Tag: casualties

In Remembrance.

In Remembrance.

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Being from a dedicated military family, this is a somber time of year for us, in remembrance of those in our families who have served, or worse yet, who we lost during military service.

 

The relationships to our children, Erin and Stuart, are in italics following the excerpt.


Remembering those we lost in battle:

 

Coon, David 1843

  • Elisha Cadwallader (1840-1862) – Civil War (4th cousin, 7x removed)
  • Private Joseph Turmaine (1889-1916) – First World War(great granduncle)
    • The 27th Battalion, Winnipeg Regiment left at 2 pm, September 14, 1916 for brigade headquarters, arriving at 5 pm. They then left brigade headquarters at 9 pm and proceeded to the front line to take up position in assembly trenches, which was delayed due to congestion of the trenches…

 

Pte Joseph Philias Albert Emery


Veterans in our family who later passed away:

 

 

Cadwalader, General John Cadwalader (Revolutionary War)

  • General John Cadwalader (1742-1785) – Revolutionary War (3rd cousin, 11x removed)
  • Nathan “Hoppity-Kickity” Porter (1742-1815) – French and Indian War (7th great grandfather)

 

Portrait of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky.

  • Governor Isaac Shelby (1750-1826) – Revolutionary War, War of 1812 (1st cousin, 8x removed)
    • With a sword presented to him by Henry Clay as voted by the legislature of North Carolina for his gallantry at King’s Mountain 32 years before, Shelby assembled and personally led 4,000 Kentucky volunteers to join General Harrison in the Northwest for the invasion of Canada
  • Private John Jaquish (1753-1845) – War of 1812 (6th great grandfather)
  • Quartermaster Joseph Shelby (1787-1846) – Indian Wars (5th great grandfather)
  • James Shreve (rank unknown) (1754-1839) – War of 1812 (6th great grandfather)

 

Cadwalader, Gen. Thomas.jpg

  • General Thomas Cadwalader (1779-1841) – War of 1812. (3rd cousin 10x removed)

 

Jaques, William H

  • William Henry Jaques (1820-1913) – Civil War (4th great granduncle)
  • Laurent Jude Melanson (1820-1914) – Fenian Raids (3rd great grandfather)
  • Alfred E. Melanson (c. 1847-?) – Fenian Raids (2nd great granduncle)
  • Private Robinson Coke “Boby” Jones (1822-1897) – Mexican War (4th great grandfather)
  • Private William Seth Cadwallader (1825-    ) – Civil War (4th cousin, 7x removed)
  • John Mumby Blythe (1831-    ) – Civil War (3rd great granduncle)
  • Private Francis Elmer Keefer (1839-1863) – Civil War (3rd great granduncle)
  • Charles George Blythe (1840-1914) – Civil War(3rd great grandfather)
    • …his descendants remained in the Louth and Somercotes areas of Lincolnshire until the emigration of his great grandson Thomas Blyth and Thomas’  sons Charles George (3rd great grandfather to Erin and Stuart), John Mumby and Robert to America…

 

Keefer, Lenard Scott 2 (maybe) proof needed

  • Leonard Scott Keefer (1841-1916) – Civil War (3rd great granduncle)

 

Wedding of Elam Dennis Matthews St.

  • William Dennis Matthews (1875-1940) – Spanish American War(2nd great grandfather)
    • Bip, Fred, White and I went down to the armory this evening The Governor’s (Tanner) order, for all Illinois regiments to move to Springfield was read and great applause followed. Came home about 9 o’clock and packed up my belongings…
  • Clayton William Blythe (1883-1943) – First World War (2nd great grandfather)
    • The following men, registered with Selective Service Local Board No. 1, are classified as suspected delinquents. Any person whose name appears upon the list should report immediately to this board, for correction of records.
  • Wesley Elmer Blythe (1890-1977) – First World War (2nd great granduncle)
  • Hervé “Hervey” Turmel (1894-    ) – First World War (4th cousin, 3x removed)

 

Luther Gummeson

  • Private Luther Gummeson (1895-1934) – First World War (great granduncle)
    • Before enlisting for military service on December 10, 1917, he was a Lutheran and a farmer in Vancouver, BC. Rumour had it that his early death was attributed to being gassed during WWI. Before his death, Luther was living in the Peace River area…
  • Joseph Antonio Tumel (1896-    ) – First World War (2nd cousin, 4x removed)
  • Alfred Turmel (1896-    ) – First World War (2nd cousin, 4x removed)
  • Chester C. Blythe (1908-1995) – General Service (great grandfather)
  • Doyle Clement Cadwallader (1925-1944) (6th cousin, 5x removed)
    • “In the midst of life we are in death.
      In the moment that ye think not,
      In the twinkling of an eye,
      The Angel of Death may appear.”
    • The foregoing quotation seems to me very fitting for Doyle Clement Cadwallader, whose death was caused by an automobile accident while he was returning home on September 30, 1944…

 

Dad, c. 1955.


Veterans in our family who are still living:

 

Marsh-at-Night-at-Cabin-Small.jpg

 

Mark and I with my Mom and Dad at our wedding.

 

For more facts and dates about the above mentioned individuals, check out our family’s extensive genealogy database linked in the menu bar above.


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WWI War Stories: Turmaine and Emery.

WWI War Stories: Turmaine and Emery.

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In honor of today’s ceremonies in honor of the 100th anniversary of the battle at Vimy Ridge, I am reposting several articles about my own ancestors who died in WWI. 

 

In my father’s French Canadian, ‘Turmaine’ branch of the family, we have two known soldiers who died in the first world war. The first was my grand uncle, Pte. Joseph Philias Albert Emery, and the second was another grand uncle, Pte. Joseph Turmaine – and here are their WWI war stories.

 

Pte. Joseph Philias Albert Emery
Pte Joseph Philias Albert Emery – just one of many WWI war stories.

PTE. JOSEPH PHILIAS ALBERT EMERY, the son of Albert Emery and Émilie Labelle was born in Saint-André Avellin, Ripon Township, Papineau County, Québec, Canada. At 5’6″, he had a fair complexion, brown hair and grey eyes and he was a papermaker at the time of his enlistment in the 77th Canadian Battalion, Governor General’s Foot Guards.

Having later been reassigned to the 73rd Battalion Canadian Infantry, Black Watch of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, he was engaged in the preparations for the advance on Vimy Ridge. He was reported missing on March 1, 1917, about a month prior to the capture of the ridge. His remains were never found and he was memorialized at Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery, Souchez in Pas de Calais, France.

Gas Attacks in March 1917 at Vimy Ridge - war stories
Of many WWI war stories, this one included deadly gas attacks in March 1917 at Vimy Ridge. Image of a gas cloud being released fromm canisters on the Western Front circ 1916.

During gas and artillery attacks planned for that day, the troops came under fire from the Germans.

An excerpt from the war diary of the 73rd Battalion dated March 1, 1917 reads, “Officers and men without exception fought magnificently. Casualties during the attack were as follows: 26 OR killed, 99 OR wounded, 27 OR missing.”

 

 

Preserved WWI tunnel at Vimy Ridge
Preserved WWI fighting tunnel at Vimy Ridge.

Pte. Emery was among those missing and was never recovered.

A very detailed and well-researched account entitled, “A Proper Slaughter: The March 1917 Gas Raid on Vimy Ridge”, written by Tim Cook contains some great photos and makes great reading.

Another account of the incident taken from the ‘ Canadian Battlefields ‘ website is as follows:

   “Thirty-nine days before the Canadians infamous and victorious attack on Vimy Ridge from April 9-12, 1917 there was a disastrous reconnaissance raid.   On March 1, 1917 at 3:00 am the gas sergeants took their positions to release the phosgene gas from the hundreds of gas canisters, referred to as “rats”, they had placed prior to the scheduled raid date. Every night they had lugged the heavy, poisonous gas canisters four miles to the front lines. They dug holes in the ground, nicknamed “rat traps” where the canisters were carefully placed and held in position with dirt and sandbags. A rubber hose connected to the canister would be maneuvered away from the trench, into No Man’s Land towards the enemy. The Canadians knew all too well what poisonous gas did to the human body from their experience at the Ypres Salient in 1915 when they were hit with gas for the first time.

    At 5:00 am the gas sergeants were to release the chlorine gas and 45-minutes later the 1,700 troops assigned to the raid were to go “over the top”. Of course things didn’t work out. For a gas attack, the velocity and direction of the wind is crucial. Secondly, gas is heavier then air. This meant that even if the gas sergeants managed to release the gas from the canisters and through the hose into No Man’s Land, the gas then had to travel up the hill to kill the Germans. (I shake my head at this, as I’m sure you are too). Gas is heavier than air, therefore it is logically impossible for it to flow up hill. Rather, they would find that the gas would settle in the pot-marked landscape and trenches, the very places our soldiers would seek protection from German fire. The idea was that the first gas release would kill most of the Germans. The second release, of chlorine gas, would surely finish off the Germans. 45-minutes after the chlorine gas release, a proposed sufficient amount of time for the gas to dissipate, our soldiers would walk in, finish off the few struggling Germans, collect the information they were sent for and then return. If I, a civilian, can see flaws in this plan, I cannot help but question, almost scream, “How did anyone ever let this plan go further than its first mentioning?!”

   The Germans realized a gas attack has been launched. They sounded the alarms, and released hell on No Man’s Land. A German artillery barrage and a steady pumping of rifle and machine gun fire rained down on the Canadians. The shells smashed into buried gas cylinders, causing our own trench to instantly fill with poison gas. With a tremendous rupture a wave of yellow gas plummeted from our trenches. The chlorine gas cylinders had been hit. “Making matters worse, the wind had changed direction. The release of the second wave of gas to supposedly finish off the German defenders began blowing back in the faces of the Canadian brigades.” (Barris, 2008: 13).
   In about 5 minutes we lost 190 men and two company commanders. It total, there were 687 casualties. Only 5 men actually reached the German trenches. Those that somehow managed to stay alive in No Man’s Land, were captured and spent around 21-months in a German prison camp
   On March 3 an extraordinary event took place. No Man’s Land had been eerily silent after the attack, but out of the mist a German officer carrying a Red Cross flag walked out into No Man’s Land in front of Hill 145. He called for and was met by a Canadian officer to discuss a two-hour truce ‘from 10:00 am until 12:00 noon’ during which time Canadian stretcher bearers and medical staff could carry back casualties and remains. What seemed even more remarkable [was] “the Germans said they would assist by bringing Canadian casualties halfway.”

 

PTE. JOSEPH TURMAINE, son of Herménégilde Turmaine and Virginia Perrault, was born in 1891 at Lac Mégantic, Québec, Canada. He was 5’7 1/2″ tall, had a dark complexion, blue eyes and very dark hair. He was a Private in the 27th Battalion Infantry, Winnipeg Regiment and took part in action against the Germans in Courcelette. He was reported ‘missing in action’ and was never recovered.

I have summarized the account of his Battalion’s war diary for the date he went missing below:

The 27th Battalion, Winnipeg Regiment left at 2 pm, September 14, 1916 for brigade headquarters, arriving at 5 pm. They then left brigade headquarters at 9 pm and proceeded to the front line to take up position in assembly trenches, which was delayed due to congestion of the trenches and was completed just after 4 am.

At 6:20 am, the artillery barrage opened 50 yards ahead of the German trench and the first wave started crawling over. As the barrage lifted, the Battalion advanced to the first German line and were met with heavy rifle and machine gun fire. As soon as the Canadian troops reached the trench, the Germans threw up their hands and surrendered. The Battalion followed up the barrage closely and met very little resistance at Sunken Road, the Germans surrendering in large numbers. By this time, the first wave was nearly wiped out and the second wave took their place. Owing to casualties, reinforcements were sent to hold the line at Sunken Road. The Germans attempted to advance but were driven back by Canadian fire. A large number also advanced and started sniping the Canadian front only to also be driven back by Canadian fire.

Two Canadian patrols pushed on toward Courcelette, but were forced to return to the line due to barrage fire. The German artillery fire was very intense for 48 hours on the front line.

A few troops dashed forward under cover of Canadian machine guns and captured a German Maxim. Approximately 22 Germans surrendered.

The Germans had thrown away the feed block of the captured gun but after considerable searching it was located and the gun was turned on German snipers, causing considerable damage. After the Battalion returned to the Brigade Reserve it was reported that there were 72 killed, 250 wounded and 72 missing (including Joseph Turmaine).

photo credit: Wikipedia.org

Sources for WWI War Stories: Turmaine and Emery:

  1. Cook, Tim (1999) ““A Proper Slaughter”: The March 1917 Gas Raid at Vimy Ridge,” Canadian Military History: Vol. 8: Iss. 2, Article 1. Available at: (http://scholars.wlu.ca/cmh/vol8/iss2/1).
  2. Books of Remembrance, Veterans Affairs Canada, (http://www.veterans.gc.ca/images/collections/books/bww1/ww1234.jpg).
  3. Pas de Calais, France, “XIV. F. 25.,” database, Commonwealth War Graves Commission (http://www.cwgc.org/search/cemetery_details.aspx?cemetery=64600&mode=1) . Attestation Papers – Archives of Canada, digital images.
  4. Certificate of Memorial; Private Joseph Phillias Albert Emery (SN: 144880), 73rd Battalion, Canadian Infantry; Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery, Souchez, France.
  5. Casualty Form – Active Service; Private Joseph Philias Albert Emery.
  6. Form of Will; Private Joseph Philias Albert Emery.
  7. Medals, Decorations, Promotions and Transfers Record; Private Joseph Philias Albert Emery.
  8. War Service Gratuity Form; Private Joseph Philias Albert Emery.
  9. Provencher, Gérard and Blue Jeans, George, Pontbriand, B.; ” Marriages of Outaouais (Theft. I-II) 1815-1970 “, *86-87, Québec, 1971, S.G.C.F. * S.G.L. (Directory); French Title: Mariages de l’Outaouais (Vol. I-II) 1815-1970.
  10. Canadian Battlefields; Vimy Ridge: Before the Gas at Hill 145 (website: http://www.canadianbattlefields.ca/?cat=32)
  11. Les Labelles, Daniel Labelle online (www.leslabelle.org), accessed.1901 Canadian Census – St. André Avelin, Labelle District, Québec; Émerie Family: Charles, Émelie, Alice, Albert, Clarinda, Émeralda, Rose A. (Amande).
  12. Wikipedia.org
  13. Personal knowledge and interviews with family.



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War Diary of September 15-16, 1916 at Courcelette for Pte. Joseph Turmaine

War Diary of September 15-16, 1916 at Courcelette for Pte. Joseph Turmaine

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War Diary of September 15-16, 1916 at Courcelette for Pte. Joseph Turmaine.

 

Report on the Operation by 27th (City of Winnipeg) Battalion, on the morning of September 15th 1916.

____________

28

Reference Sheets COURCELETTE and LE MOUQUET 1/5,000.

__________________________________________________

Turmaine, Joseph - War Diary - September 15, 1916 - 1
Turmaine, Joseph – War Diary – September 15, 1916 – pg 1.

The Battalion left the BRICKFIELDS at 2.00p.m. on 14th Sept. and proceeded to Brigade Headquarters at X.ii.a.2.2. arriving there at 5.00p.m. Two platoons of D Coy. relieved the right Company of the 29th Battn. in front line by 6.30.p.m. The Battn. left Brigade H.Q. at 9.00p.m. and proceeded to the front line to take up position in Assembly Trenches. Owing to congestion of trenches this was not completed till 4.25a.m. The Battn. frontage extended from R.35.c.2.9 1/2 to R.35.c.6.5. Battn.H.Q. were located at R.35.c.4.3. At 6.20a.m. the artillery barrage opened, 50 yards in advance of German trench and the first wave commenced crawling over. As the barrage lifted the Battn. advanced on to the  first German Line and reached the trench, the Germans threw up their hands and surrendered. At least 70 dead Germans were counted in this trench This objective was reported to Battn.H.Q. as being taken at 6.27a.m. The Battn. followed up the barrage closely andmet very little opposition at SUNKEN ROAD, Germans surrendering in large numbers. By this time the first wave was nearly wiped out and the second wave took its place. A Company then swung to the left and captured its last objective with one Corpl. and 15 O.R. C and D Coys. reached their objectives and immediately commenced to dig in. This was reported to Battn. H.Q. at 7.40a.m. The line held ran from R.35.b.5. ? 1/2 on SUNKEN ROAD, through R.30.c.0.2. to R.30.c.5.2. Garrison holding this line consisted of 120 all ranks and 4 Lewis Guns located in advance posts at R.30.c.0.2 – 1.2. – 3.2. – 5.3. Owing to casualties the following reinforcements were sent up from B Coy.: – 1 platton to A Coy. on the left and 2 platoons to D Coy. on the right. 4 Officers only were left. Lieuts. McElligott, Holdsworth, Hamilton and Terndrup. Lieut Holdsworth showed great courage and devotion to duty until killed by an enemy sniper. Lieut. Hamilton n the left flank carried on under most trying conditions even after being buried by shells. He was eventually severely wounded on the afternoon of the 16th inst. Enemy attempted to advance up SUNKEN ROAD but were driven off by our Lewis Gun fire. A large number also advanced into a field South West of COURCELETTE and commenced sniping our frontage from this flank. Our Colt and Lewis Guns dealt with the satisfactorily. Two patrols of 1 Lewis gun and 30 men each from the 31st Battn. pushed on towards COURCELETTE but were forced to return to our line owing to the barrage fire. At 11.25p.m. 15th Sept. Lieut. McElligott took command of the whole of our frontage of 3 Coys. and showed great courage and ability in the organizing and consolidation work. The enemy artillery fire was very intense for 48 hours on our front line.
Colt Machine Guns.
Colt machine guns followed behind the third wave and took up positions as follows :-
No. 1 gun at R.30.c.5.1.
No. 2 gun at protecting gap at R.29.d.10.? 1.2.
No. 3 gun at R.35.b.6.7. This gun did excellent work on small parties of Huns who persisted in creeping up towards our new front line.
No. 4 gun was located on a knoll in rear of SUNKEN ROAD and covered our left frontage. When No. 2 gun had established themselves Sergt. F.W.Haines pointed out a German machine gun and crew with a number of snipers dug in in a shell hole 200 yards away. Pte. Stewart opened up with a belt knocking out a number of the party. Sgt.Haines, Corpl. Hancock and Pte.Stewart dashed forward under cover of our machine guns and captured a new model German Maxim. Germans to the number of 6 Officers and 16O.R. surrendered. Sergt.Haines, waving his revolver, motioned them to evacuate in pairs. They filed out and were marched to the  Field Ambulance party near by where they were used as stretcher bearers. The enemy hadthrown away the feed block of the captured gun but after considerable careful searching this was located in a shell hole. The gun was then mounted and turned on enemy snipers, causing considerable casualties.

2.

29

Turmaine, Joseph - War Diary - September 15, 1916 - 2
Turmaine, Joseph – War Diary – September 15, 1916 – pg. 2.

Communication. Our Signallers advanced behind the fourth wave and ran three separate lines to the final objective. These were joined up laterally in the front line, SUNKEN ROAD and the German front line. Communication, however, could not be kept as all the wires were broken by shell fire.
Battalion Scouts were utilized in the following manner :-
Two Scouts each to the following tasks :-
1. The taking of the German front line.
2. The taking of SUNKEN ROAD.
3. The taking of the left Coy.objective.
4. The taking and sonsolidation of the final objective by all Coys. All these Scouts reported successfully yo Battn.H.Q. on the completion of their observation.
Runners were employed continuously and although 75 per cent became casualties, a good number of messages were got through.
Visual Signalling was attempted with flags and flappers but this drew the enemy’s fire and could not be carried on.
Carrying Parties. During the first 24 hours, owing to the intense barrage it was only possible to get through very limited supplies. Coys. and Sections were instructed to collect water, ammunition, bombs and rations from the dead. Our stretcher bearers worked unceasingly carrying out the wounded. The following day, 16th Sept., 7 parties were organized and succeeded in getting through to the front line with tea, mulligan, rations, water, ammunition and bombs. These parties, under Lieut.Coombes and Reg.Sgt.-Mjr.Underwood also succeededin evacuating the wounded, burying the dead and cleared up the battle field. A salvage dump was established at SUNKEN ROAD. A good supply dump was also established in the old German front line. Great credit is due to Reg.S.M. Underwood for the success of this work.
The Battn. evacuated the trenches at 2.00a.m. 17th Sept. 1916 and proceeded to Brigade Reserve (5th Cdn.Inf.Bde.) at X.ii.a.2.2.
Our casualties amounted to Killed 5 officers,   67   O.R. –
Wounded 7  do. 243   do.
Missing     1  do.   71   do.
Total All Ranks 394.
At 8.00p.m. 17th Sept. 1916 the Battn. was relieved by the 1st Cdn.Battn. and proceeded to bivouacs at the BRICKFIELDS near ALBERT.
Prisoners captured by the Battalion amounted to 200.

[Signature of Officer Here]
Lieut. Col.
Commanding 27th (C.of W.)Battn.
6th Inf.Bde., 2nd Canadian Div.

19.9.16

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.



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Dad is the link to our French Canadian and military heritage.

Dad is the link to our French Canadian and military heritage.

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Although both sides of my family are ‘French Canadian,’ my mother’s ancestors are Acadians who settled in the maritime provinces and the eastern seaboard of the United States. Dad, however, is the link to our Québecois French Canadian and military heritage.
Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine
Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine at 3 circa 1938.

In earlier posts about our family’s WWI war casualties, I discussed our family’s attachment to the Canadian military. My own father, Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine, was an Instrument Electrical Technician in the Canadian Armed Forces for almost thirty years.

Gerard Turmaine in full pipe bank regalia playing his snare drum.
Gerard Turmaine in full pipe band regalia playing his snare drum.

Born in 1934 to Henry Joseph Turmaine and Rose Amande Emery of Quebec, he was nephew to both family members we lost in WWI, Joseph Philias Albert Emery (Rose’s brother) and Joseph Turmaine (Henry’s half-brother). (See photo at right of Gerry Turmaine at age 3.) As a new Canadian forces member, he spent some time in New Brunswick visiting the family of another recruit, Paul Melanson and met my mother, Patricia Gail Melanson – Paul’s sister.

Shortly after, he was transferred to Baden Söllingen, Germany and a long distance relationship proceeded for a while until he eventually asked my mother to go over and marry him. She traveled over on ship, they were married, and just over a year later I was born.

A year after my birth, my father was posted to Trenton, Ontario by the Canadian military, where we lived for ten years. During this time, he was a member of the national military pipe band (see photo at left) and frequently played all around the nation – and on one occasion, I can remember him traveling to Washington, DC to play.  During the ten years we lived in Trenton, my parents had three more girls, my sisters Renee, Andrea and Danielle.

We finally left Trenton when my parents’ dream came true and we were transferred to Comox, British Columbia. I can remember my parents talking about how much they’d like to live on the west coast of Canada for years. As a matter of fact, the story told ever after was that my Dad was so happy at the news of our transfer to British Columbia he wore holes in his socks dancing around the coffee table.

Their intention to remain in British Columbia was evident when my Dad told his superiors in Comox that he would rather forego any further promotions in order to remain in British Columbia until he retired. My parents lived in Comox until his death in 2005.

Turmaine Family in the late 1960's.
Turmaine family photo with Gerry in rear on the right; middle: Renee, Christine, Gail and Andrea; front: Danielle.

Twenty years ago I met my husband while he was training in Comox. He was an Aviation Technician with the Canadian Armed Forces and retired in 2006 to take a position with Marshall Aerospace in Abbotsford, British Columbia – where he could continue to work on his favorite aircraft, the CC130 Hercules.

To add to the tradition, my husband’s father, Marsh Blythe, retired in the 1980’s as a Sergeant in the Canadian army and my sister Andrea’s husband Larry Potter also retired several years ago from the Canadian army.


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Life, death and injury through history.

Life, death and injury through history.

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death and injury through history.
Death and injury through history.strong>
One thing I’ve realized through my research into all branches of our family is that every time we are shocked by an unusual or particularly tragic death and injury through history, it will invariably be outdone by another.

The manners of death that occurred in our family history include war casualties, murder, hangings, and one of the more bizarre – the deaths of a couple in a hotel from gas poisoning because their gas light was not turned off properly.

In the past, there was no recourse for those affected. There was no such thing as insurance, and families were not compensated through the courts for injury or death of a family member.

Today, we can plan for such events – whether we think them likely or not. We have the means to protect our loved ones.

Although we can take steps to protect ourselves from injury while out in public or at work, sometimes accidents happen that can leave us hurting in several ways. One of the more important concerns when facing a situation like this is finances. The physical aspect is only a single facet of the injury as it can affect your life in many ways that may not have been foreseen.

Long gone are the days when a doctor, lawyer, or any professional for that matter, was willing and/or able to trade their services. In our modern times, cash is always expected in payment, thereby creating a situation where the injured party has no recourse but to seek insurance or, in the worst case, a lawyer to represent them in court while seeking restitution.

Even insurance can be insufficient. There can still be a financial obligation such as a co-pay or a deductible.

If injured due to the negligence of others, the burden of payment should not be borne entirely by those affected. Those responsible bear the majority of the responsibility.

Depending on the severity, consequences of the injury could include lost wages, lost vacation and/or sick leave. One should not have to suffer financially due to the irresponsibility of other individuals or businesses.

Recovery from injury could take a great deal of time and money. Special equipment may be needed or visits to rehabilitation centers and specialists will have to be paid. Should you have to pay from your own bank accounts merely because someone wasn’t paying attention to what they were doing? This could set yourself and the family back thousands of dollars, depending on the severity of the consequences.

In modern times, although you would expect people to take responsibility for their actions, an attorney is often needed. The impact that an injury can have on your life as well as that of your family’s well-being needs to be considered and legal action may be the only course of action available.

Learn more by contacting a law firm and discover how to obtain compensation for injuries caused by the negligence of others.


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Ancestry.ca offers free access to military records for Canadians

Ancestry.ca offers free access to military records for Canadians

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Canadian army soldier's notebookFree access to military records for Canadians on Ancestry.ca is a definite opportunity not to be missed.

For the period of November 7 to 12, 2013, the numerous (over 4.4 million) military records available include:

  • Military Honours and Award Citation Cards, 1900-1961.
  • Nominal Rolls and Paylists for the Volunteer Militia, 1857-1922.
  • Canada, War Graves Registers: Circumstances of Casualty, 1914-1948
  • CEF Commonwealth War Graves Registers, 1914-1919
To trace possible military heroes in your family, visit www.ancestry.ca/honouryourheros.

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