Tag: Marriage

Transcription: 2nd Marriage Certificate of Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois-Ducharme.

Transcription: 2nd Marriage Certificate of Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois-Ducharme.

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This post contains my transcription of the second marriage certificate of Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois-Ducharme.

Certificate of Marriage

Church of St. George,

Manchester, New Hampshire.

This is to Certify that Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois were lawfully Married on the 31st day of May 1935 According to the Rite of the Roman Catholic Church and in conformity with the laws of the State of New Hampshire, Rev. T. J. E. Devoy, P.D., officiating, in the presence of Armand Ducharme and Irene St. Gelais, Witnesses, as appears from the Marriage Register of this Church. Dated April 2, 1974

Rev. Maurice W. Richer, Pastor _____________________

_________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Marriage certificate of Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois.

Transcription: Marriage certificate of Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois.

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The following is my transcription of the marriage certificate of Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois.

Marriage of Joseph William Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois.
Marriage certificate of Joseph William Herve Ducharme and Marguerite Bourgeois. 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE

Certificate of Marriage

This Certifies that on this, the 31st day of May, 1935, at Manchester, I joined in Marriage, in the presence of witnesses, Herve Ducharme of Manchester and Marguerite Bourgeois of Manchester.

Certificate of Intention of Marriage issued by the Clerk of Manchester.

I also certify that I am a Roman Catholic Clergyman residing in the town of Manchester and am legally qualified to perform the marriage ceremony.

Witnesses: Armand Ducharme, Irene St. Gelais

Signed: T. J. W. Derry, D.P.P.R.

_____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription: ‘In Memoriam’ for Edna E. Auclair.

Transcription: ‘In Memoriam’ for Edna E. Auclair.

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Following is my transcription and the Google translation of the ‘In Memoriam’ for Edna E. Auclair.

Edna E. Auclair
In Memoriam for Edna E. Auclair.

French original

A la douce memoire de

Edna_E. Auclair

Épouse de Armand Martel.

Née à Derry, N. H., 18 Juil 1910,

Décédée à Manchester, N. H., 28 Août, 1928.

A l’âge de 18 ans. 1 mois et 10 jours.

If fut court sont pélerinage.

Elle meurt au printemps de son âge.

Mais du sort elle subit la loi.

Vous qui l’aimiez, priez pour elle.Seignéur, voud nous l’aviez prêté pour faire notre bonheur; vous la réclamez, nous vous la cèdons sans murmure, mais le coeur navré de douleur.

La famille  éprouvée ici-bas, brisée dans son faisceau se refait au ciel dans la lumière.

Recevez et gardez ce souvenier d’une âme chrétienne qui vous demande de prier pour elle, afin de pouvoir plut tòt prier pour vous.

Nous l’avons aimé pendant sa vie’ ne l’oublions pas après sa mort.

Une communion, une prière, s’il vous plait adieu! Au revoir au ciel.

————————————————————————————

English translation taken from ‘Google Translate’

In the sweet memory of

Edna-E. Auclair

Wife of Armand Martel.

Born in Derry, N. H., July 18, 1910,

Died in Manchester, N. H., August 28, 1928.

At the age of 18. 1 month and 10 days.

If is was a short pilgrimage.

She died in the spring of his age.

But it suffers the fate of the law.

That you love her, pray for her.

Lord voud we had paid for our happiness, you are claiming, we cede without a murmur, but the heart brokenhearted.

The bereaved family here, broken in the beam again to heaven in the light.

Get and keep the souvenir of a Christian soul who asks you to pray for her rather early in order to pray for you.

We loved during his life, do not forget after his death.

Communion, prayer, please farewell! Goodbye to heaven.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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A Primer on Cemetery Research to Find Ancestors

A Primer on Cemetery Research to Find Ancestors

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Cemetery research absolutely is one of the most valuable tools for genealogy research.
Although I’m pretty much housebound and don’t get out much now, there was a time when I did venture out and do research in places such as cemeteries. As a matter of fact, I previously wrote about one experience at an old Catholic cemetery in Nova Scotia where I and my family spent the better portion of a day checking out the burial sites of our ancestors – and there were bunches of ’em.

By Jillynn Stevens, Ph.D., MSW

Grave Tombstone of Marguerite Melanson.
Cemetery research led to the discovery of Marguerite Melanson’s burial site.

When you’re working on researching distant generations of ancestors, cemetery research is one of the most satisfying, hands on forms of genealogical exploration you can do. It’s one way to connect with a tangible reminder of particular ancestors, which is often an elusive feeling. Finding a tombstone or other sign of the resting place of an ancestor can give you insights into who they were. Is their tombstone humble or grand? Does it contain an inscription that speaks of a simple life, of one that hints at a great love story, or a somber and religious disposition? What dates are inscribed? The information source is rich, yet locating cemeteries and navigating the research process isn’t always straightforward. Here’s how to get started with genealogical cemetery research.

What can I expect to learn from a cemetery?

It’s important to note that cemeteries and grave markers can be excellent sources of information about the deceased. While they are not primary information sources, they can clarify details such as:

An ancestor’s name, including obscure details like maiden names and middle names or even occasionally pet names, but most often:

  • date of birth
  • date of death
  • the names of family members including parents, spouses, and children
  • religion
  • military service
  • fraternal order membership

Cemeteries are a wonderful source of information that can confirm what you’ve learned from earlier research. In other cases, you’ll garner information that you didn’t know. For example, there may be symbolism on a tombstone suggesting that your ancestor was a member of the Masonic Lodge or perhaps they are buried in a Catholic burial ground. Each of these small clues can open up new avenues for research and exploration.


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Transcription: Obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson (nee Johnson)

Transcription: Obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson (nee Johnson)

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Following is my transcription of the obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson (nee Johnson), who died in Cairns, Australia. A memorial service was held in Bethel Lutheran Church in Brush Prairie, Washington on August 27, 1995.

Carolyn Alma Hodgson ObituaryCarolyn Alma Hodgson

A memorial service will be at 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 27, 1995, in Bethel Lutheran Church in Brush Prairie, Wash. Mrs. Hodgson died of a ruptured aorta Aug. 19 in Cairns, Australia, at age 52.

She was born March 14, 1943, in Becker County, Minn. Her maiden name was Johnson. She moved to the Northwest in 1957 and graduated from Central Washington State College. She married Donald L. Hodgson on June 18, 1966. They lived in Beaverton, and she taught at Oregon Episcopal School and worked for ‘Timberline Lodge.

They moved to Papua New Guinea in 1982.

Surviving are her husband; sons, Eric of Dallas, Texas, and Fernando of Gresham; daughters, Anaka of Bradleboro, Vt., and Leyla Bartruff of Troutdale; mother Esther Johnson of Battle Ground, Wash; sister, Alice Olsen of Battle Ground; brothers, Stanley Johnson of Arlington, Wash., and Arvid Johnson of Battle Ground; and four grandchildren.

Disposition by cremation.

Remembrances: Lae Hospital Save the Children Fund, in care of Bethel Lutheran Church, 12919 N.E. 159th, Brush Prairie, Wash. 98606.

________

The image of the obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson above links directly to the transcription of the document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Obituary for Yvonne (Bisson) Boily

Transcription: Obituary for Yvonne (Bisson) Boily

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Following is my transcription of the obituary for Yvonne (Bisson) Boily

 

Yvonne (Bisson) Boily
Yvonne (Bisson) Boily

A son domicile le 4 mars 1995, à l’âge de 85 ans et 8 mois, est décédée dame Yvonne Bisson, épouse de feu Léo Boily. Elle demeurait au 229 rue Principale, Vallée-Jonction. Les funérailles auront lieu mardi le 7 mars à 15h. Départ du funèrarium de la

Maison funéraire
Nouvelle Vie
Vallée-Jonction
à compter de 14h45 pour l`église de Vallée-Jonction et de là au cimetière paroissial. La famille recevra les condoléances au funérarium de la
Maison funéraire
Nouvelle Vie
139 ru Principale
Vallée-Jonction
lundi le 6 mars de 13h30 à 16h30 et de 19h à 22h, mardi, jour des funérailles à compter de 13h.

Elle laisse dans le deuil ses enfants: Louiselle (Clermont Faucher), Yvette (Arthur Vachon), Bibiane (Claude Champagne), Lauréanne (Jean Dumoulin), Guymond (Denise Giguere), Jean (Louise Vachon), Jacques (Desneiges Longchamps), Simone, Pierre (Suzanne Rhéaume); ses frères et soeurs: feu Aurèle Bisson (Blanche Poulin), feu Armand Bisson (Béatrice Trahan), Bernadette Bisson (Wellie Bergeron), feu Emilien Bisson (Laurence Goulet), Valerien Cloutier (Fernande Poulin); ses beaux-frères et belles-soeurs: Marie-Anna Boily (feu Camil Vachon), Lucia Boily (feu Donat Lehouillier), Angéline Boily (feu Aurèle Turmel), Alida Boily (Antonio Turmel), Carmel Boily (feu Emile Ferland), Paul Boily (Claire Girard), feu Emilien Boily (Gisèle Arsenault), feu Clermont Boily (Thérèse Breton), ainsi que dix-neuf petits-enfants, sept arrière petits-enfants, neveux, nièces, cousins, cousines et beaucoup d’amis (es). Toute marque de sympathie peut se traduire par un don à la maison Catherine-de-Longpré. Direction des funérailles:

Maison funéraire
Nouvelle Vie
239 rue Principale
Vallée-Jonction
Pour renseignements: 418-39704000 Fax: 418-397-?
___________

Yvonne ( Bisson )
At home March 4, 1995 , at the age of 85 years and 8 months , died lady Yvonne Bisson, wife of the late Leo Boily . She lived at 229 Main Street , Valley Jonction . The funeral will be held Tuesday, March 7 at 15h . Departure of the funeral

New Life Funeral Home
Valley Junction
from 14:45 to the church of Valley Junction and thence to the parish cemetery. The family will receive condolences at the funeral
New Life Funeral Home
139 Main ru
Valley Junction
Monday, March 6th from 13:30 to 16:30 and from 19h to 22h Tuesday day of the funeral after 13h .Valle

She is survived by her children : Louiselle ( Clermont Faucher ) , Yvette (Arthur Vachon) , Bibiana ( Claude Champagne ) Lauréanne (John Dumoulin) Guymond (Denise Giguere ), Jean (Louise Vachon) , Jacques ( Desneiges Longchamps) Simone , Pierre ( Suzanne Rheaume ) ; his brothers and sisters: the late Aurèle Bisson (Blanche Poulin ) , the late Armand Bisson ( Beatrice Trahan ) , Bernadette Bisson ( Wellie Bergeron ) , fire Emilien Bisson ( Laurence Goulet ) , Valerian Cloutier ( Feernande Poulin ) ; his brothers- and sisters- Marie- Anna Boily (late Camil Vachon) , Lucia Boily (late Donat Lehouillier ) Angeline Boily ( late Aurèle Turmel ) Alida Boily (Antonio Turmel ) Carmel Boily ( late Emile Ferland ) Paul Boily ( Claire Girard) , the late Emilien Boily ( Gisèle Arsenault) , fire Clermont Boily ( Thérèse Breton ) and nineteen grandchildren, seven great grandchildren , nephews, nieces , cousins and many friends ( es ) . Any brand of sympathy may result in a donation to the house Catherine de Longpre . Funeral :

New Life Funeral Home
239 Main Street
Valley Junction
Contact: 418-39704000 Fax: 418-397 -?

____________________

The image above links directly to the transcription of the document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data on this site is available for free access and download.

 

 


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Transcriptions: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson – II.

Transcriptions: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson – II.

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Transcriptions: Documents relating to the marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson.

 These documents are a continuation of Part I of this post.

—————-

No. 1462

MARRIAGE LICENSE

—————-

PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA

D. MacKeen

Lieutenant-Governor

BY HIS HONOUR

The Honourable David McKeen

Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia.

Whereas, Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson  have determined to enter into the holy estate of Matrimony, and are desirious of having their Marriage publicly solemnized ; in order that such their honest desires may the more speedily have due effect, and that they may be able to procure the same to be lawfully solemnized without publication of banns. I do hereby, for good causes, give and grant the License and Faculty, as well to them the said parties contracting, as to all or every Minister or Clergyman resident in the Dominion of Canada and duly ordained or appointed according to the rights and ceremonies of the Church or Denomination to which he belongs, to solemnize and perform the same with the Province of Nova Scotia ; provided always, that by reason of any Affinity, Consanguinity, Prior Marriage, or any other lawful cause, there be no legal impediment in this behalf ; otherwise if any fraud shall appear to have been committed at the time of granting this License, eight by false suggestions, or concealment of the truth, that then this License shall be null and void to all intents and purposes whatsoever.

Given, under my hand and Seal at Arms, at Halifax,

By his Honour’s Command

F. F. Mathers

Deputy Provincial Secretary

Issued this 16th day

May 1916

A. J. MacCuish

Issuer of Marriage Licenses at St. Peters

In the County of Richmond


Marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

I Hereby Certify, That the within named persons, Clifford Carter of Sampsonville and Elizabeth Sampson of Sampsonville were married under the within License at Sampsonville on the twentieth day of  May 1916, according to the rites and Ceremonies of the Catholic Church

By me, (undecipherable)

St. Peters

In presence of Vernon Sampson at Sampsonville in the County of Richmond Mattie Samspon of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond


marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

Province of Nova Scotia

—————-

MARRIAGE REGISTER

Date of Marriage ; May 20th 1916

Place of Marriage ; Sampsonville

County ; Richmond

How Married ; by License or Banns;License

Dates of Publication, if by Banns ; 

Full name of Groom ; Clifford Carter

Age ; 20 years

Condition (Bachelor or Widower) ; Bach

Religious Denomin ; Catholic

Occupation ; Farming

Residence ; Sampsonville

Where Born ; 

Names of Parents ; Finlay Carter, Mary Fougere

Occupation of Parent ; Farming

____________________;

—————-

Full name of Bride ; Elizabeth Sampson

Age ; 16 years

Condition (Spinster or Widow) ; Spinster

Religious Denomin ; Catholic

Her Place of Residence ; Sampsonville

Where Born ; Sampsonville

Names of Parents ;  Vernon Sampson, Eliza Lawry

Occupation of Parent ; Farming

Names of Witnesses          Maphis Sampson, Vernon Sampson

Signature of Parties Married          Clifford Carter, Elizabeth Sampson

Officiating Clergyman         ???? L. McDonald

Denomination of Clergyman          Catholic

I Certify, That the marriage of the persons above named was duly celebrated by me at the time and place and in the manner stated in this Register.

???? L. McDonald

Officiating Clergyman

When a marriage is celebrated by License or Certificate, this Register filled up and signed by the officiating clergyman, must be returned with the License or Certificate, to the issuer from whom the said License or Certificate was obtained, and the issuer will pay to the clergyman 25 cents for License, or Certificate, and Register, not 25 cents for each, repaying himself from the money in his hands belonging to the Department and including amount so paid in his Quarterly Returns.

Issuers must return all License, Certificates, Affidavits and Registers to the Provincial Secretary’s Office, with their Quarterly Accounts.

marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

The complete original scans of any documents clips linked above can be accessed by clicking the images. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search using the linked names above or the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on these sites is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson of Cape Breton – Part I.

Transcription: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson of Cape Breton – Part I.

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Transcription: Documents related to the marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson of Cape Breton.

____________________________________________________

The following are transcriptions from photographic images of approximately half of a collection of documents related to the marriage of Elizabeth Sampson and Clifford Carter of Sampsonville, County of Richmond, Nova Scotia, Canada. The second half of the transcriptions and links to the actual document images will be published either tomorrow or the day after.

Fine print in the margins was indecipherable due to image quality.

—————-

Sampsonville CB
May 16th 1916

I consent to the marriage of my son Clifford Carter (who is within twenty one years) to Elizabeth Sampson.

his
Philip  X  Carter
mark

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

Sampsonville CB
May 16th 1916

I consent to the marriage of my daughter Elizabeth Sampson (who is within the age of twenty one years) to Clifford Carter.

Mr. Vinny Sampson
his
X
mark
Witness

Laura Sampson

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

29/

May 20/16

No……………………191

Clifford Carter

AND

Elizabeth Sampson

MARRIAGE LICENSE AFFIDAVIT

Rich

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

(There is indecipherable fine pring text in the left 1″ margin, due to image quality.)

FORM OF AFFIDAVIT

I, Clifford Carter
of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond
labourer make oath and say as follows :

I, and Elizabeth Sampson
of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond
are desirous of entering into the contract of
marriage, and of having our marriage solemnzed at Sampsonville
in the County of Richmond.

I am the age of nineteen and eleven months years, and the said
Elizabeth Sampson, is
under twenty one years.

I am a bachelor and the said Elizabeth
Sampson is a spinster.

Philip Carter & Vin Sampson of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond labourers, both whose consent to such marriage is required, has consented thereto in writing

(Two lines of ‘struck-through’ text that is unreadable.)

I believe that there is no affinity, consanguinity, prior marriage or other lawful causes or legal impedment to bar or hinder the solemnization of our marriage.

Sworn to at St. Peters in the
County of Richmond
this 16th
day of May 1916.

Clifford Carter
Signature of Deposed

Before me,
A. J. MacCuish
Issuer of Marriage License

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

___________

V 29

Richmond – 1916

Carter, Clifford

Sampson, Elizabeth

—————-

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

Here are more documents related to this marriage.

—————-

The complete original scans of the document clips above can be accessed by clicking the image. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, click on the name link above, or search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Obituary for Harold Everett Redetzke; 1935 – 2002

Transcription: Obituary for Harold Everett Redetzke; 1935 – 2002

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Harold Everett Redetzke+ + + + OBITUARY – HAROLD EVERETT REDETZKE + + + +

May 18, 1935 – October 12, 2002

Harold Everett Redetzke, age 67, died on Saturday, October 12, 2002 at his home in rural Sebeka, MN. Harold was born to Elmer and Margaret (Kimball) Redetzke on May 18, 1935 in Butler Township, MN. Harold was united in marriage to Norma Eckert on June 8, 1957 in Sebeka, MN. They lived in Foxhome, MN for several years and then moved beck to Sebeka where Harold tanned until retirement. Harold served on the Red Eye Township Board for a few years and was a member of Our Saviour‘s Lutheran Church. Harold underwent heart transplant surgery on September 27, 1987 at the University of Minnesota Hospital.

Redetzke, Harold Everett; MemorialHarold is survived by his wife Norma Redetzke of Sebeka, MN, to their union were born five children; two daughters, Diane Steinkraus and her husband Ronnie of Sebeka, MN, Debbie Redetzke of Lincoln, Nebraska; three sons, Myron Redetzke and his wife Pam of Sebeka, MN, Marvin Redetzke and his wife Lori of Sebeka, MN, Calvin Redetzke and his wife Joni of Sebeka, MN; seven grandchildren, Lacey Eckman and her husband Justin, Shawn Redetzke, Jeremy Redetzke. Levi Steinkraus, Evette Steinkraus, Reid Redetzke, and Logan Redetzke; five sisters, Delilah Hasbargen of Frazee, MN, LaVern Milbradt of Sebeka, MN, Donna Super and her husband George of Menahga, MN, Joyce Slininger and her husband Bill of St Cloud, MN, Darlene Hought and her husband Konnie of Foxhome, MN; two brothers, Marlyn Redetzke and his wife Joyce of Sebeka, MN, Donald Redetzke and his wife Roseann of Ely, MN; and many nieces, nephews and cousins. He is preceded in death by his parents, brother Gordon, infant sister Mavis and nephew Corey Hought.

[Handwritten: ‘Herbert Redetzke (Bro.)’]

Memorial Services were held on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 at 1:30 P.M. at Our Saviour‘s Lutheran Church in Sebeka, MN with Reverend Mark Manning officiating. Organist was Hilda Mary Schoon and congregational hymns were “In the Garden,” “Precious Lord, Take My Hand” and “Softly and Tenderly Jesus is Calling.” Honorary Pallbearers were Glen Kimball, Randy Redetzke, Daniel Besonen, Ryan Milbradt, Larry Huotari, Benny Olson and Gerald Olson. lnurnment will be at Green Hill Cemetery at a later date. Arrangements by Cardini — Behrens Funeral Homes of Sebeka and Menahga, MN.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription: Marriage Record for Oscar Thomas Blythe and Thirza Estelle McKim

Transcription: Marriage Record for Oscar Thomas Blythe and Thirza Estelle McKim

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Marriage for Oscar Blythe and Thirza McKim

This is my transcription of the marriage record for Oscar Thomas Blythe and Thirza Estelle McKim of August 9, 1930 in Butte Fourche, Butte County, South Dakota.

Marriage for Oscar Blythe and Thirza McKim

Original Form Text is black. Text entered by hand is blue.

_____________________________

South Dakota Department of Health

Division of Public Health Statistics                                                                                                                                            County No. 655

RECORD OF MARRIAGE                                                                                                                                                            State No. 139423

Date of Marriage: Aug      Month: 9      Day: Yr.: 1930

Where Solemnized: Butte Fourche

City, County: Butte

GROOM

Full Name: Oscar Thomas Blythe

Usual Residence: Nisland, Butte

(City, County) Butte

BRIDE

Full Name: Thirza Estelle McKim

Usual Residence: Fruitdale

(City, County) Butte

Age

(last birthday)

24

White X

Other

(state)

Date of Birth:

Age

(last birthday)

19

White X

Other

(state)

Date of Birth:

Place of Birth:

Place of Birth:

Number of times previously married:

Last Marital Status

Widowed Annulment

Divorced Never Married X

Number of times previously married:

Last Marital Status

Widowed Annulment

Divorced Never Married X

SDVS-11

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Hartford Vital Records; Stanley, Standley, Standly, Standla; page 394

Transcription: Hartford Vital Records; Stanley, Standley, Standly, Standla; page 394

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HARTFORD VITAL RECORDS

394

BARBOUR COLLECTION

(NAME/DESCRIPTION  |  Vol  |  Page)

STANLEY, STANDLEY, STANDLY, STANDLA, (cont )
Nath[anie]l, s Nath[anie]l & Anna, b Aug 11, 1707  |  FFS  |  61
Nathaniel, d Nov 14, 1712   |  FFS  |  74
Oliver, m Mrs Mary GOODRICH, Aug 26, 1821, by Elisha Cushman  |  I  |  24
Oliver, m Mrs. Eliza WHITE, Feb 13, 1851, by Rev D. B  Tumer  |  I  |  301
Robert, m Huldah KING, b. of Hartford, Feb. 26, 1826, by Rev. Joel Linsley  |  I  |  48
Ruth, m. Izack MORE, Dec. 5, 1645  |  D  |  22
Ruth, m. Isack MORE, Dec 5, 1645  |  FFS  |  26
Ruth, [d Caleb], b July 1, 1696  |  D  |  18
Ruth, [d Caleb], b July 1, 1696  |  FFS  |  21
Ruth, m James BIDWELL, Dec. 3, 1713  |  D  |  72
Ruth, m James BIDWELL, Dec. 3, 1713  |  FFS  |  34
Ruth Ann, of Farmington, m. John R LEWIS, of Carlinville, 111 , Nov 19, 1835, by Rev. Henry Stanwood  |  I  |  126
Samuel, s Samuel & Ann, b. Jan 17, 1730/1  |  FFS  |  72
Saphira, of East Hartford, m Timothy MORE, of Gt Barrington, Apr 28, 1850, by Rev Jacob A Prime  |  I  |  284
Sarrah, [d Nathaniell & Sarrah], b Aug 24, 1669  |  D  |  18
Sarrah, d Nath[anie]ll & Sarrah, b Aug 24, 1669  |  FFS  |  21
Sarah, d. Nov. 28, 1689  |  D  |  18
Sarah, d Nov 28, 1689  |  FFS  |  21
Sarah, [d Nathaniell & Anna], b. Jan 18*, 1708/9 *(Date is doubtful)  |  D  |  16
Sarah, [d. Nathaniel 8: Anna], b. Jan. 18, 1708/9  |  FFS  |  61
Sarah, d [Nathaniel & Anna], b. Jan. 23(?), 1708/9  |  FFS  |  18
Sarah, w. Nath[anie]ll, d. Aug. 18, 1716  |  FFS  |  74
Susanna, [d. Nathaniell & Sarrah], b. Apr. 13, 1681; d Sept 18, 1683  |  D  |  18
Susanna, d [Nathaniell & Sarrah], b Apr. 13, 1681, d Sept 18, 1683  |  FFS  |  21
Susanna, [d Nathaniel & Anna], b June 26, 1717  |  FFS  |  61
Timothy, s Caleb & Abigail, b Feb. 9, 1705/6  |  FFS  |  61
Walter, of New Britain, m. Maria KNOX, of Hartford, Apr 12, 1842, by Rev. O. E. Daggett  |  I  |  179
William P., of Cleaveland, O., m Helen M. BRACE, of West Hartford, Oct. 3, 1849, by Rev Dwight M Seward  |  I  |  288
William W , m. Parmelia M BENTON, Sept 29, 1830, by Rev Joel Hawes  |  I  |  90
STANNARD, E N., Co1., of New Haven, m. Rachel WOODRUFF,  of Southington, May 29, 1845, by Rev John Moore  |  I  |  207
Lory Ann, m. Oliver SHEPHERD, b. of Hartford, May 18, 1824, by Rev. Nathan Perkins, of West Hartford  |  I  |  37
STANNIS, Mary L., m. Benjamin A. BOURNE, b of Hartford, Jan 11, 1849, by Rev. E Crawford  |  I  |  259
STANTON. STANTEN, Joseph, s. Thomas, bp Mar 21, 1646  |  D  |  4

(This is the final page of entries for STANLEY.)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription: Biography of Ervin Thornton and his family, of Tappen, New York.

Transcription: Biography of Ervin Thornton and his family, of Tappen, New York.

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Transcription: Biography of Ervin Thornton and his family, of Tappen, New York.

[Tappen, 1878 – 1966]

ERVIN THORNTON

Ervin Thornton family biography.
Ervin Thornton family biography.

On September 12. 1948 Ervin Thornton and Wynola Dewald were united in marriage in the Lutheran Church at Dawson. They were the first couple to be married in this church after it was moved there from Gackle. They made their home in Steele in a  home that was known as the “old Hi Maw House” from north of Tappen. Wynola’s father Christ Dewald moved it from Tappen to Dawson where it was for several years, then he moved it to Steele into the block next to the Archie Thornton home. This was their home for two years.

Ervin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Archie Thornton of Steele. was born in 1925 at Steele where he made his home and received his education. Ervin was the only boy in a family of four children. Rumor has it that at a very young age he was very handy with a sling shot. He could hit many targets but he was especially good at hitting a bent-over target. At the age of 16 he went to Portland, Oregon and worked on a housing project with his father. In 1944 he joined the Navy serving one ear in the states and one overseas in Japan. After his discharge he went into the trucking business for himself.

Wynola, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Christ Dewald, was born in 1930 in Napoleon. At the age of three she moved with her parents to a country store south of Dawson. She attended her elementary grades at a country school while living there. During her freshman year in high school, which she attended in Streeter, her  family moved to Dawson. Wynola graduated from Dawson High School in 1947. The following year she taught school south of Tappen in a country school near the Art J. Werre farm. After being married she taught one year north of Dawson and three years west of Steele.

In 1950 they purchased the Hoffer truckline and moved to Tappen where they are still living at present. Ervin and Wynola are the parents of four children: Donivan 15. Nanette 13, Bradley 11, and Wendell 9.

They are members of the St. John’s Lutheran Church in Tappen where Wynola teaches Sunday School and is a member of the Ladies Aid. In the fifteen years they have lived in Tappen they have found the people to be true friends and they enioy living there very much.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Debate about numbers, percentages and odds in genealogy fascinates.

Debate about numbers, percentages and odds in genealogy fascinates.

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inbreedingThere will always be debate about numbers, percentages and odds in genealogy.

I am so lucky that we have such a wide range of ancestries and national origins in my husband’s and my family trees. Those who have read my posts before are already well aware that our ancestries branch off from four (or five) distinct groups, and marriage between these groups is rare.

The groups containing our ancestries are:

MY ANCESTRY

  • Acadians

French Huguenots escaping religious persecution in France in the mid to late 17th century relocated to the Atlantic coast of Canada and the United States, giving birth to the Acadian and Cajun cultures.

  • French Canadians

You would think, since the origins of French Canadians are essentially the same as the Acadians, there would be more intermarriage between the two, but I have found very few connections between the two groups in our family tree – at least so far. Most French Canadians descended from French explorers and pioneers involved in the fur trade and colonizing what is now part of Ontario and Quebec, although Acadians did find their way up the St. Lawrence River after the great expulsion (grand dérangement) of the French settlers by the British colonists.

MARK’S ANCESTRY

  • Scandinavian

Although the majority of the ancestry of my husband on his mother’s side is Swedish, the other Scandinavian nations and cultures are represented as well.

  • Welsh Quaker

Mark’s ancestry on his father’s side originates from Welsh immigrants who were also escaping religious persecution for their puritan beliefs at the hands of the Welsh and British nobility and clergy.

  • British Royalty and Nobility

The interesting point to make here is that Mark’s connections to British royalty and nobility occur through his Welsh Quaker ancestry.

I decided to touch on this subject after reading the post on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter entitled, “Man Traces Ancestry to 1st English King – So What?.”

Mathematically, Dick Eastman’s calculations of the numbers of ancestors and/or descendants in a family based upon an average number and length of generations, as well as an average number of children in families appear to make sense. However, there are so many variables affecting the numbers, that it is almost impossible to make accurate estimations, much less calculations.

These variables include:

  1. Individuals who remained single and bore no children.
  2. Individuals who died young and were never married, much less had children.
  3. Mass deaths due to war, disease and poverty wiping out most or all of a generation or two.
  4. Variations in sizes of families as influenced by tradition or custom, health and fertility, relationships, economics, etc.

One major point made by Dick is his belief that everyone can eventually trace their ancestries back to royalty, but by my experience, this appears to be flawed.

As illustrated in the diverse groups outlined above in our ancestries, we originate from several unique national, ethnic, and socio-economic groups. Examining our family tree makes it apparent that intermarriage between these groups was almost impossible due to geography, economics, politics and custom. Most people, no matter where they were from or how wealthy and socially prominent they were, usually married within their own group.

The interesting point illustrated by our ancestry is that although my husband’s and my ancestries are quite separate and rarely intermarried, the fact that he and I married and had our two children now combines our ancestries for all future generations. Therefore, it’s easy to assume that intermarriage occurred (and will occur) much more as the world became smaller through technology, multi-culturalism, etc., which are more modern phenomena of the last hundred years or so.

In previous posts, I touched on this subject as it relates to our ancestry and evolving cultural methods of managing relationships and marriages to ensure as little inbreeding as possible. These posts are “The Science of Husbandry on a Human Scale” and “Ingenius incest prevention app created by University of Iceland students.

I must thank Dick Eastman as his is one of the few blogs I do read that routinely challenge my thinking and assumptions. I like that.

photo credit: wonker via photopin cc


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Transcription: Tombstone of Zotique Cloutier, Rosa Kingsberry, Raymonde Cloutier, Rene Cloutier, Ronald Cloutier, Rollande Labelle

Transcription: Tombstone of Zotique Cloutier, Rosa Kingsberry, Raymonde Cloutier, Rene Cloutier, Ronald Cloutier, Rollande Labelle

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Transcription of the family tombstone of Zotique Cloutier, Rosa Kingsberry, Raymonde Cloutier, Rene Cloutier, Ronald Cloutier, and Rollande Labelle.

 

Cloutier Family Tombstone
Cloutier Family Tombstone

 

CLOUTIER

1891     Zotique Cloutier     1972

epoux de

1902     Rosa Kingsberry     1994

1932     Raymonde Cloutier

1944     Rene Cloutier     1994

1938     Ronald Cloutier

epoux de

1941     Rollande Labelle

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription: U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942; Augustus Coke Cronkhite

Transcription: U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942; Augustus Coke Cronkhite

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US WWII Draft Registration Card for Augustus Coke Cronkhite

WWII Draft Card for Augustus C. Cronkhite
WWII Draft Card for Augustus C. Cronkhite

REGISTRATION CARD — (Men born on or after April 28, 1877 and on or before February 16, 1897)

Line 1
SERIAL NUMBER: U1618
NAME: Augustus Coke Cronkhite
ORDER NUMBER:

Line 2
PLACE OF RESIDENCE: Kingman, Sugar Creek Twp., Parke, Indiana
(The place of residence given on the line above will determine local board jurisdiction; line 2 of registration certificate will be identical)

Line 3
MAILING ADDRESS: Same
(Mailing address if other than line 2. If same, insert word same)

Line 4
TELEPHONE: Wallace

Line 5
AGE IN YEARS: 52; DATE OF BIRTH: May 31 1989 (typo: should read ‘1889’)

Line 6
PLACE OF BIRTH: Warren

Line 7
NAME AND ADDRESS OF PERSON WHO WILL ALWAYS KNOW YOUR ADDRESS: Martha Cronkhite, Kingman, Indiana

Line 8
EMPLOYER’S NAME AND ADDRESS: self

Line 9
PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT OR BUSINESS: R.F.D. #1, Kingman, Parke, Indiana
(Number and street or R. F. D. number) (Town) (State)

I AFFIRM THAT I HAVE VERIFIED ABOVE ANSWERS AND THAT THEY ARE TRUE.

D. S. S. FORM 1 16-21630-2    Augustus Coke Cronkhite
(Revised 4-1-42)      (over)        (Registrant’s Signature)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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We must fight for our veterans as they fought for us.

We must fight for our veterans as they fought for us.

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We must fight for our veterans.
poppy field

Remembrance Day is fast approaching and this is one very important day I always recognize with a post on this blog.

My family’s history is well-entrenched in military service.

  • My father was in the military for 30 years.
  • My father-in-law was in the military for over 30 years.
  • My husband, Mark served 20 years.

They all served tours in hostile environments.

Our family have also lost two family members in WWI, one being Pte Philias Joseph Albert Emery during advance actions at Vimy Ridge, and the other being Pte Joseph Turmaine in the Battle of Courcelette.

I have always thought that our government was not doing enough to help veterans who are disabled as a result of their duties.

I’m appalled to say that under this present Conservative government, instead of improving, the conditions and treatment of our valued veterans are much, much worse.

Reading this post at Change.org prompted me to write about his myself and I encourage everyone to go online at the Change.org site to sign the petition demanding better financial, physical and mental health care, and administrative treatment of our veterans.

This video of a rant by Rick Mercer on behalf of our veterans is a good example of just one area of concern.

Author credit: Christine Blythe, Feathering the Empty Nest Blog

photo credit: Dukas.Ju via photopin cc


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Historical Vital Statistics website of Nova Scotia Archives is searchable in French and English.

Historical Vital Statistics website of Nova Scotia Archives is searchable in French and English.

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I have a few favorite, go-to sites that I use much more than any others, and the Nova Scotia Archives site is one. Considering the substantial Acadian ancestry of my family, it’s no surprise that the majority of vital records for the majority of my ancestors are available on this site.

The searchable database of the Nova Scotia Archives contains almost one million names, each of which is linked to a corresponding vital registration, including births, baptisms, deaths and marriages. The records date from the mid-1700’s to the 1960’s, are all digitized and available online, and are searchable in French.

The records can be searched in both French and English on the Historical Vital Statistics website.


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Genealogy Mystery: Who were Christian W. Keefer’s parents?

Genealogy Mystery: Who were Christian W. Keefer’s parents?

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Christian W. Keefer (Chester) is an important figure in one of the main branches of my husband’s and children’s ascendancy. He married Mary Ann Jacques and they eventually settled and raised a family in Dodge County, Wisconsin.

After numerous years of research, however, I’m still left scratching my head at the mystery of the identity of Christian W. Keefer’s parents.

As can be seen in the list of sources I’ve found and logged for Christian (below), you would think that at least one of them would provide some concrete information about his parentage and place of birth, but that turns out to not be the case.

Here’s what I know for sure:

Christian W. Keefer was born October 1, 1811 in Pennsylvania and his family originated from France.

Christian W. Keefer's parents.
Sources for Christian W. Keefer.

That’s it.

I originally took a mention of Philadelphia as Christian’s birthplace in a biography of his son Charles with a grain of salt. I do believe that people did and do tend to describe where they’ve come from by using the nearest, largest center that would be recognized outside the area. For example, although we live in Chilliwack, BC, Canada, we frequently say we’re located near Vancouver to those who are not from the area. Considering this possibility, I would not rule out any birth location in Pennsylvania.

I have considered the possibility that our Christian may be one of the Christians mentioned of the Keefer / Kiefer family in the “Biographical Annals of Franklin County”. I was able to systematically eliminate every Christian mentioned because they could not have been born on or near the birth date of our Christian (Chester), or they married into different families, etc.

Another  possibility I’ve been checking is that his father (and possibly mother as well), may have immigrated to the United States from Germany (or Switzerland), but I’ve been unable to find immigration or naturalization records that show such a connection.

However, the same biography previously mentioned states that he was of French origin.

Through all of my research over the years, every Keefer family is of Germanic origin – except one.

The only family that shows of French origin in the time period is (lo and behold!) actually living in Philadelphia and is that of Anthony and Sarah (Shillingford) Keefer.

At the time, his family was very young with only mention of one brother born in 1810 – Thomas. The earlier births of the children of Anthony and his wife Sarah are about one year apart, leaving a gap just where Christian’s would be.

Keefer, Anthony; family pedigree chart
Family pedigree chart of Anthony Keefer, showing Christian, as I’ve entered it in my database (see http://blythegenealogy.com).

I would love to find proof beyond that of coincidence and speculation of Christian W. Keefer’s parentage. I’d like nothing better than to continue further back in time and expand on this huge Keefer family

If you or anyone you know has any documentation, images, etc. of this Christian Keefer showing his parents and brothers and sisters (or parts thereof), I would dearly love to see them, or better yet, get copies.

Sources:

  1. Biographical Sketches of Old Settlers and Prominent People of Wisconsin: Vol. I (Waterloo, Wis., Huffman & Hyer, 1899); pdf file.
  2. State of Ohio, “Ohio, County Marriages, 1790-1950,” marriage, Family Search (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XZ82-6QV: accessed
  3. Death certificate; Charles Keefer;  Digital Folder No.: 4008297; Image No.: 1576; Film Number: 1674527; Certificate No.: cn 23384. (7 June 1933), Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths, 1916-1947, State of Illinois; https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQCW-SP5.
  4. FamilySearch.org, “Wisconsin Deaths and Burials, 1835-1968,” database, FamilySearch.org, FamilySearch.org (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XL3P-121: accessed ).
  5. Rootsweb, “Wisconsin Death Records,” database, Rootsweb, Rootsweb (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~keffer/deaths/Wisconsin.htm: accessed ).
  6. Keefer, Christian W., Beaver Dam Argus, Beaver Dam, Dodge County, Wisconsin, , Obituary.
  7. Obituary of Mary Ann (Jaques) Keefer.
  8. 1880 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, Beaver Dam, Dodge, Wisconsin, enumeration district (ED) Enumeration District: 004, Page: 47A, Year: 1880; Census Place: Beaver Dam, Dodge, Wisconsin; Roll: 1422; Family History Film: 1255422, Keefer Christian W.; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com : Internet 13 July 2013).
  9. 1870 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, year: 1870; census place: elba, dodge, wisconsin; roll: m593_1710; page: 165a; image: 338; family history library film: 553209, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, enumeration district (ED) Roll: M593_1710; Image: 337; Family History Library Film: 553209, Page: 164B, Roll: M593_1710; Image: 337; Family History Library Film: 553209, Keefer Christian W; digital image, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  10. 1860 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, roll: m653_1405; page: 303; image: 308, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, Page: 303, Roll: M653_1405; Image: 308; Family History Library Film: 805405, Keefer Christian W.; dgs no.: 4298900; image no.: 0038; nara no.: m653, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  11. 1850 US Federal Census, Elba, Dodge, Wisconsin, roll: m432_996;  image: 209, , Page: 104A, Roll: M432_996; Page: 104A; Image: 209, Keefer Christian W.; digital image, Family Search ((http://blythegenealogy.com  : Internet 7 September 2013).
  12. 1840 US Federal Census, Painesville, Lake, Ohio; digital image, Ancestry.ca, Ancestry.ca (http://blythegenealogy.com  : accessed ).
  13. 1830 US Federal Census, Antrim, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, age: 395; nara series: m19; roll number: 151; family history film: 0020625; digitalk image, Ancestry.com (http://blythegenealogy.com  : accessed ).

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Transcription: Newbury Marriages; Jaques

Transcription: Newbury Marriages; Jaques

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Transcription: Newbury Marriages; Jaques

Newbury Marriages

The following is my transcription of the pages concerning variations of the Jaques / Jacques surname marriages in Newbury, Massachusetts.

Page 256

…(other names)…
JAQUES (see also Jacques), Ann, and Robert Adams, jr., Oct. 29,  1725.*
Benjamin, and Apphia Coffin, May20, 1725.*
Benjamin, and Mary Noyes, Dec. 5, 1727.*
Benjamin, and Mary Adams ofRowley, at Rowley, Mar. 25, 1760.*
Benjamin (jr. int.), and Judith Noyes, Mar. 4, 1762.*
Betsey, and Jacob Hidden, int. Mar. 14, 1812.*
Charles, and Marcy Thurlo, Feb. 5, 1821.*
Daniell, and Mary Williams, Mar. 20, 1692-3.
David, and Dolley Richards of Newburyport, int. Nov. 24, 1804.
Deborah, and Cutting Lunt, Dec. 10, 1735.*
Deborah, and Capt. Israel Adams, Nov. 11, 1779.*
Deborah, and True Brown, jr. of Deerfield, N. H., Feb. 5, 1825.*

Newbury Parish Church
Newbury Parish Church

Page 257

Jaques, Eleanor, and James Noyes, May 7, 1747.*
Eleanor, and Benjamin Short, Dec. 16, 1813.*
Eliphalet, and Lydia Adams, Jan. 3, 1737-8.*
Elisabeth, and Enoch Knight, Nov.11,1736.*
Elisabeth, and Moses Moodey, June 12, 1744.*
Elisabeth, andAmos Knight of Newburyport, Jan. 12,  1797.*
Ellanor, and Benjamin Short, Dec. –, 1808 ? C. R. 1.
Enoch, and Mary Hale, int. Jan.  8, 1772.
Enoch, and Joanna Plumer, Feb. 9, 1797.*
Enoch, jr., and Sally Williams Tilton of Newburyport, May 26, 1811.*
Eunice, and Samuel Pearson, int.Dec. 5,  1767.
Eunice, and Jacob Haskell of Newburyport, Dec. 23, 1819.*
Florence, and James Safford, Apr.  5, 1763.*
Hanna, and Ephraim Plumer, Jan. 15, 1679.
Hannah, and  Ephraim B. Horn, Sept.  21, 1815.*
Henry, and Anne Knight, Oct. 8, 1648.
Henry, and Mrs. Rebecca Pikering of Portsmouth, int. Apr. 10, 1706.
Henry, and Mary Coffin, Jan. 24, 1711-12.*
Henry Cromwell, andPolly Follansbee of Newburyport, int. May9, 1807.
John, and Sarah Jaques, June 12, 1746.*
Joseph, and Martha Brown, Mar. 4, 1756.*
Judeth,  and William Dole, Apr.3, 1755.*
Judith, and Abraham Mace (jr. int.)of Newburyport, Apr. 16, 1795.*
Love, and Robert Adams, 3d, Sept 6m 1738.*
Lydia, and  Capt. Kindal Pearson of Wilmington, Jan. 30, 1737-8.*
Lydia, and Tristram Lunt, Feb. 20, 1799.*
Martha, and Enoch Thurston of Newburyport, May 28, 1794.*
Mary, and Richard Brown, May 7, 1674 (1675. CT. R.)
Mary, and  Parker  Greenleaf, Nov. 24, 1715.*
Mary, and  Samuel Peirce, Oct. 19, 1738.*
Mary, and James Greenough of Bradford, Dec. 13, 1759.*
Mary, of Gloucester, and Simon Thorla, int. Mar. 15, 1770.
Mary, and John Knight, Jan. 12, 1809.*
Mary, and Stephen Adams, jr., Jan. 27, 1814.*
Mary A., of West Newbury, and William Giddings, int.Aug.1, 1846.

Page 258

Jaques, Mehetabel, and Richard Smith, Oct. 11, 1779.*
Moses, and Sarah Woodman, Nov. 4, 1778.*
Moses, and Abigail Hale, Aug. 15, 1782.*
Moses, and Rebekah Hills, July –, 1792.*
Moses, jr., and HannahChase, int. Oct. 27, 1804.
Parker, jr., and Sarah Adams, Dec. 1, 1767.*
Phebby, and Joseph Ilsley, Sept. 3, 1798.*
Prudence, and Edmund Knight, June 11, 1751.*
Rebeckah, and John Dodge of Newburyport, int. Sept. 22, 1804.
Rhoda, and John Loud Tilton, Jan. 25, 1814.*
Richard, and Ruth Plumer, Jan. 18, 1681.
Richard, and Elisabeth Knight, Feb. 25, 1713-14.*
Richard, jr., and Mrs. Judith Noyes, Feb.  19, 1722-3.*
Richard, of Gloucester, and Mary Ilsley, Jan. 13, 1785.*
Richard, and Polly Emerson of Hampstead, N. H., int. May 15, 1792.
Richard, Lt., and Eunise Thurston, Nov. 28, 1799.*
Richard T., and Caroline Noyes, Aug. 20, 1837.*
Ruth, and Stephen Emery, Nov. 29, 1692.
Ruth, and JamesShort, Apr. 19, 1737.*
Sally, of Bradford, and Samuel Jewett, int. Mar. 5, 1814.
Samuel, and Mary Noyes, May  8,  1750.*
Samuel (jr. int.), and Eunice Chase, Aug. 12, 1779.*
Samuell, and Lydiah Pike, Dec. 12, 1717.
Sarah, Mrs. and Moses Little, jr., Feb. 12, 1716-17.*
Sarah, and John Jaques, June 12, 1746.*
Sarah, and Somersby Chase, Apr. 16, 1777.*
Sarah, and Dudley Rogers, jr., of Newburyport, int. Aug. 25, 1798.
Sarah B., and JohnEngland,Dec. 3, 1818.*
Sophia, and John Ladd, Aug. 25, 1814.*
Stephen, jr., and Mrs. Thankfull Taylor of Yarmouth, int. Feb. 21,  1712-13.
Stephen, and Mary Bartlett, July 6,1783.*
Stephen, and Mehitabel Hovey, Nov. 15, 1792.*
Steven, and Debora Plumer, May 13,  1684.
Susanah, and Moses Noyes(jr. int.), May 21, 1738.*
Susannah Newman, and Benjamin Rolf of Portland, int. Apr. 30,  1803.
Theophilus, and Sarah Wood of Newburyport, int. Mar. 14, 1795.

Page 259

Jaques, William, and Lydia Bartlet of Newburyport, int. Mar. 11, 1815.
William, andE lizabeth Savory, May 3,  1815.*
…(other names)…

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Baptism Record for Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois

Transcription: Baptism Record for Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois

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The following is my transcription and translation of the baptism certificate for Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois.

ORIGINAL FRENCH

Extrait du régistre de baptémes, marriages, sépulture. De la paroisse de St. Hughes du Lac Saguay, from l’année mil neuf cent quinze.

Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois baptism certificate.
Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois baptism certificate.

Le trente et un octobre mil neuf cent quinze, nous frétre, soussigné, arons baptisé Marie Marguerite Yvette, née le quatre aout,fille légitimé de Émile Bourgeois, cultivateur, et de Marie-Anne Turmel de cette paroisse. Le frarraine a été Gédéon Grondines et la Marraine Antoinette Sauvéles quels ont déclaré ne savoirsigner. Le frère é tait présent et a signé avec nous Lecture faite.

Émile Bourgeois
Josephat Cossette

Lequel extrait conforme a l’original ce 31 mars 1931.

E. Brousseau
Lac Saguay

ENGLISH TRANSLATION

Extract from the register of baptisms, marriages, and burials. The parish of St. Hughes Saguay Lake, from the year one thousand nine hundred and fifteen.

On 31 October, nineteen hundred and fifteen frétre we hereby arons named Yvette Marie Marguerite, born August 4, legitimate daughter of Emile Bourgeois, farmer, and Marie-Anne Turmel of this parish. The godfather was Gédéon Grondines and godmother Antoinette Sauvéles who swore as such and signed. The priest was present and signed after reading.

Emile Bourgeois
Josephat Cossette

Extract which conforms to the original March 31, 1931.

E. Brousseau
Saguay Lake

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Legend lives on: George, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in wine.

Legend lives on: George, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in wine.

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George, Duke of Clarence was born on October 21, 1449 at Dublin Castle in Dublin, Ireland to Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York (21 Sep 1411-30 Dec 1460) and Cecily Neville (3 May 1415-31 May 1495). George has lived in infamy because of his horrible end: George, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in wine.

 

George, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in wine
George, the Duke of Clarence, drowned in wine.

This was a time when Richard, Duke of York, was beginning to challenge King Henry VI for the crown.

George was the third of the four sons of Richard and Cecily who survived to adulthood. Following his father’s death and the accession of his elder brother, Edward, to the throne, George was created Duke of Clarence on June 28, 1461 and became a Knight of the Garter. From February 1462 to March 1470, he was Chief Governor of Ireland, and on May 20, 1471 he became Great Chamberlain of England.

On July 11, 1469, George married Isabel Neville (5 Sep 1451-22 Dec 1476) at Calais, which was controlled by England at that time. Isabel was the daughter and co-heiress of Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick and Salisbury, and his wife Anne Beauchamp.

George had actively supported his elder brother Edward’s claim to the throne, but when his father-in-law the Earl of Warwick deserted Edward to ally with Margaret of Anjou, King Henry’s consort, George, along with his pregnant wife, followed him to France.

Their firstborn, Anne, was born on April 16, 1470 on a ship off Calais, only to die shortly afterward while still on board the ship.

Henry VI rewarded George for his loyalty by making him next in line to the throne after Edward of Westminster, justifying the exclusion of Edward IV either by attainder for his treason against Henry or on the grounds of his alleged illegitimacy.

After a short time, George realized that his loyalty to his father-in-law was misplaced. Warwick had his younger daughter, Anne, marry Edward of Westminster, King Henry VI’s heir. Since it now seemed unlikely that George would be replacing Edward, George again allied with his brother King Edward and regained his favor.

The George, Duke of Clarence and his wife, Isabel.
The George, Duke of Clarence and his wife.

Although George was made Earl of Warwick on March 25, 1472, he did not inherit the entire Warwick estate as his brother, Richard, Duke of Gloucester, would marry the widowed younger sister of his wife, Anne Neville.

Anne had become increasingly concerned with her sister Isabel and how she must be coping with these hostilities. Isabel was expecting another child. She had already borne two children, their daughter Margaret (14 Aug 1473-28 May 1541) and their son, Edward (25 Feb 1475-28 Nov 1499), who was later also Earl of Warwick. Edward passed the greater part of his life in prison and was beheaded in 1499.

Being close to the king, the Woodvilles were under scrutiny, and Richard had witnessed their self-serving and underhanded ways and knew it was best to avoid them. It was well known that George had always loathed the Woodvilles. To him, they were usurpers who achieved their ends through manipulation and control.

Clarence had suspicions about the validity of the marriage of Elizabeth Woodville and did not hesitate to say so. Having been informed that a certain lady of high breeding had caught Edward’s eye, George took further notice. She was was of good morals and would not lose her virtue, even to the King, so the King had a private wedding ceremony before he had married Elizabeth Woodville. George made sure to tell the people through whom the story would travel to Burgundy and the ears of Louis XI, and James III of Scotland.

The Woodvilles became aware of the allegations and planned Clarence’s downfall to protect their positions from being threatened.

Isabel was late in her pregnancy and was staying at Warwick Castle when a lady named Ankarette Twynyho professed to be a midwife and offered her services. Things looked good at first as Isabel gave birth to a boy who they named Richard (6 Oct 1476-1 Jan 1477). Richard was a sickly child and both of his parents worried for his welfare.

Isabel seemingly recovered well from the birth. The midwife, having told them she was good with herbs for healing, also told them she could nurse the baby back to health. Both George and Isabel having believed her claims, allowed her to remain until Isabel suddenly fell ill after drinking ale. In panic, the midwife fled and Isabel died in agony two months after giving birth to Richard who lived only about three months, and they were buried together at Tewkesbury Abbey in Gloucestershire.

Clarence truly believed his wife had been murdered. He wanted whoever was responsible for his wife’s murder brought to justice, and he refused to eat and drink as if he suspected attempts to poison him as well.

Today, most historians believe Isabel’s death resulted from either childhood fever or consumption. Clarence was convinced she had been poisoned by Ankarette Twynyho, and in revenge he had her murdered in April of 1477, by having her arrested, and strong-arming a jury at Warwick into convicting her. She was one of two hanged immediately after the trial with John Thursby, a fellow defendant.

A petition regarding the events states:

“That whereas the said Ankarette on Saturday, 12th of April 17 Edward IV (1477), was in her manor at Cayford (ie Keyford, Somerset) and Richard Hyde late of Warwick, gentleman and Roger Strugg late of Bekehampton, co Somerset, towker, with drivers riotous persons to number of fourscore by the command of George, duke of Clarence, came to Cayford about two of the clock after noon and entered her house and carried her off the same day to bath and from thence on the Sunday following to Circeter (Cirencester) co. Gloucester, and from thence to Warwick, whither they brought her on the Monday following about eight of the clock in the after noon, which town of Warwick is distant from Cayforde seventy miles, and then and there took from her all her jewels, money and goods and also in the said dukes behalf, as though he had used King’s power, Commanded Thomas Delalynde, esquire, and Edith his wife, daughter of the said Ankarette, and their servants to avoid from the town of Warwick and lodged them at Stattforde upon Aven that night, six miles from thence and the said duke kept Ankarette imprison unto the hour of nine before noon on the morrow, to wit the Tuesday after the closing of Pasche (ie Easter) and caused her to be brought to the Guildhall at Warwick before divers of Justices of the peace in the County then sitting in sessions and caused her to be indicted by the name of Ankarette Twynyho, late of Warwick, widow, late servant of the duke and Isabel his wife, of having at on 10 October, 16 Edward IV, given to the said Isabel a venomous drink of ale mixed with poison, of which the latter sickened until the Sunday before Christmas, on which day she died, and the justices arraigned the said Ankarette and a jury appeared and found her guilty and it was considered that she should be led from the bar there to the gaol of Warwick and thence should be drawn through the town to the gallows of Myton and hanged till she was dead, and the Sheriff was commanded to do execution and so he did, which indictment, trail and judgement were done and given within three hours of said Tuesday, and juror for fear gave the Sheriff was verdict contrary to their conscience, in proof where of divers of them came to said Ankarette in remorse and asked her forgiveness, in consideration of the imaginations of and her good disposition, the King should ordain that the record, process, verdict and judgement should be void and of no effect, but that as the premises were done by the command of the said duke, the said justices and Sheriff and the under-Sheriff and their ministers should not be vexed, The answer of the king. So it fait come il est desire (“ Let it be done as the petitioner”)

George had known that it was the work of Elizabeth Woodville that was behind Isabel’s death and he was determined to prove to all that Elizabeth Woodville was behind it all. Elizabeth reinforced with Edward that George must be silenced for the sake of children, including the heir.

At first Edward was reluctant to turn against his brother, not caring much for his wife or her family. But George had turned his attentions to Edward, and managed to anger Edward sufficiently that he decided to act. Clarence was arrested for treason and and attempted necromancy against the King.

Wishing to look into the acts of Clarence George further, Edward summoned him to appear before him at the place of Westminster. He accused Clarence of pursuing vigilante justice and then had his guards escort Clarence to the tower. Meanwhile, a messenger brought Richard the news that Clarence was locked up in the tower and having read the charges, Richard realised that George had walked into a trap set by the Woodvilles trap and was therefore at the mercy of the King.

Richard sent a letter to Edward requesting that his own servants look after George in the tower and he had also asked Edward if he could look after George’s children. Having obtained permission, Richard journeyed to Warwick. He dispatched sent George’s most trusted servants to the tower.

By October, 1477, Richard was actively pleading for Clarence since he’d become aware that the Woodvilles were seeking Edward’s signature on  a death warrant. Richard hoped that George would beg for forgiveness and promise to remain loyal to Edward.

Upon seeing George, Richard realized he was prepared to die rather than even hint at submission to the Woodville family. Richard pleaded with Edward to allow him to try to persuade George, and Edward promised not to sign the death warrant.

Having been arrested, one of Clarence’s retainers, confessed under torture that he had ‘imagined and compassed’ the King’s death using the black arts. He implicated two others and they were all tried for treason, convicted, and sentenced to be drawn and hanged at Tyburn. One was saved at the eleventh hour by a plea for his life by the Bishop of Norwich, but the other two were executed.
Clarence chose to ignore this ominous warning.

Edward had Clarence brought to Windsor, accused him of treason, and ordered his arrest and imprisonment. Clarence was held in the Tower of London and put on trial for treason against his brother Edward IV. Edward prosecuted his own brother, demanding that a Bill of Attainder be passed by Parliament. Clarence was executed at the Tower of London on February 18, 1478.
He was laid to rest at Tewkesbury along  with his wife and son.

The legend grew that Clarence had drowned in a butt of Malmsey wine, possibly having evolved from a joke about his being a heavy drinker. What was believed to be the body of Clarence was later exhumed and it surprisingly showed no indications of beheading, which was the traditional method of execution for those of nobility. It could also be possible that George’s remains were transported to the abbey in a barrel of Malmsey.

In Shakespeare’s play, “Richard III”, George is portrayed to have been drowned in a butt of Malmsey wine.

Sources:

  1. Kings and Queens of England – The Plantagenets, The Royal Family online [http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page58.asp].
  2. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy online [http://fmg.ac/].
  3. Kings and Queens of England – The Plantagenets, online [http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page58.asp].
  4. “George Plantagenet, 1st Duke of Clarence”; Wikipedia.org; [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Plantagenet,_1st_Duke_of_Clarence]
  5. “The Demise of George, Duke of Clarence”; Historum.com; http://historum.com/blogs/crystal+rainbow/831-demise-george-duke-clarence.html
    http://www.luminarium.org/encyclopedia/clarence.htm

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Edward “Longshanks” I, King of England

Edward “Longshanks” I, King of England

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Edward “Longshanks” I, King of England was born 17/18 June 1239, eldest son of Henry III, King of England (1207-1272) and Eléonore de Provence (1223- ), in Westminster Palace, London.

 

Edward I, King of England
Edward “Longshanks” I, King of England

Edward was created Earl of Chester and granted the Dukedom of Gascony on 14 February 1254, after arriving in France.

Leonore de Castile
Leonore de Castile

Edward’s father arranged his  marriage to Infanta doña Leonor de Castile y León (1240-1290) with an eye to preventing the barons obtaining help for their rebellion from Castile. What started as an arranged marriage on 18 October 1254 at Abbey of Las Huelgas, Burgos, Castile, Spain, later became a love match. Leonore was born to Infante don Fernando, III, de Castilla y León, King of Castile, Toledo and Extremadura from his second marriage to Jeanne, de Dammartin, Comtesse de Ponthieu.

Their children were:

Eleonore (1264-1297)
Joan, of England ( -1265)
John, of England ( – )
Henry, of England (1267-1274)
Julian (1271-1271)
Katherine of England (1271- )
Joan D’Acre, of England ( -1307)
Alfonso, Earl of Chester (1273-1284)
Margaret (1275-1318)
Berengaria, of England (1276-1276)
Mary, of England (1278-1332)
Alice ( – )
Isabella (1279-1279)
Elizabeth (1282-1316)
Edward, II, King of England (1284-1327)
Beatrice (1286-1286)
Blanche (1290- )

Edward initially supported the rebellious barons under Simon, de Montfort, Earl of Leicester (26th great grandfather to Mark). He later changed to support his father, served and was taken prisoner at the Battle of Lewes on 14 May 1264 by Simon de Montfort’s rebel Barons, but escaped after only 12 days on 16 May 1264. With the objective of making peace and ending the war, Edward gave Simon de Montfort the Earldom of Chester on 24 Dec 1264. The Earldom of Chester was restored to Edward after he killed Simon de Montfort at the battle of Evesham, on 4 Aug 1265.

Although originally planning to join Louis IX, King of France (27th great grandfather to Mark) in Tunisia in the summer of 1270, his plans were changed upon hearing the news of the King’s death when he arrived in Africa. After spending the winter with King Charles in Sicily, he sailed for Acre, Palestine,  to join the seventh crusade, landing on 9 May 1271.

Lacking resources against the Mameluk Sultan Baibars, he and the Sultan signed a peace agreement at Caesarea on 22 May 1272.

In an assassination attempt, Edward I was stabbed him with a poisoned dagger. Although he survived, the effects of the poison left him incapacitated until he left Acre to return to England 22 September 1272. He succeeded his father as Edward I, ‘Longshanks’, King of England while stopped in Sicily during his return from the Crusade.

He returned to England just prior to being crowned King of England on 19 Aug 1274 at Westminster Abbey in London.
Edward turned out to be a strong king and managed to increase the power and influence of the crown at a high cost to the Barons.

Caernarvon Castle
Caernarvon Castle

In 1277, Edward initiated a war with Llewelyn ap Gruffydd (25th great grandfather to Mark), ruler of Wales, and husband to Eleanor de Montfort, the daughter of Simon de Montfort, after Llewelyn he refused to submit to the English crown. As a result, the dominions of Llewelyn were halved. In 1282, Llewelyn’s brother David rebelled. Llewelyn joined him in the revolt but was soon killed in a small foray. With no leader remaining, Wales became annexed by England in 1284, and soon after, Edward saw several large castles built including Caernarvon, Harlech and Conway, to prevent any further revolt. Edward resided in Caernarvon Castle, Caernarvonshire, Wales, where his own son Edward II, future King of England, was born in 1284.

Edward Longshanks I presiding over parliament.
Edward I presiding over parliament.

In 1290, the same year Edward I lost his wife Leonore, the royal line of Scotland ended, and Edward agreed to arbitrate the negotiations with claimants to the throne of Scotland on condition that he was recognized as overlord of Scotland. In the end, the Scots acted against him, allying with France. To support his efforts to resolve the situations in Scotland and Wales, Edward formed the ‘Model Parliament’, the forerunner to following parliaments. Buoyed by this support, Edward was able to quell the Welsh rebellion in the field, conquering northwest Wales and ending the rule of the native Princes of Wales, naming his own son Prince of Wales. After his invasion and conquest of Scotland in 1296, he named himself King of Scotland and began a rather brutal, ruthless rule. In 1298, he was again called to invade Scotland to suppress a new revolt under Sir Walliam Wallace. Although victorious at the Battle of Falkirk, he was unable to win the war.

In 1299, peace was made with France and Edward married Marguerite de France (1275-1318), daughter of Philippe III, King of France (son to Louis IX above, and 26th great grandfather to Mark) and his second wife Marie de Brabant, on 8/9 September 1299 at Canterbury Cathedral.

Free of conflict with France, he again attempted to conquer Scotland in 1303. Sir William Wallace was captured and executed in 1305, only for another revolt to start up, this time successful and culminating in Robert Bruce’s coronation as King of Scotland.

Edward once again sought to subdue the Scottish, but before he could, he died 8 July 1307 near Carlisle and was buried 28 October 1307 at Westminster Abbey in London.

John Fines, author of “Who’s Who in the Middle Ages” describes Edward Longshanks I, King of England as:

Son and father of weak and ineffectual kings, Edward I had many fine qualities which seem to make nonsence of heredity. He was tall and strong, a fine horseman and a doughty warrior. A great leader of men, he was also able to lead to success. He was interested in government and law in a very genuine way. As a personality he was pious, but easily provoked to rage and often vindictive. He was fond of games—so passionately did he love his hawks that when they were ill he sent money to shrines to pray for their recovery. He was generous to the poor, and often a gay companion: he played chess, and loved music and acrobats; once he bet his laundress Matilda that she couldn’t ride his charger, and she won! Every Easter Monday he paid ransom to his maids if they found him in bed. He loved his two wives, and fussed over their health and that of his children with a pathetic concern—sometimes threatening the doctor with what would happen to him if his patient did not recover. His people feared, respected and remembered him.

Sources:

  1. Kings and Queens of England – The Plantagenets, The Royal Family online [http://www.royal.gov.uk/output/Page58.asp].
  2. Gary Boyd Roberts, The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants, (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1983).
  3. T. H. Owen, Compiler, Cross Index of Ancestral Roots of 60 American Colonists and Supplement (Supplement by Frederick Weiss,). David Faris, The Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth Century Colonists (English Ancestry Series, Vol. I, Second Edition; New England Historic Genealogy Society, 1999).
  4. John Fines, Who’s Who in the Middle Ages (New York: Barnes and Noble Books, 1995).
  5. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Th.D., The Magna Carta Sureties, 1215, (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc.), 5th Ed., c1999. George Smith, Dictionary of National Biography, Vols. 1-21 (: Oxford Press, 1885-1990).
  6. Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came To America Bef ore 1700, 8th Edition (Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., 2004).
  7. The Plantagenet Ancestry of Seventeenth Century Colonists. Directory of Royal Genealogical Data, Brian Tompsett, Dept. of Computer Science, Hull University online [http://www.hull.ac.uk/php/cssbct/genealogy/royal/].
  8. Ernst-Friedrich Kraentzler, Ancestry of Richard Plantagenet and Cecily de Neville (Selp-published, 1978).
  9. The Complete Peerage of England, Scotland, Ireland, Great Britain and the United Kingdon, Extant, Extinct or Dormant (G.E. Cokayne; with Vicary Gibbs, H.A. Doubleday, Geoffrey H. White, Duncan Warrand and Lord Howard de Walden, editors, new ed., 13 volumes in 14 (1910-1959; reprint in 6 volumes, Gloucester, U.K.: Alan Sutton Publishing, 2000), volume I.).
  10. Sir Bernard Burke, LL.D., A Genealogical History of the Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire; New Edition, 1866; London, Harrson, 59, Pall Mall; Bookseller to her Majesty and H.R.H. the Prince of Wales..
  11. Foundation for Medieval Genealogy, online [http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20Kings%201066-1603.htm#HenriIIdied1189A].

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Transcription: Obituary for Elsie Elizabeth Gurr

Transcription: Obituary for Elsie Elizabeth Gurr

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Transcription of the obituary of Elsie Elizabeth Gurr from the “L M Leader” of April 24, 1913.

Gurr, Elsie Elizabeth; Obituary
Obituary for Elsie Elizabeth Gurr.

L M Leader

24 Apr 1913

OBITUARY

Elsie Elizabeth Gurr was born in the town of Fountain Prairie, near Fall River, September 8, 1886 and died at her home in the village of Fall River, Wis., April 11, 1913. Her short life was all spent here, with the exception of one year when, with her parents, she lived at Elba, Dodge Col, Wis. Her education was given her by the public schools of our town, and by the Sabbath schools of our churches

On May 29, 1907, she was united in marriage with Mr. Frank E. Keefer, of Fall River. Four beautiful children, three daughters and a son, each bearing Heaven’s benediction, came to bless this home. All these, with the grief stricken husband, father, mother, and one sister, as well as a large circle of more distant relatives, and innumerable friends are left where tears and heartaches abound, to mourn the untimely death, but to look forward to that

“Land where beauty cannot fade,

Nor sorrow dim the eye;

Where true love shall not droop nor be dismayed,

And none shall ever die.”

Funeral services were held at the Methodist church, Sunday afternoon, Rev. A. A. Bennett officiating.

A large number of relatives and friends from neighboring places were in attendance. — Columbus Republican

To access this image  full size or any other documents, images or photos attached to this or other individuals in my database, just click on the image or here.


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Louise Ruth Reynolds: A woman of many names and identities.

Louise Ruth Reynolds: A woman of many names and identities.

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Louise Ruth Froemling: Child.

 

Froemling, Louise Ruth - Birth Record
Froemling, Louise Ruth – Birth Record

According to my husband Mark, his grandmother, Louise Ruth Froemling was born on 10 Oct 1911 at 1712 Paulina Street in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois to Emma Mary Froemling and William Read Kirk.

Since Emma was unmarried, and William, a soldier, returned to his military post with no intention of marrying her, Emma made the difficult decision to give Louise up for adoption.

Notes of Louise Reynolds
Handwritten research notes of Louise Reynolds regarding her birth parents.
The Matthews family. Left to right: William Matthews, Dennis Matthews, Louise Ruth Matthews (Froemling), Claudia Matthews.
The Matthews family. Left to right: William Matthews, Dennis Matthews, Louise Ruth Matthews (Froemling), Claudia Matthews.

Louise was adopted as an infant of about five months of age by William Dennis and Claudia Matthews.

The circumstances surrounding the adoption are unclear.

At the time of the adoption, William and Claudia lived in Morning Sun, Iowa and it is believed they were acquainted with Emma Froemling and/or her family and the adoption was arranged privately.

She lived with her adopted parents in Morning Sun until at least grade 11.

 

Louise Ruth Matthews: Student and Nurse.

 

29ish-15.-Louise-183x3001.jpgAfter her graduation from high school, Louise took her training in nursing – more specifically in infant care, working to be one of ‘Wisconsin’s Little Mothers’ in Wisconsin around 1930.

She shows up in Chicago, Illinois about 1930 and again in 1935, working as a nurse.

Her Social Security Card indicates her address was 3901 North Sheridan Road, Chicago, Illinois at one point.

 

Louise Ruth Blythe: Nurse and Mother.

 

Marriage Certificate for Chester Blythe and Louise Matthews.
Marriage certificate for Chester Blythe and Louise Matthews (Froemling).

At the age of 25, Louise met and married Chester C. Blythe, son of Clayton William Blythe and Harriet Maude Jones. The marriage took place on 25 Nov 1936 in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois.

According to the US Census, Louise lived in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois on 01 Apr 1940 and she was employed as a nurse at the time.

Chester C. Blythe and Louise Ruth Froemling had the following children:

Not long after, Chester left the family and they divorced. No one is sure what happened, but the general consensus is that Chester had just abandoned them.

 

Louise Ruth Reynolds: Farmer’s wife and mother.

 

Reynolds Family circa 1944
Rear: Jim and Louise Reynolds. Front: Louise’s sons, Marsh and Paul Blythe (respectively) from her first marriage.

Once Louise was divorced and living as a struggling, young single mother working as a nurse in Chicago, she met Harmond James (Jim) Reynolds. They were married prior to 1933, but the exact date is unknown. After the death of Jim’s mother, they moved to Seymour Township, Peterborough County, Ontario, Canada, where they took over and worked the land he inherited on Mud Lake.

Jim and Louise had the following children:

She died on 16 Apr 1989 in Havelock, Seymour Township at the home of her son William (Bill) and his family.

In 1972, Louise had taken up the challenge of finding information about her birth and her biological parents. The following are two of the many letters she wrote to the City of Chicago during her life.

Louise Reynolds - Adoption Records request.
Louise Reynolds’ letter of February 9, 1972 to Wilmette, Illinois authorities to request her adoption records.
Request for adoption records to Chicago, Illinois
Louise Reynold’s request to the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Chicago Illinois for her adoption information.

Sources:

  1. Blythe, Chester and Matthews, Louise; Marriage Certificate; 25 Nov 1836 ; Rev. Preston Bradley, D.C.L., Pastor; The Peoples’ Church of Chicago.
  2. Interview with Marsh and Bev Blythe – about 15 March 2005.
  3. Louise Matthews, comp., Bureau of Child Welfare, Infant Care Course. (: Wisconsin State Board of Health,).
  4. 1930 Census, Morning Sun, Louisa County, Iowa; digital images. Ancestry.com , 1930 United States Federal Census (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012), Ancestry.com .
  5. 1940; Census Place: Chicago, Cook, Illinois; Roll: T627_1019; Page: 18A; Enumeration District: 103-3104; Record for Marshall Blythe. http://search.ancestry.ca/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1940usfedcen&h=145155311&indiv=try. Ancestry.com , 1940 United States Federal Census (Provo, UT, USA, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012), Ancestry.com .
  6. Louise Matthews, comp., Bureau of Child Welfare, Infant Care Cou rse. (: Wisconsin State Board of Health,).
  7. “Keefer, Christian W; Outline Descendancy Chart,”, 22 Feb 2013; pp. 1-7.

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