Tag: Germany

Stehle Ancestry

Stehle Ancestry

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In a previous post, Relationship Chart of Mark Blythe to Barack Obama, I posted the Stehle ancestry chart showing the connection between Barack Obama and my husband, through their common ancestor, Ulrich Stehle.
Stehle Ancestry: First Page of Gabriel Steely's Court Document
Stehle Ancestry: First Page of Gabriel Steely’s Court Document

Ulrich Stehle Sr. was my children’s eighth great-grandfather. He was born in Europe (presumably in Holland or Germany) in about 1699, married Anna (parents unknown) on September 21, 1732 at about the age of 33. He, Anna, and their three children emigrated from Rotterdam on the ship Pink Plaisance to Philadelphia, USA.

His children were all born prior to the family’s emigration to the USA and were Hans Peter Stehle (Steely), born about 1716; Anna Barbra Stehle (Steely), also born about 1716; and Ulrich Stehle (Steely) Jr., born about 1720 and dying in 1773.

Stehle Ancestry: Second Page of Gabriel Steely's Court Document
Stehle Ancestry: Second Page of Gabriel Steely’s Court Document

Ulrich Steely (Stehle) Jr., seventh great-grandfather to Erin and Stuart, also married an Anna, who was born about 1705 and died about 1793. Ulrich Jr. was born in Europe (some sources say in Mifflin County, Pennsylvania, but according to the documented timeline, this is highly doubtful). He died in abt 1773 in Derry Township, Mifflin County, Pennsylvania, USA.

Ulrich Jr.’s children were Sarah Steely (1755-1829), Jacob Steely (1756-1829), Christiana Steely (born 1759), Gabriel Steely (1763-1830), Lazarus Steely (1764-1808), Henry Steely (born 1765), and Mary Steely (1766-1835).

Sarah Steely, daughter of Ulrich Steely, Jr. died and was buried in 1829. Her headstone reads, “Sarah, wife of William Frampton, died July 6, 1829, aged seventy-four years.”

Gabriel Steely son of Ulrich Steely Jr., was sixth great-grandfather to my children and was born August 19, 1763 in Pennsylvania, USA. He is said to have died May 2, 1830 at about 66 years of age in Kingston, Ohio and was buried May 4, 1830 in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Kingston, Ross County, Ohio, USA.

One point of interest about Gabriel Steely is the fact that there are records regarding court proceedings in a suit he brought against Joshua Gay and Joshua Gay, Jr. over an unpaid debt (click on thumbnails below to see full documents).

Gabriel married Mary Meek (1767-1850), daughter of Capt. George Meek and Rachel Herron, before 1785. They had ten children: John (1785-1842), Sarah (1793-1860), Meek (1797-1865), George Ray (born about 1800), Reuben (Ruban) (born about 1802), Elizabeth (1811-1880), as well as David, William Wallace, Isabell and Sally, the latter four’s birth dates being unknown. Some records indicate that Mary’s surname at the time of her marriage was Stuart.  Could she have been previously married, or was there a second wife at sometime named Mary Stuart?

According to “Brief History of Pickaway County, Ohio”, Gabriel was among the earliest settlers, settling in Pickaway Township in 1807.

 Sources:

  1. Obama Family Tree, Chicago Sun Times; September 9, 2007.
  2. 1790 Census, Mifflin County, Pennsylvania ; digital images, (http://dgmweb.net/genealogy/FGS/S/SteelyUlrich-Anna_.shtml.
  3. US Census, “Mifflin County, Pennsylvania,” http://dgmweb.net/genealogy/FGS/S/SteelyUlrich-Anna_.shtml.
  4. “Names of Foreigners Who Took the Oath of Allegiance to the Province and State of Pennsylvania, 1727-1775, with the Foreign Arrivals, 1786-1808.,” database, http://dgmweb.net/genealogy/FGS/S/StehleUlrich-Anna_.shtml.
  5. 1790 US Census; Steely, Gabriel;. Roll No. M637_9; Pg 154; Image 0318.
  6. Brief History of Pickaway Township, Pickaway County, Ohio.
  7. History of Pickaway County; www.heritagepursuit.com/Pickaway/PickawayChapXIII.htm.
  8. 1800 US Census; Steely, Gabriel; Roll No. M32_37; Pg 496; Image 19.
  9. Court Judgment in Suit of Gabriel Steely vs. Joshua Gay and John Gay; May 17, 1830 – May 27, 1831.
  10. John Stroup and Mary Steely, database; http://dgmweb.net/genealogy/FGS/Stro/StroupJohn-MarySteely.shtml.

For more facts and dates about the above mentioned individuals, check out our family’s extensive genealogy database.


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Genealogy Database

Genealogy Database

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Athelwulf, King of Wessex
Athelwulf, King of Wessex

Our Blythe Genealogy Database

After extensive work, my genealogy database is now updated and links can be found in the upper menu or in the left sidebar. There are thousands of surnames and the extensive lineages include Welsh Quaker immigrants to the USA, French Canadian, Acadian, American pioneers, Canadian pioneers, French, British, Welsh, German, Scandinavian and medieval and royal genealogies.

The database includes extensive facts, sources and some images.


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WWII art thefts documented in recently recovered diary of Alfred Rosenberg.

WWII art thefts documented in recently recovered diary of Alfred Rosenberg.

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WWII art thefts
The nazi military and culture resulted in a great many WWII art thefts.

A lingering mystery from the second world war is where are the artworks missing as a result of the WWII art thefts?

One of my earliest memories is from when I was about five years old, shuffling through a small stack of black and white postcards my parents had collected of Hitler’s compound and bunker, and some of the concentration camps.

I was fascinated because my parents had told me what I could understand about the second world war, most likely fostering my ongoing fascination with war, history and genealogy.

I was born in July of 1959, just fourteen years after the end of WWII, and the war was still very fresh in everyone’s mind – including my parents’. Mom had travelled to Germany in 1958 to marry my Dad, who was posted with the Canadian military, and live with him in a tiny apartment in Baden Soellingen – where I was born just a year later. My Dad was quite an amateur photographer and they spent most of their free time travelling around Europe, including visiting the most memorable and disturbing landmarks of Hitler’s regime up to and including the second world war.

The stories my Mom and Dad told of their landlords and others they got to know while living on the German economy painted a picture of lovely, warm, welcoming people, as described in a post on my personal blog, Feathering the Empty Nest, “Did my birth break a curse?” There was no way I could reconcile these stories with the ones I was hearing about the Hitler regime (the military and politicians) of the time. How could there be such a dichotomy?

Among the numerous unspeakable acts against the Jews was the systematic theft of valuables including cash, jewelry, and works of art. Alfred Rosenberg managed the thefts and documented the entire endeavor in his diary.

This morning I read an article in Prologue: Pieces of History on the National Archives site called “Nazi Art Looter’s Diary, Long Missing, Found and Online for the First Time” about the availability online of this German language diary, which was recovered recently and moved to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

I only hope that Mark’s and my interest in the events of WWII has made enough of an impact on our kids that they will do their part to ensure the tragic consequences of the madness of one man and his regime will never be forgotten in their generation and that of their children to come.

Source:

Hilary, “Nazi Art Looter’s Diary, Long Missing, Found and Online for the First Time,” National Archives, http://blogs.archives.gov/prologue/.

Photo credit:

photo credit: x-ray delta one via photopin cc


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Sometimes it pays to look to the present for information about the past.

Sometimes it pays to look to the present for information about the past.

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It’s amazing what information about the past including people and events can be found by searching through online newspapers, magazines, etc. – even if they are in a foreign language.

I’m routinely having to read, translate and understand documents written in their original language such as French, German, Swedish, and so on. My go to method for getting started is accessing ‘Google Translate’. To have a web page translated, just type the complete original language url in the Google search box, press ‘search’, find what you’re looking for in the search results list and click on ‘Translate this page’.

El Economista TranslatedOne such site I’ve recently accessed was ‘El Economista’ a Mexican, Spanish language online newspaper. On this particular day, the headlines were dominated by news of Javier Duarte de Ochoa and his handling of the crisis created by the recent tropical storm. Javier Duarte is the Governor of Veracruz, Mexico.

Above is a clip from the Google translated site mentioned and as you can see the text in the first paragraph is quite understandable, although not quite grammatically correct. I would always suggest finding independent confirmation elsewhere to confirm your understanding, if possible.

I routinely search through newspapers in the areas in which I’m researching and I have stumbled upon some real ‘gems’ related to my research, including a rooming house arson fire a recent ancestor escaped from, another ancestor whose name was published as a deserter in WWI, and most recently news of a tragic train crash in a community from which my own father’s French Canadian family originates. It was particularly heartbreaking to read the names of the deceased in the online French language news sites, and to recognize many of them as distant relatives.

Using Google translate  is also a useful tool if transcribing documents from their original language. Go to the main Google translate page, type the text in question in the left box, making sure it’s labeled with the correct language and click ‘Translate’. The English translation will appear to the right if English is the selected language. Text can be translated to and from numerous languages.

photo credit: Augie Schwer via photopin cc


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Genealogy Mystery: Who were Christian W. Keefer’s parents?

Genealogy Mystery: Who were Christian W. Keefer’s parents?

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Christian W. Keefer (Chester) is an important figure in one of the main branches of my husband’s and children’s ascendancy. He married Mary Ann Jacques and they eventually settled and raised a family in Dodge County, Wisconsin.

After numerous years of research, however, I’m still left scratching my head at the mystery of the identity of Christian W. Keefer’s parents.

As can be seen in the list of sources I’ve found and logged for Christian (below), you would think that at least one of them would provide some concrete information about his parentage and place of birth, but that turns out to not be the case.

Here’s what I know for sure:

Christian W. Keefer was born October 1, 1811 in Pennsylvania and his family originated from France.

Christian W. Keefer's parents.
Sources for Christian W. Keefer.

That’s it.

I originally took a mention of Philadelphia as Christian’s birthplace in a biography of his son Charles with a grain of salt. I do believe that people did and do tend to describe where they’ve come from by using the nearest, largest center that would be recognized outside the area. For example, although we live in Chilliwack, BC, Canada, we frequently say we’re located near Vancouver to those who are not from the area. Considering this possibility, I would not rule out any birth location in Pennsylvania.

I have considered the possibility that our Christian may be one of the Christians mentioned of the Keefer / Kiefer family in the “Biographical Annals of Franklin County”. I was able to systematically eliminate every Christian mentioned because they could not have been born on or near the birth date of our Christian (Chester), or they married into different families, etc.

Another  possibility I’ve been checking is that his father (and possibly mother as well), may have immigrated to the United States from Germany (or Switzerland), but I’ve been unable to find immigration or naturalization records that show such a connection.

However, the same biography previously mentioned states that he was of French origin.

Through all of my research over the years, every Keefer family is of Germanic origin – except one.

The only family that shows of French origin in the time period is (lo and behold!) actually living in Philadelphia and is that of Anthony and Sarah (Shillingford) Keefer.

At the time, his family was very young with only mention of one brother born in 1810 – Thomas. The earlier births of the children of Anthony and his wife Sarah are about one year apart, leaving a gap just where Christian’s would be.

Keefer, Anthony; family pedigree chart
Family pedigree chart of Anthony Keefer, showing Christian, as I’ve entered it in my database (see http://blythegenealogy.com).

I would love to find proof beyond that of coincidence and speculation of Christian W. Keefer’s parentage. I’d like nothing better than to continue further back in time and expand on this huge Keefer family

If you or anyone you know has any documentation, images, etc. of this Christian Keefer showing his parents and brothers and sisters (or parts thereof), I would dearly love to see them, or better yet, get copies.

Sources:

  1. Biographical Sketches of Old Settlers and Prominent People of Wisconsin: Vol. I (Waterloo, Wis., Huffman & Hyer, 1899); pdf file.
  2. State of Ohio, “Ohio, County Marriages, 1790-1950,” marriage, Family Search (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZ82-6QV: accessed
  3. Death certificate; Charles Keefer;  Digital Folder No.: 4008297; Image No.: 1576; Film Number: 1674527; Certificate No.: cn 23384. (7 June 1933), Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947, State of Illinois; https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQCW-SP5.
  4. FamilySearch.org, “Wisconsin Deaths and Burials, 1835-1968,” database, FamilySearch.org, FamilySearch.org (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XL3P-121: accessed ).
  5. Rootsweb, “Wisconsin Death Records,” database, Rootsweb, Rootsweb (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~keffer/deaths/Wisconsin.htm: accessed ).
  6. Keefer, Christian W., Beaver Dam Argus, Beaver Dam, Dodge County, Wisconsin, , Obituary.
  7. Obituary of Mary Ann (Jaques) Keefer.
  8. 1880 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, Beaver Dam, Dodge, Wisconsin, enumeration district (ED) Enumeration District: 004, Page: 47A, Year: 1880; Census Place: Beaver Dam, Dodge, Wisconsin; Roll: 1422; Family History Film: 1255422, Keefer Christian W.; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com : Internet 13 July 2013).
  9. 1870 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, year: 1870; census place: elba, dodge, wisconsin; roll: m593_1710; page: 165a; image: 338; family history library film: 553209, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, enumeration district (ED) Roll: M593_1710; Image: 337; Family History Library Film: 553209, Page: 164B, Roll: M593_1710; Image: 337; Family History Library Film: 553209, Keefer Christian W; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  10. 1860 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, roll: m653_1405; page: 303; image: 308, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, Page: 303, Roll: M653_1405; Image: 308; Family History Library Film: 805405, Keefer Christian W.; dgs no.: 4298900; image no.: 0038; nara no.: m653, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  11. 1850 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, roll: m432_996;  image: 209, , Page: 104A, Roll: M432_996; Page: 104A; Image: 209, Keefer Christian W.; digital image, Family Search ((http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  12. 1840 US Federal Census, Painesville, Lake, Ohio; digital image, Ancestry.ca, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : accessed ).
  13. 1830 US Federal Census, Antrim, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, age: 395; nara series: m19; roll number: 151; family history film: 0020625; digitalk image, Ancestry.com (http://blythegenealogy.com  : accessed ).

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 2 Dec 2017.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 2 Dec 2017.

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The following are the more recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 2 Dec 2017.

 

FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 2 Dec 2017.

 

Argentina

Brazil

Denmark

Italy

Peru

Sweden

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com updates and additions to 2 Dec 2017.

 

Australia

Brazil

Canada

Germany

Italy

Mexico

Norway

Sweden

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide


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In Remembrance.

In Remembrance.

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Being from a dedicated military family, this is a somber time of year for us, in remembrance of those in our families who have served, or worse yet, who we lost during military service.

 

The relationships to our children, Erin and Stuart, are in italics following the excerpt.


Remembering those we lost in battle:

 

Coon, David 1843

  • Elisha Cadwallader (1840-1862) – Civil War (4th cousin, 7x removed)
  • Private Joseph Turmaine (1889-1916) – First World War(great granduncle)
    • The 27th Battalion, Winnipeg Regiment left at 2 pm, September 14, 1916 for brigade headquarters, arriving at 5 pm. They then left brigade headquarters at 9 pm and proceeded to the front line to take up position in assembly trenches, which was delayed due to congestion of the trenches…

 

Pte Joseph Philias Albert Emery


Veterans in our family who later passed away:

 

 

Cadwalader, General John Cadwalader (Revolutionary War)

  • General John Cadwalader (1742-1785) – Revolutionary War (3rd cousin, 11x removed)
  • Nathan “Hoppity-Kickity” Porter (1742-1815) – French and Indian War (7th great grandfather)

 

Portrait of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky.

  • Governor Isaac Shelby (1750-1826) – Revolutionary War, War of 1812 (1st cousin, 8x removed)
    • With a sword presented to him by Henry Clay as voted by the legislature of North Carolina for his gallantry at King’s Mountain 32 years before, Shelby assembled and personally led 4,000 Kentucky volunteers to join General Harrison in the Northwest for the invasion of Canada
  • Private John Jaquish (1753-1845) – War of 1812 (6th great grandfather)
  • Quartermaster Joseph Shelby (1787-1846) – Indian Wars (5th great grandfather)
  • James Shreve (rank unknown) (1754-1839) – War of 1812 (6th great grandfather)

 

Cadwalader, Gen. Thomas.jpg

  • General Thomas Cadwalader (1779-1841) – War of 1812. (3rd cousin 10x removed)

 

Jaques, William H

  • William Henry Jaques (1820-1913) – Civil War (4th great granduncle)
  • Laurent Jude Melanson (1820-1914) – Fenian Raids (3rd great grandfather)
  • Alfred E. Melanson (c. 1847-?) – Fenian Raids (2nd great granduncle)
  • Private Robinson Coke “Boby” Jones (1822-1897) – Mexican War (4th great grandfather)
  • Private William Seth Cadwallader (1825-    ) – Civil War (4th cousin, 7x removed)
  • John Mumby Blythe (1831-    ) – Civil War (3rd great granduncle)
  • Private Francis Elmer Keefer (1839-1863) – Civil War (3rd great granduncle)
  • Charles George Blythe (1840-1914) – Civil War(3rd great grandfather)
    • …his descendants remained in the Louth and Somercotes areas of Lincolnshire until the emigration of his great grandson Thomas Blyth and Thomas’  sons Charles George (3rd great grandfather to Erin and Stuart), John Mumby and Robert to America…

 

Keefer, Lenard Scott 2 (maybe) proof needed

  • Leonard Scott Keefer (1841-1916) – Civil War (3rd great granduncle)

 

Wedding of Elam Dennis Matthews St.

  • William Dennis Matthews (1875-1940) – Spanish American War(2nd great grandfather)
    • Bip, Fred, White and I went down to the armory this evening The Governor’s (Tanner) order, for all Illinois regiments to move to Springfield was read and great applause followed. Came home about 9 o’clock and packed up my belongings…
  • Clayton William Blythe (1883-1943) – First World War (2nd great grandfather)
    • The following men, registered with Selective Service Local Board No. 1, are classified as suspected delinquents. Any person whose name appears upon the list should report immediately to this board, for correction of records.
  • Wesley Elmer Blythe (1890-1977) – First World War (2nd great granduncle)
  • Hervé “Hervey” Turmel (1894-    ) – First World War (4th cousin, 3x removed)

 

Luther Gummeson

  • Private Luther Gummeson (1895-1934) – First World War (great granduncle)
    • Before enlisting for military service on December 10, 1917, he was a Lutheran and a farmer in Vancouver, BC. Rumour had it that his early death was attributed to being gassed during WWI. Before his death, Luther was living in the Peace River area…
  • Joseph Antonio Tumel (1896-    ) – First World War (2nd cousin, 4x removed)
  • Alfred Turmel (1896-    ) – First World War (2nd cousin, 4x removed)
  • Chester C. Blythe (1908-1995) – General Service (great grandfather)
  • Doyle Clement Cadwallader (1925-1944) (6th cousin, 5x removed)
    • “In the midst of life we are in death.
      In the moment that ye think not,
      In the twinkling of an eye,
      The Angel of Death may appear.”
    • The foregoing quotation seems to me very fitting for Doyle Clement Cadwallader, whose death was caused by an automobile accident while he was returning home on September 30, 1944…

 

Dad, c. 1955.


Veterans in our family who are still living:

 

Marsh-at-Night-at-Cabin-Small.jpg

 

Mark and I with my Mom and Dad at our wedding.

 

For more facts and dates about the above mentioned individuals, check out our family’s extensive genealogy database linked in the menu bar above.


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Concerned citizens use genealogy to connect Jewish heirs with compensation for family property lost or destroyed in WWII..

Concerned citizens use genealogy to connect Jewish heirs with compensation for family property lost or destroyed in WWII..

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holocaust

I love genealogy.

I get so much pleasure and satisfaction from the small breakthroughs that are part of the pursuit of genealogy. This, however, is surely nothing compared to the self-worth and satisfaction felt by those who use their knowledge and experience in genealogy to track down the heirs to compensation for the lost or destroyed property and belongings of their ancestors at the hands of the Nazis.

Can you just imagine how it must have felt to be the one to have sent Cati Holland the email notifying her that she was entitled to compensation from Germany for the store her grandparents had owned.

I learned of her story from this article on the NBC40.net website, and it has inspired me.

Genealogy is such a personal pursuit and it was so wonderful to hear of the hobby possibly having a much broader implication, helping people who may very well have not known they were due anything at all.

If I were approached to help with such a pursuit, I would not hesitate to volunteer as much time (and as much money as I could afford) as is necessary.

These are the stories I like to hear.

photo credit: warein.holgado via photopin cc


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What we don’t hear about the battle of Vimy Ridge.

What we don’t hear about the battle of Vimy Ridge.

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In honor of today’s ceremonies for the 100th anniversary of the battle at Vimy Ridge, I am reposting several articles about my own ancestors who died in WWI. 

In my father’s French Canadian, ‘Turmaine’ branch of the family, we have two known soldiers who died in the first world war. The first was my grand uncle, Pte. Joseph Philias Albert Emery, who died at Vimy Ridge, and the second was another grand uncle, Pte. Joseph Turmaine, who died at Courcelette.

The Battle of Vimy Ridge was fought largely by Canadian troops consisting of all four divisions of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) from April 9 to 12, 1917, with the objective of gaining control of the German held high ground, ensuring that the southern flank of the forces could advance without the threat of German fire.

What we don’t hear about the battle of Vimy Ridge is how so many of our own troops lost their lives due to poor leadership in the days prior to the battle.

The Battle of Vimy Ridge was the catalyst for a newly born nationalistic pride for Canadians and their achievements as part of the British forces.

Gas Attacks in March 1917 at Vimy Ridge
Gas Attacks in March 1917 at the battle of Vimy Ridge.

What we don’t hear much about, however, is the disastrous actions taken previously in preparation for the battle.

As described in my previous post ‘War Stories‘, my own great granduncle (brother to my grandmother) was Pte. Joseph Phillias Albert Emery, a soldier with the 73rd Battalion Canadian Infantry, Black Watch. He took part in operations in preparation for the advance on Vimy Ridge and was reported missing on March 1, 1917.

The majority of the losses during this operation were the result of mismanagement by the senior officers. As a result of poor planning, the gas canisters were deployed despite the winds blowing back onto the Canadians, causing mass casualties from the gas.

Below are the six pages of the war diary for the 73rd Battalion on the day my ancestor went missing. In another previous post, I’ve published full transcriptions of all the pages.

Battle of Vimy Ridge War Diary for the 73rd Battalion.

Battle of Vimy Ridge War Diary for the 73rd Battalion.

Battle of Vimy Ridge War Diary for the 73rd Battalion.

Battle of Vimy Ridge War Diary for the 73rd Battalion.

Battle of Vimy Ridge War Diary for the 73rd Battalion.

Battle of Vimy Ridge War Diary for the 73rd Battalion.

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Related articles on this site about Vimy Ridge:

Transcription: War Diary of the 73rd Canadian Infantry Battalion for the Vimy Ridge Disaster of March 1-3, 1917.

WWI War Stories: Turmaine and Emery.

Transcription: Form of Will for Joseph Philias Albert Emery

Dad is the link to our French Canadian and military heritage.

We must fight for our veterans as they fought for us.

In Remembrance.


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Transcription: War Diary of the 73rd Canadian Infantry Battalion for the Vimy Ridge Disaster of March 1-3, 1917.

Transcription: War Diary of the 73rd Canadian Infantry Battalion for the Vimy Ridge Disaster of March 1-3, 1917.

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In honor of today’s ceremonies in honor of the 100th anniversary of the battle at Vimy Ridge, I am reposting several articles about my own ancestors who died in WWI. 

 

In my father’s French Canadian, ‘Turmaine’ branch of the family, we have two known soldiers who died in the first world war. The first was my grand uncle, Pte. Joseph Philias Albert Emery who died at Vimy Ridge, and the second was another grand uncle, Pte. Joseph Turmaine, who died at Courcelette.

 

The following is my full transcription of photocopies of the handwritten pages of the war diary of the 73rd Canadian Infantry Battalion for the Vimy Ridge Disaster of March 1-3, 1917, during which my great uncle Joseph Philias Albert Emery went missing in action.

 

1917    

 

Vol. VIII, Page I

  • March 1st
73rd Battalion War Diary
73rd Battalion War Diary – page 1.

Battalion in the lines on its regular frontage.
At 12.05 AM code message was received from the 12th Canadian Infantry Brigade to the effect that the Gas Attack and consequent Infantry Attack, which had been postponed for several days, would take place that morning. This was immediately communicated to the Companies also in code, and preparation for the assembly commenced. At 2.00 am Battalion Headquarters moved to Advanced Battalion Headquarters off UHLAN C.T. where comunication was established with Advanced Brigade Headquarters, and with both points of assembly. “B” and “D” Companies moved up from ARRAS ALLEY and asembled in dugouts in LIME STREET, dugouts on TUNNELLERS RIDGE, and in COBURG NO I TUNNEL, Major Brown 2nd in Command, being in charge of these two Companies which occupied the left half of the Battalion frontage. “A” and “C” Companies, forming the right half of the attack, moved out of the front line to the right where they assembled in BLUE BULL TUNNEL, Major H [P] Stanley being in charge of these two Companies for assembly. The dispositions for the attack were as follows :-
Right Half 1st Wave “A” Coy under Captain B. Simpson and Lieut D. H. Farnori.
Left Half 1st Wave “B” Coy under Captain H H Patch, and Lieuts G.H.H. Eadie and P.G. Hawkins.

VOL VIII, Page II

  • March 1st
73rd Battalion War Diary
73rd Battalion War Diary – page 2.

 

2nd Wave, “C” Coy under Lieut G. S. McLennan, Major Munroe and Lieut J. Norsworthy.

No. 1 Patrol, 1 Platoon of “D” Coy under Lieut. Griffiths.
No. 2 Patrol, 1 Platoon of “D” Coy under Lieut. Lester.
No. 3 Patrol, 1 Platoon of “B” Coy under Lieut Hutchinson.

At 2.55 a.m. messages were received from all Companies that they were in position.
At 3 am the first gas cloud, known as the “White Star Gas” was released. Within a few minutes after the release of the gas very heavy rifles and machine gun fires opened upo from the German front and support lines, and the sky was lit upo by hundreds of flares sent up by the Boche; this fire and the sending up of the flares continued for 36 minutes, showing that the gas was not effective. At about 3.06 am the Germans opened heavy Artillery fire across our whole front, which continued tunil 4.00 am at which time it died down and shortly afterwards the situation became almost normal. Soon after 4 o’clock the direction of the wind commenced to change, and by 5 am, which was the time for liberation of the 2nd Gas Wave, it was coming from almost due [North], so that it was decided

VOL VIII, Page III

  • March 1st
73rd Battalion War Diary
73rd Battalion War Diary – page 3.

 

that the gas could not be let off. The Infantry Attack was to commence at 5.40 AM. About 5.20 a message was received from Advanced Brigade Headquarters to the effect that there remained considerable gas in our front line trench for a distance extending 300 yard north of [C]RANBY C.T. This interfered with the assembly of our right attacking parties and instructions were immediately sent to Major Stanley to have “A” and “C” Companies assemble in front and behind the front line trench, and to proceed overland instead of assembling in the trench; this complicated the assembly of these two Companies very much, but the situation was admirably handled by Major Stanley. At 5.32 a.m. while the assembly across our whole front was in progress, heavy artillery fire was opened on our front and support lines and on ZOUAVE VALLEY by the Germans. It transpired that the Brigade on our right had commenced to get out over the parapet and form a line in front of our wire at 5.30 instead of waiting for our barrage which was to commence at 5.40 am; this was noticed by the Germans, who immediately sent up their “S.O.S.” with the foregoing result. This meant that the last 5 minutes of the assembly of our parties had to be completed under fire, and a number of casualties occurred before our men got out of our own trenches. On the righ casualties began to come into BLUE BULL

VOL VIII, Page IV

  • March 1st
73rd Battalion War Diary
73rd Battalion War Diary – page 4.

 

TUNNEL before much more than half of our attacking parties were out of the Tunnels. A few men were affected by gas on this front. Promptly at 5.40 AM our barrage opened up, and our attacking parties got over the parapet and went forward. On our extreme left our barrage was short, and some casualties were caused to our men by our own fire particularly among the party going out by way of Sap B6. A full account of the action of all attacking paties and the results obtained is attached hereto. Casualties soon began to come back to our lines, about 6.20 Lieut. Eadie reached Advanced Battalion Headquarters and about 6.50 Captain Patch also returned, both wounded slightly. Wounded came in steadily but it was a considerable time before it was possible to even approximately check up casualties. By 8 a.m. the situation had quieted down, except that several of our wounded accompanied by Lieut Hutchison were still out in shellholes beyond Sap B6. The artillery was called upon for a barrage on the German front line to enable these men to be got in, their fire however was short, and word was sent to have it stopped. During this fire Battalion Headquarters moved to the normal position in ZOUAVE VALEY and our own shells lit jut behind the personnel of Battalion Headquarters while moving down UHLAN C.T. It was for a time thought the Germans would counter attack, and this impression was increased by the fact that a German

VOL VIII Page V

  • March 1st
73rd-Battalion-War-Diary-5-1024x6561.jpg
73rd Battalion War Diary – page 5.

 

aeroplane made several flights along our line net over 100 yards in the air, evidently observing the number of men in our line and their movements; all precautions were taken to beat off a counter attack, and it did not develope. During the day there continued a certain amount of enemy artillery activity, which, however, did not do any particular harm. That night it was decided to keep the whole Battalion on the eastern side of ZOUAVE VALLEY in case of attack, and the men of the Support Companies were accomodated in tunnels and dugouts on the Wester slope of the Ridge. The night, however, passed quietly. Many individual cases of outstanding bravery were noted during the action, especially Sgt. Millar and Sgt Holmden. During the attack 22 prisoners were taken by this Battalion, 19 of them being taken by Sgt Hannaford and Pte McLachlan. Officers and men without exception fought magnificently. Casualties during the action were as follow :-

Lieuts H P MacGregor, J W Lester, D A Farnori and [P] G Hawkins, Missing
Lieut J W. Griffiths – Died of Wounds
Capt. B Simpson, Capt. H H Patch and Lieuts G H H Eadie and G S McLennan – Wounded
26 OR Killed, 99 OR Wounded 27 OR Missing Total Casualties 161.

As a result of the operation two Officers were recommended for the D.S.O. four Officers for the M.C.

VOL VIII Page VI

  • March 1st
73rd Battalion War Diary
73rd Battalion War Diary – page 6.

 

…four OR’s for the D.C.M. and twelve OR’s for the M.M.
Notice received from Brigade that Lieuts. H [S] MacGregor and J H Christie ahd been awarded the Military Cross for their work in connection with the previous raid.

  • March 2nd

During the night a number of parties were sent out into “NO MAN’S LAND” to bring in dead and wounded, and a number of bodies were recovered, these were all sent out and buried in VILLERS and BOIS Cemetery.
The day was fairly quiet, only the usual artillery and trench mortor activity. Large parties of men were employed carrying out empty gas cylinders, as well as those full ones which had not been let off on the 1st Mar. A great deal of work was also necessary, and was sone on those trenches which had been damaged by the enemy’s fire on the 1st. In the afternoon word was received that Hunt Griffiths had died of his wounds, and arrangements were made for representatives of the Battalion to attend his funeral on the 3rd.

  • March 3rd

The early hours of the morning passed fairly quietly, but at 3 am the enemy opened up a heavy artillery and trench mortar fire on our front and support lines, doiing considerable damage. Our artillery retaliation was both slow and ineffective. The German fire caused no casualties, one OR Killed and one OR Wounded by our own Artillery.

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More posts about WWI.

WWI War Stories
What We Don’t Hear About Vimy Ridge
UK National Archives treasures: WWI war diaries now online

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb.

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The following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb, 2017.

 

Feature image: Map of the kingdom of Prussia in the 18th century.

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 11 Feb, 2017.

 

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Croatia

Czechoslovakia

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Hungary

Netherlands

Philippines

Spain

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United Kingdom

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Worldwide

 

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 11 Feb, 2017.

 

Australia

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Transcription: Civil War Letters of Private David Coon (1824-1864)

Transcription: Civil War Letters of Private David Coon (1824-1864)

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Transcription of the final pages of this extensive project of the Civil War Letters of Private David Coon was completed April 10, 2013.

 

David Coon and Mary Ann Adams circa 1843.
David Coon with his wife Mary Ann Adams in about 1843.

Page 1…

FOREWORD.

The following letters, written by David Coon to his wife and children, are here collected, carefully copied from the originals. Many of the letters were written on such scraps of paper as were available, the ink being often very poor — in one instance at least, made from the juice of pokeberries gathered on the battlefield, — so that they have become greatly faded by the lapse of time, and a number are quite difficult to decipher.

David Coon enlistment record.
David Coon enlistment record.

It is desired in this way to preserve for his children and grand-children, the letters, giving in a simple and direct way, some of the experiences of a private soldier through a por-tion of one of the greatest campaigns of the Civil War.

Dedication to E. D. Matthews on Coon Letters
This is the dedication to E. D. Matthews on the first page of the transcription of David Coon’s letters by John, David’s son and E. D. Matthews’ brother.

David Coon enlisted from Green Lake County Feb. 26, 1864, in Co. A, 35th Wisconsin infantry. With his regiment he remained at Camp Randall until May 10, when he was ordered to join Hancock’s Corps in Virginia, participating in many of the great battles of that terrible campaign until Aug. 25, 1864, when he, with nearly the whole regiment, was captured at the battle of Ream’s Station. He was taken first to Libby prison, Richmond, and afterward transferred to Salisbury, N. C., where he died Nov. 2, 1864.

David Coon was a good man, a kind husband and father, a true soldier of the American type, not only a patriot but a philosopher.

In loving remembrance these words are penned by his son,

John W. Coon, M. D.

Wales, Wis., July 16, 1913.

 

Page 2…

GRAND ARMY CORNER.

By H. W. Hood.

(From the Madison Democrat, January 12th, 1913.)

THE THIRTY-SIXTH WISCONSIN.

 

A goodly number of survivors of the 36th Wisconsin infantry are dwelling upon the Pacific Coast. They hold reunions from time to time, and it goes without saying that they heartily enjoy themselves when together.

In August, of 1903, when the national encampment of the Grand Army of the Republic was held at San Francisco, several members of the regiment from east of the Rocky Mountains were in attendance, and on the 18th day of the month they met with their comrades of the coast, and then had an unusually good time together. At that meeting Colonel C. E. Warner, of Windsor, was chosen President and James M. Aubery, secretary. Aubery enlisted February 29, 1864, in Company G of the 36th, and was, September 1, ’64, promoted to the position of sergeant major of the regiment. November 1, same year, he was made quartermaster sergeant, and on the 15th of June, 1865, was commissioned second lieutenant of Company G, but was not mustered as such. In the year 1900, he published a history of the service of his regiment, — a book containing 430 pages. It has about it many excellent features, and is good reading. It would be a good thing if every regiment could have had so able a historian.

On the occasion of this reunion, there were present,

 

Page 3…

Colonel Warner, wife and daughter; Captain Austin Cannon, Company H, who came from Pennsylvania; Charles A. Storke, Company G, of Santa Barbara, daughter and son-in-law; Judge James Paris, Company H, and wife, of Long Beach; A. T. Large, Company D, Los Angeles; William Patton, Company H, Berkeley; William Bright, Company I, Santa Cruz; David Kribs, Company I, and wife; Frederick Jennings, Company H, Lamorie; J. W. Thomas, Company K, and wife, Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin; George Clark, Coimpany B, Midway; James LeTellier, Company C; W. S. Hengy, Company B., and wife, Oroville; James M Aubery and two daughters, Los Angeles; Mrs. Skeels, Menomonie, Wisconsin; E. M. Chamberlain, Company D, and wife, Albany, Wisconsin.

After a season spent in reminiscences and renewing their ancient comradeship, they sat down to a feast — twenty-eight of them — given by Comrade Large. The spread before them made it plain that their host was not only Large by name, but of heart. They had a jolly time of it.

On the 12th of last September several of those old badgers gathered again at table, at Los Angeles, Comrade Storke being the genial host. He was chosen chairman of the meeting and Comrade Aubery, secretary. On that occasion there were present, Comrades Storke, Aubery, Clarke and wife, Jennings, Parish, and Large, of those mentioned above; also F. A. Wilde, Company F, Kingman, Arizona; Robert Moorhouse, Company G, Heber, California; J. V. Bartow, Company G, Long Beach; Edward Parish, Company H, Los Angeles, wife and daughter; Captain Wesley S. Potter, Company D,

 

Page 4…

Pasadena; George W. Raymer, Company D, Madison, Wisconsin; Benjamin Bailey, Company A, San Diego.

I have been looking over the records to see how the comrades named above fared in their term of service of a year and a third. Colonel Warner was so wounded at the battle of Deep Bottom, Virginia, August 14, ’64, that it was necessary to amputate his left arm. Chales A. Storke was taken prisoner at Cold Harbor, June 1, ’64. W. H. Patton was wounded at Petersburg, June 18, 1864. William Bright was wounded at the same place, same day. David Kribe was taken prisoner at Ream’s Station. Frederick Jennings was wounded in the battle at Petersburg, June 18, ’64, J. W. Thomas was wounded at Petersburg, George Clarke was sun-struck July 14, ’64, Edward Parish was wounded June 18, ’64, at Petersburg, F. A. Wilde was taken prisoner June 1, ’64, at Cold Harbor, Robert Moorhouse was taken prisoner the same day, George W. Raymer was wounded near Petersburg, June 18, ’64.

The Thirty-sixth was recruited under President Lincoln’s call, February 1, 1864, for 500,000 men. It was quickly recruited at Camp Randall to the maximum number under direction of Colonel Frank A. Haskell, who had been adjutant of the 6th Wisconsin. He was commissioned colonel on the 23d of March. The regiment left Camp Randall on the 10th of May and was in Washington on the 14th. It served till the close of the war in the first brigade, second division, second army corps.

This is a brief sketch of the service of the regiment:

 

Page 5…

It was at Spottsylvania May 18-21, North Anna river May 23-26, Totopotomy May 28-31, Bethesda Church June 1, Cold Harbor June 1-12, before Petersburg June 16-18. It was in the siege of Petersburg from June 16, ’64 to April 2, 1865. In the meantime it was on the Weldon railroad June 22-23, demonstration north of James river at Deep Bottom August 13-20, where Colonel Warner lost his left arm, Ream’s Station August 25, Boydton Plank Road, Hatcher’s Run, October 17-28, Dabney’s Mills, Hatcher’s Run, February 5-7, 1865, Watkin’s House March 25. It was in the movement, March 28-April 9, that terminated in the surrender of General Lee. On the second day of May it started for Washington, where, on the 23d of that month, it marched in the Grand Review that was the formal close of the war. On the 17th day of June the regiment left Washington for Louisville, Kentucky, going into camp on the north side of the river, at Jeffersonville, Indiana. There on the 12th of July it was mustered out of the service and started for Madison, where it arrived on the 14th, and was disbanded on the 24th.

Colonel Haskell was killed at Cold Harbor June 3, ’64, and Colonel John A. Savage, who succeeded Haskell, died July 4, ’64, of wounds received June 18, at Petersburg. Colonel Harvey M. Brown, of Columbus, who succeeded Savage, was, because of wounds received June 18, discharged October 27, ’64. He was succeeded by Colonel Warner.

No other Wisconsin regiment lost so many men during a corresponding term of service as the Thirty-sixth. The original

 

Page 6…

Strength of the regiment was 990. It received twenty-four recruits, making in all, 1,014. Of these, 156 were killed in action or died of wounds, 172 died of disease and 12 of accidents, — making a total loss of 340, or 43-1/3 per cent. Of all who enlisted in the regiment.

I am taking these figures from the report of the adjutant general of the state in 1866. Comrade Aubery, in his history of the regiment, makes his figures a little different. Abuery says that during the first two months of the real campaigning of the regiment there were losses as follows: 273 killed and wounded— averaging 34 every week, five a day; 61 killed outright— eight a week, one a day; 221 wounded— 26 ½ a week, nearly four a day; 336 killed, wounded and prisoners— 42 every week, six a day. At the charge of Cold Harbor there were 17 killed and 53 wounded in about the time it takes to tell it. At Bethesda Church there were killed, in the charge, 49, wounded, 79.

The Thirty-sixth was one of the hardest fighting regiments of all in the service from all of the states and its losses were among the greatest. Every survivor feels proud of having been a member of it.

 

Page 7…

Camp Randall, Madison, Reb. 28th, 1864.

Dear Wife and Children:-

Well, I didn’t go back to bid you good-bye. I found it necessary when I got to Berlin to come right on to this place in order to get in in time to make arrangements to secure my bounty, &c. I have enlisted in the 36th regiment, and yesterday was taken into a room with nine others and stripped naked, and passed examination so slick that there wouldn’t have been any chance at all of getting clear if I had been drafted, but Orange Snell was thrown out, the last man I should have thought of.

Tomorrow we are to be mustered in. We expect our company will be “A”, as it is the first one of all. Messs. Vergin, Putnam, Dewey, Wm. Luckey, Gordon and Mart Haskill are all in the same company; all accepted but the two last, their case is not decided yet. Luckey is my bunk partner. Thos. And Jess Brown are in the same reg. but another Co. We are in Luman’s quarters to-day, as there was no good chance for writing in the barrack. Palen and Sol. Reynolds go into the 18th Colts Co. Little Lester Stephens goes into the 16th.

Now about the pay and bounty. I expect $165 local bounty, which I think we had better pay for the sugar bush, 40, and all of our other debts, and you will get $5.00 a month from the state, and I think I can send home $5.000 a month more; and I hope Herbert will be able to raise your own provisions and some to spare. Plant an acre of beans, and Emma must help hoe them and work in the garden, &c.,

 

Page 8…

and do the best you can, all of you.

The Government bounty I want to have salted down, so that it will keep. I got 44 brooms and sold at $2.00 per doz. Poor little things. Got the things you sent for and left them at L. A.’s. I wish you had them. I had a chance to get the brooms and myself bro’t down to Berlin, and did not get a chance to go to see Hiram and Dennis, and I have thought that it was best perhaps that I should have left the way I did, as it spared us all the pain of parting that we should have experienced had I not expected to return before my final departure. Herbert, I expect Mr. Dunlap will send for a hundred buckets, and I want you to tighten the hoops and let him have as good as there is. I have been thinking that we are a good deal better off than the rest in the neighborhood that have left, in having a team and a boy old enough to use it and take care of things, and I hope you will succeed and take good care of things. I must close for this time, hoping to write again in a few days when we get a little settled. You needn’t write until I write again.

Your affectionate husband and father,

D. Coon.

P.S. – Herbert, try and get Mr. Locke to take that lumber to Berlin if he is going, so that he can to to Brushes, and get that, and the rest from Poysippi.

 

Page 9…

Camp Randall, March 2, 1864.

Dear Wife and Children:

Well, we were mustered into Uncle Sam’s service yesterday, and here we are tight, to-day not allowed to go out of camp, and we can’t go out any day without a pass from headquarters, and the orders are not to give any of us a pass to-day. There was several hundred left camp yesterday for Dixie for the old regiment.

Now I will give you a history of the time I had about my local bounty. There was a man from Green Lake town on the care that wanted a few men for their town to fill their quota. They offered $200.00, to be deposited in the bank at Ripon by the first of April. He took my name for one, but found on getting here that he didn’t want me, so I engaged to another man for $165 cash down, but found afterwards that he didn’t take down my name, and got the number he wanted without me, so I was out again and the bounties were falling. I then heard that my Green Lake man’s men hadn’t all come on and he still wanted more. I then went to him (I knew where he put up) Monday morning engaged to him, making the thing sure this time. That same afternoon I saw the Captain. He told me that he had done the best for me, got me into some town for $150.00 cash down. I told him I didn’t want to be credited to that town, I had made other arrangements, that I couldn’t afford to lose $50.00. He said they had to make out the muster roll in order to muster us in and they couldn’t make out the roll without crediting us to some town and that was the best chance they could find, and when the roll was made out they couldn’t be altered, &c.

 

Page 10…

I gave them to understand that I wasn’t satisfied, so they concluded to make out a new muster roll and put me into Green Lake, and so it is at last.

Joe Howard, Wormwood, his boy, T. L. Hall and Jesse Brown was all thrown out on examination. Paln, J. Snell, Cross, Sol. Reynolds not mustered in yet. L. A. gave me an empty housewife. If we should stay a good while here we may get a chance to come home, but it is doubtful. I can’t think of the name of the place where that cousin Margaret lives. Please tell me. As I couldn’t get out to get writing materials I borrowed what I could get, but such a place to write, playing cards, swearing and all sorts, but I am thankful that all are not of that kind. I attended the best prayer and conference meeting last night that I have attended in the state. A Miss Hobart is lecturing in camp on temperance, &c. She is to lecture tonight. I wish you would write as soon as you can. You may expect a letter from me as often as once a week while we stay here. I must stop. Kiss the babies for pa. Herbert had better let Chas. Have that calf skin towards the shoes, if he will take it.

Yours affectionately,

D. Coon.

P. S. – Direct Co. A. 36 Reg., Campb Randall, Madison.


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War Diary of September 15-16, 1916 at Courcelette for Pte. Joseph Turmaine

War Diary of September 15-16, 1916 at Courcelette for Pte. Joseph Turmaine

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War Diary of September 15-16, 1916 at Courcelette for Pte. Joseph Turmaine.

 

Report on the Operation by 27th (City of Winnipeg) Battalion, on the morning of September 15th 1916.

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28

Reference Sheets COURCELETTE and LE MOUQUET 1/5,000.

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Turmaine, Joseph - War Diary - September 15, 1916 - 1
Turmaine, Joseph – War Diary – September 15, 1916 – pg 1.

The Battalion left the BRICKFIELDS at 2.00p.m. on 14th Sept. and proceeded to Brigade Headquarters at X.ii.a.2.2. arriving there at 5.00p.m. Two platoons of D Coy. relieved the right Company of the 29th Battn. in front line by 6.30.p.m. The Battn. left Brigade H.Q. at 9.00p.m. and proceeded to the front line to take up position in Assembly Trenches. Owing to congestion of trenches this was not completed till 4.25a.m. The Battn. frontage extended from R.35.c.2.9 1/2 to R.35.c.6.5. Battn.H.Q. were located at R.35.c.4.3. At 6.20a.m. the artillery barrage opened, 50 yards in advance of German trench and the first wave commenced crawling over. As the barrage lifted the Battn. advanced on to the  first German Line and reached the trench, the Germans threw up their hands and surrendered. At least 70 dead Germans were counted in this trench This objective was reported to Battn.H.Q. as being taken at 6.27a.m. The Battn. followed up the barrage closely andmet very little opposition at SUNKEN ROAD, Germans surrendering in large numbers. By this time the first wave was nearly wiped out and the second wave took its place. A Company then swung to the left and captured its last objective with one Corpl. and 15 O.R. C and D Coys. reached their objectives and immediately commenced to dig in. This was reported to Battn. H.Q. at 7.40a.m. The line held ran from R.35.b.5. ? 1/2 on SUNKEN ROAD, through R.30.c.0.2. to R.30.c.5.2. Garrison holding this line consisted of 120 all ranks and 4 Lewis Guns located in advance posts at R.30.c.0.2 – 1.2. – 3.2. – 5.3. Owing to casualties the following reinforcements were sent up from B Coy.: – 1 platton to A Coy. on the left and 2 platoons to D Coy. on the right. 4 Officers only were left. Lieuts. McElligott, Holdsworth, Hamilton and Terndrup. Lieut Holdsworth showed great courage and devotion to duty until killed by an enemy sniper. Lieut. Hamilton n the left flank carried on under most trying conditions even after being buried by shells. He was eventually severely wounded on the afternoon of the 16th inst. Enemy attempted to advance up SUNKEN ROAD but were driven off by our Lewis Gun fire. A large number also advanced into a field South West of COURCELETTE and commenced sniping our frontage from this flank. Our Colt and Lewis Guns dealt with the satisfactorily. Two patrols of 1 Lewis gun and 30 men each from the 31st Battn. pushed on towards COURCELETTE but were forced to return to our line owing to the barrage fire. At 11.25p.m. 15th Sept. Lieut. McElligott took command of the whole of our frontage of 3 Coys. and showed great courage and ability in the organizing and consolidation work. The enemy artillery fire was very intense for 48 hours on our front line.
Colt Machine Guns.
Colt machine guns followed behind the third wave and took up positions as follows :-
No. 1 gun at R.30.c.5.1.
No. 2 gun at protecting gap at R.29.d.10.? 1.2.
No. 3 gun at R.35.b.6.7. This gun did excellent work on small parties of Huns who persisted in creeping up towards our new front line.
No. 4 gun was located on a knoll in rear of SUNKEN ROAD and covered our left frontage. When No. 2 gun had established themselves Sergt. F.W.Haines pointed out a German machine gun and crew with a number of snipers dug in in a shell hole 200 yards away. Pte. Stewart opened up with a belt knocking out a number of the party. Sgt.Haines, Corpl. Hancock and Pte.Stewart dashed forward under cover of our machine guns and captured a new model German Maxim. Germans to the number of 6 Officers and 16O.R. surrendered. Sergt.Haines, waving his revolver, motioned them to evacuate in pairs. They filed out and were marched to the  Field Ambulance party near by where they were used as stretcher bearers. The enemy hadthrown away the feed block of the captured gun but after considerable careful searching this was located in a shell hole. The gun was then mounted and turned on enemy snipers, causing considerable casualties.

2.

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Turmaine, Joseph - War Diary - September 15, 1916 - 2
Turmaine, Joseph – War Diary – September 15, 1916 – pg. 2.

Communication. Our Signallers advanced behind the fourth wave and ran three separate lines to the final objective. These were joined up laterally in the front line, SUNKEN ROAD and the German front line. Communication, however, could not be kept as all the wires were broken by shell fire.
Battalion Scouts were utilized in the following manner :-
Two Scouts each to the following tasks :-
1. The taking of the German front line.
2. The taking of SUNKEN ROAD.
3. The taking of the left Coy.objective.
4. The taking and sonsolidation of the final objective by all Coys. All these Scouts reported successfully yo Battn.H.Q. on the completion of their observation.
Runners were employed continuously and although 75 per cent became casualties, a good number of messages were got through.
Visual Signalling was attempted with flags and flappers but this drew the enemy’s fire and could not be carried on.
Carrying Parties. During the first 24 hours, owing to the intense barrage it was only possible to get through very limited supplies. Coys. and Sections were instructed to collect water, ammunition, bombs and rations from the dead. Our stretcher bearers worked unceasingly carrying out the wounded. The following day, 16th Sept., 7 parties were organized and succeeded in getting through to the front line with tea, mulligan, rations, water, ammunition and bombs. These parties, under Lieut.Coombes and Reg.Sgt.-Mjr.Underwood also succeededin evacuating the wounded, burying the dead and cleared up the battle field. A salvage dump was established at SUNKEN ROAD. A good supply dump was also established in the old German front line. Great credit is due to Reg.S.M. Underwood for the success of this work.
The Battn. evacuated the trenches at 2.00a.m. 17th Sept. 1916 and proceeded to Brigade Reserve (5th Cdn.Inf.Bde.) at X.ii.a.2.2.
Our casualties amounted to Killed 5 officers,   67   O.R. –
Wounded 7  do. 243   do.
Missing     1  do.   71   do.
Total All Ranks 394.
At 8.00p.m. 17th Sept. 1916 the Battn. was relieved by the 1st Cdn.Battn. and proceeded to bivouacs at the BRICKFIELDS near ALBERT.
Prisoners captured by the Battalion amounted to 200.

[Signature of Officer Here]
Lieut. Col.
Commanding 27th (C.of W.)Battn.
6th Inf.Bde., 2nd Canadian Div.

19.9.16

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

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All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.



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Mark Blythe to Barack Obama Relationship Chart

Mark Blythe to Barack Obama Relationship Chart

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The relationship chart illustrating the multi-generational, multi-cultural, multi-racial connections between Barack Obama and my husband Mark Blythe.

 

A while ago, we saw a genealogy chart in a Chicago newspaper online showing Barack Obama’s family tree, which includes one Ulrich Stehle (Steely), born about 1720 and died before 1773, living the entire time in Pennsylvania.

The connection is through Barack’s maternal line from his mother Stanley Ann Dunham and Mark’s paternal line.

We later discovered that Barack Obama and Mark are both related to John Bunch, the first documented slave in America, as described in a previous post.

Mark Blythe to Barack Obama Relationship Chart
Mark Blythe to Barack Obama Relationship Chart

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Transcription: Biography of Dr. Oscar B. Steely; Dictionary of National Biography

Transcription: Biography of Dr. Oscar B. Steely; Dictionary of National Biography

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Following is my transcription of the biography of Dr. Oscar B. Steely from the Dictionary of National Biography.

Featured image: Replica of the first Fort Hall in Pocatello, Idaho.

Dr. Oscar B. Steely, Biography
Dr. Oscar B. Steely, Biography

DR. OSCAR B. STEELY.

 

Greater than the responsibility of almost any other line of human endeavor is that which rests upon the physician; the issues of life and death are in his hands, and the physician’s skill and power must be his own; not by gift, by purchase or influence can he acquire it. If he would retain relative precedence, it must come as the result of superior skill, knowledge and ability, and these qualifications are possessed in a marked degree by Dr. Oscar B. Steely, who is not only numbered among the representative physicians and surgeons of the state, recognition of this fact having been made by Governor McConnell in his “appointment as surgeon general of Idaho, but his executive ability, force of character and strong personal magnetism have caused his election and reelection to the responsible office of mayor of the progressive city of Pocatello, where he resides.

Doctor Steely was born in Belleville, Pa., on August 22, 1862, a son of William and

055

Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Dictionary of National Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Dictionary of National Biography

Sarah (Baker) Steely, natives of Pennsylvania, to which commonwealth his early paternal German ancestors emigrated in the early Colonial days, as did the progenitors of his mother, who came from England at about the same period of time, and both his maternal and paternal great-grandfathers patriotically served in the long and bloody contest of the Revolutionary war.

Doctor Steely received his preliminary literary education in the public schools of his native place, thereafter continuing his studies in the Bloomsburg State Normal School and Literary Institute, from which he was graduated with a high standing, thereafter matriculating at the famous University of Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated in 1883, in the meantime engaging in pedagogic work in Philadelphia, where he held the office of supervising principal of the public schools of the city for four years, thereafter entering Jefferson Medical College, where he completed the prescribed course, being graduated therefrom with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1891.

Thus thoroughly prepared and equipped for his profession, he served one year as surgeon in the Jefferson Hospital, and in 1892

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Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography

located in Pocatello, Idaho, and entered at once upon a successful and far-reaching practice, being the ofiicial physician and surgeon of the Oregon Short Line Railroad, of which he is still in incumbency, and he has been very successful both as a physician and a surgeon. His private practice in both medicine and surgery is one of the largest in the state, controlling a large clientele of leading citizens, and manifesting a liberality and generosity in his treatment of the poor and unfortunate which have bound them to him as with hooks of steel. He stands high in medical circles, was a member of the Pennsylvania State Medical Association and the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States, while his papers and articles on medical and surgical subjects take rank as authoritative, and his incumbency of the office of surgeon general was marked by a careful, conservative, but at the same time progressive administration of the duties connected therewith.

A man of strong character and unbounded energy, he has ever stood true in all the relations of life and has acquired a high and well-deserved popularity. He was a candidate of the Progressive Young Men of Pocatello for

057

Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography

mayor of that city in I902 and after a stirring canvass was elected by a very complimentary vote, and he is now in the incumbency of the office, having been elected on the Republican ticket in 1903 by a handsome majority to the second term, running far ahead of the rest of the ticket, and thus proving himself not only a very efficient but an exceedingly popular mayor, ever maintaining a high dignity and performing the duties of the position to the decided advantage of the city.

In county, state and national political affairs he has been an active force in the Republican party. discharging with fidelity and advantage to the people every trust his party has reposed in him. In the last Republican state convention he was distinctively honored by being placed in candidacy for governor of the state, lacking only three votes of securing the nomination. In educational lines his influence and labors have been effective and far-reaching. and he is at present the president of the school board of Pocatello. and he has been an earnest and public spirited member of the board for the last six years. Fraternally he has attained the Knight Templar degree in the Masonic order, being the high priest of the

058

Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography
Oscar B. Steely, M.D.; Biography

local chapter, and is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, Knights of Pythias, Woodmen of the World and the Eagles.

In Denver, Colo., on December 31, 1900, Dr. Steely was united in matrimony with Miss Bernice H. Smith. a native of Massachusetts, and a daughter of Edwin K. and Helen A. Smith, also natives of the old Bay state. They have one son, Hobart H., and their attractive home possesses a most pleasing atmosphere of cultured hospitality.

It is not too much to say of Dr. Steely. as has been said by several who are excellent judges of character. that his qualifications would dignify and elevate any office in the gift of the people of his state. He has held responsible positions with great ability, has adorned every walk in life in which he has been found, and is an inspiration and example to good men of all classes, while his advice is held most valuable in business and financial circles, and his careful and conscientious execution of every duty has gained him high prestige.

Progressive men of Bannock, Bear Lake, Bingham, Fremont and Oneida counties, Idaho. 1904.

059

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 31 Mar 2016.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 31 Mar 2016.

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The following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org updates and additions to 31 Mar 2016.

 

FamilySearch.org updates and additions.

 

Mainz, Germany; Ancestry.com updates and additions.
Mainz, Germany; Ancestry.com updates and additions to 31 Mar 2016.
Brazil
Czechoslovakia
Japan
Netherlands
Peru
South Africa
Ukraine
United States
Worldwide

 

Ancestry.com updates and additions.

 

Australia
Germany
Czechoslovakia
Jamaica
Mexico
Netherlands
North America
Poland
Romania
United Kingdom

England

Isle of Man

Ireland

United States

 


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Medieval Genealogy Research: Myth vs. Fact

Medieval Genealogy Research: Myth vs. Fact

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I have found my many years of our family genealogy research to be both difficult and rewarding; especially medieval research when one has to distinguish between myth and fact. There is no feeling like breaking down a ‘brick wall’ and finding solid support and/or primary genealogy sources to document the finds.

 

There are a few sites for ancestry research that I consider to be ‘gold standard’. I have itemized these global and Canadian sites in my previous post ‘O Canada!‘ and on the site’s ‘Genealogy Links‘ pages.

Research into my husband’s royal and Welsh Quaker family history has been consistently rewarding and I was able to find sources without a great deal of difficulty – until I reached the medieval period. I spent a great amount of time searching for reliable and respected sites and usually had to resort to entering unsupported data until I could locate sources for verification.

The truth of the matter is that medieval genealogy research incorporates fact and myth and it can be very difficult to verify information as few primary sources are available.

Foundation for Medieval Genealogy LogoThe one site I have found and rely upon the most is that of the ‘Foundation for Medieval Genealogy‘, a non-profit organization consisting of British genealogists and historians with a special interest in the medieval period. They seek to educate in, promote research in and publish results from the study of medieval genealogy.

It is possible to search for specific individuals. However, one thing I have learned is that name spellings can vary greatly. When researching one individual, I will usually search for them first and then close family members second. Once a family member is identified, it’s a simple matter of comparing the data of the others to identify duplicates for merge.

To access the digital collections, it is necessary to register. I have never registered, but I have been able to obtain information by using their open genealogical database that does not require registration.

Those responsible for this database have made every effort to cite the best possible sources in support of their conclusions and deductions. I especially like and respect the fact that they make it clear when information is speculative and provide detailed explanations of their conclusions. Any information that is speculative or unsupported is contained within square brackets (i.e. ‘[ ]’). Facts supported by sources are signified by numerical links to the source citation.

I consider this site to be the best source for medieval genealogy research and would not hesitate to recommend it for such.


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Transcription: German Pioneers of the Ship Mortonhouse

Transcription: German Pioneers of the Ship Mortonhouse

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Transcription of a passenger list of German pioneers of the ship Mortonhouse, including Ulrich Croll.

German pioneers of the ship Mortonhouse
German pioneers of the ship Mortonhouse

—————————-

Mortonhouse 1729

25

Sworn Before the Governour in Council, 19th August 1729. Cleared from Deal in Great Britain. James Coultas.

Rt Charles

“At the Courthouse of Philadelphia, August 19th, 1729, … A List was presented of the Names of Seventy five Palatines, who with their families, making in all about One hundred & Eighty persons, were imported here in the Ship Mortonhouse, James Coults, Mr., from Rotterdam, but last from Deal, as by Clearance thence dated 21st of June last.” From Minutes of the Provincial Council, printed in Colonial Records, Vol. III, p. 367.

[List 9 B] Palatines imported in the ship Mortonhouse, Jas Coultas, Mr, from Rotterdam, but last from Deal p. Clearance thence, dated 21st June 1729. Subscribed this Declaration 19th Augt. 1729.

Carl Ernst Musselbach                         Jakob Crebil
Georg Threhr [Dreher]                        Henrich Schlengeluf
Johan Philip Ranck                              Henrich Gunter
Hans Műller                                           Hans Uldric (H) Vry
Kunradt Wőrntz                                    Christ (O) Vry
Casper (X) Dorest                                 Jacob (O) Bowman
Dielman Kolb                                         Johan Nicolas Prietschler
Hans Michel Frőlich                             Johannes Műller
Michael Borst                                         Jacob (O) Obere
Johannes Hoock                                    David Montandon
Roedolp (X) Moor                                 Peter Weger
Hans Jacob (O) Roodlys                      Valentine (/) Ficus
Uldric (X) Root                                      Adam Orth
Nicolaas (O) Peffell                               Hanns Michel Heider
Heinrich Dubs                                       Johannes Reis
Mr. (X) Meli [?]                                     Johann Stephen Rumer
Henrich Blim                                         Gőrg Adam Wedel
Hans Ullrich Hűber                              Ulrich (/) Croll
Christ (B) Baown                                   Adolph Schombach
Christ (C) Kroll                                      Conrad (O) Kilner
Hendk. (H) Werner                               Johannes (/) Binkler
Gerhard Műller                                      Michel Weber
Andres Mys                                             Rudolff Walder

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Wogaman, Burkett and Holdery – Burkhart — Burckhardt — Burket — Burkett

Transcription: Wogaman, Burkett and Holdery – Burkhart — Burckhardt — Burket — Burkett

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Transcription: Wogaman, Burkett and Holdery – Burkhart — Burckhardt — Burket — Burkett

 

WOGAMAN, BURKETT, HOLDERY

Author:     Ezra McFall Kuhns
Publisher:     [Dayton, Ohio? : s.n., 1948]
Series:      Genealogy & local history, G7296.

BURKHART — BURCKHARDT — BURKET — BURKETT
(First Page)

Burket Family Bio
Burket Family Bio – Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery

It has been said that Emanuel Burkhart whose home was in one of the Swiss Cantons, probably Berne, had two sons who came to America, sometime between 1742 and 1754. One of these is said to have been Jonathan and the other Christian. Rupp’s records no persons by either of these names, until the arrival on November 22, 1752, on the ship St. Michael, of Johann Burckhard, and on September 24, 1753, the arrival on the ship Neptune, of Johannes Burkhart. There is listed, however, the arrival on the ship Rosanna, on September 26, 1743, of Heinrich Burckhart. This person so nearly fits in with the known facts of the case, as to lead to the belief that this Henry, to use the English equivalent of his first name, was the progenitor of the family under discussion, in America. There is not much support to the traditional name of Jonathan, and it could easily be the case, in any event, that like thousands of others, there was the first name “Johan”, by which he might have been known, but omitted from the registration. It is stated that the immigrant’s wife died at sea, and that the father died four years after arrival. There were four children, Salome, probably the eldest, born August 14, 1734, Jehu, Nathaniel, and probably another boy said to have been named Christian. Salome, according to well authenticated statements, was seven years of age upon arrival, and this fact, as well as her marriage in 1759, she being then of marriageable age, seems to be controlling in fixing the approximate time of the arrival in America, that is at about the time of the arrival of Henry as above stated. Jehu married Madalene (Motlene) Croll or Kroll, who was the daughter of Ulric Croll, of Elizabeth township, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, who came to America on August 19, 1729, aged 27 years, on the ship Mortonhouse. The brothers moved to Frederick county, Maryland, residing and working there at their trade, as well as farming, from about 1768 to 1775, after which Jehu and family moved to Reedy creek on the Yadkin, Rowan county, North Carolina. About 1809, Jehu moved to Montgomery county, Ohio, and became the owner of a 112-acre tract located on Salem pike, a few miles north of the city of Dayton, opposite the Brethren church at Ft. McKinley, Jehu died in 1823, and his wife a few years before. He was the first Bishop or Elder of the church of the Brethren (Dunkard) in this vicinity, and assisted in the organization of the Lower Stillwater church of that denomination (still flourishing at Ft. McKinley) and out of which church sprung the church at “Happy Corners”. Despite his connection with one of the peace loving sects, Jehu seems to have served in the North Carolina troops in the Revolution, was paid a fairly large sum presumably for military services. Again, in a muster roll of Capt. Andrew Long’s company of Col. Samuel Miles’ rifle regiment of Pennsylvania troops, taken on June 4, 1776, appears the name of “Jehu Burket”. This company came from western Bucks county, and there is authority for the statement that Jehu’s wife’s people were, or had been, formerly residents of that region. It could easily be possible that Jehu had returned to Pennsylvania before finally settling in North Carolina, and enrolled for a short time only as the records of that company would indicate, after which he returned to Maryland or North Carolina. From the extreme infrequency of the name Jehu, and the singular fact of it being attached in this case to the last name “Burket”, it appears to the writer as more than a coin

BURKHART — BURCKHARDT — BURKET — BURKETT
(Second Page)

Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery 2
Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery

cidence. This conclusion might be further justified from the fact of the somewhat roving disposition of the person in question, who in the course of this life, removed three or four different times, and to distant points. Jehu and Motlene had nine children, Henry being the fourth. He, Henry, was born on May 13, 1771, in Maryland. On December 25, 1793, Henry married Elizabeth Rinker, in North Carolina, who was born on June 22, 1772, and who died on February 9, 1836. About 1815 or 1816 this family came to Montgomery county, where Henry’s father had already located. Henry acquired 400 or more acres of land on the so-called Stringtown pike, in Madison township, about a mile or so north of the village of Trotwood, and about the same distance west of the settlement on the Salem pike formerly known as Taylorsburg. He died in September 1817, leaving a will which was probated in due course. Henry and Elizabeth had the following children, all born in North Carolina: Mary (sometimes called Mollie) born October 27, 1794; John, born December 27, 1795; George, born November 23, 1797; Elizabeth, born September 7, 1801; Isaac, born February 3, 1803; Charles, born March 13, 1805; Amelia, born December 8, 1807; Anne, born December 8, 1809; Martin, born October 5, 1811; and Barbara, born April 20, 1815.

As previously stated in this narrative, Mary the first child of Henry and Elizabeth, married John Wogaman the second, on August 18, 1818, and their child was George, who married Catherine Hilderbrick on June 15, 1843. She was born on July 17, 1824, the daughter of David Mary Hilderbrick, and Mary was the daughter of George and Elizabeth Holtry.

In connection with what has been said as to Jehu Burket, it should be mentioned that the material is based somewhat on a History of the Burgner family, published in 1892. This narrates an interview, in 1889, with a granddaughter of Salome Burket. This granddaughter well remembered Salome the sister of Jehu. She had married a Burgner, and after her husband’s death lived in Maryland near Frederick. Also, a pamphlet on the Burket family, prepared by Mr. John M. Burkett, of Washington, D. C., has been useful and most essential in establishing some of the important facts of the story of this family. It should also be mentioned that the family migrated in large numbers to Indiana in the early part of the nineteenth century, and many members have achieved prominence both in civil and professional walks of life, including farming and other lines of business.

___________________

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Transcription: Biography of Jehu Burkett and Family

Transcription: Biography of Jehu Burkett and Family

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The following is a transcription of a biography of Jehu Burkett and his family, taken from the publication, “BURKHART — BURCKHARDT — BURKET — BURKETT.”

Burket Family Bio
Burket Family Bio – Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery; Page 1

 

Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery 2
Burket Family Bio – Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery; Page 2

lt has been said that Emanuel Burkhart whose home was in one of the Swiss Cantons, probably Berne, had two sons who came to America, sometime between 1742 and 1754. One of these is said to have been Jonathan and the other Christian. Rupp’s records no persons by either of these names, until the arrival on November 22, 1752, on the ship St. Michael, of Johann Burckhard, and on September 24, 1753, the arrival on the ship Neptune, of Johannes Burkhart. There is listed, however, the arrival on the ship Rosanna, on September 26, 1745, of Heinrich Burckhart. This person so nearly fits in with the known facts of the case, as to lead to the belief that this Henry, to use the English equivalent of his first name, was the progenitor of the family under discussion, in America. There is not much support to the traditional name of Jonathan, and it could easily be the case, in any event, that like thousands of others, there was the first name “Johan”, by which he might have been known, but omitted from the registration. It is stated that the immigrant’s wife died at sea, and that the father died four years after arrival. There were four children, Salome, probably the eldest, born August 14, 1734, Jehu, Nathaniel, and probably another boy said to have been named Christian. Salome, according to well authenticated statements, was seven years of age upon arrival, and this fact, as well as her marriage in 1759, she being then of marriageable age, seems to be controlling in fixing the approximate time of the arrival in America, that is at about the time of the arrival of Henry as above stated. Jehu married Madalene (Motlene) Croll or Kroll, who was the daughter of Ulric Croll, of Elizabeth township, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, who came to America on August 19, 1729, aged 27 years, on the ship Mortonhouse. The brothers moved to Frederick county, Maryland, residing and working there at their trade, as well as farming, from about 1768 to 1775, after which Jehu and family moved to Reedy creek on the Yadkin, Rowan county, North Carolina. About 1809, Jehu moved to Montgomery county, Ohio, and became the owner of a 112-acre tract located on Salem pike, a few miles north of the city of Dayton, opposite the Brethren church at Ft. McKinley. ]ehu died in 1823, and his wife a few years before. He was the first Bishop or Elder of the church of the Brethren (Dunkard) in this vicinity, and assisted in the organization of the Lower Stillwater church of that denomination (still flourishing at Ft. McKinley) and out of which church sprung the church at “Happy Corners.” Despite his connection with one of the peace loving sects,.Jehu seems to have served in the North Carolina troops in the Revolution, as there is an entry in the Army accounts “of that state which would indicate that he was paid a fairly large sum presumably for military services. Again, in a muster roll of Capt. Andrew Long’s company of Col. Samuel Miles’ rifle regiment of Pennsylvania troops, taken on June 4, 1776, appears the name of “Jehu Burket”. This company came from western Bucks county, and there is authority for the statement that Jehu’s wife’s people were, or had been, formerly residents of that region. It could easily be possible that Jehu had returned to Pennsylvania before finally settling in North Carolina, and enrolled for a short time only as the records of that company would indicate, after which he returned to Maryland or North Carolina. From the extreme infrequency of the name Jehu, and the singular fact of it being attached in this case to the last name “Burket”, it appears to the writer as more than a coincidence. This conclusion might be further justified from the fact of the somewhat roving disposition of the person in question, who in the course of his life, removed three or four different times, and to distant points. Jehu and Motlene had nine children, Henry being the fourth. He, Henry, was born on May 13, 1771, in Maryland. On December 25, 1793, Henry married Elizabeth Rinker, in North Carolina,“ who was born on June 22, 1772, and who died on February 9, 1836. About 1815 or 1816 this family came to Montgomery county, where Henry’s father had already located. Henry acquired 400 or more acres of land on the so-called Stringtown pike, in Madison township, about a mile or so north of the village of Trotwood, and about the same distance west of the settlement on the Salem pike formerly known as Taylorsburg. He died in September 1817, leaving a will which was probated in due course. Henry and Elizabeth had the following children, all born in North Carolina: Mary (sometimes called Mollie) born October 27,1794; John, born December 27, 1795; George, born November 23, 1797; Elizabeth, born September 7, 1801; Isaac, born February 3, 1803; Charles, born March 13,1805; Amelia, born December 8, 1807; Anne, born December 8, 1809; Martin, born October 5, 1811; and Barbara, born April 20, 1815.

As previously stated in this narrative, Mary the first child of Henry and Elizabeth, married John Wogaman the second, on August 18, 1818, and their child was George, who married Catherine Hilderbrick on June 15, 1843. She was born on July 17, 1824, the daughter of David and Mary Hilderbrick, and Mary was the daughter of George and Elizabeth Holtry.

In connection with what has been said as to Jehu Burket, it should be mentioned that the material is based somewhat on a History of the Burgner family, published in 1892. This narrates an interview, in 1889, with a granddaughter of Salome Burket. This granddaughter well remembered Salome the sister of Jehu. She had married a Burgner, and after her husband’s death lived in Maryland near Frederick. Also, a pamphlet on the Burket family, prepared by Mr. John M. Burkett of Washington, D. C., has been useful and most essential in establishing some of the important facts of the story of this family. lt should also be mentioned that the family migrated in large numbers to Indiana in the early part of the nineteenth century, and many members have achieved prominence both in civil and professional walks of life, including farming and other lines of business.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 19 Feb 2015.

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 19 Feb 2015.

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The following are the FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 19 Feb 2015.

 

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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 Jan 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 Jan 2015.

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Following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions up to 30 Jan 2015.

 

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