Tag: Family Genealogies

Transcription: Obituary for Marieanne Turmel Bourgeois

Transcription: Obituary for Marieanne Turmel Bourgeois

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The following is my transcription of the newspaper article or obituary for Marieanne Turmel Bourgeois.

Obituary for Marieanne Turmel-Bourgeois.
Obituary for Marieanne Turmel Bourgeois.

 

Emile Bourgeois

Mrs. Marieanne Turmel Bourgeois, 82, widow of Emile Paul Bourgeois, formerly of 1200 Elm St., died Friday night at a Manchester nursing home after a long illness. She was born in St. Agnes, County Beauce, Que., the daughter of Jean and Reberra (Thivierge) Turmel and had been a resident of Manchester since 1912.

Mr. Bourgeois was an attendant of St.-George Church.

Members of her family include two daughters, Mr. Roland (Antoinette) Marois of Manchester, and Mrs. Margaret Ducharme, of Goffstown; two sons, Albert Bourgeois and Edouard Bourgeois, both of Manchester; 12 grandchildren, great-nieces.

Relatives and friends may call at the Lambert Funeral Home, 1799 Elm st., corner of North Street. Visiting hours are from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. today.

A mass of Christian burial will be celebrated Monday morning at 9 in St. George Church. Burial will be in Mt. Calvary Cemetery.

_____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Dad is the link to our French Canadian and military heritage.

Dad is the link to our French Canadian and military heritage.

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Although both sides of my family are ‘French Canadian,’ my mother’s ancestors are Acadians who settled in the maritime provinces and the eastern seaboard of the United States. Dad, however, is the link to our Québecois French Canadian and military heritage.
Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine
Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine at 3 circa 1938.

In earlier posts about our family’s WWI war casualties, I discussed our family’s attachment to the Canadian military. My own father, Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine, was an Instrument Electrical Technician in the Canadian Armed Forces for almost thirty years.

Gerard Turmaine in full pipe bank regalia playing his snare drum.
Gerard Turmaine in full pipe band regalia playing his snare drum.

Born in 1934 to Henry Joseph Turmaine and Rose Amande Emery of Quebec, he was nephew to both family members we lost in WWI, Joseph Philias Albert Emery (Rose’s brother) and Joseph Turmaine (Henry’s half-brother). (See photo at right of Gerry Turmaine at age 3.) As a new Canadian forces member, he spent some time in New Brunswick visiting the family of another recruit, Paul Melanson and met my mother, Patricia Gail Melanson – Paul’s sister.

Shortly after, he was transferred to Baden Söllingen, Germany and a long distance relationship proceeded for a while until he eventually asked my mother to go over and marry him. She traveled over on ship, they were married, and just over a year later I was born.

A year after my birth, my father was posted to Trenton, Ontario by the Canadian military, where we lived for ten years. During this time, he was a member of the national military pipe band (see photo at left) and frequently played all around the nation – and on one occasion, I can remember him traveling to Washington, DC to play.  During the ten years we lived in Trenton, my parents had three more girls, my sisters Renee, Andrea and Danielle.

We finally left Trenton when my parents’ dream came true and we were transferred to Comox, British Columbia. I can remember my parents talking about how much they’d like to live on the west coast of Canada for years. As a matter of fact, the story told ever after was that my Dad was so happy at the news of our transfer to British Columbia he wore holes in his socks dancing around the coffee table.

Their intention to remain in British Columbia was evident when my Dad told his superiors in Comox that he would rather forego any further promotions in order to remain in British Columbia until he retired. My parents lived in Comox until his death in 2005.

Turmaine Family in the late 1960's.
Turmaine family photo with Gerry in rear on the right; middle: Renee, Christine, Gail and Andrea; front: Danielle.

Twenty years ago I met my husband while he was training in Comox. He was an Aviation Technician with the Canadian Armed Forces and retired in 2006 to take a position with Marshall Aerospace in Abbotsford, British Columbia – where he could continue to work on his favorite aircraft, the CC130 Hercules.

To add to the tradition, my husband’s father, Marsh Blythe, retired in the 1980’s as a Sergeant in the Canadian army and my sister Andrea’s husband Larry Potter also retired several years ago from the Canadian army.


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Transcription: 2nd Marriage Certificate of Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois-Ducharme.

Transcription: 2nd Marriage Certificate of Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois-Ducharme.

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This post contains my transcription of the second marriage certificate of Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois-Ducharme.

Certificate of Marriage

Church of St. George,

Manchester, New Hampshire.

This is to Certify that Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois were lawfully Married on the 31st day of May 1935 According to the Rite of the Roman Catholic Church and in conformity with the laws of the State of New Hampshire, Rev. T. J. E. Devoy, P.D., officiating, in the presence of Armand Ducharme and Irene St. Gelais, Witnesses, as appears from the Marriage Register of this Church. Dated April 2, 1974

Rev. Maurice W. Richer, Pastor _____________________

_________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Marriage certificate of Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois.

Transcription: Marriage certificate of Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois.

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The following is my transcription of the marriage certificate of Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois.

Marriage of Joseph William Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois.
Marriage certificate of Joseph William Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois. 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

Certificate of Marriage

This Certifies that on this, the 31st day of May, 1935, at Manchester, I joined in Marriage, in the presence of witnesses, Herve Ducharme of Manchester and Marguerite Bourgeois of Manchester.

Certificate of Intention of Marriage issued by the Clerk of Manchester.

I also certify that I am a Roman Catholic Clergyman residing in the town of Manchester and am legally qualified to perform the marriage ceremony.

Witnesses: Armand Ducharme, Irene St. Gelais

Signed: T. J. W. Derry, D.P.P.R.

_____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription – 1901 Canadian Census for Geffrey and Annie (Fougère) Forgeron

Transcription – 1901 Canadian Census for Geffrey and Annie (Fougère) Forgeron

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1901 Canadian Census: Geffrey and Annie Forgeron and Family

 

Geffrey and Annie Forgeron in 1901 Canadian Census
Family of Geffrey and Annie Josephine Forgeron in the 1901 Canadian Census.

Headings:
Dwelling House; Family or Household; Name; Sex; Colour; Relationship; Marital Status; Birth Month and Day; Year of Birth; Age; Birth Place: Year of Immigration; Year of…; Racial or Tribal Origin; Nationality: Religion; Profession…

152, 161;

Forgeron, Geffrey; M, “, Head, M, 10 Sept, 1860, 40, ” ” “, Blank, Blank, “, “, “, Mariner…
“, Annie; F, “, Wife, M, 25 March, 1871, 30, ” ” “, Blank, ” ” “, Blank, Blank, “, “, “, Blank…
“, Louise; F, “, Daughter, S, 14 Dec., 1889, 11, ” ” “, Blank, ” ” “, Blank, Blank, “, “, “, Blank…
“, Alice; F, “, Daughter, S, 3 Sept., 1891, 9, ” ” “, Blank, ” ” “, Blank, Blank, “, “, “, Blank…
“, Narcisse; M, “, Son, S, 5 Oct., 1893, 7, ” ” “, Blank, ” ” “, Blank, Blank, “, “, “, Blank…
“, M. Florence; F, “, Daughter, S, 12 June, 1897, 3, ” ” “, Blank, ” ” “, Blank, Blank, “, “, “, Blank…
“, J. Lizzie; F, “, Daughter, S, 12 Nov., 1899, 1, ” ” “, Blank, ” ” “, Blank, Blank, “, “, “, Blank…
Fougère, Nancy; F, “, Lodger, W, 12 Dec., 1836, 64, ” ” “, Blank, ” ” “, Blank, Blank, “, “, “, Blank…

____________________

The complete original scans of any documents clips linked above can be accessed by clicking the images. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search using the linked names above or the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on these sites is available for free access and download.



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Grandmère Rose – Marie Marguerite Rose Amande Emery

Grandmère Rose – Marie Marguerite Rose Amande Emery

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Being the child of a military member has one huge drawback – we didn’t have any control over where we lived, when or for how long. As a result, contact with family members was infrequent at best and I do regret not getting to know our relatives better.

My grandparents on my father’s side were Henri Joseph Turmaine (Henri) and Marie Marguerite Rose Amande Emery (Rose Amande).

Gail, Gerard, Grandma Rose and Christine (front) Turmaine
Rear l-r: Patricia-Gail (Gail), Gerard Ronald Joseph (Gerry), Rose Amande Turmaine; Front: Christine Blythe (Turmaine).

Dad, Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine (1934-2005) was the youngest of three children who survived infancy. Dad’s brothers and sisters included Albert Joseph Turmaine (1923-1966), Rose-Marie Azilda Thérèse Turmaine (1929-2003), and Marianne Claudette Andrea Turmaine (1937-1937).

The Turmaine Family
Turmaine Family: Theresa, Henry (Grandpère), Gerard (Dad), Rose (Grandmère), and Joseph.

Therese Paquette (Turmaine) with Christine.
Ma tante Thérèse Paquette and Christine Blythe (Turmaine) circa 1989.

I was too young to remember much about my grandfather Henri as he died in 1966 in General Hospital in Toronto. I know I saw Grandma Rose quite frequently within the first few years of my life, but again, I was too young to remember much. When I turned 10 in 1970, however, that all changed since we were transferred from Ontario to Comox, British Columbia. We took the last opportunity to visit everyone we could that summer on our trip across the country.

I can remember one particular visit where we were permitted to stay at the cottage of cousins, the Pollaris, at Loon Lake in Ontario. What a beautiful cottage it was, too. A semi-circle shape, the front circular side rested on posts in the lake shore, extending over the water. That entire side of the cottage was one big great room and standing in it felt like being in motion on the lake.

I do remember being awestruck in Grandmère’s home. She was a highly devoted Catholic and as soon as we walked in, we were overwhelmed by praying hands, her obsession. There were praying hands statues, prints, and paintings everywhere.  I can remember being told when I was young that Grandmère’s ambition was for Dad to become a Catholic priest and how disappointed she was when he opted for the military instead and married my mother. Knowing my father, he definitely chose the path that suited his own nature and ambitions, especially considering his naughty, rather raunchy sense of humor. Somehow, I don’t think it would have gone over very well as a priest.

Front: Rose Amande and her mother Émilie Labelle, Rear: Unknown Cousin
Front: Rose Armande Emery seated next to her mother, Émilie (Labelle), wife of Charles (Albert) Emery. MIddle: Betty Turmaine, daughter of Hérmènégilde and Azilda Labelle.

A couple of years later, we saw Grandmère Rose one last time in about 1972 when she came to visit us in Comox. She passed away in 1978. Tante Thérèse came out in 1987 for my sister Andréa’s wedding, in 1989 for Renée’s wedding and in 1991 for my own wedding to Mark. She passed away in 2003 in Chateaugay, Québec. It may seem odd that I haven’t mentioned Dad’s brother, my uncle Albert Joseph, but unfortunately, he had committed suicide just prior to Grandpère Henri’s death in 1966.

Grandmère Rose’s father was Charles Albert Emery, who was born in about 1870 in Vermont, United States and died in about 1915. Her mother was Émilie Labelle, born about 1870 in St. André Avellin, Ripon, Papineau County, Québec to Antoine Labelle (1820-1890) and Joséphine Périllard (born 1844), both of Québec. In addition to Grandmère Rose, they had four other children, of whom one was Pte. Joseph Philias Albert (1889-1917) who was missing in action and presumed dead at Vimy Ridge during WWII. His name is only one of many immortalized on the Vimy Ridge Memorial in France.

Oddly enough, my father’s grandfather Herménégilde (father-in-law to Grandmère Rose) took Marie Joséphine Azilda Labelle as his second wife in 1911. Azilda was sister to Joséphine (and Rose’s grandmother).

Children of Antoine Labelle and Joséphine Périard (Périllard)
Children of Antoine Labelle and Joséphine Périllard.

Antoine Labelle (1820-1890) was the son of Antoine Labelle and Marie Isaac Duplanty dit Héry of Québec, and had been married twice, first to Émilie Fournelle and second on November 23, 1863 to Joséphine Périllard (my great great grandmother), born 1844 in Ste. Magdeleine Rigaud, Vaudreuil, Québec to Michel Périllard and Zoé (Madeleine, Michel) Demers. The 1852 Census of Canada East shows Joséphine Périllard with her parents, brothers and sisters living in 274 Petite Nation Parish, St-André Avellin, Ottawa County.

Antoine and Joséphine’s six children included Émilie Labelle (born 1870), Antoine Labelle (1872-1944), Célima (Délima) (born 1874), Joseph (1877-1944), Marguerite (1880-1960), Azilda (1884-1933).

During my extensive research into my French Canadian ancestry, I’ve come to realize one thing – there are no surprises. Families remained close in proximity and emotion, and marriage within the inner circle – and yes, family, according to the laws of consanguinity of the Catholic church was commonplace.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription – Obituary for Elam Dennis Matthews, 96

Transcription – Obituary for Elam Dennis Matthews, 96

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The following is my transcription of the obituary for Elam Dennis Matthews of Louisa County, Iowa, published in the local newspaper at the time.

Area Deaths
______________
Aged Louisa County Resident Dies
Obituary for Elam Dennis Matthews.
Obituary for Elam Dennis Matthews.

Wapello — Elam Dennis Matthews, 96, one of the oldest residents of Louisa county, died Jan. 1[0], at 3:10 p. m., at the home of his daughter Mrs. Roland Barrick. Death resulted from a stroke suffered New Year’s day.

A native of Neenah, Wis., Matthews was born Dec. 1, 1854, the son of David and Mary Ann Adams Coon. His mother died when he was 3 1/2 years old and his father died while a prisoner of the Confederate army. The child was adopted by the Nathan Matthews family of Omro, Wis. He married Martha Jane Jordan at Auroraville, Wis., Oct. 26, 1873, and they lived in Wisconsin and Colorado before coming to Iowa.

In 1899 Matthews began to operate a truck farm near Morning Sun, which he ran for many years before retiring and moving into Morning Sun. His wife died in 1935 and a son, William Matthews, died in 1940.

Despite his advanced age, Matthews was a very active man. When he was 94 he made a trip to California, and last fall took a trip to New York.

Surviving are a son and a daughter, Stanley Matthews, Morning Sun, and Mrs. Edith Barrick, Wapello, and 11 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren.

Last rites will be held at the Pierce funeral home at 2 p. m. Saturday. Officiating will be Dr. Will M. Hughes, pastor of the United Presbyterian church. Burial will be in Elmwood cemetery.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription: Death Certificate for Joseph William Hervé (Babe) Ducharme

Transcription: Death Certificate for Joseph William Hervé (Babe) Ducharme

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Following is the death certificate for Joseph William Hervé (Babe) Ducharme

Death Certificate of Joseph William Herve Ducharme
Death Certificate of Joseph William Hervé (Babe) Ducharme

CITY OF BIDDEFORD

COUNTY OF YORK

No. 95

I, Luc A. Angers City Clerk of said City of Biddeford, depose and testify that I have in my official capacity as City Clerk the books and records of said city, including the records of births, deaths and marriages. I find recorded therein the following in the record of Deaths:

Name:   Herve Ducharme

Place of Death:   Biddeford, Maine

Date of Death:
Year:   1982
Month:   December
Day:   19th

Age:
Years:   68
Months:
Days:

Place of Birth:   New Hampshire

Sex:   Male

Color:   White

Married, Single, Widowed or Divorced:   Married

Occupation:   Salwsman

Name of Father:   Joseph Ducharme

Maiden Name of Mother:   Alice Tremblay

Cause of Death:   Massive Intercerebral bleeds, ? Hypertension

Name of Physician reporting said Death:   James W. Geortitis, M.D.

I further depose that I have no interest in the prosecution of any claim against the U.S. Government, or otherwise of the above.

I hereby certify that the above is a true copy on information contained on the record of the above named person, which is in my official custody.

Attest:   Luc A. Angers City Clerk

Biddeford,   December 27, 1982

____________________

The complete original scans of any documents clips linked above can be accessed by clicking the images. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search using the linked names above or the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on these sites is available for free access and download.



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I learn my husband may be descended from the first documented slave in America, John Punch…

I learn my husband may be descended from the first documented slave in America, John Punch…

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African slave in America, John Punch.
Barack Obama is descended from the first documented African slave in America, John Punch.
A while ago I learned from news headlines that President Barack Obama is descended via marriage from John Punch, the first documented African slave in America. He was an indentured servant declared a slave for life in punishment for attempting an escape in 1640.

Ancestry.com has been researching Barack Obama’s ancestry for several years and has declared that Barack Obama is the eleventh great grandson of the first documented African slave in American history, John Punch and eighth cousin to my husband, Mark.

If this is true, then by virtue of the connection of my husband Mark and Barck Obama through Ulrich Stehle (1720-1773), who was sixth great grandfather to Mark and seventh great grandfather to Barack Obama, Mark and Barack are eighth cousins.

In the words of Joseph Shumway, genealogist with Ancestry.com , “Two of the most historically significant African Americans in the history of our country are amazingly directly related.” What is wholly surprising is that the connection exists through his Caucasian mother, Stanley Ann Dunham, and not his Kenyan father.

John Punch, an indentured servant in Colonial Virginia, was declared a slave for life in punishment for trying to escape in 1640.

Ancestry.com states further that they used DNA analysis to learn that Stanley Ann Dunham’s ancestors were white landowners in Colonial Virginia, who were actually descendants of one African man, John Punch.

President Obama is traditionally viewed as an African-American because of his father’s heritage in Kenya. However, while researching his Caucasian mother, Stanley Ann Dunham’s lineage, Ancestry.com genealogists found her to have African heritage as well, which piqued the researchers’ interest and inspired further digging into Obama’s African-American roots. With the support of existing documents and DNA, it is believed that John Punch had children with a Caucasian woman, and her free status was subsequently passed on to their children. Her descendants continued to be free land owners in Virginia.

The findings were further reviewed and verified by Elizabeth Shown Mills, past president of the Board of Certification of Genealogists and a Southern research expert. She states, “In reviewing Ancestry.com ‘s conclusions, I weighed not only the actual findings but also Virginia’s laws and social attitudes when John Punch was living,” said Mills. She further states, “A careful consideration of the evidence convinces me that the Y-DNA evidence of African origin is indisputable, and the surviving paper trail points solely to John Punch as the logical candidate.

Source:

  1. Ancestry.com ” target=”_blank” rel=”nofollow”>Ancestry.com Press Release.

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Transcription: Obituary for Charles G. Blythe

Transcription: Obituary for Charles G. Blythe

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This is my transcription of the obituary for Charles G. Blythe (2nd great grandfather to Mark) from The Hoosier Genealogist, Indiana Historical Society, June 2001, Vol. 41, No. 2.

 

Obituary for Charles G. Blythe
Obituary for Charles G. Blythe.

Blythe, Charles G.

Birthplace: England
Occupation: Farmer
Entry into service: 1861, Pvt. 8th Btry
Final discharge: May 1864; Cause: End of war
Length of service: 4 months [sic]
Mustered into GAR. Mar. 1911
Died. 13 Jan. 1914

Obituary “C. G. Blythe Dies at Daughter’s Home,” Covington Friend, Jan. 1914, p. 1, col. 1: Blythe Was born in Lincolnshire, England, on 12 July 1840. He was the youngest son of Thomas and Mary Blythe. Charles came to America when he was fifteen years of age with his parents and three older brothers. At first they Went to Chicago. The father’s goal was to see his three sons started Well in life in this country and then the father planned to return to his native land. Unfortunately the father became ill and soon died. The boys were scattered to different parts of the country Charles Went to Wisconsin about the time of the Civil War. He enlisted 21 Nov 1861 in the light artillery. He received a bayonet Wound in his arm at Lookout Mountain, Which made him nearly an invalid for the rest of his life. He was honorably discharged in Aug. 1865. After the War he returned to his farm in Wisconsin and was married to Mary Elizabeth Keefer. They had four sons and two daughters, who all survive him. They are: Jennie M. of Urbana, Ill., Charles E. of Danville, Ill. Robert of Newell, S. Dak., Olive L. of lsanti, Mich. [Ipsilanti, Mich. or lsanti, Minn.‘?], and Clayton W. and Wesley E. of Covington. He died in Urbana on 15 Jan. 1914 after having been an invalid for more than a year. Rev E. W Strecker of the Methodist [Episcopal] Church officiated. He is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Obituary for Mary Foulke (née Underwood)

Transcription: Obituary for Mary Foulke (née Underwood)

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Following is my transcription of the obituary for Mary Foulke (nee Underhill), published Monday, June 3, 1935 on page 2 of the Noblesville Daily Ledger.

MONDAY, JUNE 3, 1935

MARY FOULKE DIED SUNDAY NEAR ARCADIA

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The Funeral Services Will Be Held Tuesday Afternoon

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LONG RESIDENT OF JACKSON TOWNSHIP

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Death of Charles C. Crouch, Indianapolis, Came as a Surprise

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Obituary for Mary Foulke (nee Underwood)
Obituary for Mary Foulke (nee Underwood) – Noblesville Daily Ledger – Mon 3 June 1935, page 2.

Mrs. Mary Frances Foulke, widow of George Foulke, passed away at an early hour Sunday morning in the home of her daughter, Mrs. Grace Robbins, seven miles east of Arcadia. Mrs. Foulke has been in poor health for several years and her death was not unexpected. The body was taken to the Shaffer funeral home at Arcadia, where it will lie in state until Tuesday afternoon. Funeral services will be held in the Shaffer parlors and burial will take place in the cemetery near Sheridan.

Mrs. Foulke was the daughter of Lewis and Sarah (Statton) Underwood and was born Dec. 4, 1853, on the old homestead west of Arcadia, where she resided until less than a year ago when the daughter and family moved to east of Arcadia and she went to live with them. The husband has been dead for several years. Just a year ago, June 6th, the tragic death of her son, Arthur Foulke, of Arcadia, was a great shock to her.

She leaves besides the daughter at whose home she died, two other daughters, Mrs. Alice Phillips, of west of Arcadia, and Mrs. Sarah Ross, residing on road 31, and stepson Alvin Foulke, west of Cicero. She also leaves several grandchildren.

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Sir William ap Thomas and Gwladus ferch Dafydd Gam

Sir William ap Thomas and Gwladus ferch Dafydd Gam

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Sir William ap Thomas Herbert, (21st great grandfather to my children) was born about 1390 to Sir Thomas ap Gwilyn (1360-1438) and Maud de Morley (1375-    ).

Featured image: Tomb with Effigies of Roger Vaughan and Gwladus ferch Dafydd Gam.

Sir William ap Thomas first married Elizabeth (or Isabel) Bluet (1380-1420), daughter of Sir John Bluet of Raglan Manor and Katherine Wogan, and widow of Sir James Berkeley. Elizabeth inherited Raglan Castle while married to to James Berkeley, who later died in about 1405. There were no children born to William and Elizabeth.

Sir William ap Thomas - Battle of Agincourt in 1415.
Sir William ap Thomas – Battle of Agincourt in 1415.

William fought in support of Henry V of England alongside Sir Roger Vaughan, first husband of his later wife Gwladus ferch Dafydd Gam and her father Dafydd Gam ap Llewelyn in the battle of Agincourt. Both Sir Roger and Dafydd Gam died in battle and Dafydd Gam was knighted as he lay dying. Sir William was made a knight-banneret.

In 1426, William was knighted by King Henry VI, and was known as “Y marchog glas o Went” (the blue knight of Gwent), because of the colour of his armour.

When Sir John Bloet died, Raglan Manor was inherited by Elizabeth and her husband James Berkeley. Upon Elizabeth’s death in 1420, William lived at Raglan as a tenant of his step-son James, Lord Berkeley. In 1425, James Berkely granted William the right to live at Raglan Manor for the remainder of his life.

In the earliest of his many occupations, William was made Steward of the Lordship of Abergavenny by 1421. At about this time, he married secondly the daughter of Dafydd Gam and the widow of Sir Roger Vaughan, Gwladys ferch Dafydd Gam, who was known as ‘Seren y fenni’ (Star of Abergavenny). The exact date of Gwladus’ birth is unknown, but she was born in Breconshire, Wales. She was renowned for her beauty, discretion and influence.

Her father supported Henry IV of England and as a result, she, her father, grandfather and two brothers were driven from their last home in Wales, finding refuge at King Henry IV’s court, where Gwladus served as a Maid of Honor to both of Henry IV’s wives, Mary de Bohun (about 1368-1394) and Joan (about 1370-1437).

After her marriage to Sir Roger Vaughan, she returned to Wales with her family as Roger was a great friend of her father’s and would later fight and die with him at Agincourt. Roger and Gwlady’s children were:

  • Watkin (Walter) Vaughan, who died 1456, married Elinor, daughter of Sir Henry Wogan, on Easter 1456. Watkin was murdered at home at Bredwardine Castle. His half-brother William Herbert and Walter Devereux worked to ensure the execution of the culprits at Hereford.
  • Thomas Vaughan, born about 1400, married Ellen Gethin, daughter of Cadwgan ap Dafydd. In 1461, Thomas died at the battle of Edgecote and was entombed at Kington church, near Hergest.
  • Sir Roger Vaughan of Tretower Court married first to Cicely, daughter of Thomas ap Philip Vychan, of Talgarth and second to Lady Margaret, daughter of Lord James Audley, another of the heroes of Agincourt. He died in 1471.
  • Elizabeth Vaughan married gentleman Griffith ap Eineon.
  • Blanch Vaughan married John Milwater, a wealthy Englishman commissioned by Edward IV to accompany Blanch’s half-brother, William Herbert, to the siege of Harlech Castle.

William ap Thomas and Gwladus had the following children:

  • Thomas Herbert, born in 1422.
  • Sir William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1423–1469), who took the surname Herbert. William’s support for and loyalty to Richard, Duke of York, and Richard Neville, 16th Earl of Warwick, resulted in his being recognized as Edward IV’s Welsh “master-lock”. He was the first full-blooded Welshman to enter the English peerage and he was knighted in 1452. William married Anne Devereux in 1449. She was the daughter of Sir Walter Devereux.
  • Sir Richard Herbert, born about 1424, of Coldbrook House, near Abergavenny who died in the battle of Danesmoor.
  • Elizabeth, born about 1427, married Sir Henry Stradling (1423–1476), son of Sir Edward Stradling  and Gwenllian Berkerolles. In contrast to previous generation, Henry and his brothers-in-law were hostile to the Henry VI reign. In 1476, Henry went on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land dying on August 31, 1476 on his journey back to England. He was buried at Famagusta, Cyprus.
  • Margaret, born about 1429, married Sir Henry Wogan, Steward and Treasurer of the Earldom of Pembroke. He was made responsible for securing war material for the defence of Pembroke Castle. Their son, Sir John Wogan, was killed in battle at Banbury in 1465, fighting along side his uncle, William Herbert.

Other children that have been attributed to Gwladus and William include: Maud, Olivia, Elizabeth (who married Welsh country gentlemen, John ab Gwilym).

Gwladus and William raised their own children as well as those from her marriage to Sir Roger Vaughan.

Abergavenny Priory, Abergavenny, Wales
Abergavenny Priory

By 1432 William was able to purchase Raglan Manor for about £667 and afterward, he expanded the manor to become Raglan Castle.

Sir William was appointed to the position of High Sheriff of Cardiganshire and Carmarthenshire in 1435, and in 1440, also to the position of High Sheriff of Glamorgan. About 1442 or 1443, William became Chief Steward of the estates of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York. He also served as a member of the Duke of York’s military council.

William ap Thomas died in London in 1445 and his body was brought back to Wales. William’s wife, Gwladys, died in 1454. Gwladys and her husband William ap Thomas were patrons of Abergavenny Priory where they were both buried and their alabaster tomb and effigies can still be seen in the Priory.

Sources:

  1. The Herbert Family Pedigree, Ancient Wales Studies online; [http://www.ancientwalesstudies.org/id40.html].
  2. Herbert and Einion Sais links to Blayneys, online; [http://keithblayney.com/Blayney/Herbert_Einion.html#GAM].
  3. Thomas Allen Glenn, Merion in the Welsh Tract: With Sketches of the Townships of Haverford and Radnor (Norristown, PA: 1896), ; pdf, Digital Library; [http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Pennsylvaniana/Radnor%20Township/Radnor%20Friends/RadnorFriends-00004.xml].
  4. Gwladus ferch Dafydd Gam; Find A Grave; [http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=87468153].
  5. Early Leighs of Wales; [http://www.welshleigh.org/genealogy/prichardancestry/prichardhistorical4.htm].
  6. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdon, Extant, Extinct or Dormant (G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I.).
  7. John Burke, History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland (1834-1838).
  8. Dr. Thomas Nicholas, Annals and Antiquities of the Counties and County Families of Wales (1875); [http://books.google.com/books?id=M34ystsNDn8C&pg=PA196&lpg=PA196&dq=cadwgan+ap+elystan+glodrydd&source=web&ots=I5BTVLyS8g&sig=wllXZyPfJjxL5e9oNePiwr6YX74&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=8&ct=result].
  9. John Edward Lloyd and R. T. Jenkins, Ed.; Dictionary of Welsh Biography down to 1940 (1957).
  10. Wikipedia; [http://www.wikipedia.org].

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Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky

Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky

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Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky is the grandson of the original immigrant from Wales, Evan (Dhu) Shelby (Selby), who is eighth great grandfather to my children, Erin and Stuart; the son of Brigadier General Evan Shelby, who is the son of Evan (Dhu) and seventh great granduncle to my children; and is therefore first cousin eight times removed from my children.

Although not a direct ancestor of my husband, Marshall Mark (Mark) Blythe or our children, Isaac Shelby is of great interest to us for a couple of reasons. First, he was renowned for and distinguished himself for his actions in battle against United Empire Loyalists in Canada in the War of 1812, ultimately defeating Loyalist forces at the Battle of the Thames in southern Ontario. We are also related to and are descended from Loyalists who settled in this area. For a lengthy period of time, we lived in Trenton, Ontario which is located in the area of Loyalist activities and battles against American forces. This area is steeped in this history and it is still considered to be an honor to be from a Loyalist lineage.

Marshall Matthews Blythe
Marshall Matthews Blythe
Portrait of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky.
Portrait of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky.

Second, because Isaac Shelby is so revered in history, there are accurate portraits of him during the latter period of his life available. Upon comparing portraits of him with recent pictures of my father-in-law, Marshall Matthews Blythe (father to my husband Mark and grand-father to my children Erin and Stuart), the resemblance between them is quite remarkable. For clarification, Isaac is first cousin six times removed to my father-in-law.

Isaac Shelby (December 11, 1750 – July 18, 1826) was a revered and decorated soldier and the first Governor of Kentucky.

The son of Brigadier General Evan and Letitia (Cox) Shelby, Isaac was born December 11, 1750 near North Mountain, Frederick (now Washington) County, Maryland.

Having been raised with the use of arms, he became proficient at an early age and was very familiar with and accustomed to the hardships and stresses of frontier life. Isaac worked on his father’s plantation. However, having received an education, he was occasionally employed as a surveyor and also as Deputy Sheriff.

About 1773, the Shelby family moved to the Holston region of Southwest Virginia, now East Tennessee, where they established a new home. A timeline of Isaac Shelby’s military and political career thereafter is as follows:

1774

  • Isaac Shelby served at the Battle of Point Pleasant as a Lieutenant under his father, Brigadier General Evan Shelby, in the Fincastle Company on October 10.
  • Second in command of the garrison of Fort Blair (until July 1775), which was built on the site of the battle. An uprising of the Shawnee and Delaware Indians compelled Isaac to take up arms and he served as a Lieutenant under his father Brigadier Evan Shelby in the Battle of Point Pleasant in West Virginia.
  • He fought in the Battle of Kenhawa of 10 October. This was believed to be the most severely contested campaign ever fought with the north-western Indians.

1775

  • After July of 1775, he visited Kentucky and surveyed lands for the Transylvania Company.
  • After returning to Kentucky due to failing health, he became involved in the Battle of Long Island Flats.
  • At the first onset of the Indians, the American lines were broken and Shelby, who was there only as a volunteer Private, seized command, reformed the troops, and severely defeated the Indians.

1776

  • In July he was appointed by the Virginia Committee of Safety to the position of Captain of a company of minute men. However, he was not called into service.

1777

  • Governor Patrick Henry promoted Shelby to Captain and made him Commissary-General of the Virginia forces.
  • He attended the Long Island Treaty with the Cherokees, which was finalized at Fort Patrick Henry on July 20, 1777, at which his father was one of the Virginia commissioners.

1778

  • Helped to provide supplies for the Continental Army and for the expedition projected by General McIntosh against Detroit and the Ohio Indians.

1779

  • Provided boats for Clark’s Illinois campaign and collected and provided supplies upon his own personal credit for the successful campaign waged about the same time against the Chickamauga Indians.
  • In the spring he was elected as a member for Washington County of the Virginia legislature.
  • In the fall, Governor Thomas Jefferson made him a Major in the escort of guards for the commissioners appointed to run the western boundary line between Virginia and North Carolina. By the extension of that line, his residence was found to be within the limits of North Carolina.
  • He resigned his commission, but was at once appointed Colonel of Sullivan County by Governor Caswell.

1780

  • Upon receiving news of the fall of Charleston on May 12th, he returned home to an urgent summons for help from Colonel Charles McDowell.
  • He organized a force and about July 25, he joined McDowell at the Cherokee Ford, South Carolina.
  • On July 30, Shelby captured the major Loyalist stronghold, Thicketty Fort (Fort Anderson), at the head of the Pacolet River. On August 8, his command successfully repulsed a party sent by Major Ferguson at the second Battle of Cedar Springs.
  • Upon receipt of the report of General Gates’ defeat at Camden on August 16, operations under McDowell and Shelby were halted.
  • On August 18, he was largely responsible for the victory at Battle of Musgrove’s Mill on the north side of the Enoree River.
  • As a result of a threatening message dispatched by Ferguson, Shelby held even greater resentment and determination and in consequence, with the assistance of John Sevier and others, he organized and conducted the expedition against Ferguson.
  • On October 7, they overwhelmingly defeated Ferguson’s combined Provincial and Loyalist force in the Battle of King’s Mountain.

1781

  • Shelby has also been credited with the plan for the attack, which led to the Battle of the Cowpens on January 17.
  • In February, the legislature of North Carolina adopted resolutions of thanks to Shelby and his compatriots for their services at King’s Mountain.
  • Similar resolutions were adopted by the Continental Congress on November 13.
  • As a result of repeated uprisings by Cherokee Indians during the first half of the year, it was impractical to send forces from there to assist.
  • A treaty with the Cherokees was negotiated on July 20.
  • In October, upon receipt of a delayed message of appeal, Shelby raised 500 mounted riflemen and was accompanied by Colonel John Sevier in command of 200 more.
  • He marched to join Greene, by whose order they reported to General Marion on the Santee.
  • The joint command of Shelby and Colonel Hezekiah Maham, of the Carolina dragoons, contributed greatly to the capture of a strong British post at Fair Lawn, near Monck’s Corner, South Carolina on November 27.
  • Meanwhile, having been elected a member of the North Carolina legislature and having obtained a leave of absence, he attended the sessions in December.

1782

  • Reelected to the North Carolina Assembly, he attended the legislative sessions held at Hillsboro in April.
  • He was appointed one of three commissioners to superintend the laying off of the land south of the Cumberland River allotted by North Carolina for military service in the Revolution.

1783

  • Completed the laying off of the land south of the Cumberland River.
  • He relocated to Kentucky, where he was married to Susannah Hart, daughter of Captain Nathaniel Hart, at Boonesborough on April 19, by whom he had eleven children.
  • Appointed a Trustee of Transylvania Seminary (later Transylvania University).
  • Chairman of the convention of militia officers held at Danville on Nov. 7-8 (was also a member 1787-1789).

1787

  • In January 1791, he was appointed a member of the Board of War, which was created by Congress for the District of Kentucky, and was charged with providing for the defense of the frontier settlements mounting punitive expeditions against the Indians.
  • For several years he served as High Sheriff of Lincoln County.

1792

  • Member of the convention (April 2-19) which framed the first constitution of Kentucky.
  • In May he was elected Governor, taking office on June 4 and serving four years.
  • During his administration many events of importance to the infant commonwealth occurred, not the least being the part it took, under Shelby, in supporting Wayne’s campaigns against the Indians in the Northwest Territory.

1796

  • At the close of his term, he declined reelection.

1796-1812

  • Retired from service.

1812

  • Elected Governor of Kentucky a second time in August.
  • He actively participated in the planning and preparation for war.

1813

  • With a sword presented to him by Henry Clay as voted by the legislature of North Carolina for his gallantry at King’s Mountain 32 years before, Shelby assembled and personally led 4,000 Kentucky volunteers to join General Harrison in the Northwest for the invasion of Canada, resulting in the defeat of the Loyalists on October 5 at the Battle of the Thames.

1817

  • He was given the portfolio of War in March by President Monroe, but declined due to his age.

1818

  • Isaac Shelby was awarded a gold medal by Congress on April 4 in recognition of his patriotic and heroic services.
  • Shelby and General Andrew Jackson were commissioned to hold a treaty with the Chickasaw Indians for the purchase of their lands west of the Tennessee River.
  • He was President of the first Kentucky Agricultural Society, formed at Lexington in 1818.

1819

  • He was Chairman of the first Board of Trustees of Center College, founded in 1819 at Danville, Kentucky.
Governor Isaac Shelby - Traveler's Rest Burying Ground Plaque
Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky – Traveler’s Rest Burying Ground Plaque.

1826

  • After his death on July 18, he was buried at his historic home, “Traveller’s Rest,” and a monument was erected over his grave by the state of Kentucky. Counties in nine states have been named Shelby in his honor. __________ An account of Governor Isaac Shelby by Samuel M. Wilson is as follows:

 

Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky - Grave Marker.
Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky – Grave Marker.

“In person, Shelby was of a sturdy and well-proportioned frame, slightly above medium height, with strongly marked features and florid complexion. He had a hardy constitution capable of enduring protracted labor, great privations, and the utmost fatigue. Habitually dignified and impressive in bearing, he was, however, affable and winning. A soldier born to command, he nevertheless evidenced a high degree of political sagacity and executive ability. Numerous difficulties confronted him during his first administration, when the new government was passing through its formative stage, and much depended on the choice of officials then made by the executive. Shelby exhibited rare selective intelligence and an extraordinary mastery both of men and measures. Kentucky at this time experienced constant dread of the occlusion by Spain of the Mississippi River, and use was made of this situation by designing men to promote speculative ventures and political schemes hostile to the true interests of both Kentucky and the Union. Through it all, Shelby pursued a wise and moderate course which baffled the plots of all conspirators and held Kentucky firmly to her federal moorings. During his second administration, the pressure of the war with Great Britain fell with extraordinary and unremitting severity upon the state, and he showed himself not only a prudent and farseeing counselor, but an active, resourceful, and patriotic leader. His energy, determination, and perseverance knew no bounds, and his devotion to duty was unflagging.”

You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site are available for free access and download.

Sources:

  1. Shelby, John Todd: KERR, C. ed. History of Kentucky, v. 3-5, 1922 #4.
  2. History of Michigan; Moore, C.; v. 2-4; 1915; Shelby, William Read.
  3. Family Data Collection – Births; Shelby, Alfred, 1765.
  4. Family Data Collection – Individual Records; Shelby, Nancy, 1792.
  5. 1860 US Census; Shelby, John Warren, b. 1835; PO Lexington; Roll M653_365; Pg 0.
  6. Shelby, Isaac Flournoy: KERR, C. ed. History of Kentucky, v. 3-5, 1922.
  7. The Pioneer Mothers of America 1; Shelby, Susannah Hart; Green, H.C. and M.W.; 3 v., 1912.
  8. American Biographical and Historical Dictionary; Shelby, Isaac; Allen (W); 1832.
  9. Military Heroes of the War of 1812; Shelby, Evan; Peterson, C.J.; 1848.
  10. Eminent Americans; Shelby, Isaac; Lossing, B.J.; 1857.
  11. National Portrait Gallery of Distinguished Americans; Shelby, Isaac; 4v.; 1865.
  12. Dictionary of American Biography; Shelby, Isaac; Drake, F.S.; 1870.
  13. Biographical Annals of the Civil Government of the US…; Shelby, Isaac; Lanman, C.; 1876.
  14. Biographical Encyclopaedia of Kentucky; Shelby, Isaac; 1878.
  15. National Cyclopaedia of American Biography; Shelby, Isaac; v.1-13; 1898, 1893-1909.
  16. Harper’s Encyclopaedia of American History; Shelby, Isaac; 10v.; 1902.
  17. Century Cyclopedia of Names; Shelby, Isaac; 1904.
  18. Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography; Shelby, Isaac; Herringshaw, T.W.; 5v.; 1909-14.
  19. Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army…; Shelby, Isaac; 1775, to… 1783; new, rev. & enl. ed. 1914.
  20. History of Kentucky; Shelby, Isaac; Kerr, C. ed.; v.3-5; 1922.
  21. An American Biographical and Historical Dictionaryy; Shelby, Isaac; Allen, W.; 2nd ed.; 1832.
  22. US Army Historical Register; Shelby, Isaac; 1789-1903; Vol. 1.
  23. Appleton’s Cyclopaedia of American Biography; Shelby, Evan; 6 vol.; 1888.
  24. 1820 US Census; Shelby, Isaac; 1750; Roll No. M33_25; Pg 59; Image No. 38.
  25. Passenger and Immigration Lists, 1500s-1900s; Shelby, Isaac.
  26. Settlers of Maryland 1679 – 1783; Consolidated Edition; Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc.; 2002; Pg 597.
  27. Kentucky Land Grants, Shelby, Isaac; Jillson, Willard Rouse; The Kentucky Land Grants, Vol. I-II, Louisville, KY: Filson Club Publications, 1925.
  28. US and International Marriage Record; Shelby, Isaac b 1750; 1560-1900.
  29. Shelby, Isaac; KY Historical Society: http://kentucky.gov/kyhs/hmdb/MarkerSearch.aspx?mode=Subject&subject=185. KW-N-399-3.
  30. Dictionary of American Biography; Shelby, Isaac.
  31. DAR; Mrs. Maria Shelby Tevis Field; DAR ID Number 7785; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; Vol. 8; Pg 265.
  32. DAR; Anna Stein Shelby (Annie Shelby Darbishire); National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number; Vol. 11; Pg 182.
  33. DAR; Mrs. Alice McDowell Shelby Riddle; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 16130; Vol. 17, Pg 51.
  34. DAR; Mrs. Katherine Shelby Scott; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 18004; Vol. 19; Pg 3.
  35. DAR; Miss Katharine Shelby Todd; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 25234; Vol. 26; Pg 83.
  36. DAR; Mrs. Laura Shelby Fisher; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number; Vol. 42; Pg 154.
  37. DAR; Mrs. Mary P. Shelby Napton; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 62264; Vol. 63, Pg 87.
  38. DAR; Miss Christine Shelby; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 68811; Vol. 69; Pg 291.
  39. DAR; Miss Shelby Walker Patton; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 83679; Vol. 84; Pg 263.
  40. DAR; Miss Susan Shelby Taylor; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 85134; Vol. 86; Pg 51.
  41. DAR; Mrs. Ann Shelby Magoffin Austin; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number; Vol. 114; Pg 141.
  42. “Soldiers of the American Revolution from Franklin County,”  database, Ancestry.com http://search.ancestry.com; extracted from  (N.p.:n.p.n.d.).Revolutionary Soldiers in Kentucky p. 174.74.
  43. Shelby Historical Data (Chronology for Evan Shelby, Jr. and Letitia Cox), online http://images.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://www.trolinger.com, accessed.


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Transcription: Obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson (nee Johnson)

Transcription: Obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson (nee Johnson)

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Following is my transcription of the obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson (nee Johnson), who died in Cairns, Australia. A memorial service was held in Bethel Lutheran Church in Brush Prairie, Washington on August 27, 1995.

Carolyn Alma Hodgson ObituaryCarolyn Alma Hodgson

A memorial service will be at 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 27, 1995, in Bethel Lutheran Church in Brush Prairie, Wash. Mrs. Hodgson died of a ruptured aorta Aug. 19 in Cairns, Australia, at age 52.

She was born March 14, 1943, in Becker County, Minn. Her maiden name was Johnson. She moved to the Northwest in 1957 and graduated from Central Washington State College. She married Donald L. Hodgson on June 18, 1966. They lived in Beaverton, and she taught at Oregon Episcopal School and worked for ‘Timberline Lodge.

They moved to Papua New Guinea in 1982.

Surviving are her husband; sons, Eric of Dallas, Texas, and Fernando of Gresham; daughters, Anaka of Bradleboro, Vt., and Leyla Bartruff of Troutdale; mother Esther Johnson of Battle Ground, Wash; sister, Alice Olsen of Battle Ground; brothers, Stanley Johnson of Arlington, Wash., and Arvid Johnson of Battle Ground; and four grandchildren.

Disposition by cremation.

Remembrances: Lae Hospital Save the Children Fund, in care of Bethel Lutheran Church, 12919 N.E. 159th, Brush Prairie, Wash. 98606.

________

The image of the obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson above links directly to the transcription of the document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Obituary for Yvonne (Bisson) Boily

Transcription: Obituary for Yvonne (Bisson) Boily

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Following is my transcription of the obituary for Yvonne (Bisson) Boily

 

Yvonne (Bisson) Boily
Yvonne (Bisson) Boily

A son domicile le 4 mars 1995, à l’âge de 85 ans et 8 mois, est décédée dame Yvonne Bisson, épouse de feu Léo Boily. Elle demeurait au 229 rue Principale, Vallée-Jonction. Les funérailles auront lieu mardi le 7 mars à 15h. Départ du funèrarium de la

Maison funéraire
Nouvelle Vie
Vallée-Jonction
à compter de 14h45 pour l`église de Vallée-Jonction et de là au cimetière paroissial. La famille recevra les condoléances au funérarium de la
Maison funéraire
Nouvelle Vie
139 ru Principale
Vallée-Jonction
lundi le 6 mars de 13h30 à 16h30 et de 19h à 22h, mardi, jour des funérailles à compter de 13h.

Elle laisse dans le deuil ses enfants: Louiselle (Clermont Faucher), Yvette (Arthur Vachon), Bibiane (Claude Champagne), Lauréanne (Jean Dumoulin), Guymond (Denise Giguere), Jean (Louise Vachon), Jacques (Desneiges Longchamps), Simone, Pierre (Suzanne Rhéaume); ses frères et soeurs: feu Aurèle Bisson (Blanche Poulin), feu Armand Bisson (Béatrice Trahan), Bernadette Bisson (Wellie Bergeron), feu Emilien Bisson (Laurence Goulet), Valerien Cloutier (Fernande Poulin); ses beaux-frères et belles-soeurs: Marie-Anna Boily (feu Camil Vachon), Lucia Boily (feu Donat Lehouillier), Angéline Boily (feu Aurèle Turmel), Alida Boily (Antonio Turmel), Carmel Boily (feu Emile Ferland), Paul Boily (Claire Girard), feu Emilien Boily (Gisèle Arsenault), feu Clermont Boily (Thérèse Breton), ainsi que dix-neuf petits-enfants, sept arrière petits-enfants, neveux, nièces, cousins, cousines et beaucoup d’amis (es). Toute marque de sympathie peut se traduire par un don à la maison Catherine-de-Longpré. Direction des funérailles:

Maison funéraire
Nouvelle Vie
239 rue Principale
Vallée-Jonction
Pour renseignements: 418-39704000 Fax: 418-397-?
___________

Yvonne ( Bisson )
At home March 4, 1995 , at the age of 85 years and 8 months , died lady Yvonne Bisson, wife of the late Leo Boily . She lived at 229 Main Street , Valley Jonction . The funeral will be held Tuesday, March 7 at 15h . Departure of the funeral

New Life Funeral Home
Valley Junction
from 14:45 to the church of Valley Junction and thence to the parish cemetery. The family will receive condolences at the funeral
New Life Funeral Home
139 Main ru
Valley Junction
Monday, March 6th from 13:30 to 16:30 and from 19h to 22h Tuesday day of the funeral after 13h .Valle

She is survived by her children : Louiselle ( Clermont Faucher ) , Yvette (Arthur Vachon) , Bibiana ( Claude Champagne ) Lauréanne (John Dumoulin) Guymond (Denise Giguere ), Jean (Louise Vachon) , Jacques ( Desneiges Longchamps) Simone , Pierre ( Suzanne Rheaume ) ; his brothers and sisters: the late Aurèle Bisson (Blanche Poulin ) , the late Armand Bisson ( Beatrice Trahan ) , Bernadette Bisson ( Wellie Bergeron ) , fire Emilien Bisson ( Laurence Goulet ) , Valerian Cloutier ( Feernande Poulin ) ; his brothers- and sisters- Marie- Anna Boily (late Camil Vachon) , Lucia Boily (late Donat Lehouillier ) Angeline Boily ( late Aurèle Turmel ) Alida Boily (Antonio Turmel ) Carmel Boily ( late Emile Ferland ) Paul Boily ( Claire Girard) , the late Emilien Boily ( Gisèle Arsenault) , fire Clermont Boily ( Thérèse Breton ) and nineteen grandchildren, seven great grandchildren , nephews, nieces , cousins and many friends ( es ) . Any brand of sympathy may result in a donation to the house Catherine de Longpre . Funeral :

New Life Funeral Home
239 Main Street
Valley Junction
Contact: 418-39704000 Fax: 418-397 -?

____________________

The image above links directly to the transcription of the document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data on this site is available for free access and download.

 

 


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Transcriptions: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson – II.

Transcriptions: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson – II.

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Transcriptions: Documents relating to the marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson.

 These documents are a continuation of Part I of this post.

—————-

No. 1462

MARRIAGE LICENSE

—————-

PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA

D. MacKeen

Lieutenant-Governor

BY HIS HONOUR

The Honourable David McKeen

Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia.

Whereas, Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson  have determined to enter into the holy estate of Matrimony, and are desirious of having their Marriage publicly solemnized ; in order that such their honest desires may the more speedily have due effect, and that they may be able to procure the same to be lawfully solemnized without publication of banns. I do hereby, for good causes, give and grant the License and Faculty, as well to them the said parties contracting, as to all or every Minister or Clergyman resident in the Dominion of Canada and duly ordained or appointed according to the rights and ceremonies of the Church or Denomination to which he belongs, to solemnize and perform the same with the Province of Nova Scotia ; provided always, that by reason of any Affinity, Consanguinity, Prior Marriage, or any other lawful cause, there be no legal impediment in this behalf ; otherwise if any fraud shall appear to have been committed at the time of granting this License, eight by false suggestions, or concealment of the truth, that then this License shall be null and void to all intents and purposes whatsoever.

Given, under my hand and Seal at Arms, at Halifax,

By his Honour’s Command

F. F. Mathers

Deputy Provincial Secretary

Issued this 16th day

May 1916

A. J. MacCuish

Issuer of Marriage Licenses at St. Peters

In the County of Richmond


Marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

I Hereby Certify, That the within named persons, Clifford Carter of Sampsonville and Elizabeth Sampson of Sampsonville were married under the within License at Sampsonville on the twentieth day of  May 1916, according to the rites and Ceremonies of the Catholic Church

By me, (undecipherable)

St. Peters

In presence of Vernon Sampson at Sampsonville in the County of Richmond Mattie Samspon of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond


marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

Province of Nova Scotia

—————-

MARRIAGE REGISTER

Date of Marriage ; May 20th 1916

Place of Marriage ; Sampsonville

County ; Richmond

How Married ; by License or Banns;License

Dates of Publication, if by Banns ; 

Full name of Groom ; Clifford Carter

Age ; 20 years

Condition (Bachelor or Widower) ; Bach

Religious Denomin ; Catholic

Occupation ; Farming

Residence ; Sampsonville

Where Born ; 

Names of Parents ; Finlay Carter, Mary Fougere

Occupation of Parent ; Farming

____________________;

—————-

Full name of Bride ; Elizabeth Sampson

Age ; 16 years

Condition (Spinster or Widow) ; Spinster

Religious Denomin ; Catholic

Her Place of Residence ; Sampsonville

Where Born ; Sampsonville

Names of Parents ;  Vernon Sampson, Eliza Lawry

Occupation of Parent ; Farming

Names of Witnesses          Maphis Sampson, Vernon Sampson

Signature of Parties Married          Clifford Carter, Elizabeth Sampson

Officiating Clergyman         ???? L. McDonald

Denomination of Clergyman          Catholic

I Certify, That the marriage of the persons above named was duly celebrated by me at the time and place and in the manner stated in this Register.

???? L. McDonald

Officiating Clergyman

When a marriage is celebrated by License or Certificate, this Register filled up and signed by the officiating clergyman, must be returned with the License or Certificate, to the issuer from whom the said License or Certificate was obtained, and the issuer will pay to the clergyman 25 cents for License, or Certificate, and Register, not 25 cents for each, repaying himself from the money in his hands belonging to the Department and including amount so paid in his Quarterly Returns.

Issuers must return all License, Certificates, Affidavits and Registers to the Provincial Secretary’s Office, with their Quarterly Accounts.

marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

The complete original scans of any documents clips linked above can be accessed by clicking the images. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search using the linked names above or the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on these sites is available for free access and download.


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Genealogy Database

Genealogy Database

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Athelwulf, King of Wessex
Athelwulf, King of Wessex

Our Blythe Genealogy Database

After extensive work, my genealogy database is now updated and links can be found in the upper menu or in the left sidebar. There are thousands of surnames and the extensive lineages include Welsh Quaker immigrants to the USA, French Canadian, Acadian, American pioneers, Canadian pioneers, French, British, Welsh, German, Scandinavian and medieval and royal genealogies.

The database includes extensive facts, sources and some images.


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Transcription: Obituary for Harold Everett Redetzke; 1935 – 2002

Transcription: Obituary for Harold Everett Redetzke; 1935 – 2002

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Harold Everett Redetzke+ + + + OBITUARY – HAROLD EVERETT REDETZKE + + + +

May 18, 1935 – October 12, 2002

Harold Everett Redetzke, age 67, died on Saturday, October 12, 2002 at his home in rural Sebeka, MN. Harold was born to Elmer and Margaret (Kimball) Redetzke on May 18, 1935 in Butler Township, MN. Harold was united in marriage to Norma Eckert on June 8, 1957 in Sebeka, MN. They lived in Foxhome, MN for several years and then moved beck to Sebeka where Harold tanned until retirement. Harold served on the Red Eye Township Board for a few years and was a member of Our Saviour‘s Lutheran Church. Harold underwent heart transplant surgery on September 27, 1987 at the University of Minnesota Hospital.

Redetzke, Harold Everett; MemorialHarold is survived by his wife Norma Redetzke of Sebeka, MN, to their union were born five children; two daughters, Diane Steinkraus and her husband Ronnie of Sebeka, MN, Debbie Redetzke of Lincoln, Nebraska; three sons, Myron Redetzke and his wife Pam of Sebeka, MN, Marvin Redetzke and his wife Lori of Sebeka, MN, Calvin Redetzke and his wife Joni of Sebeka, MN; seven grandchildren, Lacey Eckman and her husband Justin, Shawn Redetzke, Jeremy Redetzke. Levi Steinkraus, Evette Steinkraus, Reid Redetzke, and Logan Redetzke; five sisters, Delilah Hasbargen of Frazee, MN, LaVern Milbradt of Sebeka, MN, Donna Super and her husband George of Menahga, MN, Joyce Slininger and her husband Bill of St Cloud, MN, Darlene Hought and her husband Konnie of Foxhome, MN; two brothers, Marlyn Redetzke and his wife Joyce of Sebeka, MN, Donald Redetzke and his wife Roseann of Ely, MN; and many nieces, nephews and cousins. He is preceded in death by his parents, brother Gordon, infant sister Mavis and nephew Corey Hought.

[Handwritten: ‘Herbert Redetzke (Bro.)’]

Memorial Services were held on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 at 1:30 P.M. at Our Saviour‘s Lutheran Church in Sebeka, MN with Reverend Mark Manning officiating. Organist was Hilda Mary Schoon and congregational hymns were “In the Garden,” “Precious Lord, Take My Hand” and “Softly and Tenderly Jesus is Calling.” Honorary Pallbearers were Glen Kimball, Randy Redetzke, Daniel Besonen, Ryan Milbradt, Larry Huotari, Benny Olson and Gerald Olson. lnurnment will be at Green Hill Cemetery at a later date. Arrangements by Cardini — Behrens Funeral Homes of Sebeka and Menahga, MN.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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The Discovery Service at the National Archives in Great Britain

The Discovery Service at the National Archives in Great Britain

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The UK National Archives  has a free online search, but there are problems. Some knowledge has always been necessary to search the catalogue with any success.

The Discovery Service makes it easier for everyone – novice to expert – to search and use the collection.

The user is able to search the collection, explore and browse, whether for genealogy research and/or scholastic purposes.

Discovery is a digitized document delivery service that will make it easier to search for genealogy records such as wills and testaments, court proceeding transcription and order digitized genealogy records.

To experience Discovery, visit the Labs section of the National Archives website, the place they release new online services for customers for testing and to provide feedback. New features are being added to Discovery regularly and the latest release includes advanced search and fixes existing problems in previous versions.

The Discovery service will be fully tested and approved before it replaces any other services.

The National Archives holds over 22 million historical government and public records, doubling in just over two years and making it one of the largest archive collections in the world. From Domesday Book to modern government papers and digital files, the collection includes paper and parchment, electronic records and websites, photographs, posters, maps, drawings and paintings.

The old catalogue offered a free search of the collection, but had its problems. A minimum knowledge level was necessary to be able to effectively search the collection. This required level of knowledge made it difficult for new users to take advantage of the search.

The National Archives Discovery Service implemented a system that makes it easier for users of all levels.


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Tombstone: Anna E. Blythe (nee Murray)

Tombstone: Anna E. Blythe (nee Murray)

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Tombstone of Anna E. Blythe
Tombstone of Anna E. Blythe
The following is a transcription of the tombstone of Anna E. Blythe. Anna died August 9, 1925 in Danville, Vermilion, Illinois, USA.

Anna E. Murray

wife of

Charles E. Blythe

1873 – 1925

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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DNA optics: seeing more clearly into the past than ever before.

DNA optics: seeing more clearly into the past than ever before.

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Another post about DNA and related discoveries?

Bering Strait land bridge DNA
Map of gene flow in and out of Beringia. Colors of the arrows correspond to approximate timing of the events and are decoded in the colored time bar. The initial peopling of Beringia (the region depicted in light yellow) was followed by a standstill after which the ancestors of the Native Americans spread swiftly all over the New World while some of the Beringian maternal lineages (C1a) spread westwards. More recent genetic exchange (shown in green) is manifested by back-migration of A2a into Siberia and the spread of D2a into north-eastern America that post-dated the initial peopling of the New World.

You bet. DNA news seems to be breaking increasingly more frequently as time goes on.

I recently found the news about the discovery through DNA that first peoples and asian peoples are definitely linked via DNA from the skeleton of a 12 to 18 month old boy discovered during construction on private property. The cause of the boy’s death is undetermined at this time.

Artifacts found buried with the boy were those of the earliest known native North Americans, in existence approximately 13,000 years ago – the Clovis people.

The determination of the origin of the young boy and the artifacts was made by comparison with other tools and artifacts from across North America.

The DNA analysis confirmed the boy was related to East Asian and Ancient Siberian people, confirming the oral tradition of many first nations people through the generations.

This discovery provides the first definitive DNA evidence of the long held theory that native people of the Americas descended from those who crossed the once existing land bridge across the Bering Strait, connecting Asia and North America.

It’s amazing to see how as we discover more and more about the minutia of what at first assessment is our enormous world, it actually appears considerably smaller through our blood and DNA connections.

Photo credit: Wikipedia.org


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Transcription: Biography of William Read Shelby; National cyclopaedia of American biography.

Transcription: Biography of William Read Shelby; National cyclopaedia of American biography.

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NOTE: In the biography of William Read Shelby as well as some biographies of earlier Shelbys, the birthplace is erroneously claimed to be Cameron, Wales, when in truth it was Tregaron, Carnarvon, Wales.

Biography of William Read Shelby
Biography of William Read Shelby

____________
1842-1930 (handwritten)

SHELBY, William Read, railroad president was born in Lincoln county, Ky., Dec. 4, 1842, eldest son of John Warren and Mary H. (Knight) Shelby, and a descendant of Evan Shelby, who came from Cameron, Wales, about 1740, and settled near Hagerstown, Md. Evan, son of Evan Shelby, was appointed brigadier-general by the state of Virginia, in 1779, for services rendered in Indian warfare. His son, Isaac Shelby, was the first governor of Kentucky. William Read Shelby acquired his eduation in the preparatory schools and at Centre College, Danville, Ky., his studies being cut short by the civil war, and subsequent occupation of Kentucky by the Federal and Confederate troops. As a member of the “Kentucky Home Guard,” he enrolled and recruited men for the Federal army. In 1863-5 he supplied wood to steamers on the Mississippi river at Isalnd No. 37, being protected by U. S. gunboats. From then until 1869, he was employed by the Adams Express Co., at Louisville, Ky., removing to Pittsburg to become secretary of the Continental Improvement Co. Among its first undertaking was the contract to build the Grand Rapids and Indiana railroad in Michigan and Indiana. Mr. Shelby took charge of a branch office at Grand Rapids, Mich., in 1871, having in the year previous been elected secretary and treasurer of the Grand Rapids & Indiana and the Michigan & Lake Shore railroad companies. On Jan. 1, 1892, he was made first vice-president of the former company, retaining the positions of treasurer and purchasing agent. In June, 1896, the Grand Rapids & Indiana

040

William Read Shelby bio
Biography of William Read Shelby

Railroad Co. was sold out under foreclosure proceedings ; a  new company, with the same name, was organized, and Mr. Shelby elected vice-president, treasurer and purchasing agent. In 1870-73 he held also the office of secretary and treasurer of the Southern Railway Security Co. On Oct. 16, 1899, he was elected president of the Muskegon, Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Co. and president of the Big Rapids & Western Railroad Co., and on Oct. 14, 1899, he was elected president of the Cincinnati, Richmone & Fort Wayne Railroad Co. Mr. Shelby has been extensively interested in the development of farming interests in various sections of the country. He is a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank, later known as the ” Old National Bank, ” of Grand Rapids, and a stockholder in various manufacturing and mercantile concerns ; a member of the board of education, and chairman of its committee on grounds ; in 1888-93 he was a member and part of the time president of the board of public works. Mr. Shelby is a Democrat, and it was on his motion in the sound money conference in Chacago that the “Indianapolis convention” was held in 1896, causing the defeat of the Chicago platform and Bryan. He was chairman of the sound money Democratic organization in Michigan, which conducted so vigorous a campaign against “Free Silver and 16 to 1.” Mr. Shelby was married, June 16, 1869, at Sewickley, Pa., to Mary C., daughter of Gen. George W. Cass, the issue being five sons and two daughters.

The National cyclopaedia of
American biography.  v.1-13.
1898.  1893-1909.

041

The complete original scans of the document clips above can be accessed by clicking the image. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, click on the name link above, or search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link in the upper right corner just below the search box and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.


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Do you have Neanderthal DNA? You may well ask if you are hairy, have tough skin, nails and thick hair.

Do you have Neanderthal DNA? You may well ask if you are hairy, have tough skin, nails and thick hair.

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A while ago, I happened upon an extremely interesting news story on malaysiandigest.com, “Are You A Hairy Diabetic Smoker Who Suffers Stomach Cramps? Blame Your Neanderthal Ancestor“, in which they describe the links between remnants of Neanderthal DNA and several modern health problems.

Do you have Type 2 diabetes, lupus, Crohn’s disease and biliary cirrhosis? These are some of the illnesses and conditions linked to Neanderthal DNA.

The Neanderthal DNA has also been linked to inherited traits such as tough skin, nails, and thick hair.

People of sub-Saharan Africa who did not migrate out and breed with Neanderthals, have very little or no Neanderthal DNA.

As genealogists, we do understood that traditional genealogy research techniques and tools can only take us back as far as a couple of centuries with any certainty.

DNA testing, however, opens up a whole new wealth of information about our ancestries that can be valuable in genealogy, but especially in determining, predicting and managing certain health conditions and traits.

The malaysiandigest.com article explains the connections in greater detail.

photo credit: wallyg via photopin cc


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Transcription: Marriage Record for Oscar Thomas Blythe and Thirza Estelle McKim

Transcription: Marriage Record for Oscar Thomas Blythe and Thirza Estelle McKim

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Marriage for Oscar Blythe and Thirza McKim

This is my transcription of the marriage record for Oscar Thomas Blythe and Thirza Estelle McKim of August 9, 1930 in Butte Fourche, Butte County, South Dakota.

Marriage for Oscar Blythe and Thirza McKim

Original Form Text is black. Text entered by hand is blue.

_____________________________

South Dakota Department of Health

Division of Public Health Statistics                                                                                                                                            County No. 655

RECORD OF MARRIAGE                                                                                                                                                            State No. 139423

Date of Marriage: Aug      Month: 9      Day: Yr.: 1930

Where Solemnized: Butte Fourche

City, County: Butte

GROOM

Full Name: Oscar Thomas Blythe

Usual Residence: Nisland, Butte

(City, County) Butte

BRIDE

Full Name: Thirza Estelle McKim

Usual Residence: Fruitdale

(City, County) Butte

Age

(last birthday)

24

White X

Other

(state)

Date of Birth:

Age

(last birthday)

19

White X

Other

(state)

Date of Birth:

Place of Birth:

Place of Birth:

Number of times previously married:

Last Marital Status

Widowed Annulment

Divorced Never Married X

Number of times previously married:

Last Marital Status

Widowed Annulment

Divorced Never Married X

SDVS-11

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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