Tag: Catholic

Transcription: Obituary for Margaret Ducharme (Peggy Ducharme).

Transcription: Obituary for Margaret Ducharme (Peggy Ducharme).

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Transcription: Obituary of Margaret Ducharme
Transcription: Obituary of Margaret Ducharme

Following is the obituary for Margaret Ducharme, who died 1998 in Jaffrey, New Hampshire. Unfortunately, I have no indication of which newspaper published this obituary.

 

She has also been known as Peggy Ducharme, Margaret Bourgeois, Peggy Bourgeois, Margaret Y. Bourgeois, and finally, Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois.

Margaret Y. Ducharme

Margaret Y. “Peggy” Ducharme, 82, of Manchester, died July 21, 1998, in her daughter’s Jaffrey home after a lengthy illness.

Born in Canada on Aug. 4, 1915, she was the daughter of Emile and Marie (Turmel) Bourgeois. She lived most of her life in Manchester.

Mrs. Ducharme worked 15 years for Hillsborough County Home. In addition. she worked for Pandora.

She was a communicant of St. Raphael Church.

Family members include two daughters. Muriel Ducharme of La Prairie, Quebec, Canada, and Mrs. Michael (Sylvia) McElhinney of Jaffrey; a sister, Antoinette Marois of Manchester; a brother, Albert Bourgeois of Andover; nieces and nephews.

SERVICES: A calling hour is Friday from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. in Lambert Funeral
Home. 1799 Elm St. corner of North Street, Manchester.

A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated Friday at ll am. in St. Raphael Church. Burial will be in Mount Calvary Cemetery.

Memorial donations may be made to Hospice at HCS, Community Lane. Peterborough 03-158.

______  Accessing Original Documents and Data ______

The image of the “Obituary for Margaret Ducharme” links directly to the document transcribed. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, click on the name link, or search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcriptions: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson – II.

Transcriptions: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson – II.

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Transcriptions: Documents relating to the marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson.

 These documents are a continuation of Part I of this post.

—————-

No. 1462

MARRIAGE LICENSE

—————-

PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA

D. MacKeen

Lieutenant-Governor

BY HIS HONOUR

The Honourable David McKeen

Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia.

Whereas, Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson  have determined to enter into the holy estate of Matrimony, and are desirious of having their Marriage publicly solemnized ; in order that such their honest desires may the more speedily have due effect, and that they may be able to procure the same to be lawfully solemnized without publication of banns. I do hereby, for good causes, give and grant the License and Faculty, as well to them the said parties contracting, as to all or every Minister or Clergyman resident in the Dominion of Canada and duly ordained or appointed according to the rights and ceremonies of the Church or Denomination to which he belongs, to solemnize and perform the same with the Province of Nova Scotia ; provided always, that by reason of any Affinity, Consanguinity, Prior Marriage, or any other lawful cause, there be no legal impediment in this behalf ; otherwise if any fraud shall appear to have been committed at the time of granting this License, eight by false suggestions, or concealment of the truth, that then this License shall be null and void to all intents and purposes whatsoever.

Given, under my hand and Seal at Arms, at Halifax,

By his Honour’s Command

F. F. Mathers

Deputy Provincial Secretary

Issued this 16th day

May 1916

A. J. MacCuish

Issuer of Marriage Licenses at St. Peters

In the County of Richmond


Marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

I Hereby Certify, That the within named persons, Clifford Carter of Sampsonville and Elizabeth Sampson of Sampsonville were married under the within License at Sampsonville on the twentieth day of  May 1916, according to the rites and Ceremonies of the Catholic Church

By me, (undecipherable)

St. Peters

In presence of Vernon Sampson at Sampsonville in the County of Richmond Mattie Samspon of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond


marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

Province of Nova Scotia

—————-

MARRIAGE REGISTER

Date of Marriage ; May 20th 1916

Place of Marriage ; Sampsonville

County ; Richmond

How Married ; by License or Banns;License

Dates of Publication, if by Banns ; 

Full name of Groom ; Clifford Carter

Age ; 20 years

Condition (Bachelor or Widower) ; Bach

Religious Denomin ; Catholic

Occupation ; Farming

Residence ; Sampsonville

Where Born ; 

Names of Parents ; Finlay Carter, Mary Fougere

Occupation of Parent ; Farming

____________________;

—————-

Full name of Bride ; Elizabeth Sampson

Age ; 16 years

Condition (Spinster or Widow) ; Spinster

Religious Denomin ; Catholic

Her Place of Residence ; Sampsonville

Where Born ; Sampsonville

Names of Parents ;  Vernon Sampson, Eliza Lawry

Occupation of Parent ; Farming

Names of Witnesses          Maphis Sampson, Vernon Sampson

Signature of Parties Married          Clifford Carter, Elizabeth Sampson

Officiating Clergyman         ???? L. McDonald

Denomination of Clergyman          Catholic

I Certify, That the marriage of the persons above named was duly celebrated by me at the time and place and in the manner stated in this Register.

???? L. McDonald

Officiating Clergyman

When a marriage is celebrated by License or Certificate, this Register filled up and signed by the officiating clergyman, must be returned with the License or Certificate, to the issuer from whom the said License or Certificate was obtained, and the issuer will pay to the clergyman 25 cents for License, or Certificate, and Register, not 25 cents for each, repaying himself from the money in his hands belonging to the Department and including amount so paid in his Quarterly Returns.

Issuers must return all License, Certificates, Affidavits and Registers to the Provincial Secretary’s Office, with their Quarterly Accounts.

marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

The complete original scans of any documents clips linked above can be accessed by clicking the images. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search using the linked names above or the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on these sites is available for free access and download.


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Transcription of the memorial stone for the priests of St. Roch Church, Quebec

Transcription of the memorial stone for the priests of St. Roch Church, Quebec

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The following is my transcription of the memorial stone for the priests of St. Roch Church, Quebec City, Quebec in Canada. It lists the head priests and the beginning and end dates of their terms.

Priests of St. Roch Church, Quebec
Priests of St. Roch Church, Quebec

 

??????????? cures de
ST. ROCH
Seigneur ????????? ??? le repos
et la lumiere eternelle
Jean Bro; 1787-
Antoine Desforces; 1787-1793
Chs. Duchouquet; 1793-1796
Jerome Raizenne; 1796-1831
Augustin Tessier; 1831-1832
Laurent Aubry; 1832-1835
Frs. de Bellefeuille; 1835-1836
Thomas Pepin; 1836-1840
J.Bte Labelle; 1840-1855
Etienne Hicks; 1855-1857
Moise Brassard; 1857-1874
Thomas Dagenais; 1874-1904
L. F. Bonin Changine; 1904-1923
J.Bte Desrosiers; 1923-1927
Elie Poitras; 1927-1933
J.O. Frechette; 1933-1951
Mathias Piette; 1951-1964
Leo Heneault; 1964-1971

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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The science of husbandry on a human scale.

The science of husbandry on a human scale.

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We’ve all heard of the centuries old practice and science of husbandry, and most interesting is the science of husbandry on a human scale.

 

The definition of ‘husbandry’ according to “The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language” is:

 

hus·band·ry (hzbn-dr)

  1. The act or practice of cultivating crops and breeding and raising livestock; agriculture.
  2. The application of scientific principles to agriculture, especially to animal breeding.
  3. Careful management or conservation of resources; economy.

 

practice and science of husbandry
The practice and science of husbandry on a human scale.

 

For the purposes of this article, I am referring to the most well known and specialized area of husbandry – the planning, tracking, and monitoring of the breeding of all varieties of livestock.

At one time, I read an article in “The Globe and Mail” which described a current practice in Iceland for monitoring the pairing and breeding of their human population. Theirs is such a small, isolated population surrounded by a vast expanse of ocean, this database has become a part of their culture that is heavily relied upon to ensure there is no accidental ‘inbreeding’ or, heaven forbid, “incest.”

The citizens of Iceland consult with a web-based database called “The “Book of Icelanders“, or “Islendingabok,” which tracks the genealogies of all the country’s citizens. This database serves a key purpose separate from the most obvious one of tracking genealogies. It allows Icelanders to check to see if they may be unknowingly about to date a relative.

After several years of research into our family genealogy, I have become aware that “husbandry” has been practiced throughout our own history as well.

Two examples are the my husband’s Quaker ancestors, as well as my own Acadian ancestors.

 

practice and science of husbandry on a human scale
The practice and science of husbandry on a human scale via a Quaker clearing meeting.

 

Quakers, or members of the Society of Friends, as they were also known, had to be cleared by a group of select members, called a “clearness committee,” during a meeting for clearness, prior to the marriage. It was during the clearing that the issue of blood relationship would be addressed.

The Acadians (and the Catholic Church at large) had a similar custom, where the pair wishing to marry would petition the church for the right if they were known to be blood related.

The church would make a decision whether to approve the marriage, based on the ‘degree of consanguinity‘ or the closeness of the blood relationship. The standard was that any couple within the fourth degree of consanguinity were not permitted to marry.

A request could be made for a dispensation, or permission from the Catholic Church to marry. The closer the blood relationship, the harder it was to obtain dispensation.

It was very rare for first cousins to be permitted to marry.

 

____________________

Sources:

  1. BBC: Religion: Quakers; http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/christianity/subdivisions/quakers_1.shtml#h7.
  2. Wikipedia.org; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quakers.

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Transcription: Marriage Register for Alfred Babin and Mary Marchand

Transcription: Marriage Register for Alfred Babin and Mary Marchand

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Transcription: Marriage Register for Alfred Babin and Mary Marchand

 

Marriage Register for Alfred Babin and Mary Marchand.
Marriage Register for Alfred Babin and Mary Marchand.

Province of Nova Scotia

MARRIAGE REGISTER

Date of Marriage:  Feb. 1st 1909
Place of Marriage:  Arichat
County:  Richmond
How Married:  by license or banns:  Banns
Date of Publication, if by Banns:  Jan. 17th – 24th – 31st 09

Full Name of GROOM:  Alfred Babin.
His Age:  25 yrs.
Condition (Bachelor or widower):  Bachelor
Occupation:  Sailor
Residence:  West Arichat
Where Born:  – do –
Parents’ Names:  Benj. Babin & Sophie Goyetche.
Parents’ Occupation:  Farming.

Full Name of BRIDE:  Mary Marchand.
Age:  19 yrs.
Condistion (Spinster or Widow):  Spinster.
Her Place of Residence:  Arichat
Where Born:  Salem, Mass.
Parents’ Names:  Désiré Marchand & Mary J. Boudreau.
Parents’ Occupation:  Farming.

Witness Names:
Albert Babin
Minnie Fougère

Signature of parties Married:
Alfred Babin
Mary Marchant

Officiating Clergyman:  [??] Mombourquette
Denomination of Clergyman:  Catholic

——

I Certify, That the marriage of the persons above named was duly celebrated by me at the time and place and in the manner stated in this register.
[??] Mombourquette
Officiating Clergyman

——

When a marriage is celebrated by License, this register, filled up and signed by the officiating clergyman, must be returned, with the License, to the Issuer from whom the said License was obtained, and the Issuer will pay to the clergyman 25 cents for both Register and License, not 25 cents for each. When the marriage is celectrated by banns, the Register is to be filled up, signed and returned by the officiating clergyman without unnecessary delay to the nearest Deputy Issuer of Marriage Licenses, who is authorized to pay him 25 cents for each Register so returned — the Deputy Issuer repaying himself from License money in his hands — and including amount so paid in his Quarterly Returns. Clergymen may obtain Marriage Registers from Deputy Issuer.
Issuers must return all Licenses, Affidavits and Registers to the Provincial Secretary’s Office, with their Quarterly Accounts.

————————————————————————

Marriage Register for Alfred Babin and Mary Marchand.
Marriage Register label for Alfred Babin and Mary Marchand.

Second Page
14
Feb. 1/09
Alfred Babin
and Mary Marchand

Richmond

————————————————————————

Marriage Register for Alfred Babin and Mary Marchand.
Marriage Register envelope for Alfred Babin and Mary Marchand.

Envelope
14
Richmond – 1909
Babin, Alfred
Marchand, Mary

To access this or any other images or sources for this or any other individual in our Blythe Database, just search our surnames index or use the search function.

____________________

The complete original scans of the documents clips above can be accessed by clicking the images. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search using the linked names above or the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on these sites is available for free access and download.

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 16 Feb 2016.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 16 Feb 2016.

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The following are the Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 16 Feb 2016.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 16 Feb 2016.

 

Liberia

Portugal

Puerto Rico

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 16 Feb 2016.

 

France

Hungary

Lithuania

Netherlands

United Kingdom

Ireland

Isle of Man

United States


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Transcription: Baptism record of Adelaide Bourgeois.

Transcription: Baptism record of Adelaide Bourgeois.

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Baptism of Adelaide Bourgeois
Baptism of Adelaide Bourgeois

Transcription: Baptism record of Adelaide Bourgeois.
___________________

Original French
B 60
Adelaide Bourgeois
Cardiné Beauchemin

C. Bapt. Roussiand???

Le trois Juin mil huit-cent-cinquante huit nous prétres sausigné avons baptisé Adelaide née aujois ???? du légitime mariage de Pierre Bourgeois

cultivateur de cette paroisse et de Olive Martel. Parrain Edouard Augé marraine Adelaide Lemire qui ont déclaré me savoir signet.
C. Bapt. Roussiand???

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 14 Jan 2016.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 14 Jan 2016.

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The following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 14 Jan 2016.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 14 Jan 2016.

 

Bolivia

Liberia

Poland

Ukraine

United States

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 14 Jan 2016.

 

Australia

United Kingdom

United States

 


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Melansons in Acadia

Melansons in Acadia

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Melanson-Crest-150x1501.jpgPierre ‘dit Laverdure and his wife Priscilla Mellanson (my eighth great grandparents on my mother’s side) were known by the name, nickname or title of Laverdure. We are descended from the second of their three sons, Charles ‘dit la Ramee’ Mellanson, (my seventh great grandfather).

The origin of the name ‘Laverdure’ is not known, but it is believed that this was actually a title or nickname referring to the area of France from which Pierre came. This is supported by the fact that he was not the only one to use the Laverdure name. The common practice of the day in the French culture was to signify a title or nickname with the use of the preceding word ‘dit’, such as ‘dit Laverdure’ in this case.Two of their sons, Pierre (of the nickname ‘Laverdure’ as well) and Charles (nickname La Ramee), appear to be the first to have begun using “Mellanson” and were both well educated and literate in English and French. The origin of this surname is unclear as their father was not known to have used it. There is speculation that ‘Mellanson’ originated from Priscilla’s last name, which is believed by some to have been Mallinson. This belief is supported by the fact that there is a document containing Priscilla’s signature as the initials ‘PM’, since neither of her married names began with the letter ‘M’.

Pierre and Priscilla had another son named John, who was also known by the name ‘Laverdure’, as was Charles dit La Ramée Mellanson’s daughter Marie (later known as Mary Laverdure), who lived with her grandmother Priscilla in Boston from a young age.

Pierre and Priscilla immigrated to Acadia (see image at left) from England on the ship ‘Satisfaction’ with the English Governor of Acadia, Sir Thomas Temple and several other settlers. They disembarked at St. John’s Fort on the St. John River. Pierre and Priscilla remained in Acadia for ten years.

About 1667, the Treaty of Breda between the English and French resulted in control of Acadia reverting back to France.

Being Protestants, Pierre and Priscilla most likely moved to Boston, Massachusetts to avoid living under a French Catholic government. A petition on file in Boston refers to ‘Peter Laverdure’ as a French Protestant and ‘Priscilla Laverdure’ as an English woman. It also states that Priscilla’s husband left St. John’s Fort to escape the Catholics, supporting the theory that Pierre may have been an Huguenot who left France in the 1620’s to escape Catholic intolerance of Protestants. Pierre is later shown in England where he married Priscilla about 1630.

Having both converted to Catholicism, eldest son Pierre dit Laverdure married Marie-Marguerite Muis d’Entremont, daughter of Philippe Muis d’Entremont and Madeleine Hélie; and Charles dit La Ramée married Marie Dugas, daughter of Abraham Dugas and Marie-Marguerite-Louise Doucet. Pierre and his wife Marie-Marguerite founded Grand Pré at Les Mines (Minas). Later becoming the Captain of the Militia while Acadia was under French control, he held a position of authority and some power in the Les Mines. He was also known to have become a French spy.

Charles became a spy for the English – the opposing side of his own brother, Pierre. In 1695, he signed his name to an oath of allegiance to the King of England at Port Royal.


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It’s important to know naming conventions for genealogy #namingconventions.

It’s important to know naming conventions for genealogy #namingconventions.

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I have learned to pay close attention to the names of individuals in my research as knowledge of naming conventions can be key to investigating a family’s genealogy. Frequently, the names provide valuable clues to the answers to my questions.

 

Individuals from differing cultures, time periods, religions and families were known to follow specific traditions and naming conventions. It’s important to know these naming conventions for genealogy research as accuracy of your conclusions can be adversely affected by misinterpreting names, titles, etc.

 

These practices could also change over time according to the practices of the day.

Below are some examples of naming practices I encountered in my research.

It’s very important to note that making assumptions in genealogy using only naming conventions is dangerous as these conventions were not followed by everyone. However, knowing naming conventions can be great help finding an ancestor as long as the other information matches to confirm the identity.

 

France

Last names in France.
Last names in France.
  • Instead of surnames as we know them, the French in the 17th and 18th centuries routinely adopted nicknames or titles denoted by the word ‘dit’  or ‘dite’ before it. This title or nickname could have referred to any number of things including a descriptive term, location, family or property in France. This was the case for my ancestor, Pierre dit Laverdure, one of the Huguenots to settle in Acadia in the mid-17th century. I couldn’t find the translation for ‘Laverdure’, but I was able to find a modern translation for ‘verdure’ as follows:

ver·dure
a. The lush greenness of flourishing vegetation.
b. Vigorous greenery.
2. A fresh or flourishing condition: the verdure of childhood.

[Middle English, from Old French, from verd, green, from Latin viridis.]

My reasoning is that, based on this definition, there are several possibilities, including: he was from a lush, green, fertile area of France; he was involved in forest management or forestry; he was in a profession concerned with vegetation such as farming; the ‘fresh or flourishing condition’ referred to in the definition above could allude to his being ‘young’, ‘youthful’, ‘vigorous’, or ‘junior’ to someone.

 

French Canada

 

  • Giving all children of the same gender the same middle name, usually in honor of a relative or ancestor.
  • Naming children after parents and grandparents (either given or middle name).
  • After the death of a child, they frequently used the name for a sibling born later.
  • Children were often given hyphenated first and middle names (i.e. Marie-Madeleine or Jean-Jacques), but they would frequently adopt one or the other for everyday use.
  • French-Canadians and Metis in early days often followed the original French convention of using the prefix of ‘dit’ or ‘ditte’ as above.

 

African-Americans

 

  • During and after the civil war, slaves frequently adopted the surname of their current or previous owner.

 

Ireland

Irish surnames.
Irish surnames.

Boys

  • 1st son was named after the father’s father.
  • 2nd son was named after the mother’s father.
  • 3rd son was named after the father.
  • 4th son was named after the father’s eldest brother.

Girls

  • 1st daughter was named after the mother’s mother.
  • 2nd daughter was named after the father’s mother.
  • 3rd daughter was named after the mother.
  • 4th daughter was named after the mother’s eldest sister

 

UK, USA and Canada

British last names.
British last names.
  • One or more children in a family, regardless of gender, were frequently given their mother’s maiden name as a middle name to carry that name on within the family. Infrequently, I have seen  families where one or more of the children had the mother’s maiden name as a middle name.

 

Wales

 

  • In Wales, individuals carried their father’s given name as a surname, preceded by a term signifying whether they were male or female. The son of a man named Rhys would use the surname ‘ap (or ab) Rhys’ and a daughter would use ‘ferch (or verch) Rhys’.

 

Scotland

Scottish clan map.
Scottish clan map.
  • In Scotland, children were usually given first names according to the following: first son is named after his father’s father; the second son is named after his mother’s father; the third son is named after his father; the first daughter is named after her mother’s mother; the second daughter is named after her father’s mother; and the third daughter is named after her mother.
  • The surname used depended on the region the family came from. For the most part, in the Scottish highlands, the child’s surname was a combination of the prefix ‘Mc’ or ‘Mac’ followed by the given name or variation of the father (i.e. Jonathan McKenzie – the son of Kenneth). In the lowlands, the suffix ‘son’ was added to the given name of the father, as in Johnson, Robertson, Jacobson, etc.
  • The Scottish were also known to take a surname from a location, occupation, and/or physical characteristic.

 

China

 

  • Chinese immigrants frequently took on entirely new names – both given and surnames – in the language of the their new country. Sometimes they would choose names that sounded phonetically similar to their original Chinese names.

 

Japan

 

  • Japanese names put surname first and given name last. However, names were frequently changed to follow the western convention of given name first and surname last when emigrating to the west.

 

Roman Catholics

 

  • Roman Catholics frequently named their children after saints or choose names from the bible, especially in French-Canadian and latin families.

 

Scandinavia and Iceland

Scandinavian last names.
Scandinavian last names.
  • The children adopted a modified version of the given name of the father as a surname, by adding ‘son’ at the end of the father’s given name. For example, in my husband’s family in Sweden, the name in America was Gummeson, originating with David Gummeson, who was the son of Gumme Svensson, who in turn was the son of Sven Hakansson. For female children, the same practice occurred, but the added suffix was either ‘dottir’ or ‘dotter’, as in Gummesdottir. This could frequently change upon immigration to the west to comply with western naming conventions.

 

Non-specific

 

  • Families often adopted naming traditions such as the first-born son and/or daughter being named in some way after either a parent, grandparent or other close relative.
  • Some changed their surname for personal or cultural reasons. In my own family on my father’s side, a male ancestor took exception to his surname of Turmel/Turmelle. In French tradition, the suffix ‘elle’ signifies the female gender. This gentleman had his surname legally changed to Turmaine and it’s carried on in this form to the present day. Other branches of the family retained the Turmel/Turmelle surname.
  • Others changed their surnames for religious reasons. As seen in a recent episode of ‘Who Do You Think You Are’, actress Helen Hunt discovered that an ancestor of hers had changed her name from Rafenberg to Roberts – most likely to escape anti-semitism, especially as she was a widow trying to support her family.


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 Apr 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 Apr 2015.

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Following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 Apr 2015.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions.

 

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Indonesia

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Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

 

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United Kingdom

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____________________

photo credit: Vogan via photopin (license)


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Learning to transcribe from ‘ye olde englishe’ and latin.

Learning to transcribe from ‘ye olde englishe’ and latin.

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Transcribing the baptism register from Norfolk, England in my previous post, “Transcription and Translation: Baptism of Elizabeth Stalham and others from the St. George Tombland Church register” was particularly problematic for me, requiring my learning to transcribe from ‘ye olde englishe’ and latin.

 

I am familiar with transcribing in several languages such as German, Swedish, French, etc., even though I do need help from Google Translate.

For this translation, I was able to interpret the text fairly easily, including the months, and the years. At first, I thought there were no days mentioned at all, until I took a closer look and realized there was one small ‘word’ in each entry I couldn’t account for. One thing I did notice was the pattern of repetition within each entry and it’s resemblance to the pattern of repetition to Roman numerals – even if they did appear to be just miscellaneous symbols or text (see image below).

 

Baptism record for Elizabeth Stalham - marked.

 

To confirm my suspicions, I did some research into interpreting Latin dates. It took some time and effort as everything I found at first referred to the date formats used in general, including those used in recording events in genealogy software.

Just as I was about to give up and use my standard ‘????’ in place of the mysterious text since I was unsure of my conclusions, I came upon the following web page that provided the answer I was looking for. They were ‘Reading dates in old English records.’ The following is the verbatim section from the page that specifically provided the answers I was seeking.

The chart below shows some of the different ways numbers may be written.

1 unus, primo, primus, I i
2 duo, secundo, secundus II ij
3 tres, tertio, tertius III iij
4 quattuor, quarto, quartus IV iiij, iv
5 quinque, quinto, quintus V v
6 sex, sexto, sextus VI vi
7 septem, septimo, septimus VII vij
8 octo, octavo, octavus VIII viij
9 novem, nono, nonus IX viiij, ix
10 decem, decimo, decimus X x
11 undecim, undecimo, undecimus XI xi
12 duodecim, duodecimo, duodecimus XII xij
13 tredecim, tertio decimo, tertius decimus XIII xiij
14 quattuordecim, quarto decimo, quartus decimus XIV xiiij, xiv
15 quindecim, quinto decimo, quintus decimus XV xv
16 sedecim, sexto decimo, sextus decimus XVI xvi
17 septendecim, septimo decimo, septimus decimus XVII xvij
18 duodeviginti, octavo decimo, octavus decimus, duodevicesimo, duodevicesimus XVIII xviij
19 undeviginti, nono decimo, nonus decimus, undevicesimo, undevicesimus XIX xviiij, xix
20 viginti, vicesimo, vicesimus, viccesimo, vicessimo, viccessimo XX xx
21 viginti unus, vicesimo primo, vicesimus primus XXI xxi
22 viginti duo, vicesimo secundo, vicemus secundus XXII xxij
23 viginti tres, vicesimo tertio, vicesimus tertius XXIII xxiij
24 viginti quattuor, vicesimo quarto, vicesimus quartus XXIV xxiiij, xxiv
25 viginti quinque, vicesimo quinto, vicesimus quintus XXV xxv
26 viginti sex, vicesimo sexto, vicesimus sextus XXVI xxvi
27 viginti septem, vicesimo septimo, vicesimus septimus XXVII xxvij
28 duodetriginta, vicesimo octavo, vicesimus octavus, duodetricesimo, duodetricesimus XXVIII xxviij
29 undetriginta, vicesimo nono, vicesimus nonus, undetricesimo, undetricesimus XXVIV xxviiij, xxix
30 triginta, tricesimo, tricesimus XXX xxx
31 triginta unus, tricesimo primo, tricesimus primus XXXI xxxi

Numbers may also be written as scores. A score is twenty and is written as XX or xx. If XX is above another number, it would be multiplied by the number under it. Therefore, four score or eighty could be written as XX over IV or xx over iiij as shown below.

XX xx

IV iiij

Sources:

  1. About.com; “Reading and Understanding Old Documents & Records”; Kimberly Powell; http://genealogy.about.com/od/basics/a/old_handwriting.htm.
  2. Family Search; Reading dates in old English records; Document ID: 111804; https://help.familysearch.org/publishing/43/111804_f.SAL_Public.html.


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 7 Mar 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 7 Mar 2015.

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The following are the ancestry.com and familysearch.org updates and additions up to and including 7 Mar 2015.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

<a href=
Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additons.” width=”350″ height=”234″ /> Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additons to 7 Mar 2015.

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Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 Jan 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 Jan 2015.

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Following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions up to 30 Jan 2015.

 

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions” src=”http://www.emptynestancestry.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/small_288022773.jpg” alt=”Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions” width=”240″ height=”159″ /> Ancestry.com