Tag: Family Genealogies

We must know the genealogy questions before we can find the answers.

It has become increasingly apparent recently that there are two distinct schools of thought regarding quality and depth in genealogy research. There are the genealogists who believe in working only with well-sourced, proven information – and then there are those of us who started our genealogical quests simply for the pleasure of doing so. Before either camp can begin searching for answers, they much first know the genealogy questions.
must know the genealogy questions

We must know the genealogy questions before we can find the answers.

My own research (see my Blythe Database) started with a curiosity about our history because I grew up in a military family that moved a great deal, and therefore I had very little opportunity to meet with near and distant family members to learn family stories and lore.

I do agree with the article “Take time to produce well-sourced, quality work,” on the Genealogy Today site, in which they respond to another article by Sharon Tate Moody in the Tampa Tribune, entitled “Drive-by genealogists should learn a few rules.” I am one who looks at unsourced information as possible clues to breaking down brick walls and answering questions. Although the information itself may be unsourced and seen as questionable, it can be regarded as a clue. When I receive gedcoms from others, or access information online, I do not discard what could be valuable information simply because there are no sources cited. I note the information, making it part of my own database, intending to return to it, find and cite concrete sources as I can.  Yes, I’ve found mistakes, but I have also found wonderful information allowing me to enlarge upon my family’s own stories.

I believe in the researchers’ responsibility for assessing the quality of the data they receive from others. I never take sources cited by others at face value, always working to find the sources cited and attach concrete proof in the form of images, etc.

Although a great deal of the Blythe Database attached to this site is not sourced, the majority of it is – the result of tireless work and ever increasing expense over 15 years. I have a clearly stated ‘Data Quality’ disclaimer linked in the upper horizontal menu of every page and post, and it states:

“The Blythe Database is my genealogy research in its entirety and is an ongoing process. I spend a minimum of four hours a day researching sources to verify data.

I have been researching genealogy for over fifteen years and you will note that I classify all sources by quality. If it is a poor quality source it is clearly indicated as such…

…It is common for there to be gaps in data and sources and in these cases I will use the individual anyway and either leave sources blank (indicating no sources found) or will clearly indicate source quality. It is up to the person using the data to use the information as classified.

I continually search out sources and documents to verify data and improve on substantiation. I have made some of my best discoveries using unsourced data as a starting point and I would hate for those clues to not be available.

This site is an effort to provide open, free sharing of genealogical information. However, all information is only as good as the sources cited.

I will gladly make corrections to data providing the information provided can be substantiated by the submitter with a source…”

Let’s face it: it’s quickly getting to the point where information gleaned from others will rarely include sources, images, etc. as more and more researchers become protective of their data. I understand as I struggle with my decision to openly share ALL of my information, but ultimately feel I’ve made the right decision, hopefully promoting more open and cooperative sharing of data by others as well.

Genealogy is a passion for me – and others. I enjoy the hunt as much as finding those elusive facts and sources. Maybe it’s my inner detective struggling to get out. Whatever the reason, my database will always have a substantial amount of unsourced data as I continually stumble upon new and hopefully ‘breakthrough’ information. I do, however, spend as much time as I can finding evidence and sources, but find (and I’m sure others do as well) that each new discovery raises numerous new questions, and finding those answers takes a great deal of time and effort.

There will never be an end to my quest…

photo credit: droetker0912 via photopin cc

John “Lackland” King of England.

John “Lackland”  King of England (the bad king) was born December 24, 1167 or 1177, to Henri II, King of England (1133-1189) and Eleonore  d’Aquitaine, Duchess d’Aquitaine (1122-1204). He was also the younger brother and successor to King Richard (the good king).
King John of England

King John painted c.1250-59 by Matthew Paris.

John was made King of Ireland in 1177, Comte de Mortain in 1189, and his reign as King of England began with his crowning in London on May 27, 1199 when he succeeded his brother Richard, who had left on crusade. He was crowned a second time October 8, 1200 at Westminster Abbey, with his second wife.

King John is seen as a villain, this impression having been fostered through the retelling of the legend of Robin Hood, who supposedly took up the cause of the people against King John’s exhorbitant taxes by stealing from the rich and giving to the poor.

In 1173, John was betrothed to Alix de Maurienne (1166-1174), daughter of Humbert III, Comte de Maurienne and his third wife Klementia von Zähringen, and an agreement was reached where John would inherit the county of Maurienne if Humbert had no sons by his wife.

He became betrothed to Isabel (Avise), Countess of Gloucester in 1176 and married her as her first husband on August 29, 1189 and they divorced (annulled on the grounds of consanguinity) before August 30, 1199. Isabel was the daughter of William FitzRobert II, Earl of Gloucester and his wife Avise de Beaumont. She remarried in 1214 to Geoffrey de Mandeville, Earl of Essex, and again in 1217 to Hubert de Burgh, who became Earl of Kent afterward, in 1227.  Isabel died in 1217.

He was then betrothed to Alix de France, daughter of Louis VII, King of France and his second wife Infanta doña Constanza de Castilla in 1193. The betrothal was arranged by King Richard, who himself had been betrothed to Alix de France at one time. Alix returned to France in Aug 1195.

Tomb of Isabelle d'Angoulême

Tomb of Isabelle d’Angoulême.

John’s second marriage was to Isabelle d’Angoulême on August 24, 1200 as her first husband. Isabelle was the daughter of Aymar “Taillefer”, Comte d’Angoulême and his wife Alix de Courtenay. She was crowned Queen Consort on October 8, 1200 at Westminster Abbey. King John and his second wife had five children: Henry  III, King of England (1207-1272); Richard, King of England and the Romans (1209-1272); Joan  of England (1210-1238); Isabella  of England (1214-1241); and Eleanor (1215-1275).

Newark Castle, Lincolnshire, England

Newark Castle in Lincolnshire, England.

After John’s death in 1216 in Newark Castle in Lincolnshire, she married again in 1220 to Hugues XI, de Lusignan, Comte de la Marche.

John also had numerous mistresses, the majority of whom were unknown. Those that were known were the daughter of Hamelin d’Anjou, Earl of Surrey and his wife Isabelle de Warenne; Clementia, the wife of Henry Pinel;  a woman named Hawise (possibly ‘de Tracy’); and a woman named Susanna, her origins unknown.

There were several children born to him of several of his mistresses, including: Joan “Joanna”  of England, Lady of Wales (1190-1237); Oliver  (    -1219); Osbert Gifford (    -1246); Geoffrey FitzRoy (    -1205); Sir John FitzJohn (    -1242); Odo FitzRoy (    -1242); Henry FitzRoy; Richard  Constable of Wallingford Castle; Matilda  Abbess of Barking; Isabella  la Blanche; Richard FitzRoy (    -1245).

Tomb of King John

Tomb of King John of England.

John died October 18 or 19, 1216 at Newark Castle in Lincolnshire and was buried at Worcester Cathedral, Worcestershire.

Effigy of King John.

Tomb effigy of John “Lackland”, King of England.

Up until 1944 King John was considered to be a horrid man and even worse king. In 1944, it was demonstrated that the main source for information about the reign of John was at best unreliable. These new findings caused a change in perception of King John, possibly resulting in a further skewed view of John on the positive side.

Those attempting to find a more accurate view of John are doing so through examination of the administrative records of the time. Even with these records, however, there is some doubt expressed about whether the records are to be taken at face value or whether John or his staff were able to skillfully produce records portraying him in a more positive light.

John’s energetic, fastidious nature belied his appearance, paunchy, 5′ 5″ tall with “erect head, staring eyes, flaring nostrils and thick lips set in a cruel pout.” It was said that “he prowled around his kingdom.” He was very clean, routinely taking numerous baths, enjoyed food and drink, gambled, and loved women.

Contradictory to the legend we have become accustomed to, he assisted the poor by providing the proceeds from the forest law and was generous to his servants.

His legend may in fact have been fueled by knowledge of his highly suspicious nature and enjoyment of intrigues and secrets. He also acted against his father, as he did against Richard while the latter was held captive in 1193.

Although John would not be considered a ‘good’ man, in different circumstances he could have been a great king.

King John was 24th great grandfather to my children.

Sources:

  1. Kings and Queens of England – The Normans, The Royal Family of England online [http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page17.asp].
  2. Kings and Queens of England – The Angevins, The Royal Family online [http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page60.asp].
  3. Early Scottish Monarchs, The Royal Family online [http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page69.asp].
  4. Gary Boyd Roberts, The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants, (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1983).
  5. Funk & Wagnalls Inc., Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia (1983).
  6. David Faris, The Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth Century Colonists (English Ancestry Series, Vol. I, Second Edition; New England Historic Genealogy Society, 1999).
  7. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdon, Extant, Extinct or Dormant (G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I.).
  8. Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy (Alison Weir, Britain’s Royal Family: A Complete Genealogy; Pimlico; 2Rev Ed edition (13 Jun 2002); London, U.K.: The Bodley Head, 1999.
  9. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Th.D., The Magna Carta Sureties, 1215, (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc.), 5th Ed., c1999.
  10. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came To America Before 1700, 8th Edition (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., 2004).
  11. Ernst-Friedrich Kraentzler, Ancestry of Richard Plantagenet and Cecily de Neville (Selp-published, 1978).
  12. Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, Brian Tompsett, Dept. of Computer Science, Hull University online [http://www.hull.ac.uk/php/cssbct/genealogy/royal/].
  13. Charles Mosley, Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 106th Edition (1999).
  14. George Smith, Dictionary of National Biography, Vols. 1-21 (: Oxford Press, 1885-1990).
  15. John Fines, Who’s Who in the Middle Ages (New York: Barnes and Noble Books, 1995).
  16. Call, Michel, Royal Ancestors of Some American Families (Salt Lake City, 1989, 1991).
  17. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy online [http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#LoretteMWilliamMarmiondied1275].
  18. Wikipedia.org [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_lackland]

 

Transcription: Obituary for Lena C. Blythe (Cade).

This is my transcription of the obituary for Lena C. Blythe (Cade).

 

Obituary of Lena C. Blythe (Cade)

Obituary of Lena C. Blythe

Obituary:

Lena Blythe

Mrs. Lena C. Blythe, 88, died Thursday in her home at 598 West County Road 38 after a lengthy illness.

Arrangements are pending at the Goodrich Mortuary.

Mrs. Blythe was born Feb. 15, 1888, in Gusse, Ind. She was married to Wesley E. Blythe on Jan. 25, 1917, in Covington, Ind. He survives.

They moved to Fort Collins in 1932 from Colorado Springs. She was a member of the First United Methodist Church and a charter member of Chapter Co of PEO here. She was a former member of Collins Chapter N. 26 of OES and Fort Collins Rebekah Lodge.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Transcription: Mme Anne-Marie Bourgeois (1912-2001).

Anne-Marie Bourgeois (1912-2001) Obituary

Obituary for Anne-Marie Bourgeois (1912-2001).

Below is my transcription of the newspaper notice of the death of Anne-Marie Bourgeois.

BOURGEOIS

MME ANNE-MARIE

Au Foyer de Saint-Célestin, le 30 juin 2001, es décédée à l’âge de 88 ans, Mme Anne-Marie Bourgeois, épouse en premières noces de feu Lucien Bourgeois et en secondes noces de feu Welly Luazière, autrefois de Sainte-Monique. La famille accueillera parents et ami(e)s au:

Centre funéraire
J.N. Rousseau et frère ltée
1370, boul. Louis-Fréchette
Nicolet.

Heures d’accueil : dimanche de 19h à 22h e lundi, jour des funérailles, à partir de 11h.

Les funérailles auront lieu
le lundi 2 juillet, à 14h
en l’église de Sainte-Monique.
L’inhumation aura lieu
au cimetière de Sainte-Monique.

Elle laisse dans le deuil : ses enfants : Maurice (Suzanne Tellier) de Saint-Guillaume, Lina (Ghislain Lévesque) de Saint-Jérôme, Gisèle (Gilles Coallier) de Laval, Lione (Carole Huot) de Saint-David, Yvon (Nicole Turmel) de Nicolet, Albert (Ginette Lemay) de Nicolet et Solange (Normand Blain) de Saint-Jérôme; sa belle-soeur : Madeleine Bourgeois (feu Philibert Bourgeois) de Cap-de-la-Madeleine; ses petits-enfants arrière-petits-enfants, ainsi que plusieur neveux, nièces, cousins, cousines et ami(e)s. Pour renseignements : (819) 293-4511.
Condoléances par télécopieur :
(819) 293-8212.
Membre de la Corporation des thanatologues de Québec.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

Transcription: ‘In Memoriam’ for Casildée Lavallée and Antoine Labelle.

Antoine Labelle & Casildee Lavallee

In Memoriam for Casildee Lavallee and Antoine Labelle.

The following is my transcription of the ‘In Memoriam’ card for Casildée Lavallée and Antoine Labelle.

A la douce mémoire de

 

CASILDÉE LAVALLÉE

épouse de feu

 

ANTOINE LABELLE

décédée à Ottawa
le 15 juin, 1964
à l’âge de 89 ans

et de

ANTOINE LABELLE
décédée à Sault Ste-Marie
le 18 mars 1944
à l’âge de 72 ans.

_____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


Transcriptions: Obituaries for Albertine Audet-Turmel.

Obituary for Albertine Audet

Obituaries for Albertine (Audet) Turmel.

Following are my transcriptions for the obituaries of Albertine Audet-Turmel in their original French.

Original French Texts

Albertine Audet-Turmel

Albertine Audet-Turmel

Obituary #1

TURMEL
Albertine (née Audet).

Au Foyer Nazareth, le 20 juin 1992, à l’âge de 93 ans et 8 mois, est décédée dame Albertine Audet, épouse de feu monsieur Michel Turmel. Elle demeurait à Québec. La famille recevra les condoléances au funérarium de la

Cooperative funéraire
de l’Anse
115, 80e Rue est
Charlesbourg

dimanche de 14h à 17h et de 19h à 22h. Le service réligieux sera célébré le lundi 22 juin, à 15h, en l’église Sts-Anges de Beauce, ou la famille recevra les condoléances une heure avant le service, et ce la au cimetiè paroissial.

Elle laisse dans le deuil ses enfants. Yvette (feu Aurèle Perreault), Laurette (Gérard Boily), Madeleine (Maurice Laroche), Thérèse (Bernard Drouin), Aline (Philippe-A. Drouin), Edith (Claude Michaud), Gérard (Fleurette Mathurin), Adrienne, Yvon (Margarete Griewel), sa soeur. Soeur Edith Audet (Dominicaine de la Trinité), ses belles-soeurs: Mme Onésime Audet, Mme Marie-Anna Turmel, ainsi que plusieurs petits-enfants, arrière-petits-enfants, neveux, nièces et ami(e)s. Veuillez compenser l’envoi de fleurs par un don à la Fondation de l’Auberivière, 401, rue St-Paul, Québec (Québec), G1K 7G7. Pour renseignements: 525-6044.

————————

Obituary #2

TURMEL

Albertine (Audet). – Les familles Turmel et Audet remercient bien sincrèrement tous les parents et amis qui ont témoigné des marques de sympathie lors du décés de Mme Albertine Turmel, survenu le 20 juin 1991, soit par offrandes de messes, envois de fleurs, affiliations de prieres, dons à la maison l’Auberivière, dons à l’église, cartes de sympathie, visite ou assistance aux funérailles. Un merci trés special au Foyer Nazareth ou elle à vécu et a tous ceux qui l’ont côtoyé pendant ses dix-sept dernières années. À tous, un cordial merci.

_____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.