Tag: Deaths

Transcription: Hartford Vital Records; Stanley, Standley, Standly, Standla; page 393

Transcription: Hartford Vital Records; Stanley, Standley, Standly, Standla; page 393

HARTFORD VITAL RECORDS

393

(Name and description   |   Vol.   |   Page)
STANLEY, STANDLEY, STANDLY, STANDLA, (cont)
Elizabeth, d. [Caleb], b. Oct. 24, 1669   |   FFS   |   21
Hanna, d Caleb, b. Oct 13, 1666   |   FFS   |   21
Hanna, d. Caleb, b Oct. l3, 1666   |   D   |   18
Hannah, [d. Nathaniel! & Sarrah], b Sept 30, 1674, d. Oct 31, 1681   |   D   |   18
Hanah, [d Nathaniel] & Sarrah], b Sept 30, 1674, d Oct 31, 1681   |   FFS   |   21
Hannah, w. Caleb, d. Dec. 5, 1702   |   D   |   25
Hannah, [w. Caleb], d. Dec. 5, 1702   |   FFS   |   29
Hiram, of Hartford, m. Margaret KING, of Enfield, Oct 30, 1825, by Nathan Johnson, J. P.   |   I   |   47
Izack, s Timothy, b Mar. 10, 1647   |   D   |   5
Isaac, s Timothy, b Mar. 10, 1647   |   FFS   |   2
John, m Sary SCOTT, Dec. 15, 1645   |   D   |   21
John, m. Sary SCOTT, Dec 15, 1645   |   FFS   |   26
John, s John, b. Nov. 3 or 4, 1647   |   D   |   4
John, s. John, b. Nov. 3, or 4, 1647   |   FFS   |   5
Jonath[an], [s Caleb & Abigail], b. Nov. 30, 1709   |   FFS   |   61
Joseph, [s. Nathaniell & Sarrah], b. Feb. 20, 1671, d Mar 18, 1675/6   |   D   |   18
Joseph, s Nathaniell & Sarrah, b. Feb. 20, 1671; d. Mar. 18, 1675/6   |   FFS   |   21
Joseph, s. Nath[anie]ll & Anna, b. Jan. 4, 1710/11   |   D   |   16
Joseph, s. [Nathaniel] & Anna], b. Jan. 4, 1710/11   |   FFS   |   18
Joseph, [s Nathaniel & Anna], b. Jan 4, 1710/11; d Aug. 14, 1712   |   FFS   |   61
Joseph, [s Nathaniel & Anna], b June 18, 172[ ]   |   FFS   |   61
Joseph, s. [Nathaniell], b. Aug. 21, 1723   |   FFS   |   74
Lowes, d.Timothy, b. Aug. 23, 1645   |   D   |   1
Louis, d. Timothy, b. Aug. 23, 1645   |   FFS   |   1
Mary, [d Nathaniell & Sarrah], b Oct 8, 1677   |   D   |   18
Mary, d. Nath[anie]ll & Sarrah, b Oct. 8, 1677   |   FFS   |   21
Mary, twin with Ann, d Capt. [Caleb], b June 14, 1692   |   D   |   18
Mary, twin with Ann, d. [Capt Caleb], b June 14, 1692   |   FFS   |   21
Mary, [d Nathaniel & Anna], b. June 20, 1721   |   FFS   |   61
Mary, m George RISLEY, Feb. 3, 1819, by Rev. Joel Hawes   |   I   |   18
Nath[anie]ll, m. Sarah BOOSEY, June 2, 1659   |   D   |   32
Nathaniel, m. Sarah BOOSEY, June 2, 1659   |   FFS   |   35
Nathaniell, s. Nath[anie]ll & Sarrah, b. June 5, 1664, d Apr 12, 1665   |   D   |   18
Nathaniel, s. Nathaniel & Sarrah, b. June 5, 1664; d Apr 12, 1665   |   FFS   |   21
Nath[anie]ll, [s. Nathaniel] & Sarrah], b July 9, 1683   |   D   |   18
Nath[anie]ll, [s. Nath[anie]ll & Sarrah], b. July 9, 1683   |   FFS   |   21
Nath[aniel], m. Anna WHITING, Nov 14, 1706   |   FFS   |   54
Nath[anie]ll, s. Nath[aniell] & Anna, b Aug. 11, 1707   |   D   |   16
Nath[anie]l, s. [Nath[aniel] & Anna, b. Aug 11, 1707   |   FFS   |   18

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

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Transcription: Sworn Statement regarding the Birth of Matthew Coon

Transcription: Sworn Statement regarding the Birth of Matthew Coon

The following is my transcription of the Sworn Statement regarding the birth of Matthew Coon.

State of Wisconsin
County of Waushara

Mrs. Mary Russell & Sarah Bradway being duly sworn upon their oaths say that they reside in said County and state that are acquainted with Isabel A. Coon widow of David Coon of Co A Batt Regt Wis Vols, and was acquainted with the said David in his lifetime.

That they were present at the births of Matthew E. Coon child of the said David and Isabel A. and know that he was born on the 3 day of November 1861 at the town of Bloomfield in said County and State.

They further say that they have no intent in any application in which this may relate.

Mary Russell

Sworn and subscribed before me this 27th day of February 1867 and I certify the affiants to be credible persons and that I have no intent in the claim of said Isabel A. for increase of pension  the word Poysippi erased & Bloomfield enten????? before signing —

James Russell  Justice of the Peace

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

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We must fight for our veterans as they fought for us.

We must fight for our veterans as they fought for us.

We must fight for our veterans.
poppy field

Remembrance Day is fast approaching and this is one very important day I always recognize with a post on this blog.

My family’s history is well-entrenched in military service.

  • My father was in the military for 30 years.
  • My father-in-law was in the military for over 30 years.
  • My husband, Mark served 20 years.

They all served tours in hostile environments.

Our family have also lost two family members in WWI, one being Pte Philias Joseph Albert Emery during advance actions at Vimy Ridge, and the other being Pte Joseph Turmaine in the Battle of Courcelette.

I have always thought that our government was not doing enough to help veterans who are disabled as a result of their duties.

I’m appalled to say that under this present Conservative government, instead of improving, the conditions and treatment of our valued veterans are much, much worse.

Reading this post at Change.org prompted me to write about his myself and I encourage everyone to go online at the Change.org site to sign the petition demanding better financial, physical and mental health care, and administrative treatment of our veterans.

This video of a rant by Rick Mercer on behalf of our veterans is a good example of just one area of concern.

Author credit: Christine Blythe, Feathering the Empty Nest Blog

photo credit: Dukas.Ju via photopin cc

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Transcription: Obituary for Camille Vachon

Transcription: Obituary for Camille Vachon

The following is a transcription of the French text of an obituary for Camille Vachon.

Camille Vachon
Camille Vachon

VACHON, Camille

À l’Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis, le  20 juin 1990, à l’âge de 83 ans et 10 mois, est décédé monsieur Camille Vachon, époux de dame Marie-Anna Boily. Il démeurait à Sts-Anges. La famille recevre les condoléances à la salle municipale, 317, des Érables à Sts-Anges, vendredi de 13h 30 à 16h 30 et de 19h à 22h, samedi de 13h à 14h 45. Le service religieux sera célébre le samedi 23 juin, à 15h, en l’église de Sts-Anges et de là au cimetiére paroissial, sous la direction de la Maison.

Armand Plante Inc.
875, Ste-Thérèse
St-Joseph

Il laisse dans le deuil, outre son épouse, ses enfants, gendres et belles-filles: Marie-Laure (Melvine Gagné), Laurent (Annette Drouin), Magella (Marie-Claire Drouin), Reina, Gemma (Laurent Lallamme), Guimond (Françoise Turmel), Thérèse (Adrien Lacroix), Pierrette (Denis Lagrange), ses vingt-deux petits-enfants, ses sept arriéres-petits-enfants; son frère et demi-soeurs: Valère, Germaine (Adélard Tardif), Eva, Iréne (Hermel Doyon), Agathe, Fernand (Jeannine Crenier), Rita (Antonio Labrie), Carmella (Freddy Jolicoeur), Imelda, ses neveus, niéces, cousins, cousines et de nombreus ami(e)s. Pour renseignements, 1-397-6948.

 

ENGLISH TRANSLATION (via Google Translate)

At the Hôtel-Dieu de Lévis, on 20 June 1990 at the age of 83 years and 10 months, Camille Mr. Vachon died, husband of Marie-Anna Boily. He remained in Sts-Anges. Family condolences will be received at the Municipal Hall , 317 Maples Sts-Anges, Friday from 13h 30 to 16h 30 and 19h to 22h Saturday from 13h to 14h 45. The funeral service will be held Saturday, June 23 at 15h, in the church of Sts-Anges and then to the parish cemetery under the direction of the house.

Armand Plante Inc.
875 , Ste- Thérèse
St. Joseph

He is survived by, in addition to his wife, children, sons and daughters, Marie-Laure (Melvin Won), Lawrence (Annette Drouin), Majella (Drouin Marie- Claire), Reina, Gemma (Laurent Lallamme), Guimond (Françoise Turmel), Therese (Adrien Lacroix), Pierrette (Denis Lagrange), twenty- two grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, his brother and half-sisters: Valere, Germaine (Adelard Tardif), Eva, Iréne (Hermel Doyon), Agathe, Fernand (Jeannine Crenier), Rita (Antonio Labrie), Carmella (Freddy Jolicoeur), Imelda, his nephews, nieces, cousins ​​and numerous friends. For more information, 1-397-6948.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

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All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

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Genealogy Mystery: Who were Christian W. Keefer’s parents?

Genealogy Mystery: Who were Christian W. Keefer’s parents?

Christian W. Keefer (Chester) is an important figure in one of the main branches of my husband’s and children’s ascendancy. He married Mary Ann Jacques and they eventually settled and raised a family in Dodge County, Wisconsin.

After numerous years of research, however, I’m still left scratching my head at the mystery of the identity of Christian W. Keefer’s parents.

As can be seen in the list of sources I’ve found and logged for Christian (below), you would think that at least one of them would provide some concrete information about his parentage and place of birth, but that turns out to not be the case.

Here’s what I know for sure:

Christian W. Keefer was born October 1, 1811 in Pennsylvania and his family originated from France.

Christian W. Keefer's parents.
Sources for Christian W. Keefer.

That’s it.

I originally took a mention of Philadelphia as Christian’s birthplace in a biography of his son Charles with a grain of salt. I do believe that people did and do tend to describe where they’ve come from by using the nearest, largest center that would be recognized outside the area. For example, although we live in Chilliwack, BC, Canada, we frequently say we’re located near Vancouver to those who are not from the area. Considering this possibility, I would not rule out any birth location in Pennsylvania.

I have considered the possibility that our Christian may be one of the Christians mentioned of the Keefer / Kiefer family in the “Biographical Annals of Franklin County”. I was able to systematically eliminate every Christian mentioned because they could not have been born on or near the birth date of our Christian (Chester), or they married into different families, etc.

Another  possibility I’ve been checking is that his father (and possibly mother as well), may have immigrated to the United States from Germany (or Switzerland), but I’ve been unable to find immigration or naturalization records that show such a connection.

However, the same biography previously mentioned states that he was of French origin.

Through all of my research over the years, every Keefer family is of Germanic origin – except one.

The only family that shows of French origin in the time period is (lo and behold!) actually living in Philadelphia and is that of Anthony and Sarah (Shillingford) Keefer.

At the time, his family was very young with only mention of one brother born in 1810 – Thomas. The earlier births of the children of Anthony and his wife Sarah are about one year apart, leaving a gap just where Christian’s would be.

Keefer, Anthony; family pedigree chart
Family pedigree chart of Anthony Keefer, showing Christian, as I’ve entered it in my database (see http://blythegenealogy.com).

I would love to find proof beyond that of coincidence and speculation of Christian W. Keefer’s parentage. I’d like nothing better than to continue further back in time and expand on this huge Keefer family

If you or anyone you know has any documentation, images, etc. of this Christian Keefer showing his parents and brothers and sisters (or parts thereof), I would dearly love to see them, or better yet, get copies.

Sources:

  1. Biographical Sketches of Old Settlers and Prominent People of Wisconsin: Vol. I (Waterloo, Wis., Huffman & Hyer, 1899); pdf file.
  2. State of Ohio, “Ohio, County Marriages, 1790-1950,” marriage, Family Search (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZ82-6QV: accessed
  3. Death certificate; Charles Keefer;  Digital Folder No.: 4008297; Image No.: 1576; Film Number: 1674527; Certificate No.: cn 23384. (7 June 1933), Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947, State of Illinois; https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQCW-SP5.
  4. FamilySearch.org, “Wisconsin Deaths and Burials, 1835-1968,” database, FamilySearch.org, FamilySearch.org (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XL3P-121: accessed ).
  5. Rootsweb, “Wisconsin Death Records,” database, Rootsweb, Rootsweb (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~keffer/deaths/Wisconsin.htm: accessed ).
  6. Keefer, Christian W., Beaver Dam Argus, Beaver Dam, Dodge County, Wisconsin, , Obituary.
  7. Obituary of Mary Ann (Jaques) Keefer.
  8. 1880 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, Beaver Dam, Dodge, Wisconsin, enumeration district (ED) Enumeration District: 004, Page: 47A, Year: 1880; Census Place: Beaver Dam, Dodge, Wisconsin; Roll: 1422; Family History Film: 1255422, Keefer Christian W.; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com : Internet 13 July 2013).
  9. 1870 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, year: 1870; census place: elba, dodge, wisconsin; roll: m593_1710; page: 165a; image: 338; family history library film: 553209, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, enumeration district (ED) Roll: M593_1710; Image: 337; Family History Library Film: 553209, Page: 164B, Roll: M593_1710; Image: 337; Family History Library Film: 553209, Keefer Christian W; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  10. 1860 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, roll: m653_1405; page: 303; image: 308, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, Page: 303, Roll: M653_1405; Image: 308; Family History Library Film: 805405, Keefer Christian W.; dgs no.: 4298900; image no.: 0038; nara no.: m653, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  11. 1850 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, roll: m432_996;  image: 209, , Page: 104A, Roll: M432_996; Page: 104A; Image: 209, Keefer Christian W.; digital image, Family Search ((http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  12. 1840 US Federal Census, Painesville, Lake, Ohio; digital image, Ancestry.ca, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : accessed ).
  13. 1830 US Federal Census, Antrim, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, age: 395; nara series: m19; roll number: 151; family history film: 0020625; digitalk image, Ancestry.com (http://blythegenealogy.com  : accessed ).
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Transcription: Andreas Keefer (Andrew Keefer), Will and Testament

Transcription: Andreas Keefer (Andrew Keefer), Will and Testament

The following is my transcription of the Will of Andreas Keefer.

Andrew Keefer – Will

IN the name of God Amen. I Andrew Keefer of Hanover Township Lebanon County State of Pennsylvania being weak in body but of sound mind and disposing mind memory and understanding calling to mind the uncertainty of this transitory life and knowing that it is appointed to all men once to die have hereby made my last will and testiment in manner and form following to wit whereas I have already given to my sons George Keefer, Frederich Keefer & Andrew Keefer Twenty Two hundred and Forty four dollars and twenty two cents as charged against them. It is my will and I do order that they shall receive no more of my estate till each of my other children to wit Jacob Keefer, John Keefer, Elizabeth intermarried with John Bamgardner, Eve intermarried with Casper Dasher, Catherine intermarried with Philip Johannes and Sarah or their legal representatives shall have each have received a like sum of Two Thousand Two Hundred and Fourty four and Twenty Two cents. I give and bequeath to my daughter Sarah the plantations piece of land whereon I now live building and improvements together with the wood land which I reserved off my son Frederich’s place supposed to contain in the whole fifty acres or there abouts to her heirs and assignees forever she allowing therefore forty dollars per acre but of it should not amount to her equal share she must have it made up to her out of my other estate. It is my will and I do order that the residue of my estate both real and personal and mixed after each of my said children or their legal representataives shall have the aforesaid sum of Two Thousand two hundred and Forty four dollars and twenty two cents shall be equally distributed to and amongst all my children or their legal representatives share and share alike. It is further my will that my daughter Sarah shall have her choice in iron Pots and Kettles. I do order and direct that the share of my estate which is due or will be  due coming to my daughter Eve intermarried with Casper Dasher the said Eve shall have the one half of share the other half to Eve’s children which Eve and Dasher will have. I do order that after there is money due beginning at the one that has the ? Siste now and so on but not till after my death. It is my will and I do order that in addition to what I have willed to my daughter Sarah I give her one full years living out of my estate that is to say all the household and kitchin furniture that she may want together with wheat rye and other grain which she may want for her own use for and during the term of one year she shall have the stove and one bed which ever she uses besides her own ?—- in her own right as also her choice of one cow of mine for her own use. It is further my will that all the bonds from my children wich? is in my  ____ ____ ____ ____  time shall bear no interest till after my decease. As lastly I do hereby nominate my beloved son Frederich Keefer and my Son in law John Baungardner?  to be the executive of this my last will and testiment declaring that no other my last will and testiment. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this nineteenth day of May One Thousand Eight Hundred and Twenty-Seven.

Signed sealed published and pronounced by the testaor as his last will and testiment in the presence of us who in his presence and at Ihis request have hereunto set our names.

jacob Unger     John Snyder

Further it is my will and I do order that my son Jacob Keefer children shall have his legal share but no more when they arrive to their legal age.

Recorded Jan 25th 1828     Peter Lineweaver      Registrar

Andreas Keefer’s Will

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

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Transcription: Obituary for Alanson Adams

Transcription: Obituary for Alanson Adams

Transcription of an obituary for Alanson Adams.

Fond du Lac Daily Commonwealth, Page 4

Tuesday, April 26, 1881

Alanson Adams
Alanson Adams

Retrospective

The death of Mr. Alanson Adams of our city on the 23rd instant, is an event of more than ordinary interest.  Born in the year 1792, in the third year of Washington’s first term, his life covers nearly the whole period of our constitutional history.  We are fairly startled at the rapidity of our country’s development, as compared with other countries, when we contemplate its history being crowded into the lifetime of one man.  During this period the small circle of States bordering the Atlantic coast, few in population and impoverished by war, has been enlarged until it now engirdles the continent.  A great nation, ranking among the first in power, wealth and influence has been developed within this comparatively short space of time.  Human life can no longer be said to be short, if we measure it by the achievements comprehended within its.limits.

Mr. Adams is identified with the history of our country in one of the most endearing relations.  Every country venerates the memory of its soldiers.  Especially is this true of a republic, which must depend very largely on the valor and patriotism of its volunteer soldiers for defense. The deceased belongs to that noble band whom our nation delights to honor.  In early manhood, at the call of his country, he entered her service in the war of 1812.  He was in several engagements during this war, among which were the battles of Chippewa and Lundy’s Lane.  At the latter place he was wounded.  Thus another one of the few surviving heroes of this war has been laid away to that rest which no battle call, or shock —–will ever disturb.

But in still another and not less important cause was the deceased identified with the history and progress of our country.  He belonged in the class of pioneers peculiar to our country, and yet sometimes overlooked, and underestimated in making our estimates of the elements entering late American progress.  To this class of our population, essentially nomadic in its character, does our country owe very much of its greatness to-day.  By it has been laid the foundations of that grand super-structure of American nationality which has no parallel in history.  Reared in central Vermont he became identified with the early struggles of that State.  In 1818 he was married.  The union thus formed continued some fifty-four years.  In 1844 with his family, consisting of one son and two daughters, he removed to Ohio.  Here he remained until 1860, when he moved to Wisconsin, where he has since resided.  Since the death of his wife, some ten years ago, he has made his home with his son, E.D. Adams, of our city, where he died.

The deceased was a devoted Christian, having been a member of the Baptist church nearly sixty years.  He will be deeply mourned by the church to which he had endeared himself, and the circle of friends how knew him best.   The sympathies of its many friends are extended to the bereaved family, with the assurance that our loss is his gain.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

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Legend lives on: George, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in wine.

Legend lives on: George, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in wine.

George, Duke of Clarence was born on October 21, 1449 at Dublin Castle in Dublin, Ireland to Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York (21 Sep 1411-30 Dec 1460) and Cecily Neville (3 May 1415-31 May 1495). George has lived in infamy because of his horrible end: George, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in wine.

 

George, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in wine
George, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in wine.

This was a time when Richard, Duke of York, was beginning to challenge King Henry VI for the crown.

George was the third of the four sons of Richard and Cecily who survived to adulthood. Following his father’s death and the accession of his elder brother, Edward, to the throne, George was created Duke of Clarence on June 28, 1461 and became a Knight of the Garter. From February 1462 to March 1470, he was Chief Governor of Ireland, and on May 20, 1471 he became Great Chamberlain of England.

On July 11, 1469, George married Isabel Neville (5 Sep 1451-22 Dec 1476) at Calais, which was controlled by England at that time. Isabel was the daughter and co-heiress of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick and Salisbury, and his wife Anne Beauchamp.

George had actively supported his elder brother Edward’s claim to the throne, but when his father-in-law the Earl of Warwick deserted Edward to ally with Margaret of Anjou, King Henry’s consort, George, along with his pregnant wife, followed him to France.

Their firstborn, Anne, was born on April 16, 1470 on a ship off Calais, only to die shortly afterward while still on board the ship.

Henry VI rewarded George for his loyalty by making him next in line to the throne after Edward of Westminster, justifying the exclusion of Edward IV either by attainder for his treason against Henry or on the grounds of his alleged illegitimacy.

After a short time, George realized that his loyalty to his father-in-law was misplaced. Warwick had his younger daughter, Anne, marry Edward of Westminster, King Henry VI’s heir. Since it now seemed unlikely that George would be replacing Edward, George again allied with his brother King Edward and regained his favor.

The George, Duke of Clarence and his wife, Isabel.
The George, Duke of Clarence and his wife.

Although George was made Earl of Warwick on March 25, 1472, he did not inherit the entire Warwick estate as his brother, Richard, Duke of Gloucester, would marry the widowed younger sister of his wife, Anne Neville.

Anne had become increasingly concerned with her sister Isabel and how she must be coping with these hostilities. Isabel was expecting another child. She had already borne two children, their daughter Margaret (14 Aug 1473-28 May 1541) and their son, Edward (25 Feb 1475-28 Nov 1499), who was later also Earl of Warwick. Edward passed the greater part of his life in prison and was beheaded in 1499.

Being close to the king, the Woodvilles were under scrutiny, and Richard had witnessed their self-serving and underhanded ways and knew it was best to avoid them. It was well known that George had always loathed the Woodvilles. To him, they were usurpers who achieved their ends through manipulation and control.

Clarence had suspicions about the validity of the marriage of Elizabeth Woodville and did not hesitate to say so. Having been informed that a certain lady of high breeding had caught Edward’s eye, George took further notice. She was was of good morals and would not lose her virtue, even to the King, so the King had a private wedding ceremony before he had married Elizabeth Woodville. George made sure to tell the people through whom the story would travel to Burgundy and the ears of Louis XI, and James III of Scotland.

The Woodvilles became aware of the allegations and planned Clarence’s downfall to protect their positions from being threatened.

Isabel was late in her pregnancy and was staying at Warwick Castle when a lady named Ankarette Twynyho professed to be a midwife and offered her services. Things looked good at first as Isabel gave birth to a boy who they named Richard (6 Oct 1476-1 Jan 1477). Richard was a sickly child and both of his parents worried for his welfare.

Isabel seemingly recovered well from the birth. The midwife, having told them she was good with herbs for healing, also told them she could nurse the baby back to health. Both George and Isabel having believed her claims, allowed her to remain until Isabel suddenly fell ill after drinking ale. In panic, the midwife fled and Isabel died in agony two months after giving birth to Richard who lived only about three months, and they were buried together at Tewkesbury Abbey in Gloucestershire.

Clarence truly believed his wife had been murdered. He wanted whoever was responsible for his wife’s murder brought to justice, and he refused to eat and drink as if he suspected attempts to poison him as well.

Today, most historians believe Isabel’s death resulted from either childhood fever or consumption. Clarence was convinced she had been poisoned by Ankarette Twynyho, and in revenge he had her murdered in April of 1477, by having her arrested, and strong-arming a jury at Warwick into convicting her. She was one of two hanged immediately after the trial with John Thursby, a fellow defendant.

A petition regarding the events states:

“That whereas the said Ankarette on Saturday, 12th of April 17 Edward IV (1477), was in her manor at Cayford (ie Keyford, Somerset) and Richard Hyde late of Warwick, gentleman and Roger Strugg late of Bekehampton, co Somerset, towker, with drivers riotous persons to number of fourscore by the command of George, duke of Clarence, came to Cayford about two of the clock after noon and entered her house and carried her off the same day to bath and from thence on the Sunday following to Circeter (Cirencester) co. Gloucester, and from thence to Warwick, whither they brought her on the Monday following about eight of the clock in the after noon, which town of Warwick is distant from Cayforde seventy miles, and then and there took from her all her jewels, money and goods and also in the said dukes behalf, as though he had used King’s power, Commanded Thomas Delalynde, esquire, and Edith his wife, daughter of the said Ankarette, and their servants to avoid from the town of Warwick and lodged them at Stattforde upon Aven that night, six miles from thence and the said duke kept Ankarette imprison unto the hour of nine before noon on the morrow, to wit the Tuesday after the closing of Pasche (ie Easter) and caused her to be brought to the Guildhall at Warwick before divers of Justices of the peace in the County then sitting in sessions and caused her to be indicted by the name of Ankarette Twynyho, late of Warwick, widow, late servant of the duke and Isabel his wife, of having at on 10 October, 16 Edward IV, given to the said Isabel a venomous drink of ale mixed with poison, of which the latter sickened until the Sunday before Christmas, on which day she died, and the justices arraigned the said Ankarette and a jury appeared and found her guilty and it was considered that she should be led from the bar there to the gaol of Warwick and thence should be drawn through the town to the gallows of Myton and hanged till she was dead, and the Sheriff was commanded to do execution and so he did, which indictment, trail and judgement were done and given within three hours of said Tuesday, and juror for fear gave the Sheriff was verdict contrary to their conscience, in proof where of divers of them came to said Ankarette in remorse and asked her forgiveness, in consideration of the imaginations of and her good disposition, the King should ordain that the record, process, verdict and judgement should be void and of no effect, but that as the premises were done by the command of the said duke, the said justices and Sheriff and the under-Sheriff and their ministers should not be vexed, The answer of the king. So it fait come il est desire (“ Let it be done as the petitioner”)

George had known that it was the work of Elizabeth Woodville that was behind Isabel’s death and he was determined to prove to all that Elizabeth Woodville was behind it all. Elizabeth reinforced with Edward that George must be silenced for the sake of children, including the heir.

At first Edward was reluctant to turn against his brother, not caring much for his wife or her family. But George had turned his attentions to Edward, and managed to anger Edward sufficiently that he decided to act. Clarence was arrested for treason and and attempted necromancy against the King.

Wishing to look into the acts of Clarence George further, Edward summoned him to appear before him at the place of Westminster. He accused Clarence of pursuing vigilante justice and then had his guards escort Clarence to the tower. Meanwhile, a messenger brought Richard the news that Clarence was locked up in the tower and having read the charges, Richard realised that George had walked into a trap set by the Woodvilles trap and was therefore at the mercy of the King.

Richard sent a letter to Edward requesting that his own servants look after George in the tower and he had also asked Edward if he could look after George’s children. Having obtained permission, Richard journeyed to Warwick. He dispatched sent George’s most trusted servants to the tower.

By October, 1477, Richard was actively pleading for Clarence since he’d become aware that the Woodvilles were seeking Edward’s signature on  a death warrant. Richard hoped that George would beg for forgiveness and promise to remain loyal to Edward.

Upon seeing George, Richard realized he was prepared to die rather than even hint at submission to the Woodville family. Richard pleaded with Edward to allow him to try to persuade George, and Edward promised not to sign the death warrant.

Having been arrested, one of Clarence’s retainers, confessed under torture that he had ‘imagined and compassed’ the King’s death using the black arts. He implicated two others and they were all tried for treason, convicted, and sentenced to be drawn and hanged at Tyburn. One was saved at the eleventh hour by a plea for his life by the Bishop of Norwich, but the other two were executed.
Clarence chose to ignore this ominous warning.

Edward had Clarence brought to Windsor, accused him of treason, and ordered his arrest and imprisonment. Clarence was held in the Tower of London and put on trial for treason against his brother Edward IV. Edward prosecuted his own brother, demanding that a Bill of Attainder be passed by Parliament. Clarence was executed at the Tower of London on February 18, 1478.
He was laid to rest at Tewkesbury along  with his wife and son.

The legend grew that Clarence had drowned in a butt of Malmsey wine, possibly having evolved from a joke about his being a heavy drinker. What was believed to be the body of Clarence was later exhumed and it surprisingly showed no indications of beheading, which was the traditional method of execution for those of nobility. It could also be possible that George’s remains were transported to the abbey in a barrel of Malmsey.

In Shakespeare’s play, “Richard III”, George is portrayed to have been drowned in a butt of Malmsey wine.

Sources:

  1. Kings and Queens of England – The Plantagenets, The Royal Family online [http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page58.asp].
  2. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy online [http://fmg.ac/].
  3. Kings and Queens of England – The Plantagenets, online [http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page58.asp].
  4. “George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence”; Wikipedia.org; [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Plantagenet,_1st_Duke_of_Clarence]
  5. “The Demise of George, Duke of Clarence”; Historum.com; http://historum.com/blogs/crystal+rainbow/831-demise-george-duke-clarence.html
    http://www.luminarium.org/encyclopedia/clarence.htm
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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 May 2018.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 May 2018.

 

The following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 May 2018.

Featured image: Stonehenge, Wiltshire, England

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 May 2018.

 

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Transcription: Last Will and Testament of Robert Stone, April 16, 1825

Transcription: Last Will and Testament of Robert Stone, April 16, 1825

 

The following is my transcription of the last will and testament of Robert Stone, husband of Ann Stone.

 

Robert Stone's Last Will and Testament
Last Will and Testament of Robert Stone.

182

Robert

Stone

16.

This is the last Will and Testament of me Robert Stone of Wyke Regis in the County of Dorset Baker. In the first place I Grant that all my just debts funeral and testamentary ??????? may be fully paid and satisfied Thou I give and bequeath to my son Robert Stone three Silver ?? ?? ?? ?? Table Spoons. to my Son Charles John Stone two Silver table Spoons and my watch and appendages and to my daughter Mary Ann Soolyar [Helyar] Stone Six Silver teaspoons and as to all the rest residue and remainder of my real and personal Estate I give and devise the same in manner hereinafter mentioned (that is to say) I give and bequeath unto my dear wife Ann Stone all and singular my household furniture plate (??????? as is hereinbefore ???????ed) linen China Books and pictures wine and other Liquors to and for her own absolute use and benefit I also give and bequeath unto my said dear wife all and every the interest dividends and annual proceeds arising from and out of the principal monies which I now have in the now four per cent annuities and other Government funds and all other my personal Estate and the ????? Issues and product arising from and out of all an every my freehold copyhold and leasehold  pieces or parcels of land in houses and Acreditaments To hold the same with the appurtenances unto my said dear wife To and for her own proper use and benefit during the term of her natural life or so long as she shall remain my widow and from and immediately after her decease or second marriage Thou I give and devise the same in monies hereinafter mentioned that is to say I give and bequeath to my daughter Jane Drew Harris the principal sum of fifty pounds Sterling and also our moiety or equal half part or share of and in ???? that my said princial ???? in the now four per cent annuities to and for her own absolute use and benefit exclusive of the ???????? debts or engagements of her ??????? or any future husband I give and devise to my son and daughter Jane Drew Harris all that my customary or copyhold messuage or dwellinghouse garden and premises situate in Wyke Regis aforesaid and now in the occupation of Elizabeth ????? bounded by land adjoining to Samuel Summers on the North part thereof and by Land late belonging to        …   ?????? deceased on the South part thereof to hold the same with the apparts unto and to the use of my said daughter Jane Drew Harris her heirs and assigns forever I give and bequeath to my said daughter Mary Ann Soolyar [Helyar] Stone the principal sum of fifty pounds sterling and the one other moiety or equal half part or share of and in all that my said principal stock in the new four per cent annuities to and for her own absolute use and benefit exclusive of the ????????? debts or engagements of any future husband I give and devise to my said daughter Mary Ann Soolyar [Helyar] Stone all that my customary  or copyhold messuage or dwellinghouse garden and premises situate in West Fleet and at present unoccupied bounded on the North by land belonging to Hubard Soollary and on the South by land belonging to myself to hold the same with the apparts unto and to the use of my said daughter Mary Ann Soolyar [Helyar] Stone her heirs and assigns for ever I give and bequeath to my said son Robert Stone the principal sum of two hundred pounds sterling and I give and devise to my said son Robert Stone all that my customary or copyhold messuage or dwellinghouse garden and other the premises now jointly occupied by myself William Williams and James Soussey and which adjoins certain property belonging to John Swaffield Esquire and also one moiety or equal ??? part or share (the same to be considered as if divided) of and in all that piece or parcel of land or ground called Stones Close ?? ??? the same with the appurtenances unto and to the use of my said son Robert Stone his heirs and assigns for ever (subject to my directions hereinafter contained ??porting the division of the entirety of the said field) But in case my said son Robert Stoone should at any time hereafter intermarry with Harriet Stephens then it is my will and I do hereby direct that all and every the interest which my said son Robert takes under this ???? will both real and personal shall devolve to and be equally divided between each and every my children who shall be living at my decease their heirs Executors and ????? share and share alike as tenants in ???????? and not as joint tenants I give and bequeath to my said son Charles John Stone the principal sum of three hundred pounds sterling and I give and devise to my said son Charles John Stone all that my customary or copyhold piece or parcel of land or ground called Richards Close bounded by land belonging to Charles Buxton Esquire on the south part and also all that remaining one moiety or equal half part or share the same to be considered as if divided of and in all that before mentioned piece or parcel of land or ground and premises called Stone Close and I direct that the said monies or half parts may be divided and ascertained by creating a fence in a straight line from the piece of land belonging to Mr. Thomas Richardson to the piece of land belonging to Mr. Gould Read the expense attending which is to be  borne equally between the parties who by virtue of this my will shall become entitled thereto and also all that messuage or tenemant dwellinghouse and premises situate in West Street and more in the occupation of Joseph Stone bounded on the south by a dwellinghouse last belonging to Mr. Samuel Weston and also all that one other messuage or dwellinghouse and premises situate at the lower end of West Street aforesaid and now in the occupation of George Stansell bounded on the south by premises belonging to Francis Wilkinson and on the north by premises belonging to Thomas Stone to hold the same with the appurtenances unto and to the use of my said son Charles John Stone his heirs and assigns forever and it is my will and I do hereby further direct that if after my decease and before the decease or second marriage of my said wife any or other of my children shall die without issue then that the interest of such child or children both real and personal under this my will shall devolve to and be equally common divided between and amongst such of my sons children ??????? or their surviving share and share alike as tenants in common and not as joint tenants and I hereby nominate constitute and appoint my said dear wife Ann Stone and all and every my children who shall be living at the time of my decease joint Executrixes and Executors of this my last Will and Testament hereby revoking all former wills by me at any time heretofore made In Witness whereof I the said Robert Stone the Testator have to this my last Will and Testament contained in four sheets of paper set my hand and seal to wit my hand only to the first three sheets and my hand and seal to this fourth and last sheet the sixteenth day of April in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty five

Robert Stone =??= Signed Sealed published and declared by the said Robert Stone the Testator as and for his last Will and Testament in the presence of us who in his presence at his request and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses = Geo Willoughby ?ol. Weymouth W Coleman Plumber Weymouth = Thos. Cornall Clerk to W. Willoughby, Weymouth

Proved at London 13th November 1838 before the judge by the oaths of a Robert Stone and Charles John Stone two of the children of the deceased and as such two of the Executors to whom ad???? was granted having been first sworn by common duly to ad???? power reserved of making the like grant to Ann Stone Widow the Robert of the said deceased one other of the Executors and also to Jane Drew Harris (wife of George Harris) and Mary Ann Soolyar [Helyar] Ingram (wife of Robert Ingram the only other children living at the time of the said deceased’s death and as such the other Executors when they shall apply for the same.

‘[ ]’ signifies the known spelling of the word or name, although somewhat undecipherable in the text of the original document.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

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Transcription: Obituary for Major General George Burges Cadwalader

Transcription: Obituary for Major General George Burges Cadwalader

Transcription of an obituary for Major General George Burges Cadwalader.

 

Obituary; General George Cadwalader— General George Cadwalader died in Philadelphia, on Monday afternoon, in the seventy-third year of his age, from an attack resembling apoplexy, with which he was seized on Sunday night. He was a brother of Judge Cadwalader, who died on Sunday week, and was the last of the five sons of General Thomas Cadwalader. The deceased was born in Philadelphia, in 1806, engaged in mercantile business, and filled the position of President of the Mutual Insurance Company for a third of a century. He served gallantly in the Mexican War as well as in the Slaveholders’ Rebellion, and distinguished himself in both position. His record is one of the best which he can safely leave behind as a grand inheritance to his family and friends.

 

Source Image: Bucks County Gazette article, , Bristol, Pennsylvania , 6 Feb 1879, Col. 3

 

___________________

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Transcription – Death Certificate for Mary Hickman of Montgomery, Ohio

Transcription – Death Certificate for Mary Hickman of Montgomery, Ohio

Transcription – Death  Certificate for Mary Hickman of Montgomery, Ohio.

 

Death Certificate of Mary A. Hickman
Death Certificate of Mary A. Hickman

STATE  OF OHIO
BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS
CERTIFICATE OF DEATH

___________________
1  PLACE OF DEATH
County   Montgomery     Registration District  No.  902     File No. _________________
Township  Clay     Primary Registration District  No. 5370     Registered No.  33055
or Village  _________________________     No.  ____, ________________St., ______ Ward
(If death in a hospital or institution, give its NAME instead of street and number)
or City of  __________________________
2  FULL NAME  Mary Hickman
(a)  Residence.     No.  ______________________St., ______ Ward. _________________
(Usual place of abode.)                              (If nonresident give city or town and State)
How long in U.S. if of foreign birth?            yrs.            mos.            ds.

——  PERSONAL AND STATISTICAL PARTICULARS ——

____________________________________________________________________________
3  SEX      |      4  COLOR OR RACE      | 5  Single, Married, Widowed or Divorced (write the word)
Female |          White                            |     Widowed
____________________________________________________________________________
5a   If married, widowed or divorced, HUSBAND of (or) WIFE of  John Hickman
____________________________________________________________________________
6  DATE  OF BIRTH  (month, day, and year)  Dec-30-1839
____________________________________________________________________________
7  AGE            Years  83    | Months  X    | Days    X    | If LESS than 1 day ___ hrs. or ___ min.
___________________________________________________________________________________
8  OCCUPATION OF DECEASED
(a) Trade, profession, or particular kind of work  Housewife        (Handwritten notation: 74a)
(b) General nature of Industry, business, or establishment in which employed (or employer)  X
(c) Name of Employer  X
___________________________________________________________________________________
9  BIRTHPLACE (city or town)  Stringtown, Ohiio
(State or country)  Montgomery Co
___________________________________________________________________________________
|  10  NAME OF  FATHER  ­ Isaac Burkett
|  11  BIRTHPLACE OF FATHER (city or town)              (State or country)  North Carolina  
|  12  MAIDEN NAME OF MOTHER  Katharina Burkett
|  13  BIRTHPLACE OF MOTHER (city or town)              (State or country)  Not Known
___________________________________________________________________________________
14  Informant    Joseph Stick
(Address)     RR #2 Brookville O
___________________________________________________________________________________
15  Filed   Dec. 31, 1922        Jos E Smith   REGISTRAR
___________________________________________________________________________________

——  MEDICAL CERTIFICATE OF DEATH ——

___________________________________________________________________________________
16  DATE OF DEATH  (month, day and year)  12-30-1922
___________________________________________________________________________________
17                     I HEREBY CERTIFY, That I attended deceased from July, 1922, to Dec. 30, 1922, that I last saw her alive on Dec. 30, 1922, and that death occurred, on the date, stated above, at 2 P.m.
The CAUSE OF DEATH* was as follows:
Cerebral hemorrhage (second attack. 1st in July, 1922)
_______________    _______________ (duration)  ____ yrs.  ­­­­____ mos.  ____ ds.
CONTRIBUTORY (Secondary) ____________________________________________________________
_______________    _______________ (duration)  ____ yrs.  ­­­­____ mos.  ____ ds.
18  Where was disease contracted if not at place of death? _______________    ______________
Did an operation precede death? _______________    ___________  Date of
Was there an autopsy? _______________    ______________
What test confirmed diagnosis? _______________    ______________
(Signed) __________________J. H. Pumphrey_________________, M. D.
___12-31-,1922__  (Address)      Clayton, O.

*State the DISEASE CAUSING DEATH, or in deaths from VIOLENT CAUSES, state (1) MEANS AND NATURE OF INJURY, and (2) whether ACCIDENTAL, SUICIDAL OR HOMICIDAL.   (See reverse side for additional space.)
___________________________________________________________________________________
19  PLACE OF BURIAL, CREMATION OR REMOVAL               |              DATE OF BURIAL
Shilo Cemetery                        |         Shipped to Granville, Ill. Dec 31st 1922
___________________________________________________________________________________
20  UNDERTAKER, License No.                |    ADDRESS
S. A. Dunkel                                              |    Brookville, Ohio
___________________________________________________________________________________

(Form text in left margin):
(Torn or cut off)… of information should be carefully supplied. AGE should be stated EXACTLY. PHYSICIANS should state CAUSE OF DEATH in plain terms, so that it may be properly classified. Exact statement of OCCUPATION is very important. See instructions on back of certificate.

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WWI War Stories: Turmaine and Emery.

WWI War Stories: Turmaine and Emery.

In honor of today’s ceremonies in honor of the 100th anniversary of the battle at Vimy Ridge, I am reposting several articles about my own ancestors who died in WWI. 

 

In my father’s French Canadian, ‘Turmaine’ branch of the family, we have two known soldiers who died in the first world war. The first was my grand uncle, Pte. Joseph Philias Albert Emery, and the second was another grand uncle, Pte. Joseph Turmaine – and here are their WWI war stories.

 

Pte. Joseph Philias Albert Emery
Pte Joseph Philias Albert Emery – just one of many WWI war stories.

PTE. JOSEPH PHILIAS ALBERT EMERY, the son of Albert Emery and Émilie Labelle was born in Saint-André Avellin, Ripon Township, Papineau County, Québec, Canada. At 5’6″, he had a fair complexion, brown hair and grey eyes and he was a papermaker at the time of his enlistment in the 77th Canadian Battalion, Governor General’s Foot Guards.

Having later been reassigned to the 73rd Battalion Canadian Infantry, Black Watch of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, he was engaged in the preparations for the advance on Vimy Ridge. He was reported missing on March 1, 1917, about a month prior to the capture of the ridge. His remains were never found and he was memorialized at Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery, Souchez in Pas de Calais, France.

Gas Attacks in March 1917 at Vimy Ridge - war stories
Of many WWI war stories, this one included deadly gas attacks in March 1917 at Vimy Ridge. Image of a gas cloud being released fromm canisters on the Western Front circ 1916.

During gas and artillery attacks planned for that day, the troops came under fire from the Germans.

An excerpt from the war diary of the 73rd Battalion dated March 1, 1917 reads, “Officers and men without exception fought magnificently. Casualties during the attack were as follows: 26 OR killed, 99 OR wounded, 27 OR missing.”

 

 

Preserved WWI tunnel at Vimy Ridge
Preserved WWI fighting tunnel at Vimy Ridge.

Pte. Emery was among those missing and was never recovered.

A very detailed and well-researched account entitled, “A Proper Slaughter: The March 1917 Gas Raid on Vimy Ridge”, written by Tim Cook contains some great photos and makes great reading.

Another account of the incident taken from the ‘ Canadian Battlefields ‘ website is as follows:

   “Thirty-nine days before the Canadians infamous and victorious attack on Vimy Ridge from April 9-12, 1917 there was a disastrous reconnaissance raid.   On March 1, 1917 at 3:00 am the gas sergeants took their positions to release the phosgene gas from the hundreds of gas canisters, referred to as “rats”, they had placed prior to the scheduled raid date. Every night they had lugged the heavy, poisonous gas canisters four miles to the front lines. They dug holes in the ground, nicknamed “rat traps” where the canisters were carefully placed and held in position with dirt and sandbags. A rubber hose connected to the canister would be maneuvered away from the trench, into No Man’s Land towards the enemy. The Canadians knew all too well what poisonous gas did to the human body from their experience at the Ypres Salient in 1915 when they were hit with gas for the first time.

    At 5:00 am the gas sergeants were to release the chlorine gas and 45-minutes later the 1,700 troops assigned to the raid were to go “over the top”. Of course things didn’t work out. For a gas attack, the velocity and direction of the wind is crucial. Secondly, gas is heavier then air. This meant that even if the gas sergeants managed to release the gas from the canisters and through the hose into No Man’s Land, the gas then had to travel up the hill to kill the Germans. (I shake my head at this, as I’m sure you are too). Gas is heavier than air, therefore it is logically impossible for it to flow up hill. Rather, they would find that the gas would settle in the pot-marked landscape and trenches, the very places our soldiers would seek protection from German fire. The idea was that the first gas release would kill most of the Germans. The second release, of chlorine gas, would surely finish off the Germans. 45-minutes after the chlorine gas release, a proposed sufficient amount of time for the gas to dissipate, our soldiers would walk in, finish off the few struggling Germans, collect the information they were sent for and then return. If I, a civilian, can see flaws in this plan, I cannot help but question, almost scream, “How did anyone ever let this plan go further than its first mentioning?!”

   The Germans realized a gas attack has been launched. They sounded the alarms, and released hell on No Man’s Land. A German artillery barrage and a steady pumping of rifle and machine gun fire rained down on the Canadians. The shells smashed into buried gas cylinders, causing our own trench to instantly fill with poison gas. With a tremendous rupture a wave of yellow gas plummeted from our trenches. The chlorine gas cylinders had been hit. “Making matters worse, the wind had changed direction. The release of the second wave of gas to supposedly finish off the German defenders began blowing back in the faces of the Canadian brigades.” (Barris, 2008: 13).
   In about 5 minutes we lost 190 men and two company commanders. It total, there were 687 casualties. Only 5 men actually reached the German trenches. Those that somehow managed to stay alive in No Man’s Land, were captured and spent around 21-months in a German prison camp
   On March 3 an extraordinary event took place. No Man’s Land had been eerily silent after the attack, but out of the mist a German officer carrying a Red Cross flag walked out into No Man’s Land in front of Hill 145. He called for and was met by a Canadian officer to discuss a two-hour truce ‘from 10:00 am until 12:00 noon’ during which time Canadian stretcher bearers and medical staff could carry back casualties and remains. What seemed even more remarkable [was] “the Germans said they would assist by bringing Canadian casualties halfway.”

 

PTE. JOSEPH TURMAINE, son of Herménégilde Turmaine and Virginia Perrault, was born in 1891 at Lac Mégantic, Québec, Canada. He was 5’7 1/2″ tall, had a dark complexion, blue eyes and very dark hair. He was a Private in the 27th Battalion Infantry, Winnipeg Regiment and took part in action against the Germans in Courcelette. He was reported ‘missing in action’ and was never recovered.

I have summarized the account of his Battalion’s war diary for the date he went missing below:

The 27th Battalion, Winnipeg Regiment left at 2 pm, September 14, 1916 for brigade headquarters, arriving at 5 pm. They then left brigade headquarters at 9 pm and proceeded to the front line to take up position in assembly trenches, which was delayed due to congestion of the trenches and was completed just after 4 am.

At 6:20 am, the artillery barrage opened 50 yards ahead of the German trench and the first wave started crawling over. As the barrage lifted, the Battalion advanced to the first German line and were met with heavy rifle and machine gun fire. As soon as the Canadian troops reached the trench, the Germans threw up their hands and surrendered. The Battalion followed up the barrage closely and met very little resistance at Sunken Road, the Germans surrendering in large numbers. By this time, the first wave was nearly wiped out and the second wave took their place. Owing to casualties, reinforcements were sent to hold the line at Sunken Road. The Germans attempted to advance but were driven back by Canadian fire. A large number also advanced and started sniping the Canadian front only to also be driven back by Canadian fire.

Two Canadian patrols pushed on toward Courcelette, but were forced to return to the line due to barrage fire. The German artillery fire was very intense for 48 hours on the front line.

A few troops dashed forward under cover of Canadian machine guns and captured a German Maxim. Approximately 22 Germans surrendered.

The Germans had thrown away the feed block of the captured gun but after considerable searching it was located and the gun was turned on German snipers, causing considerable damage. After the Battalion returned to the Brigade Reserve it was reported that there were 72 killed, 250 wounded and 72 missing (including Joseph Turmaine).

photo credit: Wikipedia.org

Sources for WWI War Stories: Turmaine and Emery:

  1. Cook, Tim (1999) ““A Proper Slaughter”: The March 1917 Gas Raid at Vimy Ridge,” Canadian Military History: Vol. 8: Iss. 2, Article 1. Available at: (http://scholars.wlu.ca/cmh/vol8/iss2/1).
  2. Books of Remembrance, Veterans Affairs Canada, (http://www.veterans.gc.ca/images/collections/books/bww1/ww1234.jpg).
  3. Pas de Calais, France, “XIV. F. 25.,” database, Commonwealth War Graves Commission (http://www.cwgc.org/search/cemetery_details.aspx?cemetery=64600&mode=1) . Attestation Papers – Archives of Canada, digital images.
  4. Certificate of Memorial; Private Joseph Phillias Albert Emery (SN: 144880), 73rd Battalion, Canadian Infantry; Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery, Souchez, France.
  5. Casualty Form – Active Service; Private Joseph Philias Albert Emery.
  6. Form of Will; Private Joseph Philias Albert Emery.
  7. Medals, Decorations, Promotions and Transfers Record; Private Joseph Philias Albert Emery.
  8. War Service Gratuity Form; Private Joseph Philias Albert Emery.
  9. Provencher, Gérard and Blue Jeans, George, Pontbriand, B.; ” Marriages of Outaouais (Theft. I-II) 1815-1970 “, *86-87, Québec, 1971, S.G.C.F. * S.G.L. (Directory); French Title: Mariages de l’Outaouais (Vol. I-II) 1815-1970.
  10. Canadian Battlefields; Vimy Ridge: Before the Gas at Hill 145 (website: http://www.canadianbattlefields.ca/?cat=32)
  11. Les Labelles, Daniel Labelle online (www.leslabelle.org), accessed.1901 Canadian Census – St. André Avelin, Labelle District, Québec; Émerie Family: Charles, Émelie, Alice, Albert, Clarinda, Émeralda, Rose A. (Amande).
  12. Wikipedia.org
  13. Personal knowledge and interviews with family.


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 16 Mar.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 16 Mar.

The following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 16 Mar.

Featured image: “Wessenden Valley” on the Pennine Way footpath south of Marsden in West Yorkshire. The area is part of the Marsden Moor Estate.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 16 Mar.

 

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Tragic gas poisoning deaths of Daniel and Isabella McDougall.

Tragic gas poisoning deaths of Daniel and Isabella McDougall.

 

I have found myself fascinated by the stories of the trials, tribulations and tragedies of our ancestors, and this story about the deaths by gas poisoning of Daniel and Isabella McDougall tragically caused by their daughter, Agnes is no exception.

 

Story of Daniel and Isabella McDougall.
Fitchburg Daily Sentinal article of November 21, 1907 – deaths by gas poisoning. Story of Daniel and Isabella McDougall.

Sometimes I wonder if I was born too late as my disability, though hidden from others, is completely disabling to me and for the most part is attributable to dealing with highly stressful work, home, family and personal circumstances.

I’ve always thought of earlier times before the onset of modern technology as being quieter and more peaceful.

Then I read a story like the one I’m about to tell you and realize there are definitely some advantages to living in our own time. No wonder we live such long lives compared to theirs.

Then I think about the risks of the industry, technology and society of our day and realize that we live with risks as well, just not the same ones.

This story is about the family of a 19 year old girl, Sara Agnes (Agnes) McDougall, who was living at an inn / boarding house in the Boston area in Cambridge, Massachusetts with her parents, Daniel Martin (b. 18 Aug 1862 in PEI, Canada) and Elizabeth “Isabella” (Hume) McDougall (b. about 1869, also in PEI, Canada), while working in the area.

Daniel had been a schoolteacher and had lived in Morrell, PEI, teaching at the Church Street School until 1906.

On the fateful night of November 20, 1907, the coin operated gas lights had burned out and Daniel and Isabella McDougall retired to sleep, leaving the gas switch in the ‘on’ position. With these lights, once the gas ran out, it was necessary to insert another quarter to restore the flow of gas to the light.

Agnes returned home from a party and promptly inserted a quarter to light the room as she prepared to retire for the night. Once finished, she turned off the light, but still having time left on the meter, the gas continued to flow into her parents’ room as they slept. Daniel and Isabella died of gas poisoning.

The November 21, 1907 edition of the Fitchburg Daily Sentinel of Fitchburg, Massachusetts printed an account of the deaths as follows:

COUPLE KILLED BY GAS

Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 21 — Mr. and Mrs. Daniel McDougall of 25 Market Street are dead, and their three children left orphans, as a result of the careless use of a quarter-in-the-slot gas machine at their home. Their daughter, Agnes McDougall, the unfortunate cause of the accident, has been almost prostrated since it occurred.

The bodies of Daniel and Isabella McDougall were returned to PEI by train from Cambridge, Massachusetts.

As recounted by family, Duncan MacDougall, Daniel’s brother, brought them home for burial in the Church of Scotland cemetary in Bangor, PEI. Duncan’s daughter, Violet, stated that the wake was held in Cambridge. Their daughter, Agnes was completely distraught, “wringing her hands and saying over and over, ‘Oh my goodness, I’ve murdered my parents.'”

Family members never knew Agnes had caused the tragedy until a newspaper article was found in 1996.

Sources:

  1. “Couple Killed By Gas”; Fitchburg Daily Sentinel; Fitchburg, Cambridge, Massachusetts; November 21, 1907. (See above.)
  2. “Massachusetts, Death Records, 1841-1915,” database, Ancestry.com ” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>Ancestry.com . (See below.)
  3. 1881 Census, Kings, Prince Edward Island, district Lot 61, Kings, Prince Edward Island; Roll: C_13164; Page: 55; Family No: 222, Page: 55, House 216; Family 222, Hume ; digital, Ancestry.com . (See below.)
  4. 1891 Canadian Census, Lot 40, Kings, Prince Edward Island, Roll: T-6382; Family No: 2, district 133, Page: 1, Household: 2, McDougall ; digital image, Ancestry.com ” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>Ancestry.com . (See below.)
McDougall, Isabella (Hume); Massachusetts Death Records, deaths by gas poisoning.
Massachusetts Death Records, deaths by gas poisoning.

 

1881 Canadian Census showing Isabella Hume.
1881 Canadian Census showing Isabella Hume.

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Transcription – Obituary of Mme Reina Bond-Labelle.

Transcription – Obituary of Mme Reina Bond-Labelle.

Transcription of the obituary of Mme Reina Bond-Labelle, de Hull.

 

ORIGINAL FRENCH

Reina Bond-Labelle

BOND-LABELLE — Mme Reina, de Hull, est décédéé le 15 juin 1986, à l’âge de 63 ans. Fille de feu Albert Bond et de feu Cécile Lalonde. Epouse de feu Armand Labelle. Elle laisse 2 fils: Félix et André; 1 fille: Denise; 1 frère: Roland de Hull; 1 demi-soeur: Lucille; 1 belle-mère: Irène Bond ainsi que plusieurs petits-enfants. Il n’y aura pas de visite au salon, cependant une messe commémorative aura lieu mercredi le 18 juin à 11h en l’église St-Benoit Abbé. Direction: Funérarium Beauchamp Ltée. Pour renseignements: 770-1300.

 

TRANSLATED ENGLISH

 

BOND-LABELLE – Ms. Reina, of Hull, died on 15 June 1986 at the age of 63 years. Daughter of the late Albert Bond and the late Cecile Lalonde. Wife of the late Armand Labelle. She leaves two sons Felix and Andrew, one daughter Denise, one brother Roland of Hull, one half-sister, Lucille, 1 stepmother Irene Bond and several grandchildren. There will be no visitation at the funeral home, however a commemorative mass will be held on Wednesday, June 18 at 11 am at St-Benoit Abbey. Direction: Beauchamp Funeral Home Ltd.. For information: 770-1300.

____________________

You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data on this site is available for free access and download.

____________________

Feature image: Place du Portage, Place du Centre, Scott Paper, and Museum of History along the Ottawa River in Hull.

 

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Translating French words for genealogy research can be tricky.

Translating French words for genealogy research can be tricky.

 

In researching genealogy, translating French words for genealogy research can be tricky, and the same goes for other languages as well, and mistakes can easily be made.

 

Getting one term, phrase or word wrong can mean taking your research off in the wrong direction based on the interpretation of that word.

 

Obituary for Paul-Henri Boily, 1926-1998

While researching my French Canadian, Acadian and French Canadian ancestors, I frequently came across terms that needed translation. From past experience, I knew it was important to not make a snap judgment of the meaning of a term based on its similarity to another French word, an English word, or words in any other language.

The most obvious example that comes to mind is ‘journalier.’ Upon first impression, I thought this might mean ‘journalist’ but after checking into it further, I discovered it meant a ‘day laborer.’

Here is my list of the French terms for occupations that are encountered most frequently in vital documents and records.

à la retraite retired
agriculteur farmer, husbandman
aide de sous commis helper to asst clerk
apothicaire pharmacist
apprenti(e) apprentice
apprêteur(euse) tanner, dresser of skins
archer bowman
architecte architect
argentier silversmith
armurier gunsmith
arpenteur, arpentier land surveyor
arquebusier matchlock gunsmith
artisan handicraftsman
aubergiste innkeeper
aumonier army chaplain
avocat, avocate lawyer, barrister
bailli bailiff
banqier(ère) banker
becheur(euse) digger
bedeau church sexton
bédeau beadle
beurrier(ère) butter-maker
bibliothécaire librarian
blanchisseur(eusse) laundryman, woman
bonnetier(ère) hosier
boucher(ère) butcher
boulanger(ère) baker
bourgeois(e) privileged person
boutonnier button-maker
braconnier poacher
brasseur(euse) brewer
briqueteur bricklayer
briquetier brick-maker
bucheron woodcutter
cabaretier(ère) saloon keeper
caissier(ère) cashier
calfat caulker
camionneur truck driver
cannonier gunner (canon)
cantinier(ère) canteen-keeper
capitaine de milice captain of the militia
capitaine de navire ship captain
capitaine de port port captain
capitaine de vaisseau ship captain
capitaine des troupes troup captain
cardeur(euse) carder(textiles)
chamoisseur chamois-dresser
chancelier chancellor
chandelier chandle-maker
chanteur(euse) singer
chapelier(èr) hatter, hatmaker
charbonnier(ère) coal merchant
charcutier(ère) port-butcher
charpentier carpenter, framer
charpentier de navires shipwright
charretier carter
charron cartwright, wheelwright
chasseur hunter
chaudronnier coppersmith, tinsmith
chaufournier furnace tender
chef cook
chevalier horseman, calvary
chirurgien surgeon
cloutier nail-maker, dealer
cocher coachman, driver
colonel colonel
commandant commander
commis clerk
commissaire d’artillerie arms stewart
commissaire de la marine ship’s purser
compagnon journeyman
comptable accountant, bookkeeper
concierge janitor, caretaker
confiseur(euse) confectioner
conseilleur counsellor, advisor
contrebandier smuggler
contremaître overseer, foreman
controleur superintendant
cordier ropemaker
cordonnier cobbler, shoemaker
corroyeur curier, leatherdresser
coureur-des-bois trapper
courrier courier, messenger
courvreur en ardoise slate roofer
coutelier cutlery maker
couturier(ère) tailor, dressmaker
couvreur roofer
couvreur en bardeau roofer who roofs with shingles
cuisinier en chef chef
cuisinier(ère) cook
cultivateur(trice) farmer
curé pastor
débardeur stevedore
défricheur clearer (of forest)
dentiste dentist
docteur doctor
domestique indentured servant, farmhand
douairière dowager
douanier(ère) custom officer
drapier clothmaker, clothier
ébeniste cabinet maker
écclésiastique clergyman
échevin alderman
écolier(ère) student
écuyer esquire
électricien electrician
éleveur(euse) animal breeder
employé(e) employee
engagé ouest hired to trap furs out west
enseigne ensign
enseigne de vaisseau ship’s sub-lieutenant
ferblantier tinsmith
fermier agricultural worker
fonctionnaire civil servant
forgeron smith, blacksmith
huissier sheriff
ingénieur engineer
journalier(ère) day laborer
maçon mason, bricklayer
marchand merchant
médecin doctor
mendiant beggar
menuisier carpenter
meunier miller
maître d’école school master, headmaster, principal
maîtresse d’école school mistress, headmistress, principal
navigateur sailor
notaire lawyer, solicitor
ouvrier worker
pecheur fisherman
peintre painter
pilote ship’s pilot, harbor pilot
pompier fireman
potier potter
prêtre priest
rentier retiree
scieur sawyer
seigneur land owner, landlord
sellier saddler
tailleur tailor
tanneur tanner
tonnellier cooper (barrel-maker)
vicaire vicar
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Transcription: Obituary for Mary Ann (Jaques) Keefer of Elba, Wisconsin.

Transcription: Obituary for Mary Ann (Jaques) Keefer of Elba, Wisconsin.

Obituary for Mary Ann (Jaques) Keefer of Elba, Wisconsin.

 

(Mary Ann Jaques, Mary Ann Keefer)

Transcription: Obituary for Mary Ann (Jaques) Keefer of Elba, Wisconsin; Mary Ann Jaques, Mary Ann Keefer
Transcription: Obituary for Mary Ann (Jaques) Keefer of Elba, Wisconsin.

KEEFER — At the home of her son Charles, in the town of Elba, Saturday March 11, 1899, Mrs. C. W. Keefer, aged 72 years and 10 months.

Mary A. Jaques, was born in New York state May 11, 1816. She was married to Christian W. Keefer at Painesville, Ohio, Oct. t, 1836, and came with him to this state in 1847. Her husband died in this cty June 28, 1885. Ten children were born to them, seven of whom survive. They are William, of Columbus, Wis., Mrs. Mary Blythe, of Tennessee, Scott, of Dell Rapids, S. D., Mrs. A. K. M. Pomeroy, of Elba, Charles of Elba, Harmon of this city and Clay, of Milwaukee. Her funeral was held in Elba Tuesday, and burial in Oak Wood Cemetery beside her husband.

____________________

The complete original scans of any documents clips linked above can be accessed by clicking the images. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search using the linked names above or the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on these sites is available for free access and download.

 

The complete original scans of the document clips above can be accessed by clicking the image. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, click on the name link above, or search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.
Read more at http://www.emptynestancestry.com/transcription-2/#m8Xte0iIEiM8dBCc.99
The complete original scans of the document clips above can be accessed by clicking the image. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, click on the name link above, or search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.
Read more at http://www.emptynestancestry.com/transcription-2/#m8Xte0iIEiM8dBCc.99

The complete original scans of the document clips above can be accessed by clicking the image. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, click on the name link above, or search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.
Read more at http://www.emptynestancestry.com/transcription-2/#m8Xte0iIEiM8dBCc.99
The complete original scans of the document clips above can be accessed by clicking the image. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, click on the name link above, or search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.
Read more at http://www.emptynestancestry.com/transcription-2/#m8Xte0iIEiM8dBCc.99
The complete original scans of the document clips above can be accessed by clicking the image. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, click on the name link above, or search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.
Read more at http://www.emptynestancestry.com/transcription-2/#m8Xte0iIEiM8dBCc.99
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The ancestor quest: humor, poems and prose for Genealogists.

The ancestor quest: humor, poems and prose for Genealogists.

I have gathered and transcribed several items of humor, poems and prose for Genealogists that have touched me in some way. The ones I have selected and printed below are my favorites of the hundreds that can be found – and the ones that hit home the most.

 

Leaf Divider

 

Dear Ancestor

 

Your tombstone stands among the rest;
Neglected and alone
The name and date are chiseled out
On polished, marbled stone.
It reaches out to all who care
It is too late to mourn.
You did not know that I exist
You died and I was born.
Yet each of us are cells of you
In flesh, in blood, in bone.
Our blood contracts and beats a pulse
Entirely not our own.
Dear Ancestor, the place you filled
So many years ago
Spreads out among the ones you left
Who would have loved you so.
I wonder if you lived and loved,
I wonder if you knew
That someday I would find this spot,
And come to visit you.

Leaf Divider

 

 Genealogy – where you confuse the dead and irritate the living.

 

Leaf Divider

 

Murphy’s Law for Genealogists

 

The public ceremony in which your distinguished ancestor participated and at which the platform collapsed under him turned out to be a hanging.

When at last after much hard work you have solved the mystery you have been working on for two years, your aunt says, “I could have told you that.”

You grandmother’s maiden name that you have searched for four years was on a letter in a box in the attic all the time.

You never asked your father about his family when he was alive because you weren’t interested in genealogy then.

The will you need is in the safe on board the Titanic.

Copies of old newspapers have holes occurring only on the surnames.

John, son of Thomas, the immigrant whom your relatives claim as the family progenitor, died on board ship at
age 10.

Your gr. grandfather’s newspaper obituary states that he died leaving no issue of record.

The keeper of the vital records you need has just been insulted by an another genealogist.

The relative who had all the family photographs gave them all to her daughter who has no interest in genealogy and no inclination to share.

The only record you find for your gr. grandfather is that his property was sold at a sheriff’s sale for insolvency.

The one document that would supply the missing link in your dead-end line has been lost due to fire, flood or war.

The town clerk to whom you wrote for the information sends you a long handwritten letter which is totally illegible.

The spelling for your European ancestor’s name bears no relationship to its current spelling or pronunciation.

None of the pictures in your recently deceased grandmother’s photo album have names written on them.

No one in your family tree ever did anything noteworthy, owned property, was sued or was named in wills.

You learn that your great aunt’s executor just sold her life’s collection of family genealogical materials to a flea market dealer “somewhere in New York City.”

Ink fades and paper deteriorates at a rate inversely proportional to the value of the data recorded.

The 37 volume, sixteen thousand page history of your county of origin isn’t indexed.

You finally find your gr. grandparent’s wedding records and discover that the brides’ father was named John Smith.

Leaf Divider

 

Whoever said “Seek and ye shall find” was not a genealogist.

 

Leaf Divider

 

Strangers in the Box

 

Come, look with me inside this drawer,
In this box I’ve often seen,
At the pictures, black and white,
Faces proud, still, and serene.

I wish I knew the people,
These strangers in the box,
Their names and all their memories,
Are lost among my socks.

I wonder what their lives were like,
How did they spend their days?
What about their special times?
I’ll never know their ways.

If only someone had taken time,
To tell, who, what, where, and when,
These faces of my heritage,
Would come to life again.

Could this become the fate,
Of the pictures we take today?
The faces and the memories,
Someday to be passed away?

Take time to save your stories,
Seize the opportunity when it knocks,
Or someday you and yours,
Could be strangers in the box.

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 31 Mar 2016.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 31 Mar 2016.

The following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 31 Mar 2016.

 

FamilySearch.org updates and additions.

 

Mainz, Germany; Ancestry.com updates and additions.
Mainz, Germany; Ancestry.com updates and additions to 31 Mar 2016.
Brazil
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Netherlands
Peru
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Ukraine
United States
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Ancestry.com updates and additions.

 

Australia
Germany
Czechoslovakia
Jamaica
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Netherlands
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United Kingdom

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Genealogy Transcription: New England Marriages Prior to 1700; Kni – Kno.

Genealogy Transcription: New England Marriages Prior to 1700; Kni – Kno.

 

Following is my transcription of “New England Marriages Prior to 1700″ for surnames starting with ‘K’ from Knight to Knowles, and all varied surnames of spouses.

 

_________________________________

 

NEW ENGLAND MARRIAGES PRIOR TO 1700

 

Knight - U.S., New England Marriages Prior to 1700

445

KNIGHT, Joseph (1673-) & Martha (GIBSON) LILLEY, w Reuben; 4 Apr 1699; Woburn
KNIGHT, Lawrence (-1728) & Elizabeth INGERSOLL, m/2 John BATTEN 1729; 2 Nov 1696; Salem
KNIGHT, Macklin?/Mautlyn?/Matting? & Dorothy _?_; b 1643; Boston
KNIGHT, Michael & Mary BULLARD; 20 Oct 1657; Woburn
KNIGHT, Nathan & Mary [WESTBROOK]; b Mar 1693/4; Portsmouth/Scarboro
KNIGHT, Philip (-1668) & Margery __?__, ?m/2 Thomas BATEMAN, m/3 Nathaniel BALL 1670/1; b 1647; Charlestown/Topsfield
KNIGHT, Philip & Margaret [WILKINS]; b 1669; Topsfield
KNITE, Philip (1669-1696) & Rebecca [TOWNE] (1668-); b 20 Aug 1693; Topsfield
KNIGHT, Richard (1602-1683) & Agnes [COFFLEY?] (-1679); b 1632; Newbury
KNIGHT, Richard & 1/wf __?_; Hampton, NH
KNIGHT, Richard & Dinah ? ; b 15 May 1642; Boston Y
KNIGHT, Richard (-1680) & 2/wf? [Sarah ROGERS] (-1685+); b 16 Jan 1648(9?), b 1647?, 1648+/- Newport, RI
KNIGHT, Richard & Joanna __?__ (not Ann CROMWELL, w Thomas, m/3 John JOYLIFFE/JOLIFFE, see Robert KNIGHT); b 1652?; Boston
KNIGHT, Richard & Julian __?__; b 1664; Boston
KNIGHT, Richard & Hannah (TOWNSEND) HULL [ALLEN], w Thomas, w Hope, m/4 Richard WAY 1687; b 1680; Boston/Dover, NH?
KNIGHT, Richard & Remember GRAFFTON/GRAFTON; 10 Apr 1685; Marblehead/Boston
KNIGHT, Richard & Sarah [KEMBALL] (-1727, New London); b 1689; Charlestown
KNIGHT, Richard & __?__; b 1690; RI
KNIGHT, Richard (1666-) & Elizabeth [JAQUES] (1669-); b 1697; Newbury
KNIGHT, Robert (1585, 1590-1676) (ae 86 in 1671?) & _?__; b 1631, ca 1620?; York, ME
KNIGHT, Robert (ae 51 in 1666) & 1/wf b 1640; Boston/Salem/Marblehead/Manchester
KNIGHT, Robert (-1655) & 2/wf Ann CROMWELL, w Thomas, m/3 John JOYLIFFE 1656/7; b 1652; Boston
KNIGHT, Robert (1667—1739+) & 1/wf Abigail WILLSON/WILSON; 3 Feb 1686; Ipswich/Manchester
KNIGHT, Roger (1596-1673) & [Anne] __?__; b 1636, b 13 Jul 1633; ?Portsrnouth, NH
KNIGHT, Samuel (1649-) & Amy [CARLE]; ca 1670, bef 27 Jul 1676; Kittery, ME
KNIGHT, Samuel (-by 1715) & Sarah ( __?__ ) HOW, w Abraham; 16 Oct 1685; Roxbury
KNIGHT, Samuel (1675-1721) & Rachel CHASE, m/2 S. MUNKLEY; 19 Jul 1700; Tisbury/Charlestown/Sudbury
KNIGHT, Walter & Elizabeth __?__ (-1634?); b 1610?
KNIGHT, Walter (1587-) & ?2/wf [?Ruth GRAY]; b I642, b 1620?, 1635?; Salem
KNIGHT, William (-1655/6) & 1/wf [?Emma POTTER]; b 1638, b 1635?; Salem/Lynn
KNIGHT, William (-1655/6) & 2/wf Elizabeth (?LEE) BALLARD/BULLARD], W William, m/3 Allen BREAD; aft 1639; Salem
KNIGHT, _ ?__ & Sarah __?__ (1665-1727): New London
KNIGHT, __?__ & Sarah __?__; Boston
KNIGHT, Walter & __?__; b 1651; Braveboat Harbor
KNOTT, Andrew & Susanna __?__; b 1689; Boston
KNOTT, George (-1648) & Martha ? _ (-1673/4); b 1630?, b 1634; Sandwich
KNOTT, Richard (-1684) & Hannah (DEVEREUX) [GREENFIELD], w Peter, m/ 3 Joseph SOUTH by 1689; ca 1674?, aft 1672, ca 1672; Marblehead
KNOWER/KNOWES, George (1617, 1697?-1675) & Elizabeth __? _; b 1650; Charlestown
KNOWER, Jonathan & Sarah [WINSLOW]; b 1685, b 1680; Malden/Charlestown
KNOWLES, Alexander (-1663) & __?__; b 1634?; Fairfield, CT
KNOWLES, Edward (1671-1740) & 1/wf Ann RIDLEY; 27 Feb 1699/1700; Eastham
KNOWLES, Eleazer (?1645-1731) & Mary _ ? _ (-1732); ca 1681?, b 1683; Woodbury, CT
KNOLLYS, Rev. Hanser (1598-1691, in Eng) & Anne? …ENEY (-1671, in 63rd y); Dover, NH/Eng
KNOWLES, Henry (?1609-1670) & _ ? _ [POTTER] (-1670+); b 1645; Warwick, Rl
KNOWLES, Henry & __?__
KNOLLES, John (-1685) & Elizabeth (WILLIS?/BILLS?], w Ephraim DAVIS?; b 1641; Watertown/Eng
KNOWLES, John (-1705) & Jemima ASTEN/AUSTIN (1641-]; 10 Jul 1660; Hampton, NH

____________________

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Genealogy transcription: Obituary of Lucian A. Porter.

Genealogy transcription: Obituary of Lucian A. Porter.

Strong-Porter House, Coventry, Connecticut
Strong-Porter House, Coventry, Connecticut

The following is my genealogy transcription of the obituary of Lucian A. Porter, who died in Coventry, Connecticut. The original and more on this individual and family are available on Blythe Genealogy.

 

Obituary for Lucian A. Porter

Featured image above:

There was an interpretive sign there, explaining how the Strong-Porter house was originally built in 1730 in Coventry, Connecticut by Aaron Strong, Nathan Hale’s great uncle. (The Nathan Hale Homestead is a half mile up the road). Later, in 1758, the Porter family bought the dwelling and expanded it.

It still stands as a national heritage home.

_________________________________________

 

A MEMORIAL

Obituary of Lucian A. Porter
Obituary of Lucian A. Porter.

Lucian A. Porter was born March 22, 1819, in Coventry, Connecticut. His father died when he was eleven and his mother when he was fifteen years old. From the time of his father’s death he began to care for himself, working on a farm in summers and attending school in winters. When he was about seventeen years of age he entered the Academy at Ellington, Conn., and during the next six years he studied in the Academies at Westfield and Monson, Mass., teaching meantime to pay his expenses. When nineteen years old he became a member of the First Congregational Church of Rockville, Conn., the only young man among those who, that day, confessed  He married Parmelia M. Dimock, Septemeber 7, 1846. After his marriage he lived, in Plymouth and Winsted, Conn., engaged in various business enterprises. In the spring of 1854 he removed to Ohio and settled in business in Painesville, residing here until his death June 18, 1889.

To those who have watched the closing of a life like that of Mr. Porter there is a pathetic interest in the brief record of his early years. They read between the lines the story of the  boy who longed and labored for an education and made a man of himself in spite of obstacles. The same steadfastness of purpose which has marked his Christian life these many years is seen in the beginning when the boyt of nineteen stood alone to devote himself to the service of Christ and the Church. We go back to the quiet wedding when the companionship of forty-three years began, flowing on through loss and sickness in unbroken harmony till death brought the parting. The years since 1854 have been known to all the residents of Painesville. To sum them up is to speak of the good citizen, the upright man of business, the faithful servant of the Church, the devoted trustee of the Seminary, the head of a Christian home. Those who knew Mr. Porter in each of these relations of life will recall some trait of character, some good deed which might fitly be spread upon the printed page, but when a good man dies his record is in many hearts and lives and it is not easy to gather into a paragraph the tribute of all who would testify to his worth.

Upright and honorable, but selfcontained, and somewhat reserved, too early weighted  with the burdens of life to seem other than seriously minded, although possessing a sense of humor that brightened many a dark hour, Mr. Porter was less known socially and in public than some men. His life moved in blessed influence along two special lines, the Seminary and the Church. The tie that bound him to the Seminary was peculiarly tender. It seemed almost as dear to him as the only son whose  life, cut short in early manhood, began in 1859, the same year in which the Seminary was opened. He was familiar with the hopes and plans preceding that year. Many a conference was held in the rear of his store when Father Hawks, Judge Wilcox and others consulted in regard to its interests. He was, therefore, no stranger to its inner life when, in 1859, he was elected trustee and treasurer of the Seminary. This was a critical time in its history. The expensive services of a steward were dispensed with and Mr. Porter undertook, without salary, to make purchases and oversee repairs and thus help out the limited income. This valuable service was continued till failing health compelled him in 1872 to give up a part of his work. Upon the death of Judge Wilcox in 1881, Mr. Porter was elected to succeed him as Secretary of the Board of Trustees which office he held till his death, although often during the last year expressing to his associates his desire to resign in favor of a stronger man. The last effort of his life was an unsuccessful attempt to guide his pen for the signing of the diploma of the class of ’89. He was also a member of the Executive Committee, having charge during many summer vacations of the repairs in the buildings, a service requiring daily oversight and attention to details. But, beyond this outward service the Seminary owes to him more than can be estimated for wise counsel and unfailing sympathy. To the last days of his life when his failing eyes rested on a little sketch for Memorial Hall, fastened to the wall near his chair, no subject connected with the Seminary was ever wearisome to him. His latest words to the teachers expressed the oft repeated longing that God would raise up strong men and good women to take the vacant places in its board of trust.

Before his connection with the Seminary Mr. Porter was a trusted officer in the Congregational church  of Painesville. He was for many years a trustee and a member of the Church Committee, thus holding the most important relations to pastor and people. He was also a wise and faithful member of various committees formed to meet emergencies in the history of the church, so that his own life and the life of the church moved on together for more than thirty years. Whether he was called to meet the heavy responsibilities of a building committee or the delicate task of selecting a new pastor, whatever was the trust committed to him, he gave to it the best that was in him with unselfish devotion. He was teacher of one of the largest adult Bible classes in the State and leader of the Sabbath school teachers in their weekly study of the International Lessons. It was natural that the Thursday evening prayer meeting after his death should become a memorial service for him, and especially fitting that a former fellow laborer in church and Sabbath school, Mr. T. S. Baldwin, should be present to bear testimony to the strong and helpful life of other years.

It remained to this useful, upright life to be crowned with suffering. Since 1872, Mr. Porter has borne a heavy burden of ill health, weary days and sleepless nights, alternating with periods of apparent restoration to health. For a year and a half he has lingered in the immediate shadow of the great change. In the winter of 1888, reluctantly, not because he was afraid to die, but because with the instinct of a true man he wanted to die at his post, he closed his business and retired to the seclusion of his home, and much of the time, to the deeper seclusion of his thick room. There he bore with fortitude not only pain and weakness, but the harder trial of seeming to be useless in the world, of having dropped out of its busy current into a life which was hardly more than death. But he turned a cheerful face to the favored friends who saw him in these days of trial and they did not realize till it was over how much the long struggle had cost him.

The end was that no not unexpected. Again and again during the year physicians and friends thought he had a few hours to live but he himself had never felt that the time had come. Now, however, something within or a voice from heaven told him that the end was near. There seemed little outward change; it was not necessary to send messages far and near: the family retired with a cheerful “good night,” and he prepared for quiet rest in charge of his nurse. Early in the June morning, when nature was at her fairest, in a moment, without fear or surprise, he was gone.

The funeral services were held in the church on Friday morning, June 21, at half past ten o’clock. The church was made beautiful with tall ferns and pots of growing plants, till it seemed as if summer had come within the walls to remind us that

“Sweet fields beyond the swelling flood
Stand dressed in living green.”

The declarations that beautify the Seminary Chapel for its thirtieth anniversary found a fitting place around the casket of its beloved and honored friend. The ladies of the church sent a cross of rose buds standing like a pillar straight and fair, the Bible Class presented a large basket of ferns and white roses, and the teachers of the Seminary a pillow of “peace,” and a wreath of pansies. The services were conducted by the pastor, Rev. P. W. Sinks, and Rev. Dr. Haydn. The hymns–“Jerusalem the Golden” and “How Firm a Foundation”–were sung by the choir, and after Scripture reading by pastor, Dr. Haydn began his remarks by saying how willingly he came to stand in a familiar place and bring his tribute to the memory of a good man. He recalled the strong men of the church who stood by him and his pastorate twenty years ago, men of marked individuality, among whom Mr. Porter was one of the strongest. He emphasized those traits of character familiar to all who knew him, integrity of purpose, rectitude towards man, faith toward God joined with the rare talent for the administration of affairs, adding, “and when you have said this of a man, what more can be said?” And yet there was one thing more, his broad and deep acquaintance with the Bible and insight into the truths revealed there, so that “his rising in the weekly meeting to speak or to offer prayer was to me,” said Dr. Haydn, “an occasion of deep interest.” His pastor, Rev. Mr. Sinks, bore the same testimony in these words: “Brother Porter was a very gifted man. He drank deep draughts from the inexhaustible fountain of light and truth–the word of God. He lived in the Scriptures, its truths shaped his life and adorned his character. I cheerfully bear this testimony to his grasp upon the Scriptures. In my experience, I have not met among ministry or laity a riper expositor of the truth of God. While it is the privilege of us all to gather up here and there a gem of truth it is not extravagant for me to say that Brother Porter went down into the word and brought up its gems and pure gold by armsfull. Patient, cheerful and with courage touching the great future, he has finished his work and has entered into the rest which he was accustomed to contemplate with joy. Often did he give expression to his faith in these lines transcribed by his own hand in his last illness.

“If round Thy footstool here below
Such radiant gems are strong,
Oh, what magnificence must glow
Great God, before Thy throne!
So radiant here, these rays of light,
There, full-motion beans now praise.”

The burial took place in Evergreen Cemetery where kind hands had lined the grave with evergreens. Mrs. Porter was accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. F. N. Smith of Elyria, and Mr. Mansfield of Cleveland, an old time friend of Mr. Porter. Mrs. Smith, (Louise Porter, the niece who had been as a daughter in the house) arrived on Monday to attend the reunion of her class at the Seminary and was thus at home when the sudden and peaceful and came, when, as his pastor so beautifully expressed it, his life went out like the morning star, “which sinks not into a darkening west, but melts away into the brightness of heaven.”

M. E.
___________________

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 16 Feb 2016.

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 14 Jan 2016.

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