de Louvaine in Essex, England. Born in 1225, Hawise was the daughter of Matthew de Louvain, Lord of Little Easton and Muriel. Hawise died before November 1254.

They had two children, daughters Margery and Aline. Hawise died before November 1254. Both daughters survived the death of their mother before November 1254, while only Aline survived beyond the death of their father, Sir Philip.

He married his second wife, Ela Longespee, between 25 November 1254 and 23 March 1255.

Upon the death of his brother Fulk, he became the heir of Alan Basset.

Although the son of a royalist, he joined the opposition under the Earl Marshall in 1233, and contributed to the liberation of Hubert de Burgh.

As a result, they were both outlawed, but upon the earl’s death in the following year, they were restored, their outlaw status being declared illegal on 8 June 1234.

He was chosen by the barons in 1244 to serve as one of the group from which attended the council of Lyons in July 1245 to protest, against the papal policy in England.

He was still active with the baronial side during the great crisis of 1258. He was also associated with the justiciar when Henry left for France in November 1259.

Oxford Castle
Oxford Castle

Although he belonged to the moderate section, he found himself leaning towards the side of the king. Upon the split of the baronial party, he acted against the extreme faction and switched to the side of the royalists.

In July of 1260, Philip was entrusted by the king with Oxford and Bristol castles.

In 1261, he was appointed sheriff of four counties, as well as being entrusted with castles Corfe and Sherburne. Subsequent to the king again assuming his power, he made Philip Justiciar of England on 24 April 1261.

Sherborne Castle
Sherborne Castle
Corfe Castle
Corfe Castle

In July 1262, Sir Philip Basset was placed in charge of the kingdom when the king went to France. He presided at a parliament, and kept the king informed.

Devizes Castle
Devizes Castle

The king returned to learn from Basset that the opposition were gaining strength. As a result, the king shored up his support by granting Hugh Despencer the justiciarship. Philip was entrusted with Devizes Castle and Somerset and Dorset counties as consolation.

Battle of Lewes
Battle of Lewes

Philip headed an advance on and capture of Northampton on 5 April 1264. He had become integral to the king’s acceptance of the Mise of Amiens.

After learning of the loss of his mansion as a result of sacking and fire at the hands of the London mob, he fought at Lewes in 1264.

Battle of Evesham
Battle of Evesham

He joined Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester, and was killed along with him at the battle of Evesham, 4 Aug 1265. He was buried in Evesham Abbey.

His second wife and widow, Ela, survived with a grant of the manors of Loughborough, Freeby, and Hugglescote. She married a second time before 29 Oct 1271, Roger le Bigod, Earl of Norfolk, Marshal of England.

She died before 11 Apr 1281.

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Transcription: Biography of Capt. George Meek and Rachel Meek.

Transcription: Biography of Capt. George Meek and Rachel Meek.

Transcription: Biography of Capt. George Meek and Rachel Meek.

 

Capt. George MEEK, Mark’s 6th great grandfather, was born in 1741 in Maryland to Robert and Elizabeth (Alexander) MEEK. He married Rachel HERRON (b. 1749; d. after 1810) daughter of David and Elizabeth HERRON, in 1770.

Marriage Record of George and Rachel Meek
Record of the marriage of Rachel Herron to George Meek in the Herron family genealogy recorded in the book “Notes and Queries Historical and Genealogical”; Vol. XVII; page 95.

George spent his formative years in Maryland. It is likely he moved to Centre County, Pennsylvania upon his marriage to Rachel.

George served with the 5th Pennsylvania Battalion under Capt. Thomas Alexander in the Revolutionary War between 1778 and 1781.

In an earlier article, I posted the full transcription of a Watchman Article of May 1, 1931 about George MEEK.

It is recorded that George took up a 1,000 acre tract of land on January 21, 1790, some of which remained with his family for generations. It is reported that the first surveys in Ferguson Township were made in 1766-1767, including tracts west of Pine Grove Mills and extending west to the Ross Farm, as well as tracts formerly belonging to General Patton. Another surveying party in 1784 camped at Stewart’s in Warrior’s Mark area on their way to Moshannon and Clearfield. On that trip, “George MEEK killed one large buck, pretty fat, not unwelcome news to the company.” In 1790, the George MEEK who killed the deer previously purchased a tract of land in Ferguson Township, Centre County.

Capt. George Meek died January 10,1802 and was buried after January 10, 1801 in the mountain gap west of Pine Grove Mills. At the time, this tract of land was used for lumbering. It is unknown whether his wife Rachel was also buried there. All trace of the grave has disappeared over the intervening years.

Meek, George - Revolutionary War Plaque
Meek, George – Revolutionary War Plaque
Meek, George - Revolutionary War Plaque
Meek, George – Revolutionary War Plaque

George Meek’s will written and dated November 3, 1801 in Ferguson Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania, was probated January 19, 1802, also in Ferguson Township.

Will Abstract of George Meek
Abstract of the Will of George Meek.

Transcription of the Abstract of George’s Will

Page 12, GEORGE MEEK, Ferguson Twp., 11/3/1801-1/19/1802, wife Rachel, friend Jonathan Wales, eldest son Robert, son William, David, John. Youngest Dr. Sarah not 21, Dtr. Mary Steelly, Dtr. Isabella, Dtr. Jean. Ex: Wife, & Thomas Ferguson. Witness: Thomas Ferguson, Joseph Diven, John Barron.

[Wills  of Centre County, Pennsylvania, by Ira F. Fravel, Col. U.S. Army, published 1/19/1939, re-copied December, 1967 by Mary Belle Lontz.]

The marriage of Capt. George MEEK and Rachel HERRON produced eight children and they were:

  1. Robert MEEK was born about 1765 and married sometime prior to 1801. His spouse is unknown.
  2. Mary MEEK (Mark’s 5th great grandmother) was born January 28, 1767, died January 25, 1850 in Fountain County, Indiana and was buried at Bend Cemetery, Fountain County. Sometime prior to 1830, she married Gabriel Stehle, son of Ulrich and Anna Stehle. Although George Meek’s will definitely records her as having been this Mary Meek, there was some debate that her last name was Stuart, perhaps resulting from a previous marriage, if indeed it is true.
  3. William Jerome MEEK was born in 1773 in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania and died in 1806 in Huntingdon County. He was married prior to 1800 near McConnellstown, Huntingdon County to Elizabeth Breckenridge.
  4. David MEEK, born about 1774, married Polly Bailey. (Davie moved with his brother John to Clarion County, Pennsylvania, where their father owned some land.)
  5. John MEEK ; born 1775. John later moved to Clarion County, Pennsylvania with his brother David, and later moved down the Ohio River, settling somewhere in Ohio.
  6. Isabella MEEK was born in about 1779 and married Abel Benton.
  7. Jean MEEK’s birth place is unknown, but she did die in 1859.
  8. Sarah MEEK, born in about 1783, later married Capt. Thomas Holt.

Sources:

  1. Some Early Families of Centre County, Pennsylvania (Mainly from Half Moon, Patton, Ferguson and College Townships); Glenn (1988); Richard C. Glenn; 916-428-7238, Sacramento, CA 95823-7736, East Parkway; Assembled 1980-1988.
  2. There’s Power in the Blood: Celebrating the 200th Anniversary of Gray’s United Methodist Church, State College District, Nov 12, 1989; Gray’s United Methodist Church, Rte 550 S of Rte 322, R.D. Port Matilda, PA 16870.
  3. Linn’s History of Centre and Clinton Counties, Pennsylvania; Linn, John Blair; 1883..
  4. Columbia County Pennsylvania Will Book C, database, Rootsweb (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~brookefamily/herronjamessr.htm: accessed).
  5. Newtownship, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, Cumberland County, PA Will Book C pages 83 & 84 Will of David Herron of Newtownship Made 17 February 1778, ; Ancestry.com , http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/14022930/person/1179236744/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=0&pgpl=pid|pgNum.
  6. Meek, George – Wills of Centre County, Pennsylvania: ; Ancestry.com , http://ancestry.com.
  7. Meek George and Herron, Rachel and Marriage Record, “Notes and Queries Historical and Genealogical,” database.
  8. Notes and Queries – XVII; page 95, Ancestry.com (: Internet 14 November 2013), .
  9. Ancestry.com , U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications,1889-1970 (Name: Name:
  10. Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:2011, Database online.
  11. Columbia County Pennsylvania Will Book C, database, Rootsweb a messr.htm: accessed ).
  12. Meek, Rachel;1810 US Census; Ferguson, Centre, Pennsylvania; Roll: 46; Page: 76; Image: 0193672; Family History Library Film: 00256, 00256; Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com)
  13. “Find A Grave Index,” database, Find A Grave, Find A Grave : Internet 4 September 2013), .
  14. “US, Federal Census Mortality Schedules Index, 1850-1880, “database, Ancestry.ca.
  15. Bend Cemetery, Covington, Fountain, Indiana, United States.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

#captgeorgemeek #rachelmeek #rachelheron

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Transcription: William Read Shelby biographies

Transcription: William Read Shelby biographies

NOTE: In biography of William Read Shelby and some other biographies of Shelbys of the time, the birthplace is erroneously claimed to be Cameron, Wales, when in truth it was Tregaron, Carnarvon, Wales.

William Read Shelby biography

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Shelby, William Read, Vice-President, Treasurer and Purchasing Agent Grand Rapids & Indiana Ry. Oflice Grand Rapids. Mich.

Born Dec. 4, 184, in Lincoln County, Kentucky. Educated at Centre College at Danvilie, Ky. Entered railway servive 1869 as secretary and treasurer Continental Improvement Co., operating the Grand Rapids & Indiana Rd. Cincinnati, Richmond & Fort Wayne Rd, Michigan Lake Shore Rd and Traverse City Rd; 1870 to 1873, also secretary and treasurer Southern Railway Security Co., operating the East Tennessee Virginia & Georgia Ry, Memphis & Charleston Rd and other southern roads ; 1877 to 1892, vice-president. treasurer and purhasing agent Grand Rapids & Indiana Rd; 1892 to date, vice-president, treasurer and purchasing agent same road and the reorganized road, the Grand Rapids & Indiana Ry; 1896 to date, also president Cincinnati Richmond & Fort Wayne, Muskegon Grand Rapids & Indiana and Traverse City Rds.

The Biographical directory of the
railway officials of America. 1906

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William Read Shelby biography

SHELBY, William Read, ry. official since 1869: b. Lincoln Co., Ky., Dec. 4, 1842 ; s, John W., s. Evan, s. Gov. Isaac, s. Gen. Evan S.; ed. prep. school and Centre CoIl., Danville, Ky., to end of sophomere year, 1861 ; preventcd by Civil war from graduating; m. Sewickley, Pa., June 16, 1869, Mary K., d. Gen. Geo. W. Cass. Sec. and treas. Continental Improvement Co., April, 1869-87 ; same, Southern Railway Security Co., 1870-73 ; treas., 1771-87, v.-p. and treas. since 1887, Grand Rapids & Ind. R. R. C0., reorganized as Grand Rapids & Ind. Ry. Co., 1896 ; pres. Cincinnati, Richmond & Fort Wayne R. R. C0., since 1899; pres. ot Muskegon, Grand Rapids & Ind. R. R. Co. since 1899 ; chmn. State Central Com. Gold Democrats, since March. 1896. Is mem. ex-com. and Nat. Com. of Nat. Dem. party. Address: 65 N. Lafayette St., Grand Rapids, Mich.

Who’s Who in
America .  1908-9

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William Read Shelby biography

Shelby, William Read, railroad official, was born Dec. 4, 1842, in Lincoln county, Ky. He was president of the Cincinnati, Richmond and Fort Wayne railroad company ; and president of the Muakegon, Grand Rapids and Indiana railroad company. He has been also extensively engaged in wheat raising in  the northwest ; and since 1875 has managed the Cass farm, a portion of which is more generally known as the great Dalrymple farm.

HERRINGSHAW, T.W. Herringshaw’s

national library of American
biography.  5v.  1909-14.

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William Read Shelby biography

   William Read Shelby. After forty-four years of continuous official service with the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway Company, under its successive organization and reorganization, William Read Shelby retired from his position as vice president in 1913. Mr. Shelby has for more than forty years been a resident of Grand Rapids, and is one of the oldest and best known railroad men in the state of Michigan. He saw service in the Civil war, and from the close of the war until very recently his entire career was devoted to transportation in some department. His career has all the interesting features of progress from a position as minor clerk to one of the highest places in the service, his ability and personal character having won a steady promotion from one grade to another.
The Shelby family to which Mr. Shelby belongs is one of the oldest and most prominent in American history, beginning with the period of the Revolutionary war, and continuing through all the successive decades of our national existence. William Read Shelby was born in Lincoln, Kentucky, December 4. 1842. The name is a household word in Kentucky, the first govemor of which state was the great-grandfather of the Grand Rapids railroad man. The Shelby family was founded in America by Evan Shelby, who came from Cameron, Wales, about 1730,  and located near North Mountain in the vicinity of Hagerstown, Maryland, Evan, a son of Evan, was noted both as a hunter and Indian trader, and rose to the grade of brigadier general, under appointment by the state of Virginia, in 1779 for services tendered in lndian warfare. He was the first officer of that grade who saw service west of the Alleghany Mountains. Isaac Shelby, son of Brigadier General Evan Shelby, was born December 11. 1750, on the old homestead near Hagerstown, Maryland. He was one of the pioneers to the “dark and bloody ground”  of Kentucky, where he founded an estate in Lincoln county, to which he gave the name “Travellers Rest.” Isaac Shelby was elected the first governor of Kentucky, and reelected in 1812. His record in the Revolutionary War gave him distinction which will be found noted in  all the larger and more comprehensive accounts of that struggle, and he was one of the chief heroes of the battle of King’s Mountain. In  the war of 1812 again, at the head of a brigade of four thousand Kentuckians, General Shelbv marched to the aid of General Harrison, and  participated in the battle of the Thames. ln 1817 President Monroe offered General Shelby a seat in his cabinet as Secretary of War. This honor was declined. lsaac Shelby died at Travellers Rest in Kentucky, July 18, 1826. Evan Shelby, son of Governor Isaac, was bom July 27, 1787, inherited a portion of his father’s estate, and named his share  “Millwood,” and was a wealthy land and slave owner. The military services continues through Evan Shelby. who was a soldier in the war of 1812. His death occurred at Seguin, Texas, April 19, 1875.
John Warrcn Shelby, fathcr of .Mr. W. R. Shelby. was a son of Evan Shelbv. He was horn at Millwood, Kentucky, November 11, 1814, and having later obtained a portion of his father’s estate, gave it the name of “Knightland.” in compliment to his wife. On the breaking out

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William Read Shelby biography

of the Civil war it was characteristic of the Shelby family that they never forgot their allegiance to the country which their early ancestors had helped to establish, and John Warren Shelby espoused the Union cause, and lost all his extensive properties, consisting of a valuable estate, stock and slaves. In 1875. his residence was established in the Pewee Valley, where he died Fcbruary 25, 1881. On January 16, 1840, John W. Shelby married Mary Humphrey Knight, a daughter of Dr. Joseph W. and Ann Catherine (Humphrey) Knight. Her grandfather was Dr. John Knight, a surgeon in the Revolutionary army, and descended from the family of the Scottish Earl, John Graham, of Clavcrhouse. In the history of the American Revolution, as it was fought on the western slope of the Alleghany Mountains, the name of Dr. Knight is familiar to all who have read of the specific accounts of the campaigns in the upper Ohio Valley. It was Dr. John Knight who was a companion of Col. Crawford on the expedition from the upper Ohio against the Indians about Sandusky, Ohio, towards the closing years of the Revolution. Dr. Knight and Col. Crawford were both captured by the Indians, and the doctor was forced to witness the burning of Col. Crawford at the stake, one of the barbarities committed by the western Indians, which has had a part in every historical account concerning those  times. A similar torture was to be inflicted on Dr. Knight on the following day, but in the meantime he managed to make his escape and his recital of the event has been the source of the only authentic account of the end of Col. Crawford. William Read Shelby was educated at Center College in Danville, Kentucky, until his sophomore year in 1861. The outbreak of the Civil war tcrminated his studies, and as a loyal Unionist he became a member of the home guard and rendered valuable aid to the Union cause. in enlisting and recruiting men for the Federal army. During 1863-64-65 his service consisted in supplying wood to the steamers on the Mississippi River at Island No. 37, under the protection of United States gun boats. His business career began in 1865 when he entered the employ of the Adams Express Company in their ofice at Louisville. Several years later, in 1869, he moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, aml took the position of secretary and treasurer of the Continental lmpr0vemcnt Company, a  company composed of such eminent financiers as General G. W. Cass, Thos. A. Scott, William Thaw, of Pennsylvania; Hon. S. J. Tilden and F. J. D. Lanier of New York; Hon. John Sherman and Reuben Stringer of Ohio. This company was organized under a charter from Pennsylvania for the purpose of building railroads. His service as secretary and treasurer continued from 1869 to 1877.
From I870 to I873 Mr. Shelby was secretary and treasurer of the Southern Railway Security Company, a company which operated in East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia roads, the Memphis & Charleston and other southern railroads. in I869 Mr. Shelby was elected secretary and treasurer of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Company. To look after his duties in this connection he moved his residence in 1871  to Grand Rapids, and that city has ever since been his home. His connection as secretary and treasurer continued until 1887, when he was promoted to vice president and treasurer of the same corporation. At the reorganization of the company, beginning with 1893. and during the reorganization period from 1893 to 1896, Mr. Shelby was acting president. At the completion of the reorganization in 1896, he became vice president and treasurer of the new company, under the name of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway Company. This position belonged

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William Read Shelby biography

to Mr. Shelby until January 1. 1913. at which date he retired on a pension after forty-four years of continuous service. His work as a railway man includes other important positions. From October 24, 1899, to January 1, 1913, he served as president of the Cincinnati, Richmond & Fort Wayne Railroad Company; was president of the Muskcgon, Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Company, from October 16. 1899, to January 1, 1013; was president of the Traverse City Railroad Cmnpany from 1899 to the first of 1913.
His work as a railroad man has not absorbed all his energies, and the development of farming interests in diferent sections of the country has been a matter in which he has long been keenly interested. Since I875 Mr. Shelby has been manager of the “Cass Farm,” a portion of which is more generally known as “The Great Dalrymple Farm” in North Dakota. He is president of the “Lake Agriculture Company,” owners of twenty thousand acres of land in what is known as the Kankakee Valley about fifty miles south of Chicago, the land being situated in both Indiana and lllinois. On this large project of reclamation from conditions of an original swamp more than two hundred thousand dollars have been expended by this company.
Mr. Shelby was a member of the executive committee and the national committee of the national Democratic party in 1896. His name is found among those of the forty original Gold Democrats at the Chicago conference, a conference which led to the Indianapolis convention of the Gold Democrats, and the nomination of the Palmer and Buckner ticket and the subsequent defeat of W. J. Bryan. lt was Mr. Shelby who offered the original resolutions resulting in what has since been known in political history as the Gold Democrat Campaign of 1896. Mr. Shelby was chairman of the State Central Committee of Michigan for the gold wing of the party in 1896.
Among other relations with the business and civic community of Grand Rapids, Mr. Shelby is a director in the Old National Bank of Grand Rapids, and was also a director in its predecessor, the First National Bank. For many years he was a member of the board of education at Grand Rapids, and chairman of its committee on grounds, and to his efforts and work may be credited the establishment of the beautiful play grounds now to be found in this west Michigan metropolis. Another public service that is well remembered for its efficiency and public spirit was his membership and presidency of the board of public works in Grand Rapids from May, 1888, until May, 1893.
At Sewickley, Pennsylvania, on June 16, 1869. Mr. Shelby married Miss Mary K. Cass, daughter of General George W. Cass of Pittsburg. Seven children were born to them, five of whom survive, namely: Cass Knight, born September 18, 1870; Charles Littleton, born August 9, 1872; Walter Humphrey. born March 1, 1875, and died in 1902; Ella Dawson, bom February 20. 1876; George Cass, born December 5, 1878; William, born April 30. 1881. and died in infancy; Violette. born April 23, 1882. The Shelby home in Grand Rapids is at 65 Lafayette Avenue, N.E.

MOORE, C.   History of
Michigan.   v.2-4.   1915.

047

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Transcription: Biography of Dr. Oscar B. Steely; Dictionary of National Biography

Transcription: Biography of Dr. Oscar B. Steely; Dictionary of National Biography

Following is my transcription of the biography of Dr. Oscar B. Steely from the Dictionary of National Biography.

Featured image: Replica of the first Fort Hall in Pocatello, Idaho.

Dr. Oscar B. Steely, Biography
Dr. Oscar B. Steely, Biography

DR. OSCAR B. STEELY.

 

Greater than the responsibility of almost any other line of human endeavor is that which rests upon the physician; the issues of life and death are in his hands, and the physician’s skill and power must be his own; not by gift, by purchase or influence can he acquire it. If he would retain relative precedence, it must come as the result of superior skill, knowledge and ability, and these qualifications are possessed in a marked degree by Dr. Oscar B. Steely, who is not only numbered among the representative physicians and surgeons of the state, recognition of this fact having been made by Governor McConnell in his “appointment as surgeon general of Idaho, but his executive ability, force of character and strong personal magnetism have caused his election and reelection to the responsible office of mayor of the progressive city of Pocatello, where he resides.

Doctor Steely was born in Belleville, Pa., on August 22, 1862, a son of William and

055

Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Dictionary of National Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Dictionary of National Biography

Sarah (Baker) Steely, natives of Pennsylvania, to which commonwealth his early paternal German ancestors emigrated in the early Colonial days, as did the progenitors of his mother, who came from England at about the same period of time, and both his maternal and paternal great-grandfathers patriotically served in the long and bloody contest of the Revolutionary war.

Doctor Steely received his preliminary literary education in the public schools of his native place, thereafter continuing his studies in the Bloomsburg State Normal School and Literary Institute, from which he was graduated with a high standing, thereafter matriculating at the famous University of Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated in 1883, in the meantime engaging in pedagogic work in Philadelphia, where he held the office of supervising principal of the public schools of the city for four years, thereafter entering Jefferson Medical College, where he completed the prescribed course, being graduated therefrom with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1891.

Thus thoroughly prepared and equipped for his profession, he served one year as surgeon in the Jefferson Hospital, and in 1892

056

Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography

located in Pocatello, Idaho, and entered at once upon a successful and far-reaching practice, being the ofiicial physician and surgeon of the Oregon Short Line Railroad, of which he is still in incumbency, and he has been very successful both as a physician and a surgeon. His private practice in both medicine and surgery is one of the largest in the state, controlling a large clientele of leading citizens, and manifesting a liberality and generosity in his treatment of the poor and unfortunate which have bound them to him as with hooks of steel. He stands high in medical circles, was a member of the Pennsylvania State Medical Association and the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States, while his papers and articles on medical and surgical subjects take rank as authoritative, and his incumbency of the office of surgeon general was marked by a careful, conservative, but at the same time progressive administration of the duties connected therewith.

A man of strong character and unbounded energy, he has ever stood true in all the relations of life and has acquired a high and well-deserved popularity. He was a candidate of the Progressive Young Men of Pocatello for

057

Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography

mayor of that city in I902 and after a stirring canvass was elected by a very complimentary vote, and he is now in the incumbency of the office, having been elected on the Republican ticket in 1903 by a handsome majority to the second term, running far ahead of the rest of the ticket, and thus proving himself not only a very efficient but an exceedingly popular mayor, ever maintaining a high dignity and performing the duties of the position to the decided advantage of the city.

In county, state and national political affairs he has been an active force in the Republican party. discharging with fidelity and advantage to the people every trust his party has reposed in him. In the last Republican state convention he was distinctively honored by being placed in candidacy for governor of the state, lacking only three votes of securing the nomination. In educational lines his influence and labors have been effective and far-reaching. and he is at present the president of the school board of Pocatello. and he has been an earnest and public spirited member of the board for the last six years. Fraternally he has attained the Knight Templar degree in the Masonic order, being the high priest of the

058

Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography

local chapter, and is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Knights of Pythias, Woodmen of the World and the Eagles.

In Denver, Colo., on December 31, 1900, Dr. Steely was united in matrimony with Miss Bernice H. Smith. a native of Massachusetts, and a daughter of Edwin K. and Helen A. Smith, also natives of the old Bay state. They have one son, Hobart H., and their attractive home possesses a most pleasing atmosphere of cultured hospitality.

It is not too much to say of Dr. Steely. as has been said by several who are excellent judges of character. that his qualifications would dignify and elevate any office in the gift of the people of his state. He has held responsible positions with great ability, has adorned every walk in life in which he has been found, and is an inspiration and example to good men of all classes, while his advice is held most valuable in business and financial circles, and his careful and conscientious execution of every duty has gained him high prestige.

Progressive men of Bannock, Bear Lake, Bingham, Fremont and Oneida counties, Idaho. 1904.

059

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Transcription: Biography of Susannah Hart Shelby

Transcription: Biography of Susannah Hart Shelby

 

Biography of Susannah Hart Shelby

 

SHELBY (Susannah Hart) fl. 1779-84

 

(Featured image above: Fort Boonesborough: Nathaniel Hart was a member of the Transylvania Company and one of the original settlers at Boonesborough in 1775, having helped construct the fort there. Col. Isaac Shelby, after the capture of Cornwallis, went out to Kentucky in 1782 and in the fort at Boonesborough met Susannah Hart, whose father had been killed by the Indians, and they were married in the fort, in 1784.)

Biography of Susannah Hart ShelbySusannah Hart was the daughter of Captain Nathaniel Hart. and Sarah Simpson Hart of Caswell County, N.C.,who removed to Kentucky in 1779. Captain Hart was a brother of Thomas Hart, whose daughter married Henry Clay, and of David Hart. The three Harts and two others, formed the “Henderson and Company,” proprietors of the “Colony of Transylvania in America.” This purchase from the Indians included almost the entire State of Kentucky. The Virginia Legislature rendered this purchase null and void, but assigned the proprietors 200,000 acres of land for which they paid £10,000 sterling for their service in opening the country. It was this company that first sent Daniel Boone into the wilds of Kentucky. Col. Isaac Shelby, after the capture of Cornwallis, went out to Kentucky in 1782 and in the fort at Boonesborough met Susannah Hart, whose father had been killed by the Indians, and they were married in the

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Biography of Susannah Hart Shelby

fort, in 1784. Colonel Shelby finally fixed his home in Lincoln County, where in time he built the first stone house in the State. This home, known for its hospitality as “Traveller’s Rest,” still remains in the possession of the family. Susannah Hart Shelby was the mother of ten children, all of whom grew to maturity and several to distinction. She is patron saint of Frankfort, Ky., Chapter, D. A. R.

GREEN , H.C. and M.W.
The pioneer mothers of AMERICA
3 v. (1912.)

038

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Transcription: Biography of Joan Antrobus

Transcription: Biography of Joan Antrobus

Following is my transcription of the biography of Joan Antrobus taken from pages 67 to 69 of The Great Migration – Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Vol I.

Antrobus, Joan; The Great Migration Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635; Vol I; A to B (1)
Biography of Joan Antrobus – The Great Migration – Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Vol I., page 67. 

JOAN ANTROBUS

ORIGIN: St Albans, Hertfordshire
MIGRATION: 1635
FIRST RESIDENCE: Unknown

ESTATE: On 16 May 1614, administration on the estate of Walter Antrobus of St Albans was granted to “]ane Antrobus, his widow”
[Archdeaconry of St Albans, Diocese of London, Admon Act Book, 1574-1638].

Antrobus, Joan; The Great Migration Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635; Vol I; A to B (2)
Biography of Joan Antrobus – The Great Migration – Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Vol I., page 68.

68

The Great Migration

BIRTH: About 1567 based on date of marriage.
DEATH: 1635 or later, perhaps in New England.
MARRIAGE: Joan Arnold married at St Albans 8 February 1586/7 Walter Antrobus [St Albans PR 135]. He was buried at St Albans 5 April 1614 [St Albans PR 2.04].

CHILDREN (all baptized St Albans, Hertfordshire):

i WILLIAM, bp. 2.5 June 1587 [St Albans PR 25]; m. St Albans 6 July 1607 Alice Denton [St Albans PR 140].

ii WALTER, bp. 1 June 1589 [St Albans PR 28]; no further record.

iii ROBERT, bp. 21 February 1590/1 [St Albans PR 29]; no further record.

iv JOAN, bp. 2.5 June 1592 [St Albans PR 30]; In. (1) St Albans 23 October 1609 Thomas Lawrence [St Albans PR 141]; m. (2.) by 1628 JOHN TUTTLE [TAG 51: 173].

v ELIZABETH, bp. 6 August 1598 [St Albans PR 35]; presumably she who m. St Albans 5 May 1617 John Cowley [St Aibans PR 144].

vi HENRY, bp. 25 April 1600 [St Albans PR 36]; bur. St Albans 14 June 1602 [St Albans 196].

ASSOCIATIONS: Through her daughter, Joan (Antrobus) (Lawrence) Tuttle, this immigrant was ancestress of several members of the Tuttle, Lawrence and Giddings families (see sketches of JOHN TUTTLE, GEORGE GIDDINGS, JOHN LAWRENCE, THOMAS LAWRENCE and WILLIAM LAWRENCE).

In his will of 27 January 1664[/5], “William Antrobus of London Esq.” bequeathed to “William Antrobus in New England the sum of forty shillings for a legacy and that is all he shall have out of my estate” [PCC 11 Hyde]. Sir Reginald Antrobus suggests that this may be the William Antrobus baptized at St Albans 7 April 1611, son of William Antrobus [St Albans PR 46; Antrobus Pedigrees 34, 108], and therefore nephew of Joan (Arnold) Antrobus [Antrobus Pedigrees 12-13, 96]. But the testator of 1665 and the William baptized in 1611 were third cousins once-removed, so the legatee may be another William more closely related to the testator.

COMMENTS: On 2. April 1635, “Joan Antrobuss,” aged 65, was enrolled at London, with a certificate of conformity “from the minister of St Albans, Hertfordshire,” as a passenger for New England on the Planter [Hotten 45]. No record of Joan Antrobus has been found in New England. She may have chosen at the last minute not to make the trip, or she may have died

Antrobus, Joan; The Great Migration Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635; Vol I; A to B (3)
Biography of Joan Antrobus – The Great Migration – Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Vol I., page 69.

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Joan Antrobus

aboard ship. It she did make the passage to New England, she probably resided in Ipswich with her daughter and son-in-law.

BIBLIOGRAPHIC NOTE: In 1929 Sir Reginald L. Antrobus published extensive information on the Antrobus families of England, including data relating to the branch of interest to us here [Sir Reginald L. Antrobus, /introbus Pedigrees: The Story of a Cheshire Family (London 192.9), 12-13, 96-9’7 (cited above as Antrobus Pedigrees)]. In 1941 Mary Walton Ferris published a brief account of ]oan Antrobus [Dawes-Gates 1:64-65].

___________________

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Transcription: Biography of William Read Shelby; National cyclopaedia of American biography.

Transcription: Biography of William Read Shelby; National cyclopaedia of American biography.

NOTE: In the biography of William Read Shelby as well as some biographies of earlier Shelbys, the birthplace is erroneously claimed to be Cameron, Wales, when in truth it was Tregaron, Carnarvon, Wales.

Biography of William Read Shelby
Biography of William Read Shelby

____________
1842-1930 (handwritten)

SHELBY, William Read, railroad president was born in Lincoln county, Ky., Dec. 4, 1842, eldest son of John Warren and Mary H. (Knight) Shelby, and a descendant of Evan Shelby, who came from Cameron, Wales, about 1740, and settled near Hagerstown, Md. Evan, son of Evan Shelby, was appointed brigadier-general by the state of Virginia, in 1779, for services rendered in Indian warfare. His son, Isaac Shelby, was the first governor of Kentucky. William Read Shelby acquired his eduation in the preparatory schools and at Centre College, Danville, Ky., his studies being cut short by the civil war, and subsequent occupation of Kentucky by the Federal and Confederate troops. As a member of the “Kentucky Home Guard,” he enrolled and recruited men for the Federal army. In 1863-5 he supplied wood to steamers on the Mississippi river at Isalnd No. 37, being protected by U. S. gunboats. From then until 1869, he was employed by the Adams Express Co., at Louisville, Ky., removing to Pittsburg to become secretary of the Continental Improvement Co. Among its first undertaking was the contract to build the Grand Rapids and Indiana railroad in Michigan and Indiana. Mr. Shelby took charge of a branch office at Grand Rapids, Mich., in 1871, having in the year previous been elected secretary and treasurer of the Grand Rapids & Indiana and the Michigan & Lake Shore railroad companies. On Jan. 1, 1892, he was made first vice-president of the former company, retaining the positions of treasurer and purchasing agent. In June, 1896, the Grand Rapids & Indiana

040

William Read Shelby bio
Biography of William Read Shelby

Railroad Co. was sold out under foreclosure proceedings ; a  new company, with the same name, was organized, and Mr. Shelby elected vice-president, treasurer and purchasing agent. In 1870-73 he held also the office of secretary and treasurer of the Southern Railway Security Co. On Oct. 16, 1899, he was elected president of the Muskegon, Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Co. and president of the Big Rapids & Western Railroad Co., and on Oct. 14, 1899, he was elected president of the Cincinnati, Richmone & Fort Wayne Railroad Co. Mr. Shelby has been extensively interested in the development of farming interests in various sections of the country. He is a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank, later known as the ” Old National Bank, ” of Grand Rapids, and a stockholder in various manufacturing and mercantile concerns ; a member of the board of education, and chairman of its committee on grounds ; in 1888-93 he was a member and part of the time president of the board of public works. Mr. Shelby is a Democrat, and it was on his motion in the sound money conference in Chacago that the “Indianapolis convention” was held in 1896, causing the defeat of the Chicago platform and Bryan. He was chairman of the sound money Democratic organization in Michigan, which conducted so vigorous a campaign against “Free Silver and 16 to 1.” Mr. Shelby was married, June 16, 1869, at Sewickley, Pa., to Mary C., daughter of Gen. George W. Cass, the issue being five sons and two daughters.

The National cyclopaedia of
American biography.  v.1-13.
1898.  1893-1909.

041

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Transcription: “Who’s Who in Engineering” bio of William W. Shelby.

Transcription: “Who’s Who in Engineering” bio of William W. Shelby.

Transcription: “Who’s Who in Engineering” bio of William W. Shelby.

 

Transcription: "Who's Who in Engineering" bio of William W. Shelby.
Transcription: “Who’s Who in Engineering” bio of William W. Shelby.

SHELBY, William W., Jr., Esmeralda, Coahuila, Mex. ; res. Henderson, Ky.

Mining Engr ; b. Henderson, Ky, Nov. 16, 1888 ; s. William W. and Mary (Turner) Shelby ; R.E.M. 1908, B.C.E. 1909, Univ. of Ky ; E.M. Columbia Univ., 1911 ; Kappa Alpha ; m. Lexington, Ky, May 25, 1914, Sallie Bennett ; children: William W., 3rd, Sue Bennet. Smuggler Union Mining Co., Telluride, Colo., on assaying, sampling, surveying and designing, 1911-13 ; engr, Nacozari, Sonora, Mex., with Moctezuma Copper Co., 1913-15 : stope engr, Cooper Queen, Bisbee, Ariz., 1915-17 ; chief engr, Am. Smelting & Refining Co., Augangueo, Michoacan, Mex., 1917-18 ; gen. mine forman, Charcas Unit, S.L.P., Mex. 1918-20 ; supt, Cia Minera “La Constancia,” Sierra Mojade, Coah., Mex. Mem. A.I.M.&M.E., Tau Beta Pi.

Who’s who in engineering
… 1922-1923. [1922.]

___________________

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