Tag: England

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions – 14 Oct 2014

Sorry for the large gap. I’m in the process of doing some experimental performance of this site which has demanded much of my attention in the past couple of weeks. Finally, though, here are the FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to October 14, 2014.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions
Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions.

Australia

Belgium

Canada

Colombia

Ghana

India

Indonesia

Italy

New Zealand

Slovakia

Spain

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

Australia

Bermuda

Canada

Hungary

Netherlands

United Kingdom

United States

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates – 29 Sep 2014

The following is the list of FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates to date, September 29, 2014.

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates

FamilySearch.org Additions and Updates

Belgium

China

Finland

France

Czechoslovakia

India

Indonesia

Italy

Korea

Nicaragua

Portugal

Spain

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

Ancestry.com Additions and Updates

Canada

England

photo credit: WA State Library via photopin cc

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates – 20 Sep 2014

Following are the latest FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com additions and updates since my last update post of September 11, 2014.

 

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates – 20 Sep 2014

FamilySearch.org

Argentina

Belgium

Brazil

Canada

Colombia

Czechoslovakia

Indonesia

Italy

Peru

Philippines

Spain

United Kingdom

United States

 

Ancestry.com

Canada

United Kingdom

United States

Joan, Fair Maid of Kent

Joan, Countess of Kent was Princess of Wales and was also known as Joan, Fair Maid of Kent. Her other titles included Princess of Aquitaine, Countess of Salisbury and Baroness Wake of Liddell. She was also the 26th great grandmother to my children.
Joan, Fair Maid of Kent and Edward of Angoulême

Joan, Fair Maid of Kent and Edward of Angoulême.

Joan at one time was described by French historian Jean Froissart as “the most beautiful woman in all the realm of England, and the most loving.”

Joan was born September 29, 1328. Her father was Edmund of Woodstock, Earl of Kent (1301-1330), half-brother to Edward II, King of England and son of Edward I, and her mother was Margaret, Baroness Wake (1300-1349), daughter of Philip III, King of France. It was her father Edmund who supported Edward II in conflict with Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March and his lover Isabella of France, resulting in Edmund’s execution.

In the spring of 1340 at the age of eleven, Joan was married in secret, without royal consent, to Sir Thomas de Holand (    – 1360), Knight of the Garter, of Broughton, Buckinghamshire, son of Sir Robert de Holand and Matilda la Zouche.

In 1352, she succeeded her brother as Countess of Kent, Baroness Wake and Baroness Woodstock.

While Thomas was overseas, her family forced her into a marriage with William de Montagu (1328-1397) before February 10, 1341. She decided not to disclose the earlier marriage for fear Sir Thomas would be executed for treason. William was the son of William de Montagu, Lord Montagu and Earl of Salisbury and Katharine de Grandson and succeeded as Earl of Salisbury in 1344. Joan and William had one son, Sir William de Montagu (1341-    ).

The marriage of Joan and William was annulled in November 17, 1349 after Sir Thomas de Holand proved that he had married Joan in 1339. Thomas was made Lord Holand in 1353/4 and succeeded as Earl of Kent, dying in the winter of 1360. He was buried at the Church of the Grey Friars in Stamford, England.

The pope ordered the re-establishment of the first marriage to Sir Thomas de Holad on November 17, 1349. It was later confirmed by another Papal Bull that the Earl of Salisbury acquiesced and married another woman who remained his wife. Joan returned to her first husband and had the following children:

  • Sir Thomas de Holand II, Earl of Kent (1350-1397)
  • John de Holand, Duke of Exeter (1350-1400)
  • Edmund de Holand, Duchess of Brittany (    –    )
  • Matilda de Holand, Countess of Ligny (    –    )

Joan’s third marriage was by Papal dispensation September 10, 1361 to Edward of Woodstock, Prince of Wales (1330-1376), son of Edward III, King of England and Philippa de Hainaut. Edward was also known as “The Black Prince”. Joan and Edward had two sons:

  • Edward of Angoulême (1365-1372)
  • Richard II, King of England (1367- murdered in 1400)

Around 1365, Edward went to war on behalf of King Peter of Castile. After his return and by 1372, Edward was no longer able to perform his duties as Prince of Aquitaine and he returned to England, when the plaque has rampant. Joan became the Dowager Princess of Wales upon the succession of her son Richard, her elder son having died in 1372.

Sources:

  1. Royal Genealogies Website; http://ftp.cac.psu.edu/~saw/royal/royalgen.html.
  2. Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy; Pimlico; Rev Ed edition (13 Jun 2002); London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999.
  3. Kings and Queens of England – The Plantagenets, The Royal Family online; http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page58.asp, accessed.
  4. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy online; http://fmg.ac/, accessed.
  5. Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th Edition (: 1999,).
  6. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdon, Extant, Extinct or Dormant (G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I.).
  7. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came To America Before 1700, 8th Edition (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., 2004).
  8. George Smith, Dictionary of National Biography, Vols. 1-21 (: Oxford Press, 1885-1990).
  9. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Th.D., The Magna Carta Sureties, 1215, (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc.), 5th Ed., c1999.
  10. Wikipedia.org; http://www.wikipedia.org.

Photo credit: Wikipedia.org

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – 11 Sep 2014

Following are the Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions for the week ending September 11, 2014.

 

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions – 11 Sep 2014

FamilySearch.org

Brazil

Canada

Colombia

Ghana

India

Italy

Mexico

Netherlands

Philippines

Portugal

Russia

South Africa

Spain

United Kingdom

United States

 

Ancestry.com

Canada

United States

photo credit: wundercapo via photopin cc

Wenzel I and Boleslav “der Grausame, the Cruel”

Wenzel I, Duke of the Bohemians, by Peter Parler

Wenzel I, Duke of the Bohemians (Good King Wenceslaus), by Peter Parler.

One thing I realized very quickly after starting to research my family’s genealogy is that not all of our ancestors are ‘nice’ guys or gals. Wenzel I and Boleslave “der Grausame, the Cruel” is only one of many I have found, and I’m sure I’ll find more.

In this post, I describe my children’s 33rd great grandfather, Boleslav “der Grausame” or “the Cruel”, Duke of the Bohemians.

Boleslav, the dear boy, was the brother of Wenzel I, Duke of the Bohemians, most commonly known in our day as “Good King Wenceslaus” of the age old Christmas carol.  These two are just another example of two brothers who grow up to be the epitome of ‘good’ (Wenzel) and ‘evil’ (Boleslav).

Wenzel and Boleslav were sons of Vratislav I, Duke of the Bohemians and his wife Drahomira. They were raised at a time of religious upheaval, their own father being Christian and their mother being the daughter of a pagan chief. She was, however, baptised at the time of her marriage to Vratislav. Vratislav was killed in battle in 1921 at the rather young age of 33.

Statue of King Wenceslaus

Statue of Wenzel I, Duke of the Bohemians.

Wenzel, born about 907, although the oldest of the two boys, was only 14 when he succeeded his father upon his death. He was raised as a Christian thereafter by his grandmother, Saint Ludmila and was known as a humble, pious and intelligent young man. Ludmila was soon forced to seek sanctuary near Beroun at Tetin Castle as a result of a dispute with her daughter-in-law, Wenzel and Boleslav’s mother. This did not prove safe for Ludmila though, as her daughter-in-law Drahomira, furious at her loss of control of her son, had Ludmila strangled on September 15, 921 at Tetin.

St. Veit

St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague.

Interior of St. Vitus.

St. Vitus interior.

At about 18 years of age, Wenzel began controlling government and had his mother exiled. He founded St. Veit, Prague Castle in Prague. This still exists today as St. Vitus Cathedral.

Although at one time his father had been allied with Duke Arnulf of Bavaria, Duke Arnulf had since formed an alliance with King Henry I “the Fowler” and they joined forces to attack and force Wenzel to resume paying a tribute that had been assessed first in 895. Henry I had needed the tribute to pay tribute himself to the Magyars in 926. Another reason for the attack may have been an alliance formed between Bohemia, the Magyars and the Polabian Slavs.

Assassination of Saint Wenzels I.

Assassination of Wenzel I, Duke of the Bohemians in 935.

A group of nobles allied with Wenzel’s brother Boleslav after a quarrel between the brothers, plotting to kill Wenzel. Not suspecting a thing, Wenzel attended the feast of Saints Cosmas and Damian upon Boleslav’s invitation on September 28, 935 and three allies of Boleslav’s, Tira, Hněvsa and Čsta murdered him on his way to church, clearing the way for Boleslav to succeed as Duke of the Bohemians. Wenzel was buried at St. Veit.

Soon considered a martyr and saint, a cult of Wenzel arose in Bohemia and England. Within a few decades of his death, there were four biographies of Wenzel published and they had great influence on the perception of the ‘rex justus’ or ‘righteous king’. The common belief was that his power arose from great piety.

Boleslav became known as “der Grausame” or “the Cruel” as a result of his participation in the plot to kill his brother. His governance was a period of hostile relations with the empire until Otto I, King of Germany, forced him to pay tribute fourteen years later.

The Bohemians helped King Otto defeat the Hungarians at Lechfeld in 955, and later they crossed the Carpathian mountains and occupied Krakow and Silesia. In 965, Duke Boleslav formed an alliance with Mieszko I,  Prince of Poland. Their alliance was confirmed by Mieszko’s marriage to Dobrawa, Boleslav’s daughter.

Duke Boleslav supported the rebellion of Heinrich II, Duke of Bavaria, against Emperor Otto II. Once Emperor Otto had confiscated the duke’s territories, Heinrich II fled for refuge with Duke Boleslav in Bohemia. Boleslaw had married a woman named Biagota and died in 967.

Sources:

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy; http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/BOHEMIA.htm#BoleslavIIdied99.
Wikipedia.org; http://www.wikipedia.org.