Tag: shelby

Transcription: Biography of William Read Shelby; National cyclopaedia of American biography.

Transcription: Biography of William Read Shelby; National cyclopaedia of American biography.

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NOTE: In the biography of William Read Shelby as well as some biographies of earlier Shelbys, the birthplace is erroneously claimed to be Cameron, Wales, when in truth it was Tregaron, Carnarvon, Wales.

Biography of William Read Shelby
Biography of William Read Shelby

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1842-1930 (handwritten)

SHELBY, William Read, railroad president was born in Lincoln county, Ky., Dec. 4, 1842, eldest son of John Warren and Mary H. (Knight) Shelby, and a descendant of Evan Shelby, who came from Cameron, Wales, about 1740, and settled near Hagerstown, Md. Evan, son of Evan Shelby, was appointed brigadier-general by the state of Virginia, in 1779, for services rendered in Indian warfare. His son, Isaac Shelby, was the first governor of Kentucky. William Read Shelby acquired his eduation in the preparatory schools and at Centre College, Danville, Ky., his studies being cut short by the civil war, and subsequent occupation of Kentucky by the Federal and Confederate troops. As a member of the “Kentucky Home Guard,” he enrolled and recruited men for the Federal army. In 1863-5 he supplied wood to steamers on the Mississippi river at Isalnd No. 37, being protected by U. S. gunboats. From then until 1869, he was employed by the Adams Express Co., at Louisville, Ky., removing to Pittsburg to become secretary of the Continental Improvement Co. Among its first undertaking was the contract to build the Grand Rapids and Indiana railroad in Michigan and Indiana. Mr. Shelby took charge of a branch office at Grand Rapids, Mich., in 1871, having in the year previous been elected secretary and treasurer of the Grand Rapids & Indiana and the Michigan & Lake Shore railroad companies. On Jan. 1, 1892, he was made first vice-president of the former company, retaining the positions of treasurer and purchasing agent. In June, 1896, the Grand Rapids & Indiana

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William Read Shelby bio
Biography of William Read Shelby

Railroad Co. was sold out under foreclosure proceedings ; a  new company, with the same name, was organized, and Mr. Shelby elected vice-president, treasurer and purchasing agent. In 1870-73 he held also the office of secretary and treasurer of the Southern Railway Security Co. On Oct. 16, 1899, he was elected president of the Muskegon, Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Co. and president of the Big Rapids & Western Railroad Co., and on Oct. 14, 1899, he was elected president of the Cincinnati, Richmone & Fort Wayne Railroad Co. Mr. Shelby has been extensively interested in the development of farming interests in various sections of the country. He is a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank, later known as the ” Old National Bank, ” of Grand Rapids, and a stockholder in various manufacturing and mercantile concerns ; a member of the board of education, and chairman of its committee on grounds ; in 1888-93 he was a member and part of the time president of the board of public works. Mr. Shelby is a Democrat, and it was on his motion in the sound money conference in Chacago that the “Indianapolis convention” was held in 1896, causing the defeat of the Chicago platform and Bryan. He was chairman of the sound money Democratic organization in Michigan, which conducted so vigorous a campaign against “Free Silver and 16 to 1.” Mr. Shelby was married, June 16, 1869, at Sewickley, Pa., to Mary C., daughter of Gen. George W. Cass, the issue being five sons and two daughters.

The National cyclopaedia of
American biography.  v.1-13.
1898.  1893-1909.

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The complete original scans of the document clips above can be accessed by clicking the image. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, click on the name link above, or search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link in the upper right corner just below the search box and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.


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18th century newspapers: Shades of modern social media.

18th century newspapers: Shades of modern social media.

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Modern social media has become known for a substantial quantity of inappropriate activity and content, foul language, and being overly personal, all happening because it’s too easy to just ‘let go’ and let emotions take over without stopping to think.

 

This newspaper clipping just goes to show that the same was true of historical media. Look carefully and you will find juicy articles from 18th century newspapers that showed shades of modern social media.

 

Featured image: Backwatermen fighting in the Battle of Kings Mountain, many under the command of Isaac Shelby.

 

Although access was not as immediate, it was the outlet for those with axes to grind, political aspirations, etc.

I found this clipping to be eye opening and entertaining all at once.

Major Ferguson makes his feelings known about those gentlemen who were taking a passive stance during the Battle of King’s Mountain and leaving the protection of citizens to the “backwatermen.”

 

OVER MOUNTAIN MEN.

Although this term is loosely applied to other groups of American colonists beyond the Blue Ridge Mountains, it is more accurately restricted to those living in what later became Tennessee. Also known as back water men—”apparently,” according to Sydney George Fisher, “because they lived beyond the sources of the eastern rivers, and on the waters which flowed into the Mississippi”—their principal settlements were along the Watauga, Nolachucky (later Nolichucky), and Holston Rivers (Struggle for American Independence, vol. 2, p. 350 n.). Principal leaders were John Sevier and Isaac Shelby. Although they are often referred to as “mountain men,” Fisher points out that “very few people lived in the mountains at the time of the Revolution, and the Back Water men were merely North Carolinians, mostly of Scotch-Irish stock, who had crossed the mountains to enjoy the level and fertile lands of Tennessee, in the same way that the Virginians who followed Boone crossed the mountains into Kentucky” (ibid., vol. 2, p. 351 n.). Another misconception is that the Battle of Kings Mountain was won by the over mountain men; although their leaders, Shelby and Sevier, deserve credit for this levée en masse, their manpower contribution was only 480 out of the 1,800 or so who eventually arrived on the eve of the battle.

Aside from their part in the skirmishes leading up to this battle and in the battle itself, the over mountain men did little fighting. Sevier and Shelby showed up with some men after the Battle of Eutaw Springs (8 September 1781), but they faded back into the mountains when Greene asked them to reinforce Marion during the subsequent operations leading up to the advance on Dorchester, South Carolina, on 1 December 1781 (Ward, War of the Revolution, p. 838). William Campbell’s Virginia mountain riflemen, who figured prominently at Kings Mountain and appeared in the final phases of Lafayette’s maneuvering against Cornwallis in the Virginia military operations, were not over mountain men in the strict sense of the term.

[Excerpt from http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/encyclopedias-almanacs-transcripts-and-maps/over-mountain-men.]

 

Following is my transcription of the clipping word for word as it appeared in the Maryland Gazette of Annapolis, Maryland on 24 Nov 1780, on page 1.

Obviously, it made an impression on the newspaper Editor as well for it to be placed on the first page.

Major Ferguson’s address to the inhabitants of North-Carolina, dated Denard’s ford, Broad river, Tryon county, Oct. 1, 1780.

 

Shelby Letter; Newspaper - Modern social mediaClipping
18th century newspapers: Shades of modern social media.

” GENTLEMEN

” U N L E S S  you wish to be eat up by an inundation of barbarians, who have begun, by murdering the unarmed son before the aged father, and afterwards lopped off his arms, and who by their shocking cruelty and irregularities, give the best proof of their cowardice and want of discipline : I say, if you wish to be pinioned, robbed, or murdered, and to see your wives and daughters in four days, abused by the dregs of mankind ; in short, if you wish or deserve to live and bear the name of man, grasp your arms in a moment and run to camp. The Backwatermen have crossed the mountain, McDowell, Hampton, Shelby, and Cleveland, are at their head, so that you know what you have to depend upon. If you choose to be pissed upon for ever and ever, by a set of Mongrels, say so at once, and let your women turn their backs upon you and look out for real men to protect them.

PAT. FERGUSON, major 71st regt.”

 


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Transcription: William Read Shelby biographies

Transcription: William Read Shelby biographies

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NOTE: In biography of William Read Shelby and some other biographies of Shelbys of the time, the birthplace is erroneously claimed to be Cameron, Wales, when in truth it was Tregaron, Carnarvon, Wales.

William Read Shelby biography

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Shelby, William Read, Vice-President, Treasurer and Purchasing Agent Grand Rapids & Indiana Ry. Oflice Grand Rapids. Mich.

Born Dec. 4, 184, in Lincoln County, Kentucky. Educated at Centre College at Danvilie, Ky. Entered railway servive 1869 as secretary and treasurer Continental Improvement Co., operating the Grand Rapids & Indiana Rd. Cincinnati, Richmond & Fort Wayne Rd, Michigan Lake Shore Rd and Traverse City Rd; 1870 to 1873, also secretary and treasurer Southern Railway Security Co., operating the East Tennessee Virginia & Georgia Ry, Memphis & Charleston Rd and other southern roads ; 1877 to 1892, vice-president. treasurer and purhasing agent Grand Rapids & Indiana Rd; 1892 to date, vice-president, treasurer and purchasing agent same road and the reorganized road, the Grand Rapids & Indiana Ry; 1896 to date, also president Cincinnati Richmond & Fort Wayne, Muskegon Grand Rapids & Indiana and Traverse City Rds.

The Biographical directory of the
railway officials of America. 1906

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William Read Shelby biography

SHELBY, William Read, ry. official since 1869: b. Lincoln Co., Ky., Dec. 4, 1842 ; s, John W., s. Evan, s. Gov. Isaac, s. Gen. Evan S.; ed. prep. school and Centre CoIl., Danville, Ky., to end of sophomere year, 1861 ; preventcd by Civil war from graduating; m. Sewickley, Pa., June 16, 1869, Mary K., d. Gen. Geo. W. Cass. Sec. and treas. Continental Improvement Co., April, 1869-87 ; same, Southern Railway Security Co., 1870-73 ; treas., 1771-87, v.-p. and treas. since 1887, Grand Rapids & Ind. R. R. C0., reorganized as Grand Rapids & Ind. Ry. Co., 1896 ; pres. Cincinnati, Richmond & Fort Wayne R. R. C0., since 1899; pres. ot Muskegon, Grand Rapids & Ind. R. R. Co. since 1899 ; chmn. State Central Com. Gold Democrats, since March. 1896. Is mem. ex-com. and Nat. Com. of Nat. Dem. party. Address: 65 N. Lafayette St., Grand Rapids, Mich.

Who’s Who in
America .  1908-9

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William Read Shelby biography

Shelby, William Read, railroad official, was born Dec. 4, 1842, in Lincoln county, Ky. He was president of the Cincinnati, Richmond and Fort Wayne railroad company ; and president of the Muakegon, Grand Rapids and Indiana railroad company. He has been also extensively engaged in wheat raising in  the northwest ; and since 1875 has managed the Cass farm, a portion of which is more generally known as the great Dalrymple farm.

HERRINGSHAW, T.W. Herringshaw’s

national library of American
biography.  5v.  1909-14.

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William Read Shelby biography

   William Read Shelby. After forty-four years of continuous official service with the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway Company, under its successive organization and reorganization, William Read Shelby retired from his position as vice president in 1913. Mr. Shelby has for more than forty years been a resident of Grand Rapids, and is one of the oldest and best known railroad men in the state of Michigan. He saw service in the Civil war, and from the close of the war until very recently his entire career was devoted to transportation in some department. His career has all the interesting features of progress from a position as minor clerk to one of the highest places in the service, his ability and personal character having won a steady promotion from one grade to another.
The Shelby family to which Mr. Shelby belongs is one of the oldest and most prominent in American history, beginning with the period of the Revolutionary war, and continuing through all the successive decades of our national existence. William Read Shelby was born in Lincoln, Kentucky, December 4. 1842. The name is a household word in Kentucky, the first govemor of which state was the great-grandfather of the Grand Rapids railroad man. The Shelby family was founded in America by Evan Shelby, who came from Cameron, Wales, about 1730,  and located near North Mountain in the vicinity of Hagerstown, Maryland, Evan, a son of Evan, was noted both as a hunter and Indian trader, and rose to the grade of brigadier general, under appointment by the state of Virginia, in 1779 for services tendered in lndian warfare. He was the first officer of that grade who saw service west of the Alleghany Mountains. Isaac Shelby, son of Brigadier General Evan Shelby, was born December 11. 1750, on the old homestead near Hagerstown, Maryland. He was one of the pioneers to the “dark and bloody ground”  of Kentucky, where he founded an estate in Lincoln county, to which he gave the name “Travellers Rest.” Isaac Shelby was elected the first governor of Kentucky, and reelected in 1812. His record in the Revolutionary War gave him distinction which will be found noted in  all the larger and more comprehensive accounts of that struggle, and he was one of the chief heroes of the battle of King’s Mountain. In  the war of 1812 again, at the head of a brigade of four thousand Kentuckians, General Shelbv marched to the aid of General Harrison, and  participated in the battle of the Thames. ln 1817 President Monroe offered General Shelby a seat in his cabinet as Secretary of War. This honor was declined. lsaac Shelby died at Travellers Rest in Kentucky, July 18, 1826. Evan Shelby, son of Governor Isaac, was bom July 27, 1787, inherited a portion of his father’s estate, and named his share  “Millwood,” and was a wealthy land and slave owner. The military services continues through Evan Shelby. who was a soldier in the war of 1812. His death occurred at Seguin, Texas, April 19, 1875.
John Warrcn Shelby, fathcr of .Mr. W. R. Shelby. was a son of Evan Shelbv. He was horn at Millwood, Kentucky, November 11, 1814, and having later obtained a portion of his father’s estate, gave it the name of “Knightland.” in compliment to his wife. On the breaking out

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William Read Shelby biography

of the Civil war it was characteristic of the Shelby family that they never forgot their allegiance to the country which their early ancestors had helped to establish, and John Warren Shelby espoused the Union cause, and lost all his extensive properties, consisting of a valuable estate, stock and slaves. In 1875. his residence was established in the Pewee Valley, where he died Fcbruary 25, 1881. On January 16, 1840, John W. Shelby married Mary Humphrey Knight, a daughter of Dr. Joseph W. and Ann Catherine (Humphrey) Knight. Her grandfather was Dr. John Knight, a surgeon in the Revolutionary army, and descended from the family of the Scottish Earl, John Graham, of Clavcrhouse. In the history of the American Revolution, as it was fought on the western slope of the Alleghany Mountains, the name of Dr. Knight is familiar to all who have read of the specific accounts of the campaigns in the upper Ohio Valley. It was Dr. John Knight who was a companion of Col. Crawford on the expedition from the upper Ohio against the Indians about Sandusky, Ohio, towards the closing years of the Revolution. Dr. Knight and Col. Crawford were both captured by the Indians, and the doctor was forced to witness the burning of Col. Crawford at the stake, one of the barbarities committed by the western Indians, which has had a part in every historical account concerning those  times. A similar torture was to be inflicted on Dr. Knight on the following day, but in the meantime he managed to make his escape and his recital of the event has been the source of the only authentic account of the end of Col. Crawford. William Read Shelby was educated at Center College in Danville, Kentucky, until his sophomore year in 1861. The outbreak of the Civil war tcrminated his studies, and as a loyal Unionist he became a member of the home guard and rendered valuable aid to the Union cause. in enlisting and recruiting men for the Federal army. During 1863-64-65 his service consisted in supplying wood to the steamers on the Mississippi River at Island No. 37, under the protection of United States gun boats. His business career began in 1865 when he entered the employ of the Adams Express Company in their ofice at Louisville. Several years later, in 1869, he moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, aml took the position of secretary and treasurer of the Continental lmpr0vemcnt Company, a  company composed of such eminent financiers as General G. W. Cass, Thos. A. Scott, William Thaw, of Pennsylvania; Hon. S. J. Tilden and F. J. D. Lanier of New York; Hon. John Sherman and Reuben Stringer of Ohio. This company was organized under a charter from Pennsylvania for the purpose of building railroads. His service as secretary and treasurer continued from 1869 to 1877.
From I870 to I873 Mr. Shelby was secretary and treasurer of the Southern Railway Security Company, a company which operated in East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia roads, the Memphis & Charleston and other southern railroads. in I869 Mr. Shelby was elected secretary and treasurer of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Company. To look after his duties in this connection he moved his residence in 1871  to Grand Rapids, and that city has ever since been his home. His connection as secretary and treasurer continued until 1887, when he was promoted to vice president and treasurer of the same corporation. At the reorganization of the company, beginning with 1893. and during the reorganization period from 1893 to 1896, Mr. Shelby was acting president. At the completion of the reorganization in 1896, he became vice president and treasurer of the new company, under the name of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway Company. This position belonged

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William Read Shelby biography

to Mr. Shelby until January 1. 1913. at which date he retired on a pension after forty-four years of continuous service. His work as a railway man includes other important positions. From October 24, 1899, to January 1, 1913, he served as president of the Cincinnati, Richmond & Fort Wayne Railroad Company; was president of the Muskcgon, Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Company, from October 16. 1899, to January 1, 1013; was president of the Traverse City Railroad Cmnpany from 1899 to the first of 1913.
His work as a railroad man has not absorbed all his energies, and the development of farming interests in diferent sections of the country has been a matter in which he has long been keenly interested. Since I875 Mr. Shelby has been manager of the “Cass Farm,” a portion of which is more generally known as “The Great Dalrymple Farm” in North Dakota. He is president of the “Lake Agriculture Company,” owners of twenty thousand acres of land in what is known as the Kankakee Valley about fifty miles south of Chicago, the land being situated in both Indiana and lllinois. On this large project of reclamation from conditions of an original swamp more than two hundred thousand dollars have been expended by this company.
Mr. Shelby was a member of the executive committee and the national committee of the national Democratic party in 1896. His name is found among those of the forty original Gold Democrats at the Chicago conference, a conference which led to the Indianapolis convention of the Gold Democrats, and the nomination of the Palmer and Buckner ticket and the subsequent defeat of W. J. Bryan. lt was Mr. Shelby who offered the original resolutions resulting in what has since been known in political history as the Gold Democrat Campaign of 1896. Mr. Shelby was chairman of the State Central Committee of Michigan for the gold wing of the party in 1896.
Among other relations with the business and civic community of Grand Rapids, Mr. Shelby is a director in the Old National Bank of Grand Rapids, and was also a director in its predecessor, the First National Bank. For many years he was a member of the board of education at Grand Rapids, and chairman of its committee on grounds, and to his efforts and work may be credited the establishment of the beautiful play grounds now to be found in this west Michigan metropolis. Another public service that is well remembered for its efficiency and public spirit was his membership and presidency of the board of public works in Grand Rapids from May, 1888, until May, 1893.
At Sewickley, Pennsylvania, on June 16, 1869. Mr. Shelby married Miss Mary K. Cass, daughter of General George W. Cass of Pittsburg. Seven children were born to them, five of whom survive, namely: Cass Knight, born September 18, 1870; Charles Littleton, born August 9, 1872; Walter Humphrey. born March 1, 1875, and died in 1902; Ella Dawson, bom February 20. 1876; George Cass, born December 5, 1878; William, born April 30. 1881. and died in infancy; Violette. born April 23, 1882. The Shelby home in Grand Rapids is at 65 Lafayette Avenue, N.E.

MOORE, C.   History of
Michigan.   v.2-4.   1915.

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommerel=”nofollow” nded to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription: Biography of Susannah Hart Shelby

Transcription: Biography of Susannah Hart Shelby

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Biography of Susannah Hart Shelby

 

SHELBY (Susannah Hart) fl. 1779-84

 

(Featured image above: Fort Boonesborough: Nathaniel Hart was a member of the Transylvania Company and one of the original settlers at Boonesborough in 1775, having helped construct the fort there. Col. Isaac Shelby, after the capture of Cornwallis, went out to Kentucky in 1782 and in the fort at Boonesborough met Susannah Hart, whose father had been killed by the Indians, and they were married in the fort, in 1784.)

Biography of Susannah Hart ShelbySusannah Hart was the daughter of Captain Nathaniel Hart. and Sarah Simpson Hart of Caswell County, N.C.,who removed to Kentucky in 1779. Captain Hart was a brother of Thomas Hart, whose daughter married Henry Clay, and of David Hart. The three Harts and two others, formed the “Henderson and Company,” proprietors of the “Colony of Transylvania in America.” This purchase from the Indians included almost the entire State of Kentucky. The Virginia Legislature rendered this purchase null and void, but assigned the proprietors 200,000 acres of land for which they paid £10,000 sterling for their service in opening the country. It was this company that first sent Daniel Boone into the wilds of Kentucky. Col. Isaac Shelby, after the capture of Cornwallis, went out to Kentucky in 1782 and in the fort at Boonesborough met Susannah Hart, whose father had been killed by the Indians, and they were married in the

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Biography of Susannah Hart Shelby

fort, in 1784. Colonel Shelby finally fixed his home in Lincoln County, where in time he built the first stone house in the State. This home, known for its hospitality as “Traveller’s Rest,” still remains in the possession of the family. Susannah Hart Shelby was the mother of ten children, all of whom grew to maturity and several to distinction. She is patron saint of Frankfort, Ky., Chapter, D. A. R.

GREEN , H.C. and M.W.
The pioneer mothers of AMERICA
3 v. (1912.)

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You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Researching paternal or maternal lines: Is one better than the other?

Researching paternal or maternal lines: Is one better than the other?

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When researching paternal or maternal lines, the tendency seems to be to place more value – and therefore time and effort – into the paternal lines. Is it true that following paternal lines is better than following maternal lines?

 

In my mind, no.

Turmaine and Emery maternal ancestors.
Turmaine and Emery maternal ancestors.

The other side of this question is: “Should genealogy research concentrate more on one to the exclusion of the other?

Again, I say “no”.

When I first started researching my family’s genealogy almost fifteen years ago, it was easier to concentrate on the paternal lines, and I did so based on my limited knowledge of genealogy, in which the paternal lines seemed to be valued more.

This may be a carryover from history where women were rarely recorded as anything other than their husband’s wives and/or father’s daughters. Unless they were particularly noteworthy, details of their own personal lives were unimportant.

This may also be a result of the difficulties that can arise when researching maternal lines. Because most research works back in time, we usually first encounter a female ancestor as a wife who has taken on her husband’s name. Since a great deal of the records don’t go into any detail about the women, it’s difficult to find even clues with which to research further to find out a woman’s maiden name and parentage.

It does change for the better in more modern records such as censuses, marriage records, etc., where more detailed information about a woman’s place of origin, and her parents and their places of origin can be found.

What a shame since one’s knowledge of one’s own ancestry increases exponentially when venturing into maternal lines.

Several of the individuals I have posted about on this blog were discovered by following maternal lines of both my husband and myself.

As a matter of fact, when going through posts to identify maternal lines for this article, it was apparent that those involving the paternal lines were a definite minority. This matters because I have consistently chosen those I find most interesting to write about.

The fact that there seems to be more from the maternal lines is perfectly understandable when the odds are considered. When restricting one’s research to only paternal lines, there is no branching off through the female spouses, therefore restricting the course back in family history through one straight line from father to father to father (and so on). Although some prefer to research in this way, I’m positive they are missing out as a result.

For the purposes of this post, I am using my parents: Gerard Ronald Joseph Turmaine and Patricia Gail Melanson; and Mark’s parents: Marshall Matthews Blythe and Beverley Gummeson as the root persons.

In all of the cases below, we would never have known our connection to these ancestors had I not explored the maternal lines.Bourg Ancestral Line

Antoine Bourg

The ancestral line to this 7th great grandfather of my mother follows her paternal line through six generations to Pierre Melanson and his wife Marie Josèphe Granger, then follows Marie Josèphe’s line the rest of the way back.

Antoine Bourg is one of the original Acadian pioneers to come over from France in the 17th century. Although Antoine Bourg is not the Acadian ancestor from our paternal line that we most associate with, we are related to him through three branching maternal lines leading to three of his sons.

Bevan Ancestral Line

John ap Evan (John Bevan) of Wales

John ap Evan (John Bevan) was 10th great grandfather to my husband’s father, Marshall Matthews Blythe. An early Welsh immigrant and pioneer of Pennsylvania, he was a Minister with the Friends’ Meeting, land trustee for several settlers, and later became a Justice and member of the Colonial Assembly.

Emily S. Shelby is a common maternal link in this ancestry, plus those of Robert William, the Stehle family, and of course the illustrious Shelbys (see below for all).

Shelby Ancestral LineEvan (Dhu) Isaac Shelby of Tregaron, Wales

Evan (Dhu) Shelby, 6th great grandfather to my father-in-law, Marshall Matthews Blythe, was the pioneer immigrant of the Shelby family to Pennsylvania from Wales. He, along with those already mentioned were persecuted for their Quaker religion and suffered terribly at the hands of their persecutors.

The Shelby family were among the few with six family members who participated in the Revolutionary War. Of these were Brigadier General Evan Shelby, John Shelby and Moses Shelby (sons to our Evan); Governor Isaac Shelby of Kentucky and Evan Shelby III, sons to Brigadier General Shelby; and another David Shelby, son of John Shelby above.

Stehle Ancestral LineUlrich Stehle (Steely)

This Ulrich Stehle was 5th great grandfather to my father-in-law and was the son of another Ulrich, an immigrant to Pennsylvania from Europe (possibly Germany) in 1732.

Ulrich Jr. is documented as the immigrant ancestor of President Barack Obama through his mother, Stanley Ann Dunham.

Emery Ancestral LinePte. Joseph Philias Albert Emery

Joseph Philias Albert Emery was my father’s uncle (brother to my grandmother).

Compared to some of the other ancestors above, he is fairly recent, but his life was remarkable in that he died so young in horribly tragic circumstances.

He was one of many soldiers involved in the preparations for the battle at Vimy Ridge. On March 1, 1917, the troops were misguidedly given the order to let off gas charges. This was a tragic decision because the winds were blowing the wrong way, causing the lethal gases to be blown back onto our Canadian troops.

As a result of the chaos, Pte. Emery was never found, was reported as missing in action and was later declared to have died in action.

There are a few more who occur further back in history, but I wanted to concentrate on those for whom I had the best documentary support.


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Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky

Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky

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Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky is the grandson of the original immigrant from Wales, Evan (Dhu) Shelby (Selby), who is eighth great grandfather to my children, Erin and Stuart; the son of Brigadier General Evan Shelby, who is the son of Evan (Dhu) and seventh great granduncle to my children; and is therefore first cousin eight times removed from my children.

Although not a direct ancestor of my husband, Marshall Mark (Mark) Blythe or our children, Isaac Shelby is of great interest to us for a couple of reasons. First, he was renowned for and distinguished himself for his actions in battle against United Empire Loyalists in Canada in the War of 1812, ultimately defeating Loyalist forces at the Battle of the Thames in southern Ontario. We are also related to and are descended from Loyalists who settled in this area. For a lengthy period of time, we lived in Trenton, Ontario which is located in the area of Loyalist activities and battles against American forces. This area is steeped in this history and it is still considered to be an honor to be from a Loyalist lineage.

Marshall Matthews Blythe
Marshall Matthews Blythe
Portrait of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky.
Portrait of Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky.

Second, because Isaac Shelby is so revered in history, there are accurate portraits of him during the latter period of his life available. Upon comparing portraits of him with recent pictures of my father-in-law, Marshall Matthews Blythe (father to my husband Mark and grand-father to my children Erin and Stuart), the resemblance between them is quite remarkable. For clarification, Isaac is first cousin six times removed to my father-in-law.

Isaac Shelby (December 11, 1750 – July 18, 1826) was a revered and decorated soldier and the first Governor of Kentucky.

The son of Brigadier General Evan and Letitia (Cox) Shelby, Isaac was born December 11, 1750 near North Mountain, Frederick (now Washington) County, Maryland.

Having been raised with the use of arms, he became proficient at an early age and was very familiar with and accustomed to the hardships and stresses of frontier life. Isaac worked on his father’s plantation. However, having received an education, he was occasionally employed as a surveyor and also as Deputy Sheriff.

About 1773, the Shelby family moved to the Holston region of Southwest Virginia, now East Tennessee, where they established a new home. A timeline of Isaac Shelby’s military and political career thereafter is as follows:

1774

  • Isaac Shelby served at the Battle of Point Pleasant as a Lieutenant under his father, Brigadier General Evan Shelby, in the Fincastle Company on October 10.
  • Second in command of the garrison of Fort Blair (until July 1775), which was built on the site of the battle. An uprising of the Shawnee and Delaware Indians compelled Isaac to take up arms and he served as a Lieutenant under his father Brigadier Evan Shelby in the Battle of Point Pleasant in West Virginia.
  • He fought in the Battle of Kenhawa of 10 October. This was believed to be the most severely contested campaign ever fought with the north-western Indians.

1775

  • After July of 1775, he visited Kentucky and surveyed lands for the Transylvania Company.
  • After returning to Kentucky due to failing health, he became involved in the Battle of Long Island Flats.
  • At the first onset of the Indians, the American lines were broken and Shelby, who was there only as a volunteer Private, seized command, reformed the troops, and severely defeated the Indians.

1776

  • In July he was appointed by the Virginia Committee of Safety to the position of Captain of a company of minute men. However, he was not called into service.

1777

  • Governor Patrick Henry promoted Shelby to Captain and made him Commissary-General of the Virginia forces.
  • He attended the Long Island Treaty with the Cherokees, which was finalized at Fort Patrick Henry on July 20, 1777, at which his father was one of the Virginia commissioners.

1778

  • Helped to provide supplies for the Continental Army and for the expedition projected by General McIntosh against Detroit and the Ohio Indians.

1779

  • Provided boats for Clark’s Illinois campaign and collected and provided supplies upon his own personal credit for the successful campaign waged about the same time against the Chickamauga Indians.
  • In the spring he was elected as a member for Washington County of the Virginia legislature.
  • In the fall, Governor Thomas Jefferson made him a Major in the escort of guards for the commissioners appointed to run the western boundary line between Virginia and North Carolina. By the extension of that line, his residence was found to be within the limits of North Carolina.
  • He resigned his commission, but was at once appointed Colonel of Sullivan County by Governor Caswell.

1780

  • Upon receiving news of the fall of Charleston on May 12th, he returned home to an urgent summons for help from Colonel Charles McDowell.
  • He organized a force and about July 25, he joined McDowell at the Cherokee Ford, South Carolina.
  • On July 30, Shelby captured the major Loyalist stronghold, Thicketty Fort (Fort Anderson), at the head of the Pacolet River. On August 8, his command successfully repulsed a party sent by Major Ferguson at the second Battle of Cedar Springs.
  • Upon receipt of the report of General Gates’ defeat at Camden on August 16, operations under McDowell and Shelby were halted.
  • On August 18, he was largely responsible for the victory at Battle of Musgrove’s Mill on the north side of the Enoree River.
  • As a result of a threatening message dispatched by Ferguson, Shelby held even greater resentment and determination and in consequence, with the assistance of John Sevier and others, he organized and conducted the expedition against Ferguson.
  • On October 7, they overwhelmingly defeated Ferguson’s combined Provincial and Loyalist force in the Battle of King’s Mountain.

1781

  • Shelby has also been credited with the plan for the attack, which led to the Battle of the Cowpens on January 17.
  • In February, the legislature of North Carolina adopted resolutions of thanks to Shelby and his compatriots for their services at King’s Mountain.
  • Similar resolutions were adopted by the Continental Congress on November 13.
  • As a result of repeated uprisings by Cherokee Indians during the first half of the year, it was impractical to send forces from there to assist.
  • A treaty with the Cherokees was negotiated on July 20.
  • In October, upon receipt of a delayed message of appeal, Shelby raised 500 mounted riflemen and was accompanied by Colonel John Sevier in command of 200 more.
  • He marched to join Greene, by whose order they reported to General Marion on the Santee.
  • The joint command of Shelby and Colonel Hezekiah Maham, of the Carolina dragoons, contributed greatly to the capture of a strong British post at Fair Lawn, near Monck’s Corner, South Carolina on November 27.
  • Meanwhile, having been elected a member of the North Carolina legislature and having obtained a leave of absence, he attended the sessions in December.

1782

  • Reelected to the North Carolina Assembly, he attended the legislative sessions held at Hillsboro in April.
  • He was appointed one of three commissioners to superintend the laying off of the land south of the Cumberland River allotted by North Carolina for military service in the Revolution.

1783

  • Completed the laying off of the land south of the Cumberland River.
  • He relocated to Kentucky, where he was married to Susannah Hart, daughter of Captain Nathaniel Hart, at Boonesborough on April 19, by whom he had eleven children.
  • Appointed a Trustee of Transylvania Seminary (later Transylvania University).
  • Chairman of the convention of militia officers held at Danville on Nov. 7-8 (was also a member 1787-1789).

1787

  • In January 1791, he was appointed a member of the Board of War, which was created by Congress for the District of Kentucky, and was charged with providing for the defense of the frontier settlements mounting punitive expeditions against the Indians.
  • For several years he served as High Sheriff of Lincoln County.

1792

  • Member of the convention (April 2-19) which framed the first constitution of Kentucky.
  • In May he was elected Governor, taking office on June 4 and serving four years.
  • During his administration many events of importance to the infant commonwealth occurred, not the least being the part it took, under Shelby, in supporting Wayne’s campaigns against the Indians in the Northwest Territory.

1796

  • At the close of his term, he declined reelection.

1796-1812

  • Retired from service.

1812

  • Elected Governor of Kentucky a second time in August.
  • He actively participated in the planning and preparation for war.

1813

  • With a sword presented to him by Henry Clay as voted by the legislature of North Carolina for his gallantry at King’s Mountain 32 years before, Shelby assembled and personally led 4,000 Kentucky volunteers to join General Harrison in the Northwest for the invasion of Canada, resulting in the defeat of the Loyalists on October 5 at the Battle of the Thames.

1817

  • He was given the portfolio of War in March by President Monroe, but declined due to his age.

1818

  • Isaac Shelby was awarded a gold medal by Congress on April 4 in recognition of his patriotic and heroic services.
  • Shelby and General Andrew Jackson were commissioned to hold a treaty with the Chickasaw Indians for the purchase of their lands west of the Tennessee River.
  • He was President of the first Kentucky Agricultural Society, formed at Lexington in 1818.

1819

  • He was Chairman of the first Board of Trustees of Center College, founded in 1819 at Danville, Kentucky.
Governor Isaac Shelby -  Traveler's Rest Burying Ground Plaque
Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky – Traveler’s Rest Burying Ground Plaque.

1826

  • After his death on July 18, he was buried at his historic home, “Traveller’s Rest,” and a monument was erected over his grave by the state of Kentucky. Counties in nine states have been named Shelby in his honor. __________ An account of Governor Isaac Shelby by Samuel M. Wilson is as follows:

 

Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky - Grave Marker.
Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky – Grave Marker.

“In person, Shelby was of a sturdy and well-proportioned frame, slightly above medium height, with strongly marked features and florid complexion. He had a hardy constitution capable of enduring protracted labor, great privations, and the utmost fatigue. Habitually dignified and impressive in bearing, he was, however, affable and winning. A soldier born to command, he nevertheless evidenced a high degree of political sagacity and executive ability. Numerous difficulties confronted him during his first administration, when the new government was passing through its formative stage, and much depended on the choice of officials then made by the executive. Shelby exhibited rare selective intelligence and an extraordinary mastery both of men and measures. Kentucky at this time experienced constant dread of the occlusion by Spain of the Mississippi River, and use was made of this situation by designing men to promote speculative ventures and political schemes hostile to the true interests of both Kentucky and the Union. Through it all, Shelby pursued a wise and moderate course which baffled the plots of all conspirators and held Kentucky firmly to her federal moorings. During his second administration, the pressure of the war with Great Britain fell with extraordinary and unremitting severity upon the state, and he showed himself not only a prudent and farseeing counselor, but an active, resourceful, and patriotic leader. His energy, determination, and perseverance knew no bounds, and his devotion to duty was unflagging.”

You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site are available for free access and download.

Sources:

  1. Shelby, John Todd: KERR, C. ed. History of Kentucky, v. 3-5, 1922 #4.
  2. History of Michigan; Moore, C.; v. 2-4; 1915; Shelby, William Read.
  3. Family Data Collection – Births; Shelby, Alfred, 1765.
  4. Family Data Collection – Individual Records; Shelby, Nancy, 1792.
  5. 1860 US Census; Shelby, John Warren, b. 1835; PO Lexington; Roll M653_365; Pg 0.
  6. Shelby, Isaac Flournoy: KERR, C. ed. History of Kentucky, v. 3-5, 1922.
  7. The Pioneer Mothers of America 1; Shelby, Susannah Hart; Green, H.C. and M.W.; 3 v., 1912.
  8. American Biographical and Historical Dictionary; Shelby, Isaac; Allen (W); 1832.
  9. Military Heroes of the War of 1812; Shelby, Evan; Peterson, C.J.; 1848.
  10. Eminent Americans; Shelby, Isaac; Lossing, B.J.; 1857.
  11. National Portrait Gallery of Distinguished Americans; Shelby, Isaac; 4v.; 1865.
  12. Dictionary of American Biography; Shelby, Isaac; Drake, F.S.; 1870.
  13. Biographical Annals of the Civil Government of the US…; Shelby, Isaac; Lanman, C.; 1876.
  14. Biographical Encyclopaedia of Kentucky; Shelby, Isaac; 1878.
  15. National Cyclopaedia of American Biography; Shelby, Isaac; v.1-13; 1898, 1893-1909.
  16. Harper’s Encyclopaedia of American History; Shelby, Isaac; 10v.; 1902.
  17. Century Cyclopedia of Names; Shelby, Isaac; 1904.
  18. Herringshaw’s National Library of American Biography; Shelby, Isaac; Herringshaw, T.W.; 5v.; 1909-14.
  19. Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army…; Shelby, Isaac; 1775, to… 1783; new, rev. & enl. ed. 1914.
  20. History of Kentucky; Shelby, Isaac; Kerr, C. ed.; v.3-5; 1922.
  21. An American Biographical and Historical Dictionaryy; Shelby, Isaac; Allen, W.; 2nd ed.; 1832.
  22. US Army Historical Register; Shelby, Isaac; 1789-1903; Vol. 1.
  23. Appleton’s Cyclopaedia of American Biography; Shelby, Evan; 6 vol.; 1888.
  24. 1820 US Census; Shelby, Isaac; 1750; Roll No. M33_25; Pg 59; Image No. 38.
  25. Passenger and Immigration Lists, 1500s-1900s; Shelby, Isaac.
  26. Settlers of Maryland 1679 – 1783; Consolidated Edition; Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc.; 2002; Pg 597.
  27. Kentucky Land Grants, Shelby, Isaac; Jillson, Willard Rouse; The Kentucky Land Grants, Vol. I-II, Louisville, KY: Filson Club Publications, 1925.
  28. US and International Marriage Record; Shelby, Isaac b 1750; 1560-1900.
  29. Shelby, Isaac; KY Historical Society: http://kentucky.gov/kyhs/hmdb/MarkerSearch.aspx?mode=Subject&subject=185. KW-N-399-3.
  30. Dictionary of American Biography; Shelby, Isaac.
  31. DAR; Mrs. Maria Shelby Tevis Field; DAR ID Number 7785; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; Vol. 8; Pg 265.
  32. DAR; Anna Stein Shelby (Annie Shelby Darbishire); National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number; Vol. 11; Pg 182.
  33. DAR; Mrs. Alice McDowell Shelby Riddle; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 16130; Vol. 17, Pg 51.
  34. DAR; Mrs. Katherine Shelby Scott; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 18004; Vol. 19; Pg 3.
  35. DAR; Miss Katharine Shelby Todd; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 25234; Vol. 26; Pg 83.
  36. DAR; Mrs. Laura Shelby Fisher; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number; Vol. 42; Pg 154.
  37. DAR; Mrs. Mary P. Shelby Napton; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 62264; Vol. 63, Pg 87.
  38. DAR; Miss Christine Shelby; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 68811; Vol. 69; Pg 291.
  39. DAR; Miss Shelby Walker Patton; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 83679; Vol. 84; Pg 263.
  40. DAR; Miss Susan Shelby Taylor; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number 85134; Vol. 86; Pg 51.
  41. DAR; Mrs. Ann Shelby Magoffin Austin; National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution; DAR ID Number; Vol. 114; Pg 141.
  42. “Soldiers of the American Revolution from Franklin County,”  database, Ancestry.com http://search.ancestry.com; extracted from  (N.p.:n.p.n.d.).Revolutionary Soldiers in Kentucky p. 174.74.
  43. Shelby Historical Data (Chronology for Evan Shelby, Jr. and Letitia Cox), online http://images.google.ca/imgres?imgurl=http://www.trolinger.com, accessed.


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