Tag: Censuses

Permanently label media and files with identifying information.

A very large part of my genealogical research over the past twenty years has produced thousands of photographs and other images and naming and cataloging these files required me to permanently label media files with identifying information.
Permanently label media files with identifying information. Insert cursor to the right of the 'Comments' line and a scroll box appears. Enter relevant data in the 'Comments' box and click 'OK' to save and exit.

Permanently label media files with identifying information. Insert cursor to the right of the ‘Comments’ line and a scroll box appears. Enter relevant data in the ‘Comments’ box and click ‘OK’ to save and exit.

I have developed a system over the past few years that has been invaluable to me.

I did not develop this universal system until many years after beginning my research. Therefore there are numerous files in my database that do not follow this, but as I edit individuals and data, I change the file names and comments entries as I go along.

Key points in this system are:

File Comments Section

  • On the file being named and labelled:
    • Right click on the file in the list
    • Select ‘Properties’
    • Select the ‘Details’ tab
    • Insert cursor to the right of the ‘Comments’ line and a scroll box appears.
    • Enter relevant data in the ‘Comments’ box and click ‘OK’ to save and exit.

File Names

Photos

Commas (,) separate data for an individual while a semi-colon (;) separates different individuals. The last name appearing first enables sorting file lists alphabetically with last name first. Otherwise, a file search can be done.

  • Individual persons
    • Last name, First and Middle Names, birth date (i.e. Smith, George Walter, b. 1961.jpg).
    • The addition of the birth date enables identifying an individual when there is more than one with the same name.
  • Married couples
    • Husband’s last name, first name; wife’s last name (if different), first name (i.e. Smith, George; Christine.jpg; Smith, George Walter; Foster, Samantha.jpg).
    • In the comments section I list individuals from left rear to right front or clockwise, as they appear in the image.
  • Family groups
    • Father’s last name, first name; wife’s last name (if different), first name; children’s last name (if different), first name (i.e. Smith, George Walter; Samantha; Grace; John.jpg).
    • In the comments section I list individuals from left rear to right front or clockwise, as they appear in the image.
    • If the group is too large to include all names, I list individuals in detail in the comments section of the file data in order from left rear to right front.
  • Groups of miscellaneous people.
    • Each individual’s last name, first name, b. date (if more than one with the name); last name, first name; etc. (i.e. Smith, George Walter; Davidson, Thomas; Foster, Helen).
    • If there are too many to include in the file name, start on the left rear and work to the front right or clockwise, with as many names as possible (i.e. Smith, George Walter; Samantha; Grace; John and family and friends.jpg).
    • If the group is too large to include all names, I list individuals in detail in the comments section of the file data.
  • Places, buildings, etc.
    • List the place data in the file name as follows: Country, State or Province, County, City or Town (i.e. Chilliwack Senior Secondary School; Chilliwack, British Columbia, Canada.jpg).
    • In the comments section, I list as stated followed by the street address and any other pertinent information (i.e. landmark name, owner, date, background information).
Source Images
  • Individual records (i.e. birth, marriage, death, etc.).
    • For the file name list the last name, first name – record type, relevant date (i.e. Smith, George; Death Record; December 12, 1911.jpg).
    • In the comments section, also include all other relevant data for identification purposes (i.e. place, other people mentioned, etc.).
  • Group records that include several individuals (i.e. censuses, tax rolls, passenger lists, etc.).
    • For the file name list the head of household’s last name, first and middle names, birth date if more than one individual with that name – record type, country, state or province, county, city or town, street address, household (i.e. Smith, George A, b. 1872; 1850 US Census; Beekmantown, Clinton, New York.jpg).
    • Whatever does not fit in the file name can be included in the comments section of the file.

Grandmère Rose – Marie Marguerite Rose Amande Emery

Gail, Gerard, Grandma Rose and Christine (front) Turmaine

Rear l-r: Patricia-Gail (Gail), Gerard Ronald Joseph (Gerry), Rose Amande Turmaine; Front: Christine Blythe (Turmaine).

Being the child of a military member has one huge drawback – we didn’t have any control over where we lived, when or for how long. As a result, contact with family members was infrequent at best and I do regret not getting to know our relatives better.

My grandparents on my father’s side were Henri Joseph Turmaine (Henri) and Marie Marguerite Rose Amande Emery (Rose Amande).

Therese Paquette (Turmaine) with Christine.

Ma tante Thérèse Paquette and Christine Blythe (Turmaine) circa 1989.

Dad, Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine (1934-2005) was the youngest of three children who survived infancy. Dad’s brothers and sisters included Albert Joseph Turmaine (1923-1966), Rose-Marie Azilda Thérèse Turmaine (1929-2003), and Marianne Claudette Andrea Turmaine (1937-1937).

The Turmaine Family

Turmaine Family: Theresa, Henry (Grandpère), Gerard (Dad), Rose (Grandmère), and Joseph.

I was too young to remember much about my grandfather Henri as he died in 1966 in General Hospital in Toronto. I know I saw Grandma Rose quite frequently within the first few years of my life, but again, I was too young to remember much. When I turned 10 in 1970, however, that all changed since we were transferred from Ontario to Comox, British Columbia. We took the last opportunity to visit everyone we could that summer on our trip across the country.

I can remember one particular visit where we were permitted to stay at the cottage of cousins, the Pollaris, at Loon Lake in Ontario. What a beautiful cottage it was, too. A semi-circle shape, the front circular side rested on posts in the lake shore, extending over the water. That entire side of the cottage was one big great room and standing in it felt like being in motion on the lake.

I do remember being awestruck in Grandmère’s home. She was a highly devoted Catholic and as soon as we walked in, we were overwhelmed by praying hands, her obsession. There were praying hands statues, prints, and paintings everywhere.  I can remember being told when I was young that Grandmère’s ambition was for Dad to become a Catholic priest and how disappointed she was when he opted for the military instead and married my mother. Knowing my father, he definitely chose the path that suited his own nature and ambitions, especially considering his naughty, rather raunchy sense of humor. Somehow, I don’t think it would have gone over very well as a priest.

Front: Rose Amande and her mother Émilie Labelle, Rear: Unknown Cousin

Front: Rose Armande Emery seated next to her mother, Émilie (Labelle), wife of Charles (Albert) Emery. MIddle: Betty Turmaine, daughter of Hérmènégilde and Azilda Labelle.

A couple of years later, we saw Grandmère Rose one last time in about 1972 when she came to visit us in Comox. She passed away in 1978. Tante Thérèse came out in 1987 for my sister Andréa’s wedding, in 1989 for Renée’s wedding and in 1991 for my own wedding to Mark. She passed away in 2003 in Chateaugay, Québec. It may seem odd that I haven’t mentioned Dad’s brother, my uncle Albert Joseph, but unfortunately, he had committed suicide just prior to Grandpère Henri’s death in 1966.

Grandmère Rose’s father was Charles Albert Emery, who was born in about 1870 in Vermont, United States and died in about 1915. Her mother was Émilie Labelle, born about 1870 in St. André Avellin, Ripon, Papineau County, Québec to Antoine Labelle (1820-1890) and Joséphine Périllard (born 1844), both of Québec. In addition to Grandmère Rose, they had four other children, of whom one was Pte. Joseph Philias Albert (1889-1917) who was missing in action and presumed dead at Vimy Ridge during WWII. His name is only one of many immortalized on the Vimy Ridge Memorial in France.

Oddly enough, my father’s grandfather Herménégilde (father-in-law to Grandmère Rose) took Marie Joséphine Azilda Labelle as his second wife in 1911. Azilda was sister to Joséphine (and Rose’s grandmother).

Children of Antoine Labelle and Joséphine Périard (Périllard)

Children of Antoine Labelle and Joséphine Périllard.

Antoine Labelle (1820-1890) was the son of Antoine Labelle and Marie Isaac Duplanty dit Héry of Québec, and had been married twice, first to Émilie Fournelle and second on November 23, 1863 to Joséphine Périllard (my great great grandmother), born 1844 in Ste. Magdeleine Rigaud, Vaudreuil, Québec to Michel Périllard and Zoé (Madeleine, Michel) Demers. The 1852 Census of Canada East shows Joséphine Périllard with her parents, brothers and sisters living in 274 Petite Nation Parish, St-André Avellin, Ottawa County.

Antoine and Joséphine’s six children included Émilie Labelle (born 1870), Antoine Labelle (1872-1944), Célima (Délima) (born 1874), Joseph (1877-1944), Marguerite (1880-1960), Azilda (1884-1933).

During my extensive research into my French Canadian ancestry, I’ve come to realize one thing – there are no surprises. Families remained close in proximity and emotion, and marriage within the inner circle – and yes, family, according to the laws of consanguinity of the Catholic church was commonplace.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Transcription – Obituary for Elam Dennis Matthews, 96

Obituary for Elam Dennis Matthews.

Obituary for Elam Dennis Matthews.

The following is my transcription of the obituary for Elam Dennis Matthews of Louisa County, Iowa, published in the local newspaper at the time.

Area Deaths

______________

Aged Louisa County Resident Dies

WapelloElam Dennis Matthews, 96, one of the oldest residents of Louisa county, died Jan. 1[0], at 3:10 p. m., at the home of his daughter Mrs. Roland Barrick. Death resulted from a stroke suffered New Year’s day.

A native of Neenah, Wis., Matthews was born Dec. 1, 1854, the son of David and Mary Ann Adams Coon. His mother died when he was 3 1/2 years old and his father died while a prisoner of the Confederate army. The child was adopted by the Nathan Matthews family of Omro, Wis. He married Martha Jane Jordan at Auroraville, Wis., Oct. 26, 1873, and they lived in Wisconsin and Colorado before coming to Iowa.

In 1899 Matthews began to operate a truck farm near Morning Sun, which he ran for many years before retiring and moving into Morning Sun. His wife died in 1935 and a son, William Matthews, died in 1940.

Despite his advanced age, Matthews was a very active man. When he was 94 he made a trip to California, and last fall took a trip to New York.

Surviving are a son and a daughter, Stanley Matthews, Morning Sun, and Mrs. Edith Barrick, Wapello, and 11 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren.

Last rites will be held at the Pierce funeral home at 2 p. m. Saturday. Officiating will be Dr. Will M. Hughes, pastor of the United Presbyterian church. Burial will be in Elmwood cemetery.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Alanson and Gardner Adams, Brothers in Arms in the War of 1812

I mentioned in a previous post about William B. Coon, who served as a soldier for the United States in the War of 1812 and was the father of Civil War casualty David Coon, that I would be writing about Alanson Adams (fifth great grandfather to my kids) who was father to David Coon’s first wife Mary Ann Adams. Alanson and Gardner Adams both fought in the War of 1812.
Alanson Adams

Alanson Adams

Alanson was born April 16, 1792 to Joseph Adams (born 1756) in Williston, Vermont, United States and was the brother of Gardner Adams.

Alanson and Gardner Adams - Muster Roll

Alanson and Gardner Adams – War of 1812 Muster Roll.

Alanson worked as a farmer until he enlisted along with his brother Gardner on January 28, 1813 for service as soldiers for the United States in the War of 1812, both as Privates with Captain Samuel R. Gordon and Captain (later Lieutenant) Valentine R. Goodrich’s Company of the 11th Infantry Regiment in Vermont.

On February 28, 1814, Alanson’s brother Gardner was recorded to be sick in hospital at Brownsville. He had been shot in the leg, and as a result of this injury, he received a military pension after his discharge on January 28, 1818, just one day following the discharge of his brother Alanson.

Submit Hall

Submit (Mitty) Hall

Alanson married Submit “Mitty or Malinda” Hall in 1840 and they had the following children: Elam Dennis Adams (1821-1897), Martha Marie Adams (1827-1861) and Mary Ann Adams (1824-1859), first wife of Civil War veteran David Coon (fourth great grandfather to my kids). Throughout his life, he worked as a farmer (early years), labourer in manufacturing and as a shoemaker.

Sometime between 1840 and 1844, Alanson and his family relocated to Licking County, Ohio, living there until after 1860, when they are recorded in the census at Fold du Lac, Wisconsin, where he is shown living near his son Elam Dennis Adams.

The wealth of Alanson and his family appears to have fluctuated considerably. In 1850, he owned $600 value in real estate, yet in 1860 his wealth had reduced to just $100 in personal goods (no real estate), and then in 1870 he owned $1,000 in real estate. It is unknown whether Alanson had any personal wealth in 1880 as he is showing in the Canadian census to be living with the family of his son Elam Dennis Adams, while still in Fold du Lac, Wisconsin.

Alanson and his family were members of the Baptist Church.

Alanson died April 23, 1881 while living in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. The following obituary was published in the Fond du Lac Daily Commonwealth of Tuesday, April 26, 1881, on page 4.

Retrospective

The death of Mr. Alanson Adams of our city on the 23rd instant, is an event of more than ordinary interest. Born in the year 1792, in the third year of Washington’s first term, his life covers nearly the whole period of our constitutional history. We are fairly startled at the rapidity of our country’s development, as compared with other countries, when we contemplate its history being crowded into the lifetime of one man. During this period the small circle of States bordering the Atlantic coast, few in population and impoverished by war, has been enlarged until it now engirdles the continent. A great nation, ranking among the first in power, wealth and influence has been developed within this comparatively short space of time. Human life can no longer be said to be short, if we measure it by the achievements comprehended within its.limits.

Mr. Adams is identified with the history of our country in one of the most endearing relations. Every country venerates the memory of its soldiers. Especially is this true of a republic, which must depend very largely on the valor and patriotism of its volunteer soldiers for defense. The deceased belongs to that noble band whom our nation delights to honor. In early manhood, at the call of his country, he entered her service in the war of 1812. He was in several engagements during this war, among which were the battles of Chippewa and Lundy’s Lane. At the latter place he was wounded. Thus another one of the few surviving heroes of this war has been laid away to that rest which no battle call, or shock —–will ever disturb.

But in still another and not less important cause was the deceased identified with the history and progress of our country. He belonged in the class of pioneers peculiar to our country, and yet sometimes overlooked, and underestimated in making our estimates of the elements entering late American progress. To this class of our population, essentially nomadic in its character, does our country owe very much of its greatness to-day. By it has been laid the foundations of that grand super-structure of American nationality which has no parallel in history. Reared in central Vermont he became identified with the early struggles of that State. In 1818 he was married. The union thus formed continued some fifty-four years. In 1844 with his family, consisting of one son and two daughters, he removed to Ohio. Here he remained until 1860, when he moved to Wisconsin, where he has since resided. Since the death of his wife, some ten years ago, he has made his home with his son, E.D. Adams, of our city, where he died.

The deceased was a devoted Christian, having been a member of the Baptist church nearly sixty years. He will be deeply mourned by the church to which he had endeared himself, and the circle of friends how knew him best. The sympathies of its many friends are extended to the bereaved family, with the assurance that our loss is his gain.

Sources:

  1. Payroll of a Company of Infantry Commanded by Lt. Valentine R. Goodrich, the Eleventh Regiment of the United States, for the Months of January and February, 1813, online [], accessed.
  2. Emily Bailey, “Mary Ann Adams,” e-mail message to Christine Blythe, 20 Nov 2006.
  3. Coon, David, death certificate no. Widow’s Claim to Pension – Emma and Hiram Coon (1864).
  4. Affidavit of Alanson and Mitty Adams (31 Mar 1869).
  5. Adams, Alanson obituary, Fond du Lac Commonwealth, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, Tuesday, April 26, 1881, Pg. 4.
  6. 1840 US Census, , (Burlington, Chittenden, Vermont); 541, Roll: 48; Page: 541; Image: 101, Family History Library Film: 0027439, 48, Original data: Sixth Census of the United States, 1840. (NARA microfilm publication M704, 580 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29, National Archives, Washington, D.C..
  7. 1870 US Census, , (Fond du Lac Ward 3, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin); Page: 285B, Roll: M593_1713; Page: 285B; Image: 577, Family History Library Film: 553212, Roll: M593_1713, Image: 577, National Archives and Records Administration, n.d., Washington, D.C..
  8. 1880 US Census, , (Fond du Lac Ward 3, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin); 212A, Roll: 1425; Page: 212A; Enumeration District: 41, Family History Film: 1255425, 1425, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, USA, Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
  9. 1800 US Census, , (Williston, Chittenden, Vermont, USA); 350, Roll: 51; Page: 350; Image: 195, Family History Library Film: 218688, 51, Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C..
  10. Adjutant-General, “Adjutant-General’s Report,” jpg, Roll of Capt. V. R. Goodrich’s Company (: accessed ).
  11. “William B. Coon Family,” e-mail message to Christine Blythe, 20 Nov 2006.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – 6 Aug 2014

Following are the Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions up to and including August 6, 2014.

 

Following are the Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions up to and including August 6, 2014.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

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United States

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Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

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William B. Coon – Soldier in the War of 1812

In a previous post, I told the story of David Coon, the fourth great grandfather to my children Erin and Stuart, and his service and death in the Civil War. His father, William B. Coon (about 1789 to August 25, 1854) was also a soldier, but in his case he served in the War of 1812. William was born in Beekmantown, Clinton, New York and was the son of Joseph Coon.
War of 1812 Minor's Claim to Bounty Land for William B. Coon

War of 1812 Claim to Bounty Land by William B. Coon, page 1.

War of 1812 Minor's Claim to Bounty Land

War of 1812 Claim to Bounty Land by William B. Coon, page 2.

In 1813, at the age of 24, William enlisted as a Private with the 36th Regiment of the New York Militia under Captain Fillmore at Plattsburgh, New York.

Zebulon Pike

Colonel Zebulon Pike

On January 4, 1851, William B. Coon swore an affidavit before John Kilborn, Justice of the Peace in Canada West, United Counties of Leeds and Grenville, in support of his claim to bounty land in compensation for his service in the War of 1812. According to the affidavit, he, along with his horses and sleigh, were pressed into service March 1, 1813 by Colonel Pike’s 15th Infantry Regiment to go from Plattsburgh to Sackets Harbor, serving seventeen days.

Subsequently, he enlisted August 25, 1813 at Beekmantown, Clinton County, New York, as a Private in Captain S. Fillmore’s Company of the militia commanded by Major John Roberts. He was honorably discharged about December 1, 1813. During this three month period of service, they defended the town of Plattsburgh during the burning of the newly promoted General Pike’s encampment, under command of Colonel Thomas Miller.

War of 1812 Minor's Claim to Bounty Land

War of 1812 Minor’s Claim to Bounty Land, page 2.

War of 1812 Minor's Claim to Bounty Land

War of 1812 Minor’s Claim to Bounty Land, page 1.

A supporting “Declaration on Behalf of Minor Children for Bounty Land” of August 3, 1869 by Harriet (Hattie) Laplaint of Beekmantown, Clinton County, New York states she is the child of William B. Coon, who had been married to Elizabeth Hicks. She further states William B. Coon had died August 25, 1854 and that Elizabeth had predeceased him on September 26, 1842. She was the only child of William and Elizabeth listed and as there were other children by both of his marriages, it appears she was the only claimant for the bounty land. This declaration is witnessed by her half-brother Samuel C. Coon and one Joel Cudworth.

Bounty Land Claim signed by Hiram Southwick.

Bounty Land Claim signed by Hiram Southwick.

The “Bounty Land Claim” document signed by Hiram Southwick proves the previous marriage of William B. Coon, although his first wife is not named, stating he was the half-brother of Hattie in support of her claim. William’s first wife Clarissa Haskill had previously been briefly married to Ebenezer (Eben) Southwick and had two sons by him, Hiram and James.

Power of Attorney re land claim.

Power of Attorney re William B. Coon’s land claim.

William B. Coon was married about 1818 to Clarissa Haskill at Beekmantown. Their children were: John Williams Coon (1819-1842); David Coon (1824-1864); Samuel Churchill Coon (1824-1903); and Clarinda Coon (1826-1870).

The fate of Clarissa is unknown at this point, but it is assumed she had died sometime between 1826 and 1840, as William married a second time in about 1840 in Ontario, Canada to Elizabeth Hicks. Their children were: Mary Eleanor Coon (born circa 1840) and Harriet “Hattie” Coon (born circa 1841).

Military Bounty Land Warrant Certificate - William B. Coon

William B. Coon’s Military Bounty Land Warrant Certificate. 

William died August 25, 1854 in Alexandria, Licking County, Ohio. Unfortunately, this was before he could receive his 40 acres of bounty land in Wisconsin, which then went to his son David, who relocated there with his family prior to his own service in the Civil War.

Keep checking back as I will soon write a post about my children’s other fifth great grandfather, Alanson Adams, the father of David Coon’s wife, Mary Ann Adams. Alanson also fought in the War of 1812, having enlisted along with his brother Gardner in 1813.

Sources:

  1. Emily Bailey, “David Coon and Family Background,” e-mail message to Christine Blythe, 19 Nov 2006.
  2. Emily Bailey, “William B. Coon Family,” e-mail message to Christine Blythe, 20 Nov 2006.
  3. Coon, William B.; War of 1812 Service File.
  4. Act of Sept. 28 1850 Land Warrant Card – Coon, W.B. and Coon, David.
  5. Military Bounty Land Warrant Certificate – Coon, William B.
  6. Military Bounty Land Location Record – Coon, William B.
  7. 1851 Canadian, Lansdowne Township, Leeds County; Ontario GenWeb; http://www.geneofun.on.ca/ongenweb/.
  8. “Genealogy Genforum,” database, Coon Family (http://genforum.genealogy.com/coon/messages/1961.html).