Tag: Marriage

Transcription: Marriage Record for Oscar Thomas Blythe and Thirza Estelle McKim

Transcription: Marriage Record for Oscar Thomas Blythe and Thirza Estelle McKim

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Marriage for Oscar Blythe and Thirza McKim

This is my transcription of the marriage record for Oscar Thomas Blythe and Thirza Estelle McKim of August 9, 1930 in Butte Fourche, Butte County, South Dakota.

Marriage for Oscar Blythe and Thirza McKim

Original Form Text is black. Text entered by hand is blue.

_____________________________

South Dakota Department of Health

Division of Public Health Statistics                                                                                                                                            County No. 655

RECORD OF MARRIAGE                                                                                                                                                            State No. 139423

Date of Marriage: Aug      Month: 9      Day: Yr.: 1930

Where Solemnized: Butte Fourche

City, County: Butte

GROOM

Full Name: Oscar Thomas Blythe

Usual Residence: Nisland, Butte

(City, County) Butte

BRIDE

Full Name: Thirza Estelle McKim

Usual Residence: Fruitdale

(City, County) Butte

Age

(last birthday)

24

White X

Other

(state)

Date of Birth:

Age

(last birthday)

19

White X

Other

(state)

Date of Birth:

Place of Birth:

Place of Birth:

Number of times previously married:

Last Marital Status

Widowed Annulment

Divorced Never Married X

Number of times previously married:

Last Marital Status

Widowed Annulment

Divorced Never Married X

SDVS-11

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Hartford Vital Records; Stanley, Standley, Standly, Standla; page 394

Transcription: Hartford Vital Records; Stanley, Standley, Standly, Standla; page 394

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HARTFORD VITAL RECORDS

394

BARBOUR COLLECTION

(NAME/DESCRIPTION  |  Vol  |  Page)

STANLEY, STANDLEY, STANDLY, STANDLA, (cont )
Nath[anie]l, s Nath[anie]l & Anna, b Aug 11, 1707  |  FFS  |  61
Nathaniel, d Nov 14, 1712   |  FFS  |  74
Oliver, m Mrs Mary GOODRICH, Aug 26, 1821, by Elisha Cushman  |  I  |  24
Oliver, m Mrs. Eliza WHITE, Feb 13, 1851, by Rev D. B  Tumer  |  I  |  301
Robert, m Huldah KING, b. of Hartford, Feb. 26, 1826, by Rev. Joel Linsley  |  I  |  48
Ruth, m. Izack MORE, Dec. 5, 1645  |  D  |  22
Ruth, m. Isack MORE, Dec 5, 1645  |  FFS  |  26
Ruth, [d Caleb], b July 1, 1696  |  D  |  18
Ruth, [d Caleb], b July 1, 1696  |  FFS  |  21
Ruth, m James BIDWELL, Dec. 3, 1713  |  D  |  72
Ruth, m James BIDWELL, Dec. 3, 1713  |  FFS  |  34
Ruth Ann, of Farmington, m. John R LEWIS, of Carlinville, 111 , Nov 19, 1835, by Rev. Henry Stanwood  |  I  |  126
Samuel, s Samuel & Ann, b. Jan 17, 1730/1  |  FFS  |  72
Saphira, of East Hartford, m Timothy MORE, of Gt Barrington, Apr 28, 1850, by Rev Jacob A Prime  |  I  |  284
Sarrah, [d Nathaniell & Sarrah], b Aug 24, 1669  |  D  |  18
Sarrah, d Nath[anie]ll & Sarrah, b Aug 24, 1669  |  FFS  |  21
Sarah, d. Nov. 28, 1689  |  D  |  18
Sarah, d Nov 28, 1689  |  FFS  |  21
Sarah, [d Nathaniell & Anna], b. Jan 18*, 1708/9 *(Date is doubtful)  |  D  |  16
Sarah, [d. Nathaniel 8: Anna], b. Jan. 18, 1708/9  |  FFS  |  61
Sarah, d [Nathaniel & Anna], b. Jan. 23(?), 1708/9  |  FFS  |  18
Sarah, w. Nath[anie]ll, d. Aug. 18, 1716  |  FFS  |  74
Susanna, [d. Nathaniell & Sarrah], b. Apr. 13, 1681; d Sept 18, 1683  |  D  |  18
Susanna, d [Nathaniell & Sarrah], b Apr. 13, 1681, d Sept 18, 1683  |  FFS  |  21
Susanna, [d Nathaniel & Anna], b June 26, 1717  |  FFS  |  61
Timothy, s Caleb & Abigail, b Feb. 9, 1705/6  |  FFS  |  61
Walter, of New Britain, m. Maria KNOX, of Hartford, Apr 12, 1842, by Rev. O. E. Daggett  |  I  |  179
William P., of Cleaveland, O., m Helen M. BRACE, of West Hartford, Oct. 3, 1849, by Rev Dwight M Seward  |  I  |  288
William W , m. Parmelia M BENTON, Sept 29, 1830, by Rev Joel Hawes  |  I  |  90
STANNARD, E N., Co1., of New Haven, m. Rachel WOODRUFF,  of Southington, May 29, 1845, by Rev John Moore  |  I  |  207
Lory Ann, m. Oliver SHEPHERD, b. of Hartford, May 18, 1824, by Rev. Nathan Perkins, of West Hartford  |  I  |  37
STANNIS, Mary L., m. Benjamin A. BOURNE, b of Hartford, Jan 11, 1849, by Rev. E Crawford  |  I  |  259
STANTON. STANTEN, Joseph, s. Thomas, bp Mar 21, 1646  |  D  |  4

(This is the final page of entries for STANLEY.)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription: Biography of Ervin Thornton and his family, of Tappen, New York.

Transcription: Biography of Ervin Thornton and his family, of Tappen, New York.

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Transcription: Biography of Ervin Thornton and his family, of Tappen, New York.

[Tappen, 1878 – 1966]

ERVIN THORNTON

Ervin Thornton family biography.
Ervin Thornton family biography.

On September 12. 1948 Ervin Thornton and Wynola Dewald were united in marriage in the Lutheran Church at Dawson. They were the first couple to be married in this church after it was moved there from Gackle. They made their home in Steele in a  home that was known as the “old Hi Maw House” from north of Tappen. Wynola’s father Christ Dewald moved it from Tappen to Dawson where it was for several years, then he moved it to Steele into the block next to the Archie Thornton home. This was their home for two years.

Ervin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Archie Thornton of Steele. was born in 1925 at Steele where he made his home and received his education. Ervin was the only boy in a family of four children. Rumor has it that at a very young age he was very handy with a sling shot. He could hit many targets but he was especially good at hitting a bent-over target. At the age of 16 he went to Portland, Oregon and worked on a housing project with his father. In 1944 he joined the Navy serving one ear in the states and one overseas in Japan. After his discharge he went into the trucking business for himself.

Wynola, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Christ Dewald, was born in 1930 in Napoleon. At the age of three she moved with her parents to a country store south of Dawson. She attended her elementary grades at a country school while living there. During her freshman year in high school, which she attended in Streeter, her  family moved to Dawson. Wynola graduated from Dawson High School in 1947. The following year she taught school south of Tappen in a country school near the Art J. Werre farm. After being married she taught one year north of Dawson and three years west of Steele.

In 1950 they purchased the Hoffer truckline and moved to Tappen where they are still living at present. Ervin and Wynola are the parents of four children: Donivan 15. Nanette 13, Bradley 11, and Wendell 9.

They are members of the St. John’s Lutheran Church in Tappen where Wynola teaches Sunday School and is a member of the Ladies Aid. In the fifteen years they have lived in Tappen they have found the people to be true friends and they enioy living there very much.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Debate about numbers, percentages and odds in genealogy fascinates.

Debate about numbers, percentages and odds in genealogy fascinates.

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inbreedingThere will always be debate about numbers, percentages and odds in genealogy.

I am so lucky that we have such a wide range of ancestries and national origins in my husband’s and my family trees. Those who have read my posts before are already well aware that our ancestries branch off from four (or five) distinct groups, and marriage between these groups is rare.

The groups containing our ancestries are:

MY ANCESTRY

  • Acadians

French Huguenots escaping religious persecution in France in the mid to late 17th century relocated to the Atlantic coast of Canada and the United States, giving birth to the Acadian and Cajun cultures.

  • French Canadians

You would think, since the origins of French Canadians are essentially the same as the Acadians, there would be more intermarriage between the two, but I have found very few connections between the two groups in our family tree – at least so far. Most French Canadians descended from French explorers and pioneers involved in the fur trade and colonizing what is now part of Ontario and Quebec, although Acadians did find their way up the St. Lawrence River after the great expulsion (grand dérangement) of the French settlers by the British colonists.

MARK’S ANCESTRY

  • Scandinavian

Although the majority of the ancestry of my husband on his mother’s side is Swedish, the other Scandinavian nations and cultures are represented as well.

  • Welsh Quaker

Mark’s ancestry on his father’s side originates from Welsh immigrants who were also escaping religious persecution for their puritan beliefs at the hands of the Welsh and British nobility and clergy.

  • British Royalty and Nobility

The interesting point to make here is that Mark’s connections to British royalty and nobility occur through his Welsh Quaker ancestry.

I decided to touch on this subject after reading the post on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter entitled, “Man Traces Ancestry to 1st English King – So What?.”

Mathematically, Dick Eastman’s calculations of the numbers of ancestors and/or descendants in a family based upon an average number and length of generations, as well as an average number of children in families appear to make sense. However, there are so many variables affecting the numbers, that it is almost impossible to make accurate estimations, much less calculations.

These variables include:

  1. Individuals who remained single and bore no children.
  2. Individuals who died young and were never married, much less had children.
  3. Mass deaths due to war, disease and poverty wiping out most or all of a generation or two.
  4. Variations in sizes of families as influenced by tradition or custom, health and fertility, relationships, economics, etc.

One major point made by Dick is his belief that everyone can eventually trace their ancestries back to royalty, but by my experience, this appears to be flawed.

As illustrated in the diverse groups outlined above in our ancestries, we originate from several unique national, ethnic, and socio-economic groups. Examining our family tree makes it apparent that intermarriage between these groups was almost impossible due to geography, economics, politics and custom. Most people, no matter where they were from or how wealthy and socially prominent they were, usually married within their own group.

The interesting point illustrated by our ancestry is that although my husband’s and my ancestries are quite separate and rarely intermarried, the fact that he and I married and had our two children now combines our ancestries for all future generations. Therefore, it’s easy to assume that intermarriage occurred (and will occur) much more as the world became smaller through technology, multi-culturalism, etc., which are more modern phenomena of the last hundred years or so.

In previous posts, I touched on this subject as it relates to our ancestry and evolving cultural methods of managing relationships and marriages to ensure as little inbreeding as possible. These posts are “The Science of Husbandry on a Human Scale” and “Ingenius incest prevention app created by University of Iceland students.

I must thank Dick Eastman as his is one of the few blogs I do read that routinely challenge my thinking and assumptions. I like that.

photo credit: wonker via photopin cc


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Transcription: Tombstone of Zotique Cloutier, Rosa Kingsberry, Raymonde Cloutier, Rene Cloutier, Ronald Cloutier, Rollande Labelle

Transcription: Tombstone of Zotique Cloutier, Rosa Kingsberry, Raymonde Cloutier, Rene Cloutier, Ronald Cloutier, Rollande Labelle

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Transcription of the family tombstone of Zotique Cloutier, Rosa Kingsberry, Raymonde Cloutier, Rene Cloutier, Ronald Cloutier, and Rollande Labelle.

 

Cloutier Family Tombstone
Cloutier Family Tombstone

 

CLOUTIER

1891     Zotique Cloutier     1972

epoux de

1902     Rosa Kingsberry     1994

1932     Raymonde Cloutier

1944     Rene Cloutier     1994

1938     Ronald Cloutier

epoux de

1941     Rollande Labelle

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription: U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942; Augustus Coke Cronkhite

Transcription: U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942; Augustus Coke Cronkhite

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US WWII Draft Registration Card for Augustus Coke Cronkhite

WWII Draft Card for Augustus C. Cronkhite
WWII Draft Card for Augustus C. Cronkhite

REGISTRATION CARD — (Men born on or after April 28, 1877 and on or before February 16, 1897)

Line 1
SERIAL NUMBER: U1618
NAME: Augustus Coke Cronkhite
ORDER NUMBER:

Line 2
PLACE OF RESIDENCE: Kingman, Sugar Creek Twp., Parke, Indiana
(The place of residence given on the line above will determine local board jurisdiction; line 2 of registration certificate will be identical)

Line 3
MAILING ADDRESS: Same
(Mailing address if other than line 2. If same, insert word same)

Line 4
TELEPHONE: Wallace

Line 5
AGE IN YEARS: 52; DATE OF BIRTH: May 31 1989 (typo: should read ‘1889’)

Line 6
PLACE OF BIRTH: Warren

Line 7
NAME AND ADDRESS OF PERSON WHO WILL ALWAYS KNOW YOUR ADDRESS: Martha Cronkhite, Kingman, Indiana

Line 8
EMPLOYER’S NAME AND ADDRESS: self

Line 9
PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT OR BUSINESS: R.F.D. #1, Kingman, Parke, Indiana
(Number and street or R. F. D. number) (Town) (State)

I AFFIRM THAT I HAVE VERIFIED ABOVE ANSWERS AND THAT THEY ARE TRUE.

D. S. S. FORM 1 16-21630-2    Augustus Coke Cronkhite
(Revised 4-1-42)      (over)        (Registrant’s Signature)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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We must fight for our veterans as they fought for us.

We must fight for our veterans as they fought for us.

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We must fight for our veterans.
poppy field

Remembrance Day is fast approaching and this is one very important day I always recognize with a post on this blog.

My family’s history is well-entrenched in military service.

  • My father was in the military for 30 years.
  • My father-in-law was in the military for over 30 years.
  • My husband, Mark served 20 years.

They all served tours in hostile environments.

Our family have also lost two family members in WWI, one being Pte Philias Joseph Albert Emery during advance actions at Vimy Ridge, and the other being Pte Joseph Turmaine in the Battle of Courcelette.

I have always thought that our government was not doing enough to help veterans who are disabled as a result of their duties.

I’m appalled to say that under this present Conservative government, instead of improving, the conditions and treatment of our valued veterans are much, much worse.

Reading this post at Change.org prompted me to write about his myself and I encourage everyone to go online at the Change.org site to sign the petition demanding better financial, physical and mental health care, and administrative treatment of our veterans.

This video of a rant by Rick Mercer on behalf of our veterans is a good example of just one area of concern.

Author credit: Christine Blythe, Feathering the Empty Nest Blog

photo credit: Dukas.Ju via photopin cc


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Historical Vital Statistics website of Nova Scotia Archives is searchable in French and English.

Historical Vital Statistics website of Nova Scotia Archives is searchable in French and English.

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I have a few favorite, go-to sites that I use much more than any others, and the Nova Scotia Archives site is one. Considering the substantial Acadian ancestry of my family, it’s no surprise that the majority of vital records for the majority of my ancestors are available on this site.

The searchable database of the Nova Scotia Archives contains almost one million names, each of which is linked to a corresponding vital registration, including births, baptisms, deaths and marriages. The records date from the mid-1700’s to the 1960’s, are all digitized and available online, and are searchable in French.

The records can be searched in both French and English on the Historical Vital Statistics website.


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Genealogy Mystery: Who were Christian W. Keefer’s parents?

Genealogy Mystery: Who were Christian W. Keefer’s parents?

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Christian W. Keefer (Chester) is an important figure in one of the main branches of my husband’s and children’s ascendancy. He married Mary Ann Jacques and they eventually settled and raised a family in Dodge County, Wisconsin.

After numerous years of research, however, I’m still left scratching my head at the mystery of the identity of Christian W. Keefer’s parents.

As can be seen in the list of sources I’ve found and logged for Christian (below), you would think that at least one of them would provide some concrete information about his parentage and place of birth, but that turns out to not be the case.

Here’s what I know for sure:

Christian W. Keefer was born October 1, 1811 in Pennsylvania and his family originated from France.

Christian W. Keefer's parents.
Sources for Christian W. Keefer.

That’s it.

I originally took a mention of Philadelphia as Christian’s birthplace in a biography of his son Charles with a grain of salt. I do believe that people did and do tend to describe where they’ve come from by using the nearest, largest center that would be recognized outside the area. For example, although we live in Chilliwack, BC, Canada, we frequently say we’re located near Vancouver to those who are not from the area. Considering this possibility, I would not rule out any birth location in Pennsylvania.

I have considered the possibility that our Christian may be one of the Christians mentioned of the Keefer / Kiefer family in the “Biographical Annals of Franklin County”. I was able to systematically eliminate every Christian mentioned because they could not have been born on or near the birth date of our Christian (Chester), or they married into different families, etc.

Another  possibility I’ve been checking is that his father (and possibly mother as well), may have immigrated to the United States from Germany (or Switzerland), but I’ve been unable to find immigration or naturalization records that show such a connection.

However, the same biography previously mentioned states that he was of French origin.

Through all of my research over the years, every Keefer family is of Germanic origin – except one.

The only family that shows of French origin in the time period is (lo and behold!) actually living in Philadelphia and is that of Anthony and Sarah (Shillingford) Keefer.

At the time, his family was very young with only mention of one brother born in 1810 – Thomas. The earlier births of the children of Anthony and his wife Sarah are about one year apart, leaving a gap just where Christian’s would be.

Keefer, Anthony; family pedigree chart
Family pedigree chart of Anthony Keefer, showing Christian, as I’ve entered it in my database (see http://blythegenealogy.com).

I would love to find proof beyond that of coincidence and speculation of Christian W. Keefer’s parentage. I’d like nothing better than to continue further back in time and expand on this huge Keefer family

If you or anyone you know has any documentation, images, etc. of this Christian Keefer showing his parents and brothers and sisters (or parts thereof), I would dearly love to see them, or better yet, get copies.

Sources:

  1. Biographical Sketches of Old Settlers and Prominent People of Wisconsin: Vol. I (Waterloo, Wis., Huffman & Hyer, 1899); pdf file.
  2. State of Ohio, “Ohio, County Marriages, 1790-1950,” marriage, Family Search (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZ82-6QV: accessed
  3. Death certificate; Charles Keefer;  Digital Folder No.: 4008297; Image No.: 1576; Film Number: 1674527; Certificate No.: cn 23384. (7 June 1933), Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947, State of Illinois; https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQCW-SP5.
  4. FamilySearch.org, “Wisconsin Deaths and Burials, 1835-1968,” database, FamilySearch.org, FamilySearch.org (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XL3P-121: accessed ).
  5. Rootsweb, “Wisconsin Death Records,” database, Rootsweb, Rootsweb (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~keffer/deaths/Wisconsin.htm: accessed ).
  6. Keefer, Christian W., Beaver Dam Argus, Beaver Dam, Dodge County, Wisconsin, , Obituary.
  7. Obituary of Mary Ann (Jaques) Keefer.
  8. 1880 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, Beaver Dam, Dodge, Wisconsin, enumeration district (ED) Enumeration District: 004, Page: 47A, Year: 1880; Census Place: Beaver Dam, Dodge, Wisconsin; Roll: 1422; Family History Film: 1255422, Keefer Christian W.; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com : Internet 13 July 2013).
  9. 1870 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, year: 1870; census place: elba, dodge, wisconsin; roll: m593_1710; page: 165a; image: 338; family history library film: 553209, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, enumeration district (ED) Roll: M593_1710; Image: 337; Family History Library Film: 553209, Page: 164B, Roll: M593_1710; Image: 337; Family History Library Film: 553209, Keefer Christian W; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  10. 1860 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, roll: m653_1405; page: 303; image: 308, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, Page: 303, Roll: M653_1405; Image: 308; Family History Library Film: 805405, Keefer Christian W.; dgs no.: 4298900; image no.: 0038; nara no.: m653, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  11. 1850 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, roll: m432_996;  image: 209, , Page: 104A, Roll: M432_996; Page: 104A; Image: 209, Keefer Christian W.; digital image, Family Search ((http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  12. 1840 US Federal Census, Painesville, Lake, Ohio; digital image, Ancestry.ca, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : accessed ).
  13. 1830 US Federal Census, Antrim, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, age: 395; nara series: m19; roll number: 151; family history film: 0020625; digitalk image, Ancestry.com (http://blythegenealogy.com  : accessed ).

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Transcription: Newbury Marriages; Jaques

Transcription: Newbury Marriages; Jaques

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Transcription: Newbury Marriages; Jaques

Newbury Marriages

The following is my transcription of the pages concerning variations of the Jaques / Jacques surname marriages in Newbury, Massachusetts.

Page 256

…(other names)…
JAQUES (see also Jacques), Ann, and Robert Adams, jr., Oct. 29,  1725.*
Benjamin, and Apphia Coffin, May20, 1725.*
Benjamin, and Mary Noyes, Dec. 5, 1727.*
Benjamin, and Mary Adams ofRowley, at Rowley, Mar. 25, 1760.*
Benjamin (jr. int.), and Judith Noyes, Mar. 4, 1762.*
Betsey, and Jacob Hidden, int. Mar. 14, 1812.*
Charles, and Marcy Thurlo, Feb. 5, 1821.*
Daniell, and Mary Williams, Mar. 20, 1692-3.
David, and Dolley Richards of Newburyport, int. Nov. 24, 1804.
Deborah, and Cutting Lunt, Dec. 10, 1735.*
Deborah, and Capt. Israel Adams, Nov. 11, 1779.*
Deborah, and True Brown, jr. of Deerfield, N. H., Feb. 5, 1825.*

Newbury Parish Church
Newbury Parish Church

Page 257

Jaques, Eleanor, and James Noyes, May 7, 1747.*
Eleanor, and Benjamin Short, Dec. 16, 1813.*
Eliphalet, and Lydia Adams, Jan. 3, 1737-8.*
Elisabeth, and Enoch Knight, Nov.11,1736.*
Elisabeth, and Moses Moodey, June 12, 1744.*
Elisabeth, andAmos Knight of Newburyport, Jan. 12,  1797.*
Ellanor, and Benjamin Short, Dec. –, 1808 ? C. R. 1.
Enoch, and Mary Hale, int. Jan.  8, 1772.
Enoch, and Joanna Plumer, Feb. 9, 1797.*
Enoch, jr., and Sally Williams Tilton of Newburyport, May 26, 1811.*
Eunice, and Samuel Pearson, int.Dec. 5,  1767.
Eunice, and Jacob Haskell of Newburyport, Dec. 23, 1819.*
Florence, and James Safford, Apr.  5, 1763.*
Hanna, and Ephraim Plumer, Jan. 15, 1679.
Hannah, and  Ephraim B. Horn, Sept.  21, 1815.*
Henry, and Anne Knight, Oct. 8, 1648.
Henry, and Mrs. Rebecca Pikering of Portsmouth, int. Apr. 10, 1706.
Henry, and Mary Coffin, Jan. 24, 1711-12.*
Henry Cromwell, andPolly Follansbee of Newburyport, int. May9, 1807.
John, and Sarah Jaques, June 12, 1746.*
Joseph, and Martha Brown, Mar. 4, 1756.*
Judeth,  and William Dole, Apr.3, 1755.*
Judith, and Abraham Mace (jr. int.)of Newburyport, Apr. 16, 1795.*
Love, and Robert Adams, 3d, Sept 6m 1738.*
Lydia, and  Capt. Kindal Pearson of Wilmington, Jan. 30, 1737-8.*
Lydia, and Tristram Lunt, Feb. 20, 1799.*
Martha, and Enoch Thurston of Newburyport, May 28, 1794.*
Mary, and Richard Brown, May 7, 1674 (1675. CT. R.)
Mary, and  Parker  Greenleaf, Nov. 24, 1715.*
Mary, and  Samuel Peirce, Oct. 19, 1738.*
Mary, and James Greenough of Bradford, Dec. 13, 1759.*
Mary, of Gloucester, and Simon Thorla, int. Mar. 15, 1770.
Mary, and John Knight, Jan. 12, 1809.*
Mary, and Stephen Adams, jr., Jan. 27, 1814.*
Mary A., of West Newbury, and William Giddings, int.Aug.1, 1846.

Page 258

Jaques, Mehetabel, and Richard Smith, Oct. 11, 1779.*
Moses, and Sarah Woodman, Nov. 4, 1778.*
Moses, and Abigail Hale, Aug. 15, 1782.*
Moses, and Rebekah Hills, July –, 1792.*
Moses, jr., and HannahChase, int. Oct. 27, 1804.
Parker, jr., and Sarah Adams, Dec. 1, 1767.*
Phebby, and Joseph Ilsley, Sept. 3, 1798.*
Prudence, and Edmund Knight, June 11, 1751.*
Rebeckah, and John Dodge of Newburyport, int. Sept. 22, 1804.
Rhoda, and John Loud Tilton, Jan. 25, 1814.*
Richard, and Ruth Plumer, Jan. 18, 1681.
Richard, and Elisabeth Knight, Feb. 25, 1713-14.*
Richard, jr., and Mrs. Judith Noyes, Feb.  19, 1722-3.*
Richard, of Gloucester, and Mary Ilsley, Jan. 13, 1785.*
Richard, and Polly Emerson of Hampstead, N. H., int. May 15, 1792.
Richard, Lt., and Eunise Thurston, Nov. 28, 1799.*
Richard T., and Caroline Noyes, Aug. 20, 1837.*
Ruth, and Stephen Emery, Nov. 29, 1692.
Ruth, and JamesShort, Apr. 19, 1737.*
Sally, of Bradford, and Samuel Jewett, int. Mar. 5, 1814.
Samuel, and Mary Noyes, May  8,  1750.*
Samuel (jr. int.), and Eunice Chase, Aug. 12, 1779.*
Samuell, and Lydiah Pike, Dec. 12, 1717.
Sarah, Mrs. and Moses Little, jr., Feb. 12, 1716-17.*
Sarah, and John Jaques, June 12, 1746.*
Sarah, and Somersby Chase, Apr. 16, 1777.*
Sarah, and Dudley Rogers, jr., of Newburyport, int. Aug. 25, 1798.
Sarah B., and JohnEngland,Dec. 3, 1818.*
Sophia, and John Ladd, Aug. 25, 1814.*
Stephen, jr., and Mrs. Thankfull Taylor of Yarmouth, int. Feb. 21,  1712-13.
Stephen, and Mary Bartlett, July 6,1783.*
Stephen, and Mehitabel Hovey, Nov. 15, 1792.*
Steven, and Debora Plumer, May 13,  1684.
Susanah, and Moses Noyes(jr. int.), May 21, 1738.*
Susannah Newman, and Benjamin Rolf of Portland, int. Apr. 30,  1803.
Theophilus, and Sarah Wood of Newburyport, int. Mar. 14, 1795.

Page 259

Jaques, William, and Lydia Bartlet of Newburyport, int. Mar. 11, 1815.
William, andE lizabeth Savory, May 3,  1815.*
…(other names)…

___________________

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Transcription: Baptism Record for Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois

Transcription: Baptism Record for Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois

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The following is my transcription and translation of the baptism certificate for Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois.

ORIGINAL FRENCH

Extrait du régistre de baptémes, marriages, sépulture. De la paroisse de St. Hughes du Lac Saguay, from l’année mil neuf cent quinze.

Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois baptism certificate.
Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois baptism certificate.

Le trente et un octobre mil neuf cent quinze, nous frétre, soussigné, arons baptisé Marie Marguerite Yvette, née le quatre aout,fille légitimé de Émile Bourgeois, cultivateur, et de Marie-Anne Turmel de cette paroisse. Le frarraine a été Gédéon Grondines et la Marraine Antoinette Sauvéles quels ont déclaré ne savoirsigner. Le frère é tait présent et a signé avec nous Lecture faite.

Émile Bourgeois
Josephat Cossette

Lequel extrait conforme a l’original ce 31 mars 1931.

E. Brousseau
Lac Saguay

ENGLISH TRANSLATION

Extract from the register of baptisms, marriages, and burials. The parish of St. Hughes Saguay Lake, from the year one thousand nine hundred and fifteen.

On 31 October, nineteen hundred and fifteen frétre we hereby arons named Yvette Marie Marguerite, born August 4, legitimate daughter of Emile Bourgeois, farmer, and Marie-Anne Turmel of this parish. The godfather was Gédéon Grondines and godmother Antoinette Sauvéles who swore as such and signed. The priest was present and signed after reading.

Emile Bourgeois
Josephat Cossette

Extract which conforms to the original March 31, 1931.

E. Brousseau
Saguay Lake

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

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Legend lives on: George, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in wine.

Legend lives on: George, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in wine.

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George, Duke of Clarence was born on October 21, 1449 at Dublin Castle in Dublin, Ireland to Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York (21 Sep 1411-30 Dec 1460) and Cecily Neville (3 May 1415-31 May 1495). George has lived in infamy because of his horrible end: George, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in wine.

 

George, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in wine
George, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in wine.

This was a time when Richard, Duke of York, was beginning to challenge King Henry VI for the crown.

George was the third of the four sons of Richard and Cecily who survived to adulthood. Following his father’s death and the accession of his elder brother, Edward, to the throne, George was created Duke of Clarence on June 28, 1461 and became a Knight of the Garter. From February 1462 to March 1470, he was Chief Governor of Ireland, and on May 20, 1471 he became Great Chamberlain of England.

On July 11, 1469, George married Isabel Neville (5 Sep 1451-22 Dec 1476) at Calais, which was controlled by England at that time. Isabel was the daughter and co-heiress of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick and Salisbury, and his wife Anne Beauchamp.

George had actively supported his elder brother Edward’s claim to the throne, but when his father-in-law the Earl of Warwick deserted Edward to ally with Margaret of Anjou, King Henry’s consort, George, along with his pregnant wife, followed him to France.

Their firstborn, Anne, was born on April 16, 1470 on a ship off Calais, only to die shortly afterward while still on board the ship.

Henry VI rewarded George for his loyalty by making him next in line to the throne after Edward of Westminster, justifying the exclusion of Edward IV either by attainder for his treason against Henry or on the grounds of his alleged illegitimacy.

After a short time, George realized that his loyalty to his father-in-law was misplaced. Warwick had his younger daughter, Anne, marry Edward of Westminster, King Henry VI’s heir. Since it now seemed unlikely that George would be replacing Edward, George again allied with his brother King Edward and regained his favor.

The George, Duke of Clarence and his wife, Isabel.
The George, Duke of Clarence and his wife.

Although George was made Earl of Warwick on March 25, 1472, he did not inherit the entire Warwick estate as his brother, Richard, Duke of Gloucester, would marry the widowed younger sister of his wife, Anne Neville.

Anne had become increasingly concerned with her sister Isabel and how she must be coping with these hostilities. Isabel was expecting another child. She had already borne two children, their daughter Margaret (14 Aug 1473-28 May 1541) and their son, Edward (25 Feb 1475-28 Nov 1499), who was later also Earl of Warwick. Edward passed the greater part of his life in prison and was beheaded in 1499.

Being close to the king, the Woodvilles were under scrutiny, and Richard had witnessed their self-serving and underhanded ways and knew it was best to avoid them. It was well known that George had always loathed the Woodvilles. To him, they were usurpers who achieved their ends through manipulation and control.

Clarence had suspicions about the validity of the marriage of Elizabeth Woodville and did not hesitate to say so. Having been informed that a certain lady of high breeding had caught Edward’s eye, George took further notice. She was was of good morals and would not lose her virtue, even to the King, so the King had a private wedding ceremony before he had married Elizabeth Woodville. George made sure to tell the people through whom the story would travel to Burgundy and the ears of Louis XI, and James III of Scotland.

The Woodvilles became aware of the allegations and planned Clarence’s downfall to protect their positions from being threatened.

Isabel was late in her pregnancy and was staying at Warwick Castle when a lady named Ankarette Twynyho professed to be a midwife and offered her services. Things looked good at first as Isabel gave birth to a boy who they named Richard (6 Oct 1476-1 Jan 1477). Richard was a sickly child and both of his parents worried for his welfare.

Isabel seemingly recovered well from the birth. The midwife, having told them she was good with herbs for healing, also told them she could nurse the baby back to health. Both George and Isabel having believed her claims, allowed her to remain until Isabel suddenly fell ill after drinking ale. In panic, the midwife fled and Isabel died in agony two months after giving birth to Richard who lived only about three months, and they were buried together at Tewkesbury Abbey in Gloucestershire.

Clarence truly believed his wife had been murdered. He wanted whoever was responsible for his wife’s murder brought to justice, and he refused to eat and drink as if he suspected attempts to poison him as well.

Today, most historians believe Isabel’s death resulted from either childhood fever or consumption. Clarence was convinced she had been poisoned by Ankarette Twynyho, and in revenge he had her murdered in April of 1477, by having her arrested, and strong-arming a jury at Warwick into convicting her. She was one of two hanged immediately after the trial with John Thursby, a fellow defendant.

A petition regarding the events states:

“That whereas the said Ankarette on Saturday, 12th of April 17 Edward IV (1477), was in her manor at Cayford (ie Keyford, Somerset) and Richard Hyde late of Warwick, gentleman and Roger Strugg late of Bekehampton, co Somerset, towker, with drivers riotous persons to number of fourscore by the command of George, duke of Clarence, came to Cayford about two of the clock after noon and entered her house and carried her off the same day to bath and from thence on the Sunday following to Circeter (Cirencester) co. Gloucester, and from thence to Warwick, whither they brought her on the Monday following about eight of the clock in the after noon, which town of Warwick is distant from Cayforde seventy miles, and then and there took from her all her jewels, money and goods and also in the said dukes behalf, as though he had used King’s power, Commanded Thomas Delalynde, esquire, and Edith his wife, daughter of the said Ankarette, and their servants to avoid from the town of Warwick and lodged them at Stattforde upon Aven that night, six miles from thence and the said duke kept Ankarette imprison unto the hour of nine before noon on the morrow, to wit the Tuesday after the closing of Pasche (ie Easter) and caused her to be brought to the Guildhall at Warwick before divers of Justices of the peace in the County then sitting in sessions and caused her to be indicted by the name of Ankarette Twynyho, late of Warwick, widow, late servant of the duke and Isabel his wife, of having at on 10 October, 16 Edward IV, given to the said Isabel a venomous drink of ale mixed with poison, of which the latter sickened until the Sunday before Christmas, on which day she died, and the justices arraigned the said Ankarette and a jury appeared and found her guilty and it was considered that she should be led from the bar there to the gaol of Warwick and thence should be drawn through the town to the gallows of Myton and hanged till she was dead, and the Sheriff was commanded to do execution and so he did, which indictment, trail and judgement were done and given within three hours of said Tuesday, and juror for fear gave the Sheriff was verdict contrary to their conscience, in proof where of divers of them came to said Ankarette in remorse and asked her forgiveness, in consideration of the imaginations of and her good disposition, the King should ordain that the record, process, verdict and judgement should be void and of no effect, but that as the premises were done by the command of the said duke, the said justices and Sheriff and the under-Sheriff and their ministers should not be vexed, The answer of the king. So it fait come il est desire (“ Let it be done as the petitioner”)

George had known that it was the work of Elizabeth Woodville that was behind Isabel’s death and he was determined to prove to all that Elizabeth Woodville was behind it all. Elizabeth reinforced with Edward that George must be silenced for the sake of children, including the heir.

At first Edward was reluctant to turn against his brother, not caring much for his wife or her family. But George had turned his attentions to Edward, and managed to anger Edward sufficiently that he decided to act. Clarence was arrested for treason and and attempted necromancy against the King.

Wishing to look into the acts of Clarence George further, Edward summoned him to appear before him at the place of Westminster. He accused Clarence of pursuing vigilante justice and then had his guards escort Clarence to the tower. Meanwhile, a messenger brought Richard the news that Clarence was locked up in the tower and having read the charges, Richard realised that George had walked into a trap set by the Woodvilles trap and was therefore at the mercy of the King.

Richard sent a letter to Edward requesting that his own servants look after George in the tower and he had also asked Edward if he could look after George’s children. Having obtained permission, Richard journeyed to Warwick. He dispatched sent George’s most trusted servants to the tower.

By October, 1477, Richard was actively pleading for Clarence since he’d become aware that the Woodvilles were seeking Edward’s signature on  a death warrant. Richard hoped that George would beg for forgiveness and promise to remain loyal to Edward.

Upon seeing George, Richard realized he was prepared to die rather than even hint at submission to the Woodville family. Richard pleaded with Edward to allow him to try to persuade George, and Edward promised not to sign the death warrant.

Having been arrested, one of Clarence’s retainers, confessed under torture that he had ‘imagined and compassed’ the King’s death using the black arts. He implicated two others and they were all tried for treason, convicted, and sentenced to be drawn and hanged at Tyburn. One was saved at the eleventh hour by a plea for his life by the Bishop of Norwich, but the other two were executed.
Clarence chose to ignore this ominous warning.

Edward had Clarence brought to Windsor, accused him of treason, and ordered his arrest and imprisonment. Clarence was held in the Tower of London and put on trial for treason against his brother Edward IV. Edward prosecuted his own brother, demanding that a Bill of Attainder be passed by Parliament. Clarence was executed at the Tower of London on February 18, 1478.
He was laid to rest at Tewkesbury along  with his wife and son.

The legend grew that Clarence had drowned in a butt of Malmsey wine, possibly having evolved from a joke about his being a heavy drinker. What was believed to be the body of Clarence was later exhumed and it surprisingly showed no indications of beheading, which was the traditional method of execution for those of nobility. It could also be possible that George’s remains were transported to the abbey in a barrel of Malmsey.

In Shakespeare’s play, “Richard III”, George is portrayed to have been drowned in a butt of Malmsey wine.

Sources:

  1. Kings and Queens of England – The Plantagenets, The Royal Family online [http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page58.asp].
  2. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy online [http://fmg.ac/].
  3. Kings and Queens of England – The Plantagenets, online [http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page58.asp].
  4. “George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence”; Wikipedia.org; [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Plantagenet,_1st_Duke_of_Clarence]
  5. “The Demise of George, Duke of Clarence”; Historum.com; http://historum.com/blogs/crystal+rainbow/831-demise-george-duke-clarence.html
    http://www.luminarium.org/encyclopedia/clarence.htm

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Edward “Longshanks” I, King of England

Edward “Longshanks” I, King of England

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Edward “Longshanks” I, King of England was born 17/18 June 1239, eldest son of Henry III, King of England (1207-1272) and Eléonore de Provence (1223- ), in Westminster Palace, London.

 

Edward I, King of England
Edward “Longshanks” I, King of England

Edward was created Earl of Chester and granted the Dukedom of Gascony on 14 February 1254, after arriving in France.

Leonore de Castile
Leonore de Castile

Edward’s father arranged his  marriage to Infanta doña Leonor de Castile y León (1240-1290) with an eye to preventing the barons obtaining help for their rebellion from Castile. What started as an arranged marriage on 18 October 1254 at Abbey of Las Huelgas, Burgos, Castile, Spain, later became a love match. Leonore was born to Infante don Fernando, III, de Castilla y León, King of Castile, Toledo and Extremadura from his second marriage to Jeanne, de Dammartin, Comtesse de Ponthieu.

Their children were:

Eleonore (1264-1297)
Joan, of England ( -1265)
John, of England ( – )
Henry, of England (1267-1274)
Julian (1271-1271)
Katherine of England (1271- )
Joan D’Acre, of England ( -1307)
Alfonso, Earl of Chester (1273-1284)
Margaret (1275-1318)
Berengaria, of England (1276-1276)
Mary, of England (1278-1332)
Alice ( – )
Isabella (1279-1279)
Elizabeth (1282-1316)
Edward, II, King of England (1284-1327)
Beatrice (1286-1286)
Blanche (1290- )

Edward initially supported the rebellious barons under Simon, de Montfort, Earl of Leicester (26th great grandfather to Mark). He later changed to support his father, served and was taken prisoner at the Battle of Lewes on 14 May 1264 by Simon de Montfort’s rebel Barons, but escaped after only 12 days on 16 May 1264. With the objective of making peace and ending the war, Edward gave Simon de Montfort the Earldom of Chester on 24 Dec 1264. The Earldom of Chester was restored to Edward after he killed Simon de Montfort at the battle of Evesham, on 4 Aug 1265.

Although originally planning to join Louis IX, King of France (27th great grandfather to Mark) in Tunisia in the summer of 1270, his plans were changed upon hearing the news of the King’s death when he arrived in Africa. After spending the winter with King Charles in Sicily, he sailed for Acre, Palestine,  to join the seventh crusade, landing on 9 May 1271.

Lacking resources against the Mameluk Sultan Baibars, he and the Sultan signed a peace agreement at Caesarea on 22 May 1272.

In an assassination attempt, Edward I was stabbed him with a poisoned dagger. Although he survived, the effects of the poison left him incapacitated until he left Acre to return to England 22 September 1272. He succeeded his father as Edward I, ‘Longshanks’, King of England while stopped in Sicily during his return from the Crusade.

He returned to England just prior to being crowned King of England on 19 Aug 1274 at Westminster Abbey in London.
Edward turned out to be a strong king and managed to increase the power and influence of the crown at a high cost to the Barons.

Caernarvon Castle
Caernarvon Castle

In 1277, Edward initiated a war with Llewelyn ap Gruffydd (25th great grandfather to Mark), ruler of Wales, and husband to Eleanor de Montfort, the daughter of Simon de Montfort, after Llewelyn he refused to submit to the English crown. As a result, the dominions of Llewelyn were halved. In 1282, Llewelyn’s brother David rebelled. Llewelyn joined him in the revolt but was soon killed in a small foray. With no leader remaining, Wales became annexed by England in 1284, and soon after, Edward saw several large castles built including Caernarvon, Harlech and Conway, to prevent any further revolt. Edward resided in Caernarvon Castle, Caernarvonshire, Wales, where his own son Edward II, future King of England, was born in 1284.

Edward Longshanks I presiding over parliament.
Edward I presiding over parliament.

In 1290, the same year Edward I lost his wife Leonore, the royal line of Scotland ended, and Edward agreed to arbitrate the negotiations with claimants to the throne of Scotland on condition that he was recognized as overlord of Scotland. In the end, the Scots acted against him, allying with France. To support his efforts to resolve the situations in Scotland and Wales, Edward formed the ‘Model Parliament’, the forerunner to following parliaments. Buoyed by this support, Edward was able to quell the Welsh rebellion in the field, conquering northwest Wales and ending the rule of the native Princes of Wales, naming his own son Prince of Wales. After his invasion and conquest of Scotland in 1296, he named himself King of Scotland and began a rather brutal, ruthless rule. In 1298, he was again called to invade Scotland to suppress a new revolt under Sir Walliam Wallace. Although victorious at the Battle of Falkirk, he was unable to win the war.

In 1299, peace was made with France and Edward married Marguerite de France (1275-1318), daughter of Philippe III, King of France (son to Louis IX above, and 26th great grandfather to Mark) and his second wife Marie de Brabant, on 8/9 September 1299 at Canterbury Cathedral.

Free of conflict with France, he again attempted to conquer Scotland in 1303. Sir William Wallace was captured and executed in 1305, only for another revolt to start up, this time successful and culminating in Robert Bruce’s coronation as King of Scotland.

Edward once again sought to subdue the Scottish, but before he could, he died 8 July 1307 near Carlisle and was buried 28 October 1307 at Westminster Abbey in London.

John Fines, author of “Who’s Who in the Middle Ages” describes Edward Longshanks I, King of England as:

Son and father of weak and ineffectual kings, Edward I had many fine qualities which seem to make nonsence of heredity. He was tall and strong, a fine horseman and a doughty warrior. A great leader of men, he was also able to lead to success. He was interested in government and law in a very genuine way. As a personality he was pious, but easily provoked to rage and often vindictive. He was fond of games—so passionately did he love his hawks that when they were ill he sent money to shrines to pray for their recovery. He was generous to the poor, and often a gay companion: he played chess, and loved music and acrobats; once he bet his laundress Matilda that she couldn’t ride his charger, and she won! Every Easter Monday he paid ransom to his maids if they found him in bed. He loved his two wives, and fussed over their health and that of his children with a pathetic concern—sometimes threatening the doctor with what would happen to him if his patient did not recover. His people feared, respected and remembered him.

Sources:

  1. Kings and Queens of England – The Plantagenets, The Royal Family online [http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page58.asp].
  2. Gary Boyd Roberts, The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants, (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1983).
  3. T. H. Owen, Compiler, Cross Index of Ancestral Roots of 60 American Colonists and Supplement (Supplement by Frederick Weiss,). David Faris, The Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth Century Colonists (English Ancestry Series, Vol. I, Second Edition; New England Historic Genealogy Society, 1999).
  4. John Fines, Who’s Who in the Middle Ages (New York: Barnes and Noble Books, 1995).
  5. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Th.D., The Magna Carta Sureties, 1215, (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc.), 5th Ed., c1999. George Smith, Dictionary of National Biography, Vols. 1-21 (: Oxford Press, 1885-1990).
  6. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came To America Bef ore 1700, 8th Edition (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., 2004).
  7. The Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth Century Colonists. Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, Brian Tompsett, Dept. of Computer Science, Hull University online [http://www.hull.ac.uk/php/cssbct/genealogy/royal/].
  8. Ernst-Friedrich Kraentzler, Ancestry of Richard Plantagenet and Cecily de Neville (Selp-published, 1978).
  9. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdon, Extant, Extinct or Dormant (G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I.).
  10. Sir Bernard Burke, LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire; New Edition, 1866; London, Harrson, 59, Pall Mall; Bookseller to her Majesty and H.R.H. the Prince of Wales..
  11. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, online [http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenriIIdied1189A].

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Transcription: Obituary for Elsie Elizabeth Gurr

Transcription: Obituary for Elsie Elizabeth Gurr

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Transcription of the obituary of Elsie Elizabeth Gurr from the “L M Leader” of April 24, 1913.

Gurr, Elsie Elizabeth; Obituary
Obituary for Elsie Elizabeth Gurr.

L M Leader

24 Apr 1913

OBITUARY

Elsie Elizabeth Gurr was born in the town of Fountain Prairie, near Fall River, September 8, 1886 and died at her home in the village of Fall River, Wis., April 11, 1913. Her short life was all spent here, with the exception of one year when, with her parents, she lived at Elba, Dodge Col, Wis. Her education was given her by the public schools of our town, and by the Sabbath schools of our churches

On May 29, 1907, she was united in marriage with Mr. Frank E. Keefer, of Fall River. Four beautiful children, three daughters and a son, each bearing Heaven’s benediction, came to bless this home. All these, with the grief stricken husband, father, mother, and one sister, as well as a large circle of more distant relatives, and innumerable friends are left where tears and heartaches abound, to mourn the untimely death, but to look forward to that

“Land where beauty cannot fade,

Nor sorrow dim the eye;

Where true love shall not droop nor be dismayed,

And none shall ever die.”

Funeral services were held at the Methodist church, Sunday afternoon, Rev. A. A. Bennett officiating.

A large number of relatives and friends from neighboring places were in attendance. — Columbus Republican

To access this image  full size or any other documents, images or photos attached to this or other individuals in my database, just click on the image or here.


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Louise Ruth Reynolds: A woman of many names and identities.

Louise Ruth Reynolds: A woman of many names and identities.

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Louise Ruth Froemling: Child.

 

Froemling, Louise Ruth - Birth Record
Froemling, Louise Ruth – Birth Record

According to my husband Mark, his grandmother, Louise Ruth Froemling was born on 10 Oct 1911 at 1712 Paulina Street in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois to Emma Mary Froemling and William Read Kirk.

Since Emma was unmarried, and William, a soldier, returned to his military post with no intention of marrying her, Emma made the difficult decision to give Louise up for adoption.

Notes of Louise Reynolds
Handwritten research notes of Louise Reynolds regarding her birth parents.
The Matthews family. Left to right: William Matthews, Dennis Matthews, Louise Ruth Matthews (Froemling), Claudia Matthews.
The Matthews family. Left to right: William Matthews, Dennis Matthews, Louise Ruth Matthews (Froemling), Claudia Matthews.

Louise was adopted as an infant of about five months of age by William Dennis and Claudia Matthews.

The circumstances surrounding the adoption are unclear.

At the time of the adoption, William and Claudia lived in Morning Sun, Iowa and it is believed they were acquainted with Emma Froemling and/or her family and the adoption was arranged privately.

She lived with her adopted parents in Morning Sun until at least grade 11.

 

Louise Ruth Matthews: Student and Nurse.

 

29ish-15.-Louise-183x3001.jpgAfter her graduation from high school, Louise took her training in nursing – more specifically in infant care, working to be one of ‘Wisconsin’s Little Mothers’ in Wisconsin around 1930.

She shows up in Chicago, Illinois about 1930 and again in 1935, working as a nurse.

Her Social Security Card indicates her address was 3901 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, Illinois at one point.

 

Louise Ruth Blythe: Nurse and Mother.

 

Marriage Certificate for Chester Blythe and Louise Matthews.
Marriage certificate for Chester Blythe and Louise Matthews (Froemling).

At the age of 25, Louise met and married Chester C. Blythe, son of Clayton William Blythe and Harriet Maude Jones. The marriage took place on 25 Nov 1936 in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois.

According to the US Census, Louise lived in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois on 01 Apr 1940 and she was employed as a nurse at the time.

Chester C. Blythe and Louise Ruth Froemling had the following children:

Not long after, Chester left the family and they divorced. No one is sure what happened, but the general consensus is that Chester had just abandoned them.

 

Louise Ruth Reynolds: Farmer’s wife and mother.

 

Reynolds Family circa 1944
Rear: Jim and Louise Reynolds. Front: Louise’s sons, Marsh and Paul Blythe (respectively) from her first marriage.

Once Louise was divorced and living as a struggling, young single mother working as a nurse in Chicago, she met Harmond James (Jim) Reynolds. They were married prior to 1933, but the exact date is unknown. After the death of Jim’s mother, they moved to Seymour Township, Peterborough County, Ontario, Canada, where they took over and worked the land he inherited on Mud Lake.

Jim and Louise had the following children:

She died on 16 Apr 1989 in Havelock, Seymour Township at the home of her son William (Bill) and his family.

In 1972, Louise had taken up the challenge of finding information about her birth and her biological parents. The following are two of the many letters she wrote to the City of Chicago during her life.

Louise Reynolds - Adoption Records request.
Louise Reynolds’ letter of February 9, 1972 to Wilmette, Illinois authorities to request her adoption records.
Request for adoption records to Chicago, Illinois
Louise Reynold’s request to the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Chicago Illinois for her adoption information.

Sources:

  1. Blythe, Chester and Matthews, Louise; Marriage Certificate; 25 Nov 1836 ; Rev. Preston Bradley, D.C.L., Pastor; The Peoples’ Church of Chicago.
  2. Interview with Marsh and Bev Blythe – about 15 March 2005.
  3. Louise Matthews, comp., Bureau of Child Welfare, Infant Care Course. (: Wisconsin State Board of Health,).
  4. 1930 Census, Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa; digital images. Ancestry.com , 1930 United States Federal Census (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012), Ancestry.com .
  5. 1940; Census Place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T627_1019; Page: 18A; Enumeration District: 103-3104; Record for Marshall Blythe. http://search.ancestry.ca/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1940usfedcen&h=145155311&indiv=try. Ancestry.com , 1940 United States Federal Census (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012), Ancestry.com .
  6. Louise Matthews, comp., Bureau of Child Welfare, Infant Care Cou rse. (: Wisconsin State Board of Health,).
  7. “Keefer, Christian W; Outline Descendancy Chart,”, 22 Feb 2013; pp. 1-7.

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Transcription: Prominent Families of the United States of America, page 402-4; BURKET

Transcription: Prominent Families of the United States of America, page 402-4; BURKET

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Transcription:  Prominent Families of the United States of America, page 402-4; BURKET

BURKET

Burket Family Lineage
Burket Family Lineage

Jacob F. Burket, b. in Perry Co., Ohio, 25 March 1837 ; m., at Lenawee Co., Michigan, Pamy D., dau. of John Walters, of Findlay, Ohio, and, by her (who d. 6 June 1900), had issue :–

1.  Harlan Fessenden, b.  15 May 1860 ;  m., 16 Jan. 1895, Augusta, dau. of Cyrus Dukes, and has  issue :–

  1.     Jacob F., b. 28 Jan. 1897.

2.  Charles Osterlin, b.  23 June 1862 ; m., (I), 31 Dec. 1884, Florence, dau. of Captain Hiram Henderson, who d. 4 May 1908, and had issue :–

1.  Winifred.

   m. (2) Sarah, dau. of Robert Fleming, and has issue :–

1.  Reginald William, b. 4 May 1905.
2.  Thomas George, b. 4 May 1907.
2.  Janet, b.  25 Aug. 1903 ; d. young.

3.  William Jacob, b. 22 July 1869 ; m., 15 Jun 1897, Forence, dau. of William Carr ; d. 27 July 1902.

4.  John F., b. 15 June 1875 ; m., 21 Sept. 1905, Bess Louise, dau. of Dr. George Lester Hoege, and has issue :–

Harriet Walding, b. 14 June 1908.

5.  Reginald, b. 8 June 1878 ; m., 31 Oct. 1904, Mary Louise, dau.  of Robert Burne Motherwell, and has issue :–

Robert Burns, b. 14 Sept. 1905.

1.  Lillie B., b. 5 Feb. 1867 ; m., 30 May 1889, Louis White Eoff, and has issue :–

William Burket, b. 6 July 1890.

The Hon. J. F. Burket graduated at Seneca Co. Academy, Ohio, 1859, was admitted to the Bar, 1861 ; and was Judge of Supreme Court of Ohio, 1893-1904.

DESCENT

Christoph Burckhardt, of Basel, Switzerland, m. Barbara Gottenschier, and had issue :–

Christoph Burckhardt (1490-1578), of Basel, Switzerland, b. 1490 ; m., 29 July 1539, Gertrude, dau. of Theodor Brand, and, dying 6 Oct. 1578, left, by her (who d. 3 Jan. 1600), issue :–

Theodor Burckhardt (1549-1623), of Basel, Switzerland, b. 5 Sept. 1549 ; Councillor and Judge ; m., 18 June 1582, Maria, dau. of Jacob Oberreid, and, dying 18 Feb. 1623, left,by her (who d. 30 Nov. 1629), issue :–

Chrisoph Burckhardt (1586-1639), of Basel, Switzerland, b. 14 Aug. 1586 ; Councillor and Judge ; m. Margaretta, dau. of Michael Kimmell, and, dying 4 April 1639, left, by her (who d. 22 July 1675), issue :–

Christoph Burckhardt (1631-1705), of Basel, Switzerland, b. 13 June 1631 ; Councillor, Judge, and Ambassador ; m., 5 June 1654, Judith, dau. of Bonifaz Burckhardt, and, dying 24 July 1705, left, by her (who d. 6 Jan. 1679), issue :–

Christoph Burckhardt (1657-1693), of Basel, Switzerland, b. 27 Aug. 1657 ; Councillor and Administrator ; m., 30 Nov. 1682, Marie Magdalena, dau. of Emanuel Stupanus, and, dying 8 Jan. 1693, left, by her (who d. 14 April 1731), issue :–

Emanuel Burckhardt (1684-1740), of Basel, Switzerland, b. 28 Dec. 1684 ; J.U.C. Judge ; Administrator of the Hospital ; m., 1 March 1717, Susanna, dau. of Leonard Felber, and dying 18 March 1740, left, by her (who d. 26 March 1749), issue :–

Emanuel Burckhardt (1720-1787), of Basel, Switzerland, b. 19 April 1720 ; J.U.L. Judge ; Lieutenant in the French Army ; m., 16 May 1740, Anna Maria, dau. of Emanuel Linder, and, dying 19 Jan. 1787, left,by her (who d. 26 Aug. 1765), issue :–

John Burckhardt (1753-1847), of Reading, Pennsylvania, b. at Basel, Switzerland, 20 Aug. 1753 ; in General Washington’s Lifeguards ; m. Catherine Fox, of Reading, Pennsylvania, and, dying 2 Jan. 1847, left, by her (who d. 16 June 1862), issue :–

Solomon Burket (1806-1847), of Hancock Co., Ohio, b. 4 Nov. 1806; m., 1 June 1823, Mary, dau. of George Brehm, and left, by her (who d. 26 Sept. 1869), issue : —

    1.   Jacob R., of whom we treat.

He died 6 March 1847.

Residence — Findlay, Ohio.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Memorial card for Rose-Anna Labelle

Transcription: Memorial card for Rose-Anna Labelle

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Rose-Anna Labelle Memorial Card
Rose-Anna Labelle Memorial Card

The following is a transcription of the memorial card for Rose-Anna Labelle, wife of the late Frédéric Sigouin, who passed away at St-Hippolyte on September 18, 1932.

__________

A LA DOUCE MEMOIRE DE

Rose-Anna Labelle
épouse de feu Frédéric Sigouin
décédée à St-Hippolyte
le 18 septembre 1932

Seigneur, vous savez combien je dé
sirais être auprès des miens pour leur faire du bien ; puisque vous m’avez rappelé à Vous. Seigneur, prenez ma place auprès d’eux, soyez leur ami et leur consolateur.
(Père de la Colombière)

Quand Dieu rappelle à Lue une mère chrétienne D lègue à son enfant le souvenir de ses vertus pour être son modèle et sa force.

La perte d’une mère est le premier chagrin que l’on pleure sans elle.
Mon Jésus, donnez-lui le repos éternel.

Coeur Sacré de Jésus, j’ai confiance en vous.
(300 jours d’ind.)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription – Marriage of Abraham Fougere and Elizabeth Cordeau

Transcription – Marriage of Abraham Fougere and Elizabeth Cordeau

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Abraham Fougère & Elizabeth Cordeau
Film # 1316273, Record # 16

 

Date and place of Marriage:    Jany 10th 1876 River Bourgeois C.B.
How married (by License or Banns):    Banns
Full name of Groom:    Abraham Fougère
His age:    23
Condition (Bachelor or Widower):    Bachelor
Profession or Trade:    Fisherman
Residence:    River Bourgeois
Where born:        “             “
Parents names:    Abraham Fougère & Adelaide Cordeau
Their profession:    (blank)
_____________

Full name of Bride:    Elizabeth Cordeau
Age:    22
Condition (Spinster or Widow):    Spinster
Her place of residence:    River Bourgeois
Parents names:    Simon Cordeau & Elizabeth Sançon
Their profession:    (blank)
Witnesses names:    Patrick Fougère & Elias Boucher
Signatures of parties Married:    (unsigned)
Officiating Clergyman:    W. M. Leblanc
Denomination of Clergyman:    Roman Catholic

I certify that the marriage of the persons above named was duly celebrated by me at the time and place, and in the manner, stated in this slip.

(Signed):    W. M. Leblanc
Officiating Clergyman

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription: Marriage record for Chester Keefer and Mary Ann Jaques.

Transcription: Marriage record for Chester Keefer and Mary Ann Jaques.

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Transcription of the Marriage Record for Chester Keefer and Mary Ann Jaques.

 

Transcription of the Marriage Record for Chester Keefer and Mary Ann Jaques.
Transcription of the Marriage Record for Chester Keefer and Mary Ann Jaques.

THE STATE OF OHIO, Geauga County

Personaly appeared Chester W. Keefer and made application for a MARRIAGE LICENSE for himself and Mary Ann Jaques of the township of Munson in said county, and made solemn oath the he the said Chester is of the age of twenty-one years, and the said Mary Ann, is of the age of eighteen years; that they are both single, and not nearer of kin than first cousines; that he knows of no legal impediment against their being joined in marriage.

C. W. Keefer [signature]

Sworn and subscrbed this 5th day of Oct. 1836

Before me,

A. Philips D??? [signature]

 


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Transcription: Marriage Certificate and Register for William Beaver and Mary Elizabeth Fougère

Transcription: Marriage Certificate and Register for William Beaver and Mary Elizabeth Fougère

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Transcription: Marriage Certificate and Register for William Beaver and Mary Elizabeth Fougère.

Featured image: St. Peters, Nova Scotia

Beaver, William & Fougère, Mary Elizabeth; Marriage documents.

Marriage License of William Beaver and Mary Fourgere
No. 440

Province of Nova Scotia
Marriage License

(Signature)
M.B. Daly
Lt. Govn

(Right Margin) –
BY HIS HONOR
Malachy Bowes Daly, Esquire
Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia,
&c., &c., &c.

    Whereas, William Beaver Farmer and Mary Fourgere have determined to enter into the holy estate of Matrimony, and are desirous of having their Marriage publicly solemnized : in order that such their honest desires may the more speedily have due effect, and that they may be able to procure the same to be lawfully solemnized without publication of banns, I do hereby, for good causes, give and grant this License and Faculty, as well to them the said parties contracting, as to all or every Minister or Clergyman resident in the Dominion of Canada and duly ordained or appointed according to the rites and ceremonies of the Church or Denomination to which he belongs, to solemnize and perform the same : Provide always, that by reason of any Affinity, Consanguinity, Prior Marriage, or any other lawful cause, there be no legal impediment in this behalf ; otherwise if any fraud shall appear to thave been committed at the time of granting this License, either by false suggestions, or concealment of the truth, that then this License shall be null and void to all interests and purposes whatsoever.

Given under my hand and Seal at Arms, at St. Peters
this Second day of October
in the year of Our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ninetynine and in the sixteenth year of Her Majesty’s Command.

Issued this Second day of October 1899

 

R. G. Morrison
Issuer of Marriage Licenses at St. Peters
In the County of Richmond

E. C. Marbank (signature)
Deputy Provincial Secretary

 


 

Beaver, William & Fougère, Mary Elizabeth; Marriage documents.

(Back)
48
Oct. 2, 1899
No. 440, Oct. 2nd 1899
William Beaver
and
Annie Fourgère
MARRIAGE LICENSE AFFIDAVIT
Rich

 


 

Beaver, William & Fougère, Mary Elizabeth (a)

Province of Nova Scotia

MARRIAGE REGISTER

Date of Marriage:  Monday, October 2nd, 1899.
Place of Marriage:  R.C. Church, River Bourgeois.
County:  Richmond Co., N.S.
How Married:  by license or banns:  License
Date of Publication, if by Banns:

Full Name of GROOM:  William Beaver.
His Age:  33 yrs.
Condition (Bachelor or widower):  Widower
Occupation:  Farmer
Residence:  St. Peter’s Lake, C.B.
Where Born: St. Peter’s Lake, C.B.
Parents’ Names:  Edward Beaver, Mary McKay.
Parents’ Occupation:  Fisherman.

Full Name of BRIDE:  Mary Elizabeth Fougère.

Age:  22 yrs.
Condistion (Spinster or Widow):  Spinster
Her Place of Residence:  River Bourgeois
Where Born:  River Bourgeois
Parents’ Names:  Chas. Fougère & Alice Landry

Parents’ Occupation:  Fishing

Witness Names: Michael McDonald, M. Cameron X (his mark), Felicity Burke, Maggie X (her mark) [13 ????]

Signature of parties Married:
William Beaver
Mary Eliz. Fougère X (her mark)

Officiating Clergyman:  A. M. O’Handley, P.P.
Denomination of Clergyman:  Roman Catholic

——

I Certify, That the marriage of the persons above named was duly celebrated by me at the time and place and in the manner stated in this register.
A. M. O’Handley, P.P.
Officiating Clergyman

——

When a marriage is celebrated by License, this register, filled up and signed by the officiating clergyman, must be returned, with the License, to the Issuer from whom the said License was obtained, and the Issuer will pay to the clergyman 25 cents for both Register and License, not 25 cents for each. When the marriage is celebrated by banns, the Register is to be filled up, signed and returned by the officiating clergyman without unnecessary delay to the nearest Deputy Issuer of Marriage Licenses, who is authorized to pay him 25 cents for each Register so returned — the Deputy Issuer repaying himself from License money in his hands — and including amount so paid in his Quarterly Returns. Clergymen may obtain Marriage Registers from Deputy Issuer.
Issuers must return all Licenses, Affidavits and Registers to the Provincial Secretary’s Office, with their Quarterly Accounts.

 


 

Beaver, William & Fougère, Mary Elizabeth; Marriage documents.

Back of Certificate
I hereby Certify, that the within named persons, William Beaver of St. Peter’s, C.B. and Mary E. Fougère of River Bourgeois, C.B. were married under the within License, at River Bourgeois on the Second day of October 1899, according to the Rites and Ceremonies of the Roman Catholic Church
By me,
A. M. O’Handley, P.P.
River Bourgeois, C.B.
In presence of
Michael McDonald
Malcolm Cameron, x Others.

 


 

Beaver, William & Fougère, Mary Elizabeth; Marriage documents.

Form of Affidavit

I, William Beaver of St. Peter’s in the County of Richmond

Occupation
Farmer make oath and say as follows:

I, and Mary Fourchere of Riviere Bourgeois in the County of Richmond

Occupation
…………………………. are desirous of entering into the contract of marriage, and of having our marriage solemnized at River Bourgeois in the

Name of Clergyman
County of Richmond by the Reverend A. M. O’hanley.

Or the said — is of the age of — years or over.
I am of the age of thirty three years, and the said Mary Fourchere is of the full age of         twenty-one years & over.

Bachelor or widower; spinster or widow, as the case may be.
I am a Widower and the said Mary Fourchere is a spinster.
If either party is under 21 years add here the name of the father, mother or guardian of such party.
————– of —— in the County of ———————————
Occupation
whose consent to such marriage is required, has consented thereto —————————————————-
In writing or verbally before me, and if in writing, such writing to be attached to the license;
or
If no person exists whose consent is required by law.
Person under requisite age.
The father and mother of ———————- are dead or absent from the Province, and no guardian has been appointed for
Him or her.
———————–
Sworn to at St. Peter’s in the
County of Richmond
this Second
day of October 1899,
Before me,
R G Morrison
Issuer of Marriage License.

 


 

Beaver, William & Fougère, Mary Elizabeth; Marriage documents.

Envelope
48
Richmond – 1899
Beaver, William
Fougère, Mary E.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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The science of husbandry on a human scale.

The science of husbandry on a human scale.

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We’ve all heard of the centuries old practice and science of husbandry, and most interesting is the science of husbandry on a human scale.

 

The definition of ‘husbandry’ according to “The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language” is:

 

hus·band·ry (hzbn-dr)

  1. The act or practice of cultivating crops and breeding and raising livestock; agriculture.
  2. The application of scientific principles to agriculture, especially to animal breeding.
  3. Careful management or conservation of resources; economy.

 

practice and science of husbandry
The practice and science of husbandry on a human scale.

 

For the purposes of this article, I am referring to the most well known and specialized area of husbandry – the planning, tracking, and monitoring of the breeding of all varieties of livestock.

At one time, I read an article in “The Globe and Mail” which described a current practice in Iceland for monitoring the pairing and breeding of their human population. Theirs is such a small, isolated population surrounded by a vast expanse of ocean, this database has become a part of their culture that is heavily relied upon to ensure there is no accidental ‘inbreeding’ or, heaven forbid, “incest.”

The citizens of Iceland consult with a web-based database called “The “Book of Icelanders“, or “Islendingabok,” which tracks the genealogies of all the country’s citizens. This database serves a key purpose separate from the most obvious one of tracking genealogies. It allows Icelanders to check to see if they may be unknowingly about to date a relative.

After several years of research into our family genealogy, I have become aware that “husbandry” has been practiced throughout our own history as well.

Two examples are the my husband’s Quaker ancestors, as well as my own Acadian ancestors.

 

practice and science of husbandry on a human scale
The practice and science of husbandry on a human scale via a Quaker clearing meeting.

 

Quakers, or members of the Society of Friends, as they were also known, had to be cleared by a group of select members, called a “clearness committee,” during a meeting for clearness, prior to the marriage. It was during the clearing that the issue of blood relationship would be addressed.

The Acadians (and the Catholic Church at large) had a similar custom, where the pair wishing to marry would petition the church for the right if they were known to be blood related.

The church would make a decision whether to approve the marriage, based on the ‘degree of consanguinity‘ or the closeness of the blood relationship. The standard was that any couple within the fourth degree of consanguinity were not permitted to marry.

A request could be made for a dispensation, or permission from the Catholic Church to marry. The closer the blood relationship, the harder it was to obtain dispensation.

It was very rare for first cousins to be permitted to marry.

 

____________________

Sources:

  1. BBC: Religion: Quakers; http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/christianity/subdivisions/quakers_1.shtml#h7.
  2. Wikipedia.org; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quakers.

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Transcription: Biography of William H. Jaques

Transcription: Biography of William H. Jaques

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Jaques, William H. Bio 1Transcription of the biography of William H. Jaques.

 

 

 

Mr. Jaques was born February 8, 1820 in Geauga county, Ohio, then known as new Connecticut or Western reserve. But little is known of his father, Henry Jaques, who was born in the city of New York, in 1789, a French wreckage, and was apprenticed to a shoemaker in Hartford Connecticut in 1803.

He married Elizabeth Porter, in 1814, and settled in Munson, Geauga county, Ohio, in 1819, and built a “log cabin” in the midst of the dense forest.

He died in February, 1829, leaving a widow and family of seven small children, four of whom are still living, the mother having died in 1880, at the advanced age of 83 years.

W. H. Jaques, the subject of this sketch, settled in Joliet, Illinois, in 1845, and worked at his trade, [a practical tinner]. He married Eliza P. Dunham, in 1846. Two children, a son and daughter, were the fruits of this union.

J. H. Jaques, the son, is still living and resides in Tolono, in this county, with whom his father, William H., makes his home, his wife and daughter having died in Joliet, in 1852. When the gold fever was raging, Mr. Jaques became infected and crossed the plains in 1850, and work with varying success in the hill sides and cultures, mountain tops and valleys, river banks and river beds, for two years: he returned to Joliet in July 1852 having accumulated little money but a great deal of experience.

biography of William H JaquesHe came to Urbana in October, 1852 and established the first stone store and can shop; he manufactured the first tin ware ever made in Champaign county. He exhibited tinware of his own make at the first fair ever held in the County. He was married to Sarah A. Whipple in February 1854; she died May 1st, 1857. He then sold out his business to Stone Brothers and in 1859 returned with his mother and children to Ohio. He enlisted in 1862, as a private in the 103rd Ohio volunteer infantry, and served until the close of the war.

He returned to Champaign County, 1866, located in Tolono, and engaged in the sale of hardware, stoves, agricultural implements, and in the manufacture of tinware. Mr. Jaques has never sought or held any office, but was a Whig of the Clay and Webster stamp. He bleeds then as he does now that it was the duty of the government to levy a tariff with a view of protecting home industries.

He early imbibed a hatred of American slavery and when the republican party was organized to check its progress eagerly joined its ranks, and is today as he himself expresses it, a “dyed in the wool” republican because that party advocates his ideas of protection to American labor, and meets his views upon other questions as well.

Mr. Jaques can always be relied upon in business matters as well as politics. You always know where to find him.

Quiet in his demeanor, charitable where there is any just claim, truthful, honorable, and reliable, he is a good type of the successful business men of the west.

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

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From Chatterton to Blythe: A Lincolnshire family’s story.

From Chatterton to Blythe: A Lincolnshire family’s story.

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Richard Chatterton was born and baptised before August 17, 1689 in Frodingham, Lincolnshire, England as the fourth child of Richard Chatterton Sr. and Frances Coates. He had three siblings, George, Robert, and Rachel.

On May 26, 1725 and at the age of 35, Richard married Mary Brumby (see relationship chart at left). They had the following children:

  • William Chatterton was born about 12 Dec 1728 in Frodingham, Lincolnshire, England.
  • Mary Chatterton was born about 17 Nov 1731 in Frodingham, Lincolnshire, England.  She married Edward Blyth about 1750.
  • Elizabeth Chatterton was born about 20 Mar 1733 in Frodingham, Lincolnshire, England.
  • John Chatterton was born about 27 Jan 1736 in Frodingham, Lincolnshire, England.

The remainder of his life was spent providing for his family as a farmer and landowner. Some of the Lincolnshire communities in which he and his family lived and/or owned property were Louth, Crosby, Scamblesby, Saltfleetby, Scunthorpe, Gunhouse and Thealby, Skidbrook and North Somercotes.

According to the records I found, his descendants remained in the Louth and Somercotes areas of Lincolnshire until the emigration of his great grandson Thomas Blyth and Thomas’  sons Charles George (3rd great grandfather to Erin and Stuart), John Mumby and Robert to America.

Blythe Ships List Ironsides
Blythe Ships List Ironsides

Richard died and was buried at the St. Lawrence Church in Fordingham before February 15, 1772. He must have been ill prior to his death as his will was drafted and signed within a month of his death on January 21, 1772. His estate was probated on 20 Feb 1772 in Lincolnshire, England, United Kingdom.

The following is the record of Richard’s will located on the UK Archives site.

Copy of a will. 

Sheff/A/40/1  21st. January 1772

Contents:

Testator: Richard Chatterton gent. of Louth.

Beneficiaries: son William Chatterton – lands, tenements etc. at North Somercotes, 2 closes of pasture at Saltfleetby, cottage and land, and 1/ 3 of a farm at Scamblesby, ½ of a farm at Thealby, cottage at Crosby, ¾ oxgang of moor at Scunthorpe, 6 gads in Gunhouse Ings, close of pasture in North Cotes, after his death property in Crosby to go to testator’s grandson Robert Chatterton with lands etc. in Scunthorpe, Gunhouse Ings and Thealby; property at Saltfleetby to grandson William Chatterton; property at Scamblesby to grandson Richard Chatterton; property at North Somercotes and North Cotes to grandson John Chatterton. Daughter Mary Blyth, dwelling house in Louth. And the Mill Closes in Louth, 2 closes of pasture in Louth called Hagar ths, messuage in Louth, 2 closes of pasture in Skidbrooke; after her decease to her sons John and Thomas Blyth. Grandchildren

Robert Chatterton £100

William Chatterton £100

Richard Chatterton £100

John Chatterton £100

Frances Chatterton £100

John Blyth £200

Thomas Blyth £200

Residue to son William and daughter Mary

Executors: son William and daughter Mary.

Extracted Probate Records regarding Richard Chatterton, died 1772.

 

Chatterton, Extracted Probate Records
Chatterton, Extracted Probate Records

Probate Records

 

 

 

 

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

Sources:

  1. Robert Chatterton et. a.l., to George Chatterton, 1 DIXON 1/E/1/3, 8 February 1584, , UK Archives; privately held by http: www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/a2a/records.aspx?cat=057-dixon_1-1&cid=1-1-5-1-3#1-1-5-1-3, [address for private use].    FreeREG; http://www.freereg.org.uk/cgi/SearchResults.pl?RecordType=Burials&RecordID=1559068; UK Parish Registers; Additional records: 1559068, 3226772, 3955559, 2185138, 2185093, 2185216, 3658882, 6320726, 6320654, 6320812, 6320934, 3053499, 4572154, 5367405, 3210536, 326460, 3053777, 5811109, 5811145, 5810977, 5811068.    
  2. Blyth, Norton, 1861 UK Census; Louth, Lincolnshire.
  3. Blythe, Norton, 1851 UK Census – Leddington, Lincolnshire, census, www.ancestry.com, Ancestry.com .
  4. Blythe Norton, 1841 UK Census – Tealby, Lincolnshire, census, www.ancestry.com, Ancestry.com
  5. Blyth, Thomas, 1841 UK Census – Marshchapel, Lincolnshire.
  6. Blyth, Thomas, 1851 UK Census, Pages 1-2, Marshchapel, Lincolnshire.
  7. 1857 Ship’s Roster; Ironsides; Blyth, Thomas.
  8. Charles G. Blythe obituary, The Hoosier Genealogist, Indiana Historical Society, June 2001, Vol. 41, No. 2.
  9. Blyth, John and Robert and Charles; 1860 US Census – Strongs Prairie, Adams County, Wisconsin.
  10. Naturalization Record: Sargent County Naturalization, Vol. 8, Pg. 185; 28 Jun 1892, County of Sargent, State of North Dakota: Chas Afdan and A. N. Carlblom witnesses; J. N. Christian, Clerk..
  11. Blythe, John, Hanna, Thornton; 1900 US Census, Sargent, North Dakota;.
  12. Blyth, John and Anna; 1870 US Census, Monroe, Adams County, Wisconsin.
  13. Blythe, John and Anna and William A.; 1910 US Census; Wilmot, Sargent County, North Dakota.
  14. Blythe, John and Middleton, Hannah: ; Register of Marriages, Lincolnshire, England.
  15. Blythe, Charles G.; 1870 US Census; Fountain Prairie, Columbia County, Wisconsin.
  16. Blythe, Charles G.; 1900 US Census; Lawrence County, Tennessee.
  17. Blythe, Charles G.; 1880 US Census; Fountain Prairie, Columbia County, Wisconsin.
  18. Blythe, Charles G.; 1910 US Census; Troy, Fountain County, Indiana.
  19. Charles G. Blythe File, American Civil War Soldiers Database, (http://www.ancestry.com: Ancestry Website).

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Transcription: Biography of Capt. George Meek and Rachel Meek.

Transcription: Biography of Capt. George Meek and Rachel Meek.

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Transcription: Biography of Capt. George Meek and Rachel Meek.

 

Capt. George MEEK, Mark’s 6th great grandfather, was born in 1741 in Maryland to Robert and Elizabeth (Alexander) MEEK. He married Rachel HERRON (b. 1749; d. after 1810) daughter of David and Elizabeth HERRON, in 1770.

Marriage Record of George and Rachel Meek
Record of the marriage of Rachel Herron to George Meek in the Herron family genealogy recorded in the book “Notes and Queries Historical and Genealogical”; Vol. XVII; page 95.

George spent his formative years in Maryland. It is likely he moved to Centre County, Pennsylvania upon his marriage to Rachel.

George served with the 5th Pennsylvania Battalion under Capt. Thomas Alexander in the Revolutionary War between 1778 and 1781.

In an earlier article, I posted the full transcription of a Watchman Article of May 1, 1931 about George MEEK.

It is recorded that George took up a 1,000 acre tract of land on January 21, 1790, some of which remained with his family for generations. It is reported that the first surveys in Ferguson Township were made in 1766-1767, including tracts west of Pine Grove Mills and extending west to the Ross Farm, as well as tracts formerly belonging to General Patton. Another surveying party in 1784 camped at Stewart’s in Warrior’s Mark area on their way to Moshannon and Clearfield. On that trip, “George MEEK killed one large buck, pretty fat, not unwelcome news to the company.” In 1790, the George MEEK who killed the deer previously purchased a tract of land in Ferguson Township, Centre County.

Capt. George Meek died January 10,1802 and was buried after January 10, 1801 in the mountain gap west of Pine Grove Mills. At the time, this tract of land was used for lumbering. It is unknown whether his wife Rachel was also buried there. All trace of the grave has disappeared over the intervening years.

Meek, George - Revolutionary War Plaque
Meek, George – Revolutionary War Plaque
Meek, George - Revolutionary War Plaque
Meek, George – Revolutionary War Plaque

George Meek’s will written and dated November 3, 1801 in Ferguson Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania, was probated January 19, 1802, also in Ferguson Township.

Will Abstract of George Meek
Abstract of the Will of George Meek.

Transcription of the Abstract of George’s Will

Page 12, GEORGE MEEK, Ferguson Twp., 11/3/1801-1/19/1802, wife Rachel, friend Jonathan Wales, eldest son Robert, son William, David, John. Youngest Dr. Sarah not 21, Dtr. Mary Steelly, Dtr. Isabella, Dtr. Jean. Ex: Wife, & Thomas Ferguson. Witness: Thomas Ferguson, Joseph Diven, John Barron.

[Wills  of Centre County, Pennsylvania, by Ira F. Fravel, Col. U.S. Army, published 1/19/1939, re-copied December, 1967 by Mary Belle Lontz.]

The marriage of Capt. George MEEK and Rachel HERRON produced eight children and they were:

  1. Robert MEEK was born about 1765 and married sometime prior to 1801. His spouse is unknown.
  2. Mary MEEK (Mark’s 5th great grandmother) was born January 28, 1767, died January 25, 1850 in Fountain County, Indiana and was buried at Bend Cemetery, Fountain County. Sometime prior to 1830, she married Gabriel Stehle, son of Ulrich and Anna Stehle. Although George Meek’s will definitely records her as having been this Mary Meek, there was some debate that her last name was Stuart, perhaps resulting from a previous marriage, if indeed it is true.
  3. William Jerome MEEK was born in 1773 in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania and died in 1806 in Huntingdon County. He was married prior to 1800 near McConnellstown, Huntingdon County to Elizabeth Breckenridge.
  4. David MEEK, born about 1774, married Polly Bailey. (Davie moved with his brother John to Clarion County, Pennsylvania, where their father owned some land.)
  5. John MEEK ; born 1775. John later moved to Clarion County, Pennsylvania with his brother David, and later moved down the Ohio River, settling somewhere in Ohio.
  6. Isabella MEEK was born in about 1779 and married Abel Benton.
  7. Jean MEEK’s birth place is unknown, but she did die in 1859.
  8. Sarah MEEK, born in about 1783, later married Capt. Thomas Holt.

Sources:

  1. Some Early Families of Centre County, Pennsylvania (Mainly from Half Moon, Patton, Ferguson and College Townships); Glenn (1988); Richard C. Glenn; 916-428-7238, Sacramento, CA 95823-7736, East Parkway; Assembled 1980-1988.
  2. There’s Power in the Blood: Celebrating the 200th Anniversary of Gray’s United Methodist Church, State College District, Nov 12, 1989; Gray’s United Methodist Church, Rte 550 S of Rte 322, R.D. Port Matilda, PA 16870.
  3. Linn’s History of Centre and Clinton Counties, Pennsylvania; Linn, John Blair; 1883..
  4. Columbia County Pennsylvania Will Book C, database, Rootsweb (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~brookefamily/herronjamessr.htm: accessed).
  5. Newtownship, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, Cumberland County, PA Will Book C pages 83 & 84 Will of David Herron of Newtownship Made 17 February 1778, ; Ancestry.com , http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/14022930/person/1179236744/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=0&pgpl=pid|pgNum.
  6. Meek, George – Wills of Centre County, Pennsylvania: ; Ancestry.com , http://ancestry.com.
  7. Meek George and Herron, Rachel and Marriage Record, “Notes and Queries Historical and Genealogical,” database.
  8. Notes and Queries – XVII; page 95, Ancestry.com (: Internet 14 November 2013), .
  9. Ancestry.com