Tag: documents

Transcriptions: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson – II.

Transcriptions: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson – II.

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Transcriptions: Documents relating to the marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson.

 These documents are a continuation of Part I of this post.

—————-

No. 1462

MARRIAGE LICENSE

—————-

PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA

D. MacKeen

Lieutenant-Governor

BY HIS HONOUR

The Honourable David McKeen

Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia.

Whereas, Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson  have determined to enter into the holy estate of Matrimony, and are desirious of having their Marriage publicly solemnized ; in order that such their honest desires may the more speedily have due effect, and that they may be able to procure the same to be lawfully solemnized without publication of banns. I do hereby, for good causes, give and grant the License and Faculty, as well to them the said parties contracting, as to all or every Minister or Clergyman resident in the Dominion of Canada and duly ordained or appointed according to the rights and ceremonies of the Church or Denomination to which he belongs, to solemnize and perform the same with the Province of Nova Scotia ; provided always, that by reason of any Affinity, Consanguinity, Prior Marriage, or any other lawful cause, there be no legal impediment in this behalf ; otherwise if any fraud shall appear to have been committed at the time of granting this License, eight by false suggestions, or concealment of the truth, that then this License shall be null and void to all intents and purposes whatsoever.

Given, under my hand and Seal at Arms, at Halifax,

By his Honour’s Command

F. F. Mathers

Deputy Provincial Secretary

Issued this 16th day

May 1916

A. J. MacCuish

Issuer of Marriage Licenses at St. Peters

In the County of Richmond


Marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

I Hereby Certify, That the within named persons, Clifford Carter of Sampsonville and Elizabeth Sampson of Sampsonville were married under the within License at Sampsonville on the twentieth day of  May 1916, according to the rites and Ceremonies of the Catholic Church

By me, (undecipherable)

St. Peters

In presence of Vernon Sampson at Sampsonville in the County of Richmond Mattie Samspon of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond


marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

Province of Nova Scotia

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MARRIAGE REGISTER

Date of Marriage ; May 20th 1916

Place of Marriage ; Sampsonville

County ; Richmond

How Married ; by License or Banns;License

Dates of Publication, if by Banns ; 

Full name of Groom ; Clifford Carter

Age ; 20 years

Condition (Bachelor or Widower) ; Bach

Religious Denomin ; Catholic

Occupation ; Farming

Residence ; Sampsonville

Where Born ; 

Names of Parents ; Finlay Carter, Mary Fougere

Occupation of Parent ; Farming

____________________;

—————-

Full name of Bride ; Elizabeth Sampson

Age ; 16 years

Condition (Spinster or Widow) ; Spinster

Religious Denomin ; Catholic

Her Place of Residence ; Sampsonville

Where Born ; Sampsonville

Names of Parents ;  Vernon Sampson, Eliza Lawry

Occupation of Parent ; Farming

Names of Witnesses          Maphis Sampson, Vernon Sampson

Signature of Parties Married          Clifford Carter, Elizabeth Sampson

Officiating Clergyman         ???? L. McDonald

Denomination of Clergyman          Catholic

I Certify, That the marriage of the persons above named was duly celebrated by me at the time and place and in the manner stated in this Register.

???? L. McDonald

Officiating Clergyman

When a marriage is celebrated by License or Certificate, this Register filled up and signed by the officiating clergyman, must be returned with the License or Certificate, to the issuer from whom the said License or Certificate was obtained, and the issuer will pay to the clergyman 25 cents for License, or Certificate, and Register, not 25 cents for each, repaying himself from the money in his hands belonging to the Department and including amount so paid in his Quarterly Returns.

Issuers must return all License, Certificates, Affidavits and Registers to the Provincial Secretary’s Office, with their Quarterly Accounts.

marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

The complete original scans of any documents clips linked above can be accessed by clicking the images. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search using the linked names above or the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on these sites is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson of Cape Breton – Part I.

Transcription: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson of Cape Breton – Part I.

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Transcription: Documents related to the marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson of Cape Breton.

____________________________________________________

The following are transcriptions from photographic images of approximately half of a collection of documents related to the marriage of Elizabeth Sampson and Clifford Carter of Sampsonville, County of Richmond, Nova Scotia, Canada. The second half of the transcriptions and links to the actual document images will be published either tomorrow or the day after.

Fine print in the margins was indecipherable due to image quality.

—————-

Sampsonville CB
May 16th 1916

I consent to the marriage of my son Clifford Carter (who is within twenty one years) to Elizabeth Sampson.

his
Philip  X  Carter
mark

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

Sampsonville CB
May 16th 1916

I consent to the marriage of my daughter Elizabeth Sampson (who is within the age of twenty one years) to Clifford Carter.

Mr. Vinny Sampson
his
X
mark
Witness

Laura Sampson

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

29/

May 20/16

No……………………191

Clifford Carter

AND

Elizabeth Sampson

MARRIAGE LICENSE AFFIDAVIT

Rich

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

(There is indecipherable fine pring text in the left 1″ margin, due to image quality.)

FORM OF AFFIDAVIT

I, Clifford Carter
of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond
labourer make oath and say as follows :

I, and Elizabeth Sampson
of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond
are desirous of entering into the contract of
marriage, and of having our marriage solemnzed at Sampsonville
in the County of Richmond.

I am the age of nineteen and eleven months years, and the said
Elizabeth Sampson, is
under twenty one years.

I am a bachelor and the said Elizabeth
Sampson is a spinster.

Philip Carter & Vin Sampson of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond labourers, both whose consent to such marriage is required, has consented thereto in writing

(Two lines of ‘struck-through’ text that is unreadable.)

I believe that there is no affinity, consanguinity, prior marriage or other lawful causes or legal impedment to bar or hinder the solemnization of our marriage.

Sworn to at St. Peters in the
County of Richmond
this 16th
day of May 1916.

Clifford Carter
Signature of Deposed

Before me,
A. J. MacCuish
Issuer of Marriage License

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

___________

V 29

Richmond – 1916

Carter, Clifford

Sampson, Elizabeth

—————-

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

Here are more documents related to this marriage.

—————-

The complete original scans of the document clips above can be accessed by clicking the image. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, click on the name link above, or search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.


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WWII art thefts documented in recently recovered diary of Alfred Rosenberg.

WWII art thefts documented in recently recovered diary of Alfred Rosenberg.

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WWII art thefts
The nazi military and culture resulted in a great many WWII art thefts.

A lingering mystery from the second world war is where are the artworks missing as a result of the WWII art thefts?

One of my earliest memories is from when I was about five years old, shuffling through a small stack of black and white postcards my parents had collected of Hitler’s compound and bunker, and some of the concentration camps.

I was fascinated because my parents had told me what I could understand about the second world war, most likely fostering my ongoing fascination with war, history and genealogy.

I was born in July of 1959, just fourteen years after the end of WWII, and the war was still very fresh in everyone’s mind – including my parents’. Mom had travelled to Germany in 1958 to marry my Dad, who was posted with the Canadian military, and live with him in a tiny apartment in Baden Soellingen – where I was born just a year later. My Dad was quite an amateur photographer and they spent most of their free time travelling around Europe, including visiting the most memorable and disturbing landmarks of Hitler’s regime up to and including the second world war.

The stories my Mom and Dad told of their landlords and others they got to know while living on the German economy painted a picture of lovely, warm, welcoming people, as described in a post on my personal blog, Feathering the Empty Nest, “Did my birth break a curse?” There was no way I could reconcile these stories with the ones I was hearing about the Hitler regime (the military and politicians) of the time. How could there be such a dichotomy?

Among the numerous unspeakable acts against the Jews was the systematic theft of valuables including cash, jewelry, and works of art. Alfred Rosenberg managed the thefts and documented the entire endeavor in his diary.

This morning I read an article in Prologue: Pieces of History on the National Archives site called “Nazi Art Looter’s Diary, Long Missing, Found and Online for the First Time” about the availability online of this German language diary, which was recovered recently and moved to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

I only hope that Mark’s and my interest in the events of WWII has made enough of an impact on our kids that they will do their part to ensure the tragic consequences of the madness of one man and his regime will never be forgotten in their generation and that of their children to come.

Source:

Hilary, “Nazi Art Looter’s Diary, Long Missing, Found and Online for the First Time,” National Archives, http://blogs.archives.gov/prologue/.

Photo credit:

photo credit: x-ray delta one via photopin cc


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We must know the genealogy questions before we can find the answers.

We must know the genealogy questions before we can find the answers.

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It has become increasingly apparent recently that there are two distinct schools of thought regarding quality and depth in genealogy research.

There are the genealogists who believe in working only with well-sourced, proven information – and then there are those of us who started our genealogical quests simply for the pleasure of doing so.

Before either camp can begin searching for answers, they much first know the genealogy questions.

 

My own research (see my Blythe Database) started with a curiosity about our history because I grew up in a military family that moved a great deal, and therefore I had very little opportunity to meet with near and distant family members to learn family stories and lore.

I do agree with the article “Take time to produce well-sourced, quality work,” on the Genealogy Today site, in which they respond to another article by Sharon Tate Moody in the Tampa Tribune, entitled “Drive-by genealogists should learn a few rules.”

I am one who looks at unsourced information as possible clues to breaking down brick walls and answering questions. Although the information itself may be unsourced and seen as questionable, it can be regarded as a clue.

When I receive gedcoms from others, or access information online, I do not discard what could be valuable information simply because there are no sources cited. I note the information, making it part of my own database, intending to return to it, find and cite concrete sources as I can.

Yes, I’ve found mistakes, but I have also found wonderful information allowing me to enlarge upon my family’s own stories.

I believe in the researchers’ responsibility for assessing the quality of the data they receive from others. I never take sources cited by others at face value, always working to find the sources cited and attach concrete proof in the form of images, etc.

Although a great deal of the Blythe Database attached to this site is not sourced, the majority of it is – the result of tireless work and ever increasing expense over 15 years. I have a clearly stated ‘Data Quality’ disclaimer linked in the upper horizontal menu of every page and post, and it states:

“The Blythe Database is my genealogy research in its entirety and is an ongoing process. I spend a minimum of four hours a day researching sources to verify data.

I have been researching genealogy for over fifteen years and you will note that I classify all sources by quality. If it is a poor quality source it is clearly indicated as such…

…It is common for there to be gaps in data and sources and in these cases I will use the individual anyway and either leave sources blank (indicating no sources found) or will clearly indicate source quality. It is up to the person using the data to use the information as classified.

I continually search out sources and documents to verify data and improve on substantiation. I have made some of my best discoveries using unsourced data as a starting point and I would hate for those clues to not be available.

This site is an effort to provide open, free sharing of genealogical information. However, all information is only as good as the sources cited.

I will gladly make corrections to data providing the information provided can be substantiated by the submitter with a source…”

Let’s face it: it’s quickly getting to the point where information gleaned from others will rarely include sources, images, etc. as more and more researchers become protective of their data. I understand as I struggle with my decision to openly share ALL of my information, but ultimately feel I’ve made the right decision, hopefully promoting more open and cooperative sharing of data by others as well.

Genealogy is a passion for me – and others. I enjoy the hunt as much as finding those elusive facts and sources. Maybe it’s my inner detective struggling to get out. Whatever the reason, my database will always have a substantial amount of unsourced data as I continually stumble upon new and hopefully ‘breakthrough’ information. I do, however, spend as much time as I can finding evidence and sources, but find (and I’m sure others do as well) that each new discovery raises numerous new questions, and finding those answers takes a great deal of time and effort.

There will never be an end to my quest…

photo credit: droetker0912 via photopin cc


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New to genealogy? Start with free genealogy sites and tools online.

New to genealogy? Start with free genealogy sites and tools online.

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Using available free genealogy sites and tools to the best advantage.

 

I’ve been doing genealogy research for well over fifteen years now and have amassed a database of over 100,000 individuals with supporting sources, images, and documents for over 90% of the individuals, which are available for free download. Yet, I still find new information every day.

There is a certain pattern of research I highly recommend to new researchers and here it is:

  • Interview or have a questionnaire completed by as many accessible family members as possible.

Everyone needs a place to start and with genealogy, depending on the location of the information sought, privacy laws vary, but information can be inaccessible for up to 100 years back.

To successfully trace back further than 100 years, one must have information from a closely linked generation to provide clues for working back in the family history. From here, one can also work forward and fill out collateral lines by contacting individuals who are willing to impart information, documents and sources that are not public due to privacy laws.

Here is a double-sided Family View Report I designed for use during interviews or for others to fill out and return. The reverse side is for notes, tasks, etc.

Using free software allows you to learn which functions and features are important to you if you find you wish to use paid software later on.

  • Using the Family View Reports gathered, enter the data into your genealogy software of choice and then research the individuals mentioned with the free sites, databases and tools available online.

I have amassed a very large collection of links to free resources of all types in the right sidebar. It pays to explore the free resources first and obtain as much information as possible until one or more ‘brick walls’ are reached and no further information is forthcoming for free.

I also highly recommend the free genealogy link directory site Cyndi’s List, which offers over 300,000 categorized and cross-referenced links.

  • Once one reaches a brick wall (sometimes called a dead end), it is advisable to explore the paid resources available online.

The paid site I recommend most highly is Ancestry.com , where I find I get by far the best return for my dollar.

I post periodically (usually between 7 and 14 days apart) on this blog with a listing of all of the updates and additions to both of these databases and they can be accessed by clicking here.

  • If the cost of research is a concern, I have found that it’s best to purchase a short-term subscription for the paid site you prefer.

Work within this site as much as possible during the subscription period to try to find information to help break through any brick walls, and then once the subscription expires, once again use the free resources to continue.

Working in this manner can save a considerable amount of money over time.


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Creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records and images.

Creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records and images.

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The first consideration when starting to research your genealogy is creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records and images.

 

Creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records.
The importance of creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records.

I have been a computer user from the day of the old single-use word processors. Therefore, I tend to digitize everything into my own digital library of valuables from family photos, tax documents, bills, bank records, correspondence – and of course, genealogy records, genealogy databases and data.

I’m not a novice. I’m well aware of the pitfalls of relying on a digital library, but I’m as guilty as the next person for procrastination and rationalization.

When it comes to doing the tasks necessary to ensure my genealogy records are secure and permanent, I tend to think, “It’s OK, I’ll do it later.”

There are, however, some very serious pitfalls of putting these things off.

Some of the compelling reasons for digitizing records include:

  • Immediacy of sending genealogy records digitally over the internet.
  • Ease of organization, storage, searching and reproduction.
  • Ability to share family genealogy records between yourself and others.
  • Retain genealogy records in condition at the time of scanning to safeguard against the inevitable ravages of time on physical documents, etc.
  • More and more genealogy records are “born-digital”, never having been in physical form at all.

The digital backup we are used to is not sufficient to safeguard and archive records. The process required includes:

  • Storing with background, technical and descriptive information.
  • Storing records in several locations.
  • Archiving for a very lengthy period of time.
  • Saving genealogy data at a very high resolution.
  • Periodically backing up stored genealogy records to new media to prevent loss of data.
  • Converting file formats and media to new ones to avoid obsolescence.
  • Ensuring access to the digital genealogy records collection.

For my own digital archive storage, I am using a 1 terabyte hard drive and save all important genealogy documents and photos to it. If my sum total of research at this point wasn’t as large as it is, I would use the ‘cloud’ as a backup. But there are limits to the quantity of data it will hold.

All of my original genealogy files and data are on my computer.

I also transfer the files periodically to a new backup using the newest technology and format.

I don’t believe in using CDs, DVDs or even flash drives for permanent storage at all as I’ve had too many fail.

photo credit: Sean MacEntee via photopin cc


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 22 Jul 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 22 Jul 2015.

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 22 Jul 2015.

 

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions
Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions.

 

Canada

Denmark

France

Jamaica

Japan

Mexico

Peru

Philippines

United States

Zimbabwe

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

 

Australia

Canada

Ireland

United States


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Have your valuable family photos scanned free at RootsTech 2015.

Have your valuable family photos scanned free at RootsTech 2015.

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RootsTech 2015 provides the opportunity to have your valuable family photos scanned free to preserve history and memories.
RootsTech 2015 provides the opportunity to have your valuable family photos scanned to preserve history and memories.
Have your valuable family photos scanned free at RootsTech 2015.

In my recent post on my blog, “Feathering the Empty Nest“, titled “Photos and images are essential to successful genealogy research and blogging,” I outlined several options available for using photos and images to increase readership and engagement in your blog posts.

What I did not mention was the option of using your own collection of images.

Are you like me and still hold most of your photo collection as hard copy images?

It is important to digitally scan and catalogue your images for easy keyword or tag search.

Don’t have any scanning equipment?

Can’t see any reason for the need of it in the future?

A scanning service is most likely your best option.

If you’re planning to attend RootsTech 2015 in Salt Lake City, Utah on February 12 to 14, 2015, this may be your opportunity to have E-Z PhotoScan, a quality scanning service, scan your most important images for free.

They will be introducing their Scannx Photo ScanCenter system, making it available at their E-Z Photo Scan’s Expo Hall Booth #1343 for free digital scanning to preserve precious family photos.
E-Z Photo Scan

This system harnesses the power of its easy-to-use, interactive touchscreen interface with the Kodak Picture Saver Scanning Systems photo scanners, model PS50 & PS80.

This versatile tool can scan up to 85 photos per minute and can do double duty by scanning treasured documents as well.

The fluid touchscreen interface enables the user to seamlessly perform the scanning process, including setting up preferred file formats, file names, choosing document capture options like scan quality and color depth, and designating destinations.

You can even load scanned photos directly into FamilySearch.org!

Bring your photos in to their kiosk for this free scanning opportunity and preserve those precious family photos digitally, making them readily available, searchable and usable in your own genealogy research.


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Collaboration between ancestry.com, familysearch.org, findmypast.com and myheritage.com to process billions of pages of genealogy files.

Collaboration between ancestry.com, familysearch.org, findmypast.com and myheritage.com to process billions of pages of genealogy files.

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Collaboration between ancestry.com, familysearch.org, findmypast.com and myheritage.com to process billions of pages of genealogy files.

After 50 years in storage at the Latter Day Saints (LDS) Church records vault, several online genealogy companies will collaborate in their efforts to index, digitize and publish billions of pages of genealogy files and records.

The companies involved in the endeavor are familysearch.org, ancestry.com, myheritage.com, and findmypast.com. On its own, familysearch.org was expecting the enormous project to take up to 300 years to complete. Rather than denying our generation and several others the opportunity of accessing all of the genealogy files and records, LDS’ familysearch.org, with the help of the other companies, will see the project completed in just decades, providing the opportunity for most of us to see its completion in our lifetimes.

I’ve never been one who complains about the charges for accessing records online. Considering the quantity of genealogy files and records being processed and the number of people required to do the job, the costs have to be covered somehow. Just imagine how much it used to cost when online access was not available and researchers either had to travel to site, or pay others to do the research on site – both at great expense.

Familysearch.org has released the following press release, which contains links to a very informative infographic about the project.

Collaboration between ancestry.com, familysearch.org, findmypast.com and myheritage.com to process billions of pages of genealogy files.FamilySearch Works to Put the World’s Historical Records Online in One Generation

February 4, 2014

See Related Infographic

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH—FamilySearch International (online at FamilySearch.org) is leading the way in digitizing and providing access to billions of historical genealogical records by collaborating with commercial family history companies and the online community. This collaboration will carve centuries off the time needed to increase access to the world’s historical records, enabling millions more people to quickly discover, share, and preserve family memories for generations.

Recent announcements of agreements with commercial family history companies are some of the first installments in fulfilling FamilySearch’s desire to remove the traditional barriers to genealogical research. FamilySearch CEO, Dennis Brimhall, explains that joining forces with other organizations, where possible, brings significantly more financial investment and technological resources to the family history industry than the nonprofit community could provide on its own.

FamilySearch plans to collaborate on digitization projects with commercial family history companies to publish new historical records collections on FamilySearch.org that have never seen the light of the Internet. Working with individual industry leaders such as Ancestry.com , Archives.com, findmypast, Fold3, and MyHeritage will also increase and broaden access to the records FamilySearch has already published online. FamilySearch plans to involve many other interested organizations that will provide records, tools, and other resources to allow more people to build, preserve, and share their family trees online.

In a keynote address at the RootsTech 2013 conference, Brimhall shared FamilySearch’s vision to empower people globally to share their family memories and save them for future generations. “Imagine if your ancestors had easy access to computers, digital cameras, and family history websites that allowed them to upload, preserve, and share important family memories through photos, stories, and vital names, dates, and places? How amazing would that be?” Brimhall said.

FamilySearch and its predecessors have been preserving and providing access to the world’s family history records for over 100 years. FamilySearch volunteers have indexed just over three billion records in extraction and online indexing projects, but they have only scratched the surface.

“For the top countries with the highest online research demand, using our existing resources and volunteers, it will take up to 300 years to index the 5.3 billion records that we already have,” Brimhall noted. “That means you and me and the next 10 generations of our posterity would not live to personally benefit from them. And there are another 60 billion records that still need to be digitally preserved. We can do significantly better by working together with other organizations and as a community.”

As new historical record collections are published under the latest agreements with FamilySearch’s affiliates, they will be available on FamilySearch.org and for free on Ancestry.com , findmypast.com, or MyHeritage.com to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. FamilySearch offers free public access to Ancestry.com and findmypast.com through 4,715 local FamilySearch-owned family history centers worldwide. Additional details regarding expanded records access will be announced sometime in 2014, when they are available.

Infographic: Putting the World’s Historical Records Online in One Generation

Interesting Facts Addressed by FamilySearch Community Initiatives

  • Approximately 28 billion people lived on the earth in recently recorded history—from A.D. 1500 to 2010.
  • Information for an estimated one billion unique individuals may exist today in online family trees—a fraction of how many still need to be linked.
  • The bulk of online family history research today is focused on the records of North America, Europe, and Latin America. Less than seven percent of these records are searchable online today.
  • An estimated 60 billion historical records still exist to be digitally preserved and indexed.
  • Only eight percent of FamilySearch’s current online indexing volunteer workforce is non-English speaking. The majority of historical records to be made searchable online in the future will require volunteers who read non-English records.
  • With current volunteers and resources, it could take up to 300 years to make the current inventory of historical genealogical records searchable online. This time can be reduced to 20 to 30 years with more business and community involvement. Disclaimer: FamilySearch does not establish relationships with third parties or take other steps that may be in violation of the terms of contractual obligations. As a result, FamilySearch may not be able to provide some information, records, indexes, or other data to third parties or the public.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch has been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. FamilySearch is a nonprofit organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 4,500 family history centers in 70 countries, including the renowned Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.


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I wait with bated breath for the completion of two amazing new digitization projects by Library and Archives Canada.

I wait with bated breath for the completion of two amazing new digitization projects by Library and Archives Canada.

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WWI Soldier in serviceWWI Expeditionary Force personnel and service records.

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) has announced they will be digitizing 640,000 service and personnel records of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF).After being housed at LAC, these files are the most heavily consulted collection and the amount of research being conducted through the use of the paper documents and LAC is anxious to digitize them to preserve the originals for future generations.

Unfortunately, this project will require closure of portions of the collection, starting with letters A through D being closed March 2014 and expected to be available digitally online sometime in the summer. LAC will be unable to provide personal consultation and copying services from the closed collections.

This collection in particular is of interest to me because of my research into our two family members who were killed in WWI: Philias Joseph Albert Emery, who was missing and assumed killed during the preparations at Vimy Ridge; and Joseph Turmaine, who was missing in action and assumed dead at the battle of Courcelette.

The project is expected to be complete sometime in 2015.

LAC requests that interested parties consult the Fact Sheet: Digitization of Canadian Expeditionary Force Service Files.

Upper Canada governmentDigitization and indexing of millions of government administrative and personal documents.

This digitization project is expected to triple the digitized content LAC already has available online for free.

New content being added to the Héritage website will include, in part: Civil Secretary’s letter books of Upper Canada; despatches from the Colonial Office; general index to the Public Archives of Canada; Heir and Devisee Commission; Lower Canada, declarations of aliens; port records; and Upper Canada land books and sundries.

photo credit: Toronto Public Library Special Collections via photopin cc
photo credit: BiblioArchives / LibraryArchives via photopin cc


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YouWho will help you learn who you are…

YouWho will help you learn who you are…

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Martha and Elam Dennis Matthews in 1873.Former Ancestry.com executives recently unveiled their new startup venture, called YouWho at the VCIR conference in Utah.

Those involved in this venture are currently locating documents and old family photographs and then linking them to family and descendants of those in the photos.

Having raised the funding to start the venture, the company is working to raise additional funds.

Beginning with the over 200 million items they have stored, the idea is to enable those seeking invaluable documentary evidence and photos to search using keywords and tags of names, dates and places. The ultimate goal is to help researchers find evidence they may not have been aware of at all. YouWho will not own the content. The original holders will hold the license to it.

YouWho will also integrate the use of facial recognition software to facilitate linking photos to connected individuals.

YouWho intends to sell items at ‘premium’ prices (not too premium, I hope) to those with a connection to it. In order to streamline this process, the site is integrated with Facebook.

To learn more, watch the video below.


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Agreement between Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org will enable future release of billions of records.

Agreement between Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org will enable future release of billions of records.

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org” src=”http://www.emptynestancestry.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Blythe-Chas-Ships-Entry-Immigration-small.jpg” alt=”Agreement between Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org” width=”300″ height=”307″ />Agreement between Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org will enable future release of billions of records.

I rarely print press releases since I want this blog to resemble your local community genealogy center or club, where information, data and sources are made freely available and those involved in the pursuit of genealogy can communicate with me and with each other.

The last thing I want is for this blog to become just a ‘news’ website.

In this case, however, this press release is concerning an agreement between Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org that will make billions of records available and accessible online, making the experience of researching our family trees and ancestry even more productive and enjoyable. You can read more in the press release below.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch to Make a Billion Global Records Available Online

Groundbreaking Agreement to Deliver Valuable Historical Content Over the Next Five Years

PROVO, Utah, Sept. 5, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Ancestry.com and FamilySearch International (online at FamilySearch.org), the two largest providers of family history resources, announced today an agreement that is expected to make approximately 1 billion global historical records available online and more easily accessible to the public for the first time. With this long-term strategic agreement, the two services will work together with the archive community over the next five years to digitize, index and publish these records from the FamilySearch vault.

The access to the global collection of records marks a major investment in international content as Ancestry.com continues to invest in expanding family history interest in its current markets and worldwide. Ancestry.com expects to invest more than $60 million over the next five years in the project alongside thousands of hours of volunteer efforts facilitated by FamilySearch.

“This agreement sets a path for the future for Ancestry.com