Tag: library and archives canada

False portraits: In genealogy, don’t take portraits at face value.

False portraits: In genealogy, don’t take portraits at face value.

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I happened upon this article on the Library and Archives Canada Blog a while back and was surprised to learn just how prevalent false portraits really are.

 

Although I have been aware that some portraits were false or mythical, I did believe that the majority of them were identified as such. I was aware, however, that group paintings and portraits such as battle scenes, etc. were frequently false, created entirely with the artist’s imagination.

Governor Isaac Shelby: one of numerous false portraits?
False Portraits: In genealogy, don’t take portraits at face value.

Portrait of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky.As is evident on my Pinterest Board “Genealogy Research” and my numerous portraits saved and available for free download on my Blythe Genealogy database site, I am an avid portrait collector, almost to the point of obsession.

As a result of this article, I’ve decided I’m going to research portraits to see if I can determine if they are based on reality and will attempt to accurately label as many as possible.

One thing to note, though, is that with any person for whom numerous portraits are available by numerous artists, it is more likely they are based on reality.

However, even in this case, although much less likely to Shelby, Isaac Sketchbe false, there have been some whose variety of portraits were based on a previous false portrait and not on the real person – especially in cases where the first known portrait was created after death.

The portraits I have included are those I’ve collected of General Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky. It is fairly sure his portraits are based on his actual appearance because there are subtle changes between portraits including age and/or physical countenance. In this case, the portraits in which he’s more aged show him to be more gaunt and carrying a cane.

These portraits are likely based on reality because:

  • They are either original or based on an original, authentic, documented or researched portrait.
  • The artist, date of the portrait and circumstances are clearly documented.
  • Shelby-Isaac-2-219x3001.jpgThe portrait was commissioned by a group, family or government as with the portrait above of Governor Isaac Shelby.
  • There are several portraits by several different artists showing a progression in age, physical condition, etc. through the years.
  • The portrait has been researched and documented by an archive, museum, researcher, etc.

Portraits may not be based on reality because:

  • There is no existing documentation regarding date and circumstances of the portrait.
  • Not known to have been commissioned by a group, family or government.
  • Only existing portraits are rough sketches in books, etc.
  • All existing portrait variations are almost exact, not showing age progression, physical condition, etc. through time.
  • Portrait is created after the death of the subject.

In the case of these portraits of Isaac Shelby, I can also be confident of their authenticity because of genetics – the likeness carried on through the family and the similarity between Isaac and my father-in-law.

 


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Getting the most from Library and Archives Canada databases.

Getting the most from Library and Archives Canada databases.

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The wealth of information on the Library and Archives Canada website has become more easily searchable over the years as more and more indexing has occurred.

 

Albert Joseph Philias Emery died March 1, 1916 at Vimy Ridge.
My great uncle, Pte Joseph Philias Albert Emery was MIA (believed killed) during advance preparations for the advance on Vimy Ridge.

As one who is very familiar with and has used this site for years, I have found it to be so extensive that I make sure to bookmark any pages I would like to examine further so I can find them again later.

At one time, it was almost impossible to find them again otherwise.

The site has since added  an “Ancestors Search” to enable searching several of the site’s databases in one step, in addition to more targeted searches of specific databases.

Some things to remember when searching large sites and databases are:

  • Remember to use wild cards and the soundex features in your searches as transcription errors are very common due to the quality of the archived documents, handwriting, etc.
  • Middle names or nicknames may have been used routinely, especially since children were frequently named after parents or other family members and this was the best way to differentiate between individuals.
  • Language barriers and miscommunication sometimes resulted in surnames and given names being anglicized or simplified.
  • Those recording data and/or completing documentation frequently resorted to phonetic spelling because they were much less educated.
  • After widowhood, separation, divorce and sometimes even during marriage, a woman could sometimes be listed by her maiden name.
  • It was not uncommon for individuals to not know their own birth date, immigration date, etc. leaving gaps in data or in the worst cases, providing erroneous information.

This link is one of numerous included in my “Favorite Research Links” in the lower sidebar – along with several others from the Library and Archives Canada site that I have also listed below for your information.

Library and Archives Canada

  • Ancestors Search
  • Books of Remembrance
  • Databases
  • Canada’s Digital Collections
  • Genealogy Index
  • War and Military

If you have Canadian ancestors, it’s well worth your while to check out this site.


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Immigrants from China database updated at Library and Archives Canada

Immigrants from China database updated at Library and Archives Canada

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In Canada, May is Asian Heritage Month, and Library and Archives Canada has announced it has updates to the Immigrants from China database.

 

Jumbo in the doorway of Jumbo's cabin.
Jumbo in the doorway of Jumbo’s cabin.

Although I have no Chinese ancestry (at least to my knowledge), I’ve always been fascinated with the history of Chinese immigrants working in the coal mines.

This is the result of living near Cumberland, BC, one of the earliest coal mines in the province.

In my twenties, I frequently went on ‘adventures’ with my camera and one of the places I visited was the old dump site of the Chinese miners’ village and Jumbo’s Cabin. Jumbo was one of the coal miners who, as a group, were key to the progress of British Columbia.

According to Wikipedia.org:

The Chinese were, on this occasion, shipped as an experiment: they have generally been esteemed an hardy, and industrious, as well as ingenious race of people; they live on fish and rice, and, requiring but low wages, it was a matter also of œconomical consideration to employ them; and during the whole of the voyage there was every reason to be satisfied with their services. If hereafter trading posts should be established on the American coast, a colony of these men would be a very valuable acquisition.

—John Meares, Voyages Made in the Years 1788 and 1789, from China to the North West Coast of America.

The Immigrants from China database includes the C.I.9 certificates of Chinese immigrants. Included in these records are photographs, personal information such as name, age, place of birth, date and port of departure; and the ship’s name.


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Genealogy News Bites to 12 Jun 2014

Genealogy News Bites to 12 Jun 2014

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Following are the current genealogy news bites and headlines up to June 12, 2014.
Genealogy News Bites
Genealogy News Bites and Headlines

Ancestry.com Blog

Comments on Y-DNA and mtDNA Tests

As many of you know, we announced last week that we’re retiring our Y-DNA and mtDNA tests. Unfortunately, we didn’t explain clearly our rationale for our decision, which has led to confusion. We’d like to take this opportunity to share the thinking that went into our decision making process.

Ancestry.co.uk Blog

Does This Make Angelina Jolie Kate Middleton’s Fairy Godmother?

While anxiously waiting for the release of the movie Maleficent (a “Sleeping Beauty” origin story about the malevolent fairy, in case you haven’t heard), film buffs Ancestry.ca have discovered that Elle Fanning has more in common with the character she portrays, Princess Aurora, than she may have thought. Fanning is actually the 22nd great-granddaughter of King Edward III, making her a long-lost princess. Her connection to King Edward III, who ruled from 1327-1377, makes Fanning of royal blood, a princess both on and off the big screen.

Library and Archives Canada

Newly Digitized Microfilms on the Héritage Portal

The following is a list of digitized microfilms that have been recently added to the Héritage website. Please note that the titles have been translated for convenience, the records are still in the language of origin. Searching in the original language will improve search results.

Library and Archives Canada releases an updated version of the Immigrants from China database

Last month was Asian Heritage Month, and the Library and Archives Canada (LAC) updated their database to include references to the C.I.9 certificates issued to people of Chinese origin born in Canada and wanting to leave Canada for a limited time without losing their Canadian status.

Find colour photos of Canadian Second World War soldiers

Did you know that Library and Archives Canada (LAC) has rare colour photographs from the Second World War? During that time period, colour film was a new and untested medium for most professional photographers. These images were captured on Kodak Kodachrome film by members of the Canadian Film and Photo Unit (CFPU) in the days and weeks following D-Day, on June 6, 1944.

UCSF News Services

Mexican Genetics Study Reveals Huge Variation in Ancestry

The genetic diversity of Mexican populations is reflected in the composition of chromosomes of mixed ancestry throughout Mexico. Three major Native American components are distributed across northern, central/southern, and southeastern regions of the …

NARAtions

Have Your Say: Revising the Digitization Strategy

In September 2007, the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) requested public input on a Draft Plan for Digitizing Archival Materials. Incorporating feedback from the public, NARA issued the Strategy for Digitizing Archival Materials for Public Access, 2007-2016 in May 2008. The strategy has served NARA well: the online catalog has over 2 million digital objects, the public has access to over 235 million images, and there were over 1.2 billion views of NARA content on Wikipedia in FY13.

The National Archives

Disturbing the ground: a Normandy landing

The plan of attack was to hit the long distance footpath, the GR 223, before lunch. If we could get out of Caen, the map promised us a glorious walk through the Normandy countryside. Even archivists sometimes have the need to shake the dust from their cardigans and get away from history. So much so, that I felt the ancient abbey marked in a field (doubtless a ruin) was not going to be worth a detour…

Sacramento Bee

Pa. county to create ancestry record search engine

The slowly fading pages kept at the Bucks County Courthouse chronicle one final act of charity by a Catholic saint and the 15-percent inheritance tax collected by the commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The last will and testament of St…

Olive Tree Genealogy

Honouring WW1 Soldiers – a New Website

A few of my remembered soldiers In January Olive Tree Genealogy was pleased to be asked to help beta test a new website Lives of the First World War. Lives of the First World War is one of the Imperial War Museum’s major centenary projects, which looks to uncover the life stories of the men and women who served Britain and the Commonwealth during the First World War…

Births of Children of slaves, 1804-1835 in New Jersey

An interesting database came online recently on the New Jersey State Archives website. It’s called Births of Children of slaves, 1804-1835  in New Jersey According to the website The records in this series are the direct result of “An act for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery” passed by the New Jersey Legislature…

Who Do You Think You Are? Returns!

The fifth season of the American version of Who Do You Think You Are? begins July 23 on TLC  For those who aren’t familiar with Who Do You Think You Are? it is a genealogy show produced by Lisa Kudrow and Dan Bucatinsky. The new season, which will also feature new journeys with Valerie Bertinelli, Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Kelsey Grammer, Cynthia Nixon, Rachel McAdams and her sister  Kayleen…

Geneapress

The Council for the Advancement of Forensic Genealogy to Hold …

Dallas, Texas – June 12, 2014 – The Council for the Advancement of Forensic Genealogy (CAFG) announced today that the fourth annual Forensic Genealogy Institute (FGI) will be held March 26-28, 2015, at the Wyndham …

ABC News

Smithsonian explores ancestry of Shriver family in DC

Smithsonian explores ancestry of Shriver family in D.C.. By The Associated Press. June 11, 2014 – 05:51 am. Email; Print. Decrease Increase Text size. WASHINGTON (AP) – Anthropologists from the Smithsonian have been analyzing the remains of 16 …

Slate Magazine Blog

One of New York’s Most Legendary Catholic Figures Was Also Jewish

A New York Times feature on new research into the geneaology of Cardinal John O’Connor, the New York City archbishop who died in 2000, makes the case that the influential Catholic figure’s mother was born Jewish—which, according to one tradition by …

Newswise

Deeper Than ancestry.com, ‘EvoCor’ Searches for Gene Relationships

Our bodies are as vast as oceans and space, composed of a dizzying number of different types of cells. Exploration reaches far, yet the genes that make each cell and tissue unique have remained largely obscure. That’s changing…

photo credit: Spanish Flea via photopin cc


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LAC announces acquisition of Emily Carr’s journal.

LAC announces acquisition of Emily Carr’s journal.

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Having lived on the west coast of Canada for most of my life, and having visited several British Columbia museums, art galleries, etc. over the years, I can say that one artist’s work was sure to appear or even be featured. Emily Carr is an icon of western Canadian art and is known most for her representations of our natural environment and the native cultures. I would love to be able to see the 1901 Emily Carr’s journal, being released by Library and Archives Canada (LAC).

Her painting “Kitwancool,” of 1928 captures the overwhelming feeling of being in the natural environment of British Columbia so well. It’s one of my favorites.

Emily Carr
Emily Carr

News Release from  Library and Archives Canada; 2014-05-29.

Library and Archives Canada acquires Emily Carr’s journal of Queen Victoria’s funeral.

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is pleased to announce the acquisition of a booklet created by renowned Canadian artist and writer Emily Carr. The booklet was acquired last night at the Heffel auction in Vancouver, BC.

The booklet, which dates back to 1901, demonstrates both sides of Carr’s career—her skill as an artist and her talent as a writer. Carr chronicles the efforts she and her friend Hannah Kendall made to view the funeral procession for Queen Victoria on February 2, 1901. Carr and Kendall discovered that their lack of height made it difficult to see the passing horses, soldiers, and cortege. The art student had planned ahead, hiding a stool under her voluminous skirts. This prohibited item did not help much, however, as Carr lost it in the confusion of the large crowd.

To commemorate this experience, Carr created two booklets—one for her friend, and another for herself. The drawings and verse provide insight into the early days of this very important Canadian artist, demonstrating the ways in which she challenged the conventions and social rules of the time.

Emily Carr, Kitwancool, 1928.
Emily Carr, Kitwancool, 1928.

Emily Carr is an iconic Canadian artist and writer whose work has garnered both national and international recognition.

This acquisition was supported by a financial contribution from the Friends of Library and Archives Canada, a not-for-profit organization that promotes and encourages public awareness of LAC.

Quick Facts

  • While LAC also holds materials that represent the formal reaction to the end of Victoria’s long reign, Emily Carr’s hand-produced booklet documents the more informal aspects of the Queen’s passing.

Quotes

“Our Government is proud to have acquired this important part of our history. Library and Archives Canada’s acquisitions continue to document the rich diversity of Canadian society. As we approach Canada’s 150th anniversary in 2017, there is an opportunity for all of us to reflect upon and appreciate our great heritage.”

Shelly Glover
Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages

“Emily Carr is arguably one of Canada’s most important artists, and this prestigious acquisition fits very well into the documentary art mandate of our institution.”

Hervé Déry, Acting Librarian and Archivist of Canada
Library and Archives Canada

– 30 –

Contacts

Media Relations
Richard Provencher
Library and Archives Canada

819-994-4589

MEDIA@bac-lac.gc.ca

About Library and Archives Canada

The mandate of Library and Archives Canada is to preserve the documentary heritage of Canada for the benefit of present and future generations, and to be a source of enduring knowledge accessible to all, thereby contributing to the cultural, social and economic advancement of Canada. Library and Archives Canada also facilitates co-operation among communities involved in the acquisition, preservation and diffusion of knowledge, and serves as the continuing memory of the Government of Canada and its institutions. Stay connected with Library and Archives Canada on Twitter (@LibraryArchives), Facebook, Flickr and YouTube.


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Genealogy News Bites – April 28, 2014

Genealogy News Bites – April 28, 2014

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Genealogy news: checking newspapers.In an effort to help ease the load of searching for genealogy news and genealogy events, I prepare a ‘Genealogy News Bites’ post to gather together what I feel are the most important or informative genealogy news headlines from the previous week (or thereabouts).

Following are the most recent and relevant genealogy news headlines from a broad range of sites and blogs.

 

Olive Tree Genealogy

Long Lost Love Letters Found & Returned to Descendants

This is one of those feel-good stories we all love. And wouldn’t we all love to find such a treasure? Joshua McKinney, of Casnovia, Michigan, was removing old insulation in his home’s attic when he found a stack of old love letters from World War II. The letters and certificates (birth and marriage) he found all concerned the Kissel family. It didn’t take long for Joshua and his sister to

Genealogy Canada

Counties council asked to back naming County Road 34 ‘British Home Children Commemorative Highway’

Jim Brownell who is the director of the Ontario East British Home Child Family (OEBHCF), wants to rename the roadway that goes through the towns of Lancaster, Green Valley, and Alexandria on County Road 34 as the ‘British Home Children Commemorative Highway.’

Rewriting the pages of history Shelburne student corrects foggy account of war crime

Learn how a student changed history by researching a soldier in their Second World War and discovering the story of how he been executed with six other soldiers near the small town of Mouen, France

RootsTech 2015 Call for Papers

RootsTech 2015 will be held in Salt Lake City from February 11–14, 2015, and the RootsTech Content Committee is calling for dynamic presentations that inform and educate both those seeking to begin and those continuing to discovering their family story through technology

Google Blog

Hungary’s far-right and the ‘Jewish ancestry’ slippage

Today, on Holocaust Remembrance Day (Yom HaShoah in Hebrew), we commemorate the 6 million Jews slaughtered during the Holocaust, as well as the millions of Roma, homosexuals, people with disabilities, political

FamilySearch Blog

Free Guide to Hampshire England Ancestors

FamilySearch is pleased to announce a new online guide to tracing ancestors in the ceremonial County of Hampshire England. Also known as Southampton, and including the Isle of Wight, Hampshire has a long maritime history. It is the birthplace of the Royal Navy, British Army, and Royal Air Force

Free Classes Offered at the Family History Library—May, 2014

If you are planning on visiting Salt Lake City, Utah during the month of May, you may want to plan some time to come visit the Family History Library across from Temple Square. The Family History Library is offering several free classes during the month of May. Classes are free to the public. Below is information about topics, times and locations

Irish Genealogy News

Major Irish genealogy conference in Waltham, MA

A two-day conference – Celtic Connections, The Leaving of Home: Migration, Motivation and Myth – will be held in August in Waltham, Massachussets, and will witness a gathering of many of Irish genealogy’s best-known presenters from both sides of the Atlantic

Library and Archives Canada

An Arpent, a Toise, a Perche, a League… Understanding Old French Measurements

When looking through old French records, you will frequently come across old measurements that are rather mysterious nowadays. These measurements are found in records originating in France, Quebec and Louisiana. Below is a table showing the equivalencies, but many online sites offer conversion calculators, even for these old standards

Chicago Tribune

Fifteen Days Remaining for Reduced Cost Registration for Genealogy Conference

Fifteen days remain to receive a reduced rate to The Computer-Assisted Genealogy Group of Northern Illinois’ (CAGGNI) full day genealogy conference, GeneaQuest. GeneaQuest is a full day of genealogy highlighting genealogy news and technology of the future and

Genealogy and History News

Find-A-Record Helps you Find Records

Let me tell you about a new website I’ve been playing with recently. It’s called Find-A-Record. And that’s not to be confused with ‘Find-A-Grave‘ as they are two entirely different sites. Both useful for genealogy, but both with different purposes

Ancestry.com Blog

Virtual Cemeteries, Rotating Photos, User Profiles, and More in the Updated Find A Grave iOS App

Today we’re releasing the first new features update for the app. We have a lot more we’re going to do, but these first features were the most requested and are ready to release, so we hope you like them

photo credit: Public Places via photopin cc

 


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Genealogy News Bites – April 19, 2014

Genealogy News Bites – April 19, 2014

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overwhelmed with news

In an effort to help ease the ‘news’ and ‘research’ load, I prepare a ‘Genealogy News Bites’ post to gather together what I feel are the most important or informative headlines from the previous week (or thereabouts).

Following are the recent stories and headlines of interest to the genealogy community since April 10, 2014.

 

FREE OFFERS…

Basics of Genealogy Reference : A Librarian’s Guide

Basics of Genealogy Reference : A Librarian’s Guide free download

“Basics of Genealogy Reference: A Librarian’s Guide” by Jack Simpson Overview – This book offers novice and experienced reference librarians an introduction on proven genealogy techniques and

Fold3.com

Free Access to Civil War Records on Fold3

To remember the commencement of the Civil War in April 1861, FOLD 3 invites you to explore all records in its Civil War Collection for free April 14–30. Explore Civil War documents featuring everything from military records to personal accounts and historic writings. Soldier records include service records, pension index cards, “Widows’ Pension” files, Navy survivors certificates

 

GENERAL NEWS…

Library and Archives (LAC) Canada

New Genealogy & History Records on Heritage Website

This is an announcement from Library and Archives Canada: The following is a list of digitized microfilms that have been recently added to the Héritage website. Please note that although the titles have been translated, the records are still in the language of origin.

Access to Information and Privacy requests can now be made online

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is launching a form that will enable Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) requests and payments to be made online. Processing of credit card payments will be made through the Government of Canada’s secure Receiver General Buy Button (RGBB). The request form is located on the LAC website under Transparency

Newly Digitized Microfilms on the Héritage Portal – Recent Additions

The following is a list of digitized microfilms that have been recently added to the Héritage website. Please note that although the titles have been translated, the records are still in the language of origin

Genealogy Canada Blog

Parish registers: Manitoba

Heritage Canada has put more digital records online, and one of the records that you may find helpful are the parish records for Manitoba.Government registration of vital statistics (baptism, marriage and death) for Manitoba did not begin until the late 1800s

Parish registers have been put online

Irene Schofield just sent a notice that the registers of St. Ann Roman Catholic Church, Guyborough, Nova Scotia has just been transcribed and have been put on http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~saintann/Records/home.html

Ancestry.ca

Genealogy Canada: Ancestry.ca releases Lower Canada and …

Ancestry.ca releases Lower Canada and Canada East Census Records. Ancestry.ca has announced the release of more than 120,000 Canadian Census records from Lower Canada (now Quebec)

Ancestry.com

Probate in the United Kingdom: An Overview

After finding your ancestors in civil registration, census records, and parish registers, there are many different record types that are widely available for the UK. When I’m doing research, I usually look for probate records, and specifically wills, of my ancestors

Pennsylvania Death Certificates Now Available

Pennsylvania research just got easier, thanks to the release of Pennsylvania, Death Certificates 1906-1924. This collection contains more than 2.4 million records and has images of the actual death certificates

Tattoos: Signs of an “Interesting Past”

Jack London is quoted as saying, “Show me a man with a tattoo and I’ll show you a man with an interesting past.” My great-great-grandfather, Thomas Howley, was certainly no exception. In 1864, he joined the U.S. Navy under an assumed name so his wife wouldn’t find out

DNA Hints – Providing More Clarity To My DNA Results

Last week we announced that the AncestryDNA team collectively has found 2.7 million DNA hints. 10 days later, we are nearing 3 million DNA hints – and the number is increasing as more and more people get tested and build out their family tree. Remember: a hint is more than a DNA match. You get a DNA hint when AncestryDNA has found a common ancestor you and a DNA match share

Ancestry Scanning to Return in 2014 – Genealogy Jamboree Blog

We have received confirmation that Ancestry will again be on site during Jamboree to provide free scanning services. In past years, scanning has been one of the most popular activities at Jamboree. We know you’ll be happy

Online Trees. Root of All Evil?

…So are trees the root of all evil? In a word, no. And in fact, not only are they not evil, if you are doing genealogy correctly, they must be part of your research plan. Yep, I went there. Now, I’m sure some of you just spit coffee

Ancestry.co.uk

King George’s Answer to the White Feather: World War I’s Silver War Badge

The British Empire lost more than 700,000 service personnel in World War I, and almost three times that many were discharged because of wounds or illness that left them physically unfit for service. The service and sacrifice of more than 800,000 of these men—and women—is recognized in the collection of Silver War Badge Records, 1914–1920, now on Ancestry.co.uk

The Ancestry Insider

Win Ancestry.com Subscription, DNA Test, and Research Package

The unofficial, unauthorized view of Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org. The Ancestry Insider reports on, defends, and constructively criticizes these two websites and associated topics. The author attempts to fairly and

Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter (EOGN)

Update: 2014 Genealogy Cruise Early Booking Special – Eastman’s …

I wrote earlier (at http://goo.gl/MttkJE and at http://goo.gl/qhG8Oe) about a 7-day genealogy cruise on board the Celebrity Silhouette in the Eastern Caribbean that starts on December 7, 2014. I will be one of the speakers on

Federation of Genealogical Societies calls for Award Nominations …

April 10, 2014 – Austin, TX. The Federation of Genealogical Societies (FGS) calls for genealogy contribution award nominations through June 15, 2014. The specific award categories and a link to the submission form can be

Brookings Institution Blog

Trace Your Genetic Ancestry Through National Geographic’s Genographic Project

Ever wonder where you came from? Now with the help of National Geographic’s Genographic Project, you can find out. Population geneticist Dr. Spencer Wells and a team at National Geo (www.genographic.com) will send you a Geno 2.0 test kit that collect

FamilySearch.org

Attention Indexers! Your Feedback Is Needed

With the introduction of the new indexing program, FamilySearch is planning to introduce a new process to maintain indexing quality. In this new model, a single volunteer will index and submit a batch, and a second volunteer will review the completed work. The person reviewing the batch will have the ability to add corrections

FamilySearch Adds More Than 2.1 Million Images to Collections from Italy

FamilySearch has added more than 2.1 million images to collections from Italy. Notable collection updates include the 89,778 images from the new Italy, Lucca, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1807–1814, collection; the 445,302 images from the new Italy, Genova, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1796–1812, 1838–1859, 1866–1899, collection

Genealogy and History News

Chris Paton–Thomas MacEntee Downunder Tour Survey Stats …

Their events include genealogy expos, roadshows, cruises, and more some specialised meetings from time to time. To help with future events they rely on feedback, so after each event they send out a survey which allows

The National Archives (UK)

To display or not to display – that is the question…

Faded book spines, curtain backs, and tapestries; we’ve all witnessed the irreversible damage that light can cause to decorative objects.  Such colour change can detrimentally affect the aesthetic appeal, interpretation

National Genealogical Society

UpFront with NGS: The newest genealogy-related Apps for ios…

It also puts me in a bind as far as this blog, since I really like to report “news” that has broad utility and ideally that would be announcing the availability of a genealogy-related app for both platforms


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Genealogy News Bites – April 10, 2014

Genealogy News Bites – April 10, 2014

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Genealogy News Bites
Genealogy News Bites

Following are the genealogy news bites and headlines up to April 10, 2014.

The Week

Adolf Hitler’s wife Eva Braun ‘had Jewish ancestry’

Scientists who extracted genetic material from Eva Braun’s hair found she had Jewish ancestry

Gloucester Citizen

Old fashioned baby names dying out: The full list from Ancestry.co.uk

Research carried out by Ancestry.co.uk studied birth records for 1905 and produced a ‘top 100’. They then compared the names to those on the 2012 baby name list from the Office for National Statistics (ONS), the most recent data available. The extinct

Olive Tree Genealogy

Evidence of St. Louis French Colonial Log Home Found

Evidence of a French colonial home in St. Louis was found beneath layers of concrete and bricks during digging by the Department of Transportation.  It is the first trace

One Man in England Saves 5000 WW1 Photos from Being Destroyed

Screen Dump from BBC News Sussex website This is a fascinating story about an ordinary man in England who took it on himself to save and preserve WW1 photos, cards, letters and other objects from the dump

DAR Accepting DNA as Evidence of Descent From Revolutionary War Ancestor

Good news for those seeking to prove an ancestor for admittance to DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution). Keeping up with the times, DAR now accepts DNA as evidence

Corpses of WW1 Soldiers Found as Glaciers Melt in Italy

A recent story online Melting glaciers in northern Italy reveal corpses of WW1 soldiers explains how dead soldiers from WW1 battles are being found and reburied by local villagers

Library and Archives Canada

Sir John A. Macdonald: Rare and intriguing treasures from the vaults of Library and Archives Canada

Library and Archives Canada holds Canada’s most comprehensive collection of material related to the life, times and continuing appeal of Sir John A. Macdonald (1815–1891)

The Vindicator

Program on DNA Testing as a Tool for Genealogy

While her educational research focused on Cajun identity and language, her role in customer support at Family Tree DNA has led to a passion for educating the public on how to make their own connections through genetic genealogy. Her program, Getting

Huffington Post

Utah Prisoners Do Mormon Research From JailGenealogy

SALT LAKE CITY (RNS) William J. Hopkins already knew a bit about genealogy work when he arrived at the Utah State Prison in 1994, an interest that was sparked in his teens by an aunt who is a family historian. Hopkins, 40, now spends two to three hours

Owen Sound Sun Times

War medals return, family thrilled

Grey Roots purchased an Owen Sound man’s First World War war medals on eBay and now Sgt. Nelson Ross “Scotty” Crowe’s great-great-niece has come forward with pictures and details about the soldier’s life

Magic Valley Times-News

Hidden History: Farm Labor Camps in WWII

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed in 1942 an order placing all people of Japanese ancestry within the U.S. into 11 relocation centers throughout the West

Brisbane Times

DNA to pick out suspect, warts and all

Australian police and researchers are developing a ground-breaking test that will help them identify suspects based on the DNA evidence they leave behind

The Guardian

Spain offers Sephardic Jews fast track to naturalisation

Cabinet approves bill allowing dual nationality for Jews whose ancestors fled the Spanish inquisition Spain has announced new measures to speed up the naturalisation of Jews of Sephardic descent whose ancestors fled the Iberian peninsula five centuries ago when they were told to convert to Catholicism or go into exile

Havana street produces 12 sets of twins

High number of twins in Cuban capital district baffles scientists, as locals blame everything from genetics to a sacred tree Some say it could be something in the water. Others point to a tree with mystical significance

Tracing your family tree? The 10 best apps to help you find your relatives

Laura Berry, lead genealogist for BBC1’s Who Do You Think You Are?, offers an expert’s guide to aid your online searches A decade ago there was no point even considering researching your roots

The Scotsman

Pensioner meets brother and sister after 70 years

A Scottish pensioner has been reunited with his long-lost brother and sister for the first time in 70 years

Payvand Iran News

Eight Iranian-Americans among recipients of the 2014 Ellis Island Medal of Honor

Eight Iranian-Americans are among the recipients of the 2014 Ellis Island Medal of Honor which will be awarded on May 10th, 2014. The medals are presented annually to American citizens who have distinguished themselves within their own ethnic groups while exemplifying the values of the American way of life

The Vancouver Sun

John Mackie: Vancouver’s vaudeville mystery solved

Lucy Tremblay died in 1983. So imagine her daughter-in-law’s surprise when she opened up Monday’s Vancouver Sun to see Lucy in a vaudeville photo from the 1910s or ’20s


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Genealogy News Bites to March 28, 2014

Genealogy News Bites to March 28, 2014

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Internet podcasts

National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)

Amara is an online resource that gives individuals, communities, and larger organizations the power to overcome accessibility and language barriers for online videos.  This unique tool is simple to use, collaborative, and fun

National Archives (Great Britain)

Last autumn we put out a call to the higher education sector for research project proposals based on our research agenda, and received a fantastic response.  Proposals of the highest quality were received

Web Pro News

…there are plenty of ancestry sites that will help you locate the records you need. Most of these sites charge a subscription fee. The question is, are they worth the cost? If you plan on putting a lot of time and effort into your genealogy or family history

Ancestry.co.uk Blog

DNA solved a 70-year-old question of whether Loraine Allison survived the Titanic crash. Many have wondered what happened to the two-year-old little girl

FamilySearch.org Blog

For those who were not able to personally attend RootsTech 2014, we now have the video recorded present(ation)s of nineteen selected speakers posted online

Several new research classes have been added to the Learning Center on FamilySearch.org. The new training includes courses in Swedish, Danish, and Czech research, as well as 8 Spanish language research courses

Fold3 Blog

Fold3 has digitized nine titles documenting hundreds of thousands of men who served in the New York National Guard (NYNG) and other New York regiments for conflicts from the Civil War to World War II

Library and Archives Canada (LAC)

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) has a wealth of early sound recordings of pioneers in the arts on discs and wax cylinders. These recordings cover a range of themes, such as patriotic songs, jazz and dance from the 1920s, Québécois recordings

LAC is releasing its latest podcast episode, The Virtual Gramophone: Early Canadian Sound Recordings. LAC’s Virtual Gramophone is a multimedia website

Fort Howe images are now on Flickr. During the American Revolution, New Brunswick experienced continuous pressure from American forces including attacks

Discover a sampling of photos of the Indian Residential Schools of Alberta. The photos from other provinces and territories will be added to this first collection this summer

The following photographs are part of the Arctic Images from the Turn of the Twentieth Century exhibition presented at the National Gallery of Canada. Featuring material from Library and Archives Canada’s collections, the exhibition showcases rarely seen images

photo credit: Br3nda via photopin cc


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I wait with bated breath for the completion of two amazing new digitization projects by Library and Archives Canada.

I wait with bated breath for the completion of two amazing new digitization projects by Library and Archives Canada.

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WWI Soldier in serviceWWI Expeditionary Force personnel and service records.

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) has announced they will be digitizing 640,000 service and personnel records of the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF).After being housed at LAC, these files are the most heavily consulted collection and the amount of research being conducted through the use of the paper documents and LAC is anxious to digitize them to preserve the originals for future generations.

Unfortunately, this project will require closure of portions of the collection, starting with letters A through D being closed March 2014 and expected to be available digitally online sometime in the summer. LAC will be unable to provide personal consultation and copying services from the closed collections.

This collection in particular is of interest to me because of my research into our two family members who were killed in WWI: Philias Joseph Albert Emery, who was missing and assumed killed during the preparations at Vimy Ridge; and Joseph Turmaine, who was missing in action and assumed dead at the battle of Courcelette.

The project is expected to be complete sometime in 2015.

LAC requests that interested parties consult the Fact Sheet: Digitization of Canadian Expeditionary Force Service Files.

Upper Canada governmentDigitization and indexing of millions of government administrative and personal documents.

This digitization project is expected to triple the digitized content LAC already has available online for free.

New content being added to the Héritage website will include, in part: Civil Secretary’s letter books of Upper Canada; despatches from the Colonial Office; general index to the Public Archives of Canada; Heir and Devisee Commission; Lower Canada, declarations of aliens; port records; and Upper Canada land books and sundries.

photo credit: Toronto Public Library Special Collections via photopin cc
photo credit: BiblioArchives / LibraryArchives via photopin cc


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