Tag: story

Transcription: Biography of Ervin Thornton and his family, of Tappen, New York.

Transcription: Biography of Ervin Thornton and his family, of Tappen, New York.

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Transcription: Biography of Ervin Thornton and his family, of Tappen, New York.

[Tappen, 1878 – 1966]

ERVIN THORNTON

Ervin Thornton family biography.
Ervin Thornton family biography.

On September 12. 1948 Ervin Thornton and Wynola Dewald were united in marriage in the Lutheran Church at Dawson. They were the first couple to be married in this church after it was moved there from Gackle. They made their home in Steele in a  home that was known as the “old Hi Maw House” from north of Tappen. Wynola’s father Christ Dewald moved it from Tappen to Dawson where it was for several years, then he moved it to Steele into the block next to the Archie Thornton home. This was their home for two years.

Ervin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Archie Thornton of Steele. was born in 1925 at Steele where he made his home and received his education. Ervin was the only boy in a family of four children. Rumor has it that at a very young age he was very handy with a sling shot. He could hit many targets but he was especially good at hitting a bent-over target. At the age of 16 he went to Portland, Oregon and worked on a housing project with his father. In 1944 he joined the Navy serving one ear in the states and one overseas in Japan. After his discharge he went into the trucking business for himself.

Wynola, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Christ Dewald, was born in 1930 in Napoleon. At the age of three she moved with her parents to a country store south of Dawson. She attended her elementary grades at a country school while living there. During her freshman year in high school, which she attended in Streeter, her  family moved to Dawson. Wynola graduated from Dawson High School in 1947. The following year she taught school south of Tappen in a country school near the Art J. Werre farm. After being married she taught one year north of Dawson and three years west of Steele.

In 1950 they purchased the Hoffer truckline and moved to Tappen where they are still living at present. Ervin and Wynola are the parents of four children: Donivan 15. Nanette 13, Bradley 11, and Wendell 9.

They are members of the St. John’s Lutheran Church in Tappen where Wynola teaches Sunday School and is a member of the Ladies Aid. In the fifteen years they have lived in Tappen they have found the people to be true friends and they enioy living there very much.

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Transcription: Biography of Alfred Young

Transcription: Biography of Alfred Young

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Biography of Alfred Young of Cabri, Saskatchewan taken from the book, “Cabri, Through the Years.”

Julie and Alfred Young photoMr. Alfred Young was born in Halifax, N.S. in 1861. He married lian Riely in Halifax. They had five boys and three girls, all born in Halifax.

Their oldest son Frederick John, came and settled out of Cabri in 1910. He then wrote and had his father come in 1911, accompanied by the second son E. Alfred Young.

Mrs. Young, Thomas, James, George, Gertrude, Mary and Dorie came out in 1913, to King’s County District.

They farmed with all the hardships and lack of machinery, so Mr. Young opened up the first paint and wallpaper store on Main Street of Cabri in 191?. He later sold it to Al Cheeseman for a bakery. Mrs. Young lived behind and above the store so George and Mary could attend school.

Fred travelled for the John Deere Company and settled in Regina and raised two boys and one girl. E. Alfred worked for Niel Brothers. He moved to Seattle. They had one girl. Thomas went to Winnipeg, where he lived the rest of his life. He had one girl and one boy. He worked for the C.P.R. James lived on the homestead, south west of Cabri. He served in the Army and later moved to Saskatoon, where he passed away. Jim and Ella had six girls and one boy. George Young, after homesteading around Cabri, went to Regina and later to Ft. William, Ont. Mary attended school in Regina, took ill and passed away at St. Josephs, Manitoba at the age of 23. Dorie (Young) Pomeroy went to school in Regina then moved to Ft. St. John, B.C. She married Dan Pomeroy and they had four boys and two girls. Dorie is widowed now and lives in Ft. St. John, B.C.

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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Our Melanson Family: A haunting history?

Our Melanson Family: A haunting history?

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Since we’re coming up onto Halloween, I decided to repost this story about our own Melanson family’s haunting history.

 

I posted in the past about the ancestry of my mother’s Fougère and Melanson families. The Fougères and Melansons were original Acadian settlers in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, having traveled from France in the late 17th century.

My mother was the only daughter of three children born to Jude Edmond Melanson and Stella Irene Fougère. The first born son was about twelve years older than her next oldest brother, Paul, who in turn was only about two years older than her.

In an email he wrote to my mother after the rest of their family had long since passed on, Uncle Paul stated categorically that he did not believe in ghosts. This being said, however, he has never found an explanation for the strange occurrences he described that happened while he lived at and remodeled my Grandmére’s house after he moved into it upon her death in 1961. As he put it in a recent email to me, “We never (saw) things like ghosts, shadows etc, but whenever I made changes to her house strange things would happen to let me know (she) wasn’t very happy with what I was doing to her house”.

Once he started experienHalloween housecing these unexplained events, Paul’s curiosity got the better of him and he did a great deal of research into ghosts or spirits remaining in the house or other buildings after they died. He learned that it is believed that a person who was strong willed or had a very strong personality could remain within a building or home they lived in and/or loved during their lifetime. A traumatic death was also known to contribute to a spirit remaining after death.

Uncle Paul deduced that the unexplained events had something to do with the renovations since they didn’t happen during the long periods of inactivity between projects. The severity of the events seemed to depend on the extent of the renovations being done.

Uncle Paul and his wife had two children, a girl born in 1961, and a boy in 1963. They also adopted a 1 1/2 year old girl named Samantha in 1969.

After Paul’s marriage in May 1960, it became apparent that my grandmother was troubled. Although the reasons were never clear, Grandmére committed suicide and was found by Grandpére about noon on Saturday, July 9, 1960 – just under one year after she had flown to Germany to visit with me as a newborn and my Mom and Dad, as they had been posted there by the Canadian Forces before my birth.

Grandmére’s autopsy revealed she had taken a great deal of valium. She had also made prior arrangements for her hair to be done and the clothing she wished to be buried in was laid out on a chair. No suicide note was found.

Uncle Paul went against her wishes and moved in with Grandpére. Soon after, Grandpére’s wholesale business went under and he lost everything, leaving Uncle Paul in a position where he would have had no choice but to look after Grandpére anyway.

Although the house was based on the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) house plan 215, Grandmére modified it extensively. First she flipped it, reversing the complete house layout with the living room on the right and the bedrooms on the left. She had the house length and width increased by 2 feet, final dimensions being 42′ X 26′ or 1092 square feet, as well as several other changes. She was the prime contractor and the carpenter, electrician and other trades people answered to her. Upon Paul’s suggestion, Grandmére made one final change and had the roof style changed to a hip roof.

Paul didn’t make any major renovations after he had full ownership of the house in 1967. He began making extensive changes soon after, most of which Grandmére would not have approved of.

The following list of renovations is not in any particular order, but it will paint a picture of the work done over time.

1.     A wall between the living room and hall was removed.

2.     The kitchen renovations included:

⦁ changing the heavy porcelain kitchen sinks to aluminum;
⦁ transferring the floor tiles from the family’s older home for use in the newer one;
⦁ replacing these same tiles again later with carpet; and
⦁ refinished the cabinets and replaced the counter tops.
⦁ installed new appliances

3.     Paul’s changes in the bathroom involved:

⦁ replacing Grandmére’s beloved pink wall tiles with beige ones;
⦁ installing ceramic tile flooring;
⦁ installing shower doors;
⦁ adding a new sink and fixtures; and
⦁ painting the tub brown to match the new decor.

5.     The house interior and exterior were completely repainted several times, including the woodwork trim that Grandmére had painted a rather ‘ghastly’ (Paul’s word) color she mixed and called “Coral Rose”.

6.     Insulated the house with urea formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI).

7.     Changed the exterior shingles to vinyl siding.

8.     Replaced the living room picture window.

9.     Put in a 20′ x 40′ swimming pool in the back yard.

With the exception of the vinyl siding, insulation and the new living room window, Uncle Paul always did the work himself. While undergoing the renovations, and usually in the evenings, strange things would happen. Most of the time these took place while everyone was in a different room.

It became so commonplace that Paul’s kids would say, “There’s Mamére again.” Nothing ever happened in the basement and there were never any apparitions, ghosts or anything else visible at any time.

Some of the more common events were:

  • Dishes falling out of the kitchen cupboards.
  • Cupboard doors opening and closing by themselves.
  • Pictures falling off the wall in the hall and living room. The nail remained in the wall and the hanging wire on the picture did not break. The pictures just seemed to ‘jump’ off their hook and land on the floor.

Being a natural skeptic, Paul tried to rationalize these occurrences as having been caused naturally, such as by earthquakes, volcanoes, tornadoes, etc. In most instances, he could come up with a plausible explanation until he started major projects.

While doing the kitchen and bathroom renovations in particular the events escalated dramatically. In addition to the common occurrences described above, platters that were standing behind a stack of plates would come out of closed cupboards and land on the kitchen floor, unbroken. Strange noises were frequently heard.

One of the more frightening and dramatic events occurred when Paul removed the pink tiles from the bathroom wall. Before Paul cleaned the grouting from the wall, his son was cleaning up in the bathroom and Paul stood at the open door talking to him, when the old grout remaining on the walls began shooting around the bathroom. It didn’t fall to the floor with gravity as would normally be expected, but was ‘bouncing’ from one wall to the opposite wall, making a sharp snapping sound as it flew off the wall. This activity continued for about five minutes, while Paul and his son stood rooted to the spot and could only watch in disbelief. The general consensus amongst the family was that Grandmére was ‘pissed off’ at Paul for removing the pink tiles.

Upon deciding to replace the bathtub, it was discovered that it could not be removed and therefore Paul decided to paint it a chocolate brown. The paint was a two-part epoxy paint and took several steps and days to apply. The first step was to sand the tub, then the first coat was applied and left to dry for three days. Paul admits that upon finishing the first coat, he was dismayed at how bad it looked, with white streaks, uneven coloring etc. It was a mess.

Paul came home from work around 6:30 the day after and was standing in the bathroom door looking at the tub, completely disgusted with the results, when, “CRASH!!!!!” A loud noise was heard from within Grandpere’s bedroom directly across the hall from the bathroom. It was dark and the lights were off. Everyone else having been in the living room at the time, they all came running.

Paul turned the lights on in Grandpére’s room to see a set of TV tables scattered all over the room – on the bed, on the floor, etc., looking as though someone had kicked them. They were not broken but they were in complete disarray, with the legs disconnected from the table tops.

After all of this, Paul was beginning to take this possibility of a ghost a bit more seriously.

Paul was working at an airport at the time as Manager, making and operating target airplanes for the military. I told some of his colleagues about the situation at home with the TV tables. One of the girls got together with a friend over the following weekend and over a bottle of wine decided to play with a Ouija board.

After the next weekend, she phoned Paul to report what had happened. She said that as a lark they asked the Ouija board who had scattered the TV tables. In response, she got got ‘Sim’. She could make nothing of this at the time and thought the board was referring to the name ‘Sam’ in reference to Paul’s youngest adopted daughter. As soon as he heard the story, Paul told her that ‘SIM’ was most likely Grandmére’s initials – Stella Irene Melanson. Paul had never mentioned his mother’s name at work, always referring to her as ‘Mom’.

He had, however, mentioned Sam’s name at work. With this in mind, Paul’s friend decided that she would try again the following weekend – just in case she had heard Grandmére’s name at some time. She asked Paul for a question that only his mother would know the answer to. Grandmére had left Paul her car, which was a gray and  white Ford, and he had sold it soon after her death in 1960. He did not work at the airport until 1978, so there was no way they could have know the answer to the question he gave, “What color and make of car did his Mom have?”

When she called him again the following Monday, she asked if his Mom had owned a green and white Ford. Paul told her the answer was wrong and that the “stupid board was nothing but a toy”. This colleague then explained that the board spelled out GR + WH and when asked what type of car the board spelled FD. She just assumed it was referring to a green and white ford. This was most likely misinterpreted, the GR actually standing for gray, WH for white and FD for Ford, which she did own.

Grandpére died in July of 1982 and about three months later, Paul decided to remove the UFFI foam from the house, replace the living room window and to have the outside of the house redone with vinyl siding. To do this he had to remove the mirror from over the fireplace so it would not get broken if the walls bulged with the new insulation. This had been Grandmére’s flawless mirror that she had paid the princely sum of $135 for – in 1960!!

Paul was sure that this would be the ultimate provocation of her wrath, for this mirror had been her pride and joy.

Surprisingly, nothing further happened – ever.

 

Would you like to read more about the Melansons and Fougères?

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Transcription: Biography of Capt. George Meek and Rachel Meek.

Transcription: Biography of Capt. George Meek and Rachel Meek.

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Transcription: Biography of Capt. George Meek and Rachel Meek.

 

Capt. George MEEK, Mark’s 6th great grandfather, was born in 1741 in Maryland to Robert and Elizabeth (Alexander) MEEK. He married Rachel HERRON (b. 1749; d. after 1810) daughter of David and Elizabeth HERRON, in 1770.

Marriage Record of George and Rachel Meek
Record of the marriage of Rachel Herron to George Meek in the Herron family genealogy recorded in the book “Notes and Queries Historical and Genealogical”; Vol. XVII; page 95.

George spent his formative years in Maryland. It is likely he moved to Centre County, Pennsylvania upon his marriage to Rachel.

George served with the 5th Pennsylvania Battalion under Capt. Thomas Alexander in the Revolutionary War between 1778 and 1781.

In an earlier article, I posted the full transcription of a Watchman Article of May 1, 1931 about George MEEK.

It is recorded that George took up a 1,000 acre tract of land on January 21, 1790, some of which remained with his family for generations. It is reported that the first surveys in Ferguson Township were made in 1766-1767, including tracts west of Pine Grove Mills and extending west to the Ross Farm, as well as tracts formerly belonging to General Patton. Another surveying party in 1784 camped at Stewart’s in Warrior’s Mark area on their way to Moshannon and Clearfield. On that trip, “George MEEK killed one large buck, pretty fat, not unwelcome news to the company.” In 1790, the George MEEK who killed the deer previously purchased a tract of land in Ferguson Township, Centre County.

Capt. George Meek died January 10,1802 and was buried after January 10, 1801 in the mountain gap west of Pine Grove Mills. At the time, this tract of land was used for lumbering. It is unknown whether his wife Rachel was also buried there. All trace of the grave has disappeared over the intervening years.

Meek, George - Revolutionary War Plaque
Meek, George – Revolutionary War Plaque
Meek, George - Revolutionary War Plaque
Meek, George – Revolutionary War Plaque

George Meek’s will written and dated November 3, 1801 in Ferguson Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania, was probated January 19, 1802, also in Ferguson Township.

Will Abstract of George Meek
Abstract of the Will of George Meek.

Transcription of the Abstract of George’s Will

Page 12, GEORGE MEEK, Ferguson Twp., 11/3/1801-1/19/1802, wife Rachel, friend Jonathan Wales, eldest son Robert, son William, David, John. Youngest Dr. Sarah not 21, Dtr. Mary Steelly, Dtr. Isabella, Dtr. Jean. Ex: Wife, & Thomas Ferguson. Witness: Thomas Ferguson, Joseph Diven, John Barron.

[Wills  of Centre County, Pennsylvania, by Ira F. Fravel, Col. U.S. Army, published 1/19/1939, re-copied December, 1967 by Mary Belle Lontz.]

The marriage of Capt. George MEEK and Rachel HERRON produced eight children and they were:

  1. Robert MEEK was born about 1765 and married sometime prior to 1801. His spouse is unknown.
  2. Mary MEEK (Mark’s 5th great grandmother) was born January 28, 1767, died January 25, 1850 in Fountain County, Indiana and was buried at Bend Cemetery, Fountain County. Sometime prior to 1830, she married Gabriel Stehle, son of Ulrich and Anna Stehle. Although George Meek’s will definitely records her as having been this Mary Meek, there was some debate that her last name was Stuart, perhaps resulting from a previous marriage, if indeed it is true.
  3. William Jerome MEEK was born in 1773 in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania and died in 1806 in Huntingdon County. He was married prior to 1800 near McConnellstown, Huntingdon County to Elizabeth Breckenridge.
  4. David MEEK, born about 1774, married Polly Bailey. (Davie moved with his brother John to Clarion County, Pennsylvania, where their father owned some land.)
  5. John MEEK ; born 1775. John later moved to Clarion County, Pennsylvania with his brother David, and later moved down the Ohio River, settling somewhere in Ohio.
  6. Isabella MEEK was born in about 1779 and married Abel Benton.
  7. Jean MEEK’s birth place is unknown, but she did die in 1859.
  8. Sarah MEEK, born in about 1783, later married Capt. Thomas Holt.

Sources:

  1. Some Early Families of Centre County, Pennsylvania (Mainly from Half Moon, Patton, Ferguson and College Townships); Glenn (1988); Richard C. Glenn; 916-428-7238, Sacramento, CA 95823-7736, East Parkway; Assembled 1980-1988.
  2. There’s Power in the Blood: Celebrating the 200th Anniversary of Gray’s United Methodist Church, State College District, Nov 12, 1989; Gray’s United Methodist Church, Rte 550 S of Rte 322, R.D. Port Matilda, PA 16870.
  3. Linn’s History of Centre and Clinton Counties, Pennsylvania; Linn, John Blair; 1883..
  4. Columbia County Pennsylvania Will Book C, database, Rootsweb (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~brookefamily/herronjamessr.htm: accessed).
  5. Newtownship, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, Cumberland County, PA Will Book C pages 83 & 84 Will of David Herron of Newtownship Made 17 February 1778, ; Ancestry.com , http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/14022930/person/1179236744/media/1?pgnum=1&pg=0&pgpl=pid|pgNum.
  6. Meek, George – Wills of Centre County, Pennsylvania: ; Ancestry.com , http://ancestry.com.
  7. Meek George and Herron, Rachel and Marriage Record, “Notes and Queries Historical and Genealogical,” database.
  8. Notes and Queries – XVII; page 95, Ancestry.com (: Internet 14 November 2013), .
  9. Ancestry.com , U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications,1889-1970 (Name: Name:
  10. Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date:2011, Database online.
  11. Columbia County Pennsylvania Will Book C, database, Rootsweb a messr.htm: accessed ).
  12. Meek, Rachel;1810 US Census; Ferguson, Centre, Pennsylvania; Roll: 46; Page: 76; Image: 0193672; Family History Library Film: 00256, 00256; Ancestry.com (http://ancestry.com)
  13. “Find A Grave Index,” database, Find A Grave, Find A Grave : Internet 4 September 2013), .
  14. “US, Federal Census Mortality Schedules Index, 1850-1880, “database, Ancestry.ca.
  15. Bend Cemetery, Covington, Fountain, Indiana, United States.

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 

#captgeorgemeek #rachelmeek #rachelheron


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Transcription: William Read Shelby biographies

Transcription: William Read Shelby biographies

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NOTE: In biography of William Read Shelby and some other biographies of Shelbys of the time, the birthplace is erroneously claimed to be Cameron, Wales, when in truth it was Tregaron, Carnarvon, Wales.

William Read Shelby biography

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Shelby, William Read, Vice-President, Treasurer and Purchasing Agent Grand Rapids & Indiana Ry. Oflice Grand Rapids. Mich.

Born Dec. 4, 184, in Lincoln County, Kentucky. Educated at Centre College at Danvilie, Ky. Entered railway servive 1869 as secretary and treasurer Continental Improvement Co., operating the Grand Rapids & Indiana Rd. Cincinnati, Richmond & Fort Wayne Rd, Michigan Lake Shore Rd and Traverse City Rd; 1870 to 1873, also secretary and treasurer Southern Railway Security Co., operating the East Tennessee Virginia & Georgia Ry, Memphis & Charleston Rd and other southern roads ; 1877 to 1892, vice-president. treasurer and purhasing agent Grand Rapids & Indiana Rd; 1892 to date, vice-president, treasurer and purchasing agent same road and the reorganized road, the Grand Rapids & Indiana Ry; 1896 to date, also president Cincinnati Richmond & Fort Wayne, Muskegon Grand Rapids & Indiana and Traverse City Rds.

The Biographical directory of the
railway officials of America. 1906

042

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William Read Shelby biography

SHELBY, William Read, ry. official since 1869: b. Lincoln Co., Ky., Dec. 4, 1842 ; s, John W., s. Evan, s. Gov. Isaac, s. Gen. Evan S.; ed. prep. school and Centre CoIl., Danville, Ky., to end of sophomere year, 1861 ; preventcd by Civil war from graduating; m. Sewickley, Pa., June 16, 1869, Mary K., d. Gen. Geo. W. Cass. Sec. and treas. Continental Improvement Co., April, 1869-87 ; same, Southern Railway Security Co., 1870-73 ; treas., 1771-87, v.-p. and treas. since 1887, Grand Rapids & Ind. R. R. C0., reorganized as Grand Rapids & Ind. Ry. Co., 1896 ; pres. Cincinnati, Richmond & Fort Wayne R. R. C0., since 1899; pres. ot Muskegon, Grand Rapids & Ind. R. R. Co. since 1899 ; chmn. State Central Com. Gold Democrats, since March. 1896. Is mem. ex-com. and Nat. Com. of Nat. Dem. party. Address: 65 N. Lafayette St., Grand Rapids, Mich.

Who’s Who in
America .  1908-9

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William Read Shelby biography

Shelby, William Read, railroad official, was born Dec. 4, 1842, in Lincoln county, Ky. He was president of the Cincinnati, Richmond and Fort Wayne railroad company ; and president of the Muakegon, Grand Rapids and Indiana railroad company. He has been also extensively engaged in wheat raising in  the northwest ; and since 1875 has managed the Cass farm, a portion of which is more generally known as the great Dalrymple farm.

HERRINGSHAW, T.W. Herringshaw’s

national library of American
biography.  5v.  1909-14.

044

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William Read Shelby biography

   William Read Shelby. After forty-four years of continuous official service with the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway Company, under its successive organization and reorganization, William Read Shelby retired from his position as vice president in 1913. Mr. Shelby has for more than forty years been a resident of Grand Rapids, and is one of the oldest and best known railroad men in the state of Michigan. He saw service in the Civil war, and from the close of the war until very recently his entire career was devoted to transportation in some department. His career has all the interesting features of progress from a position as minor clerk to one of the highest places in the service, his ability and personal character having won a steady promotion from one grade to another.
The Shelby family to which Mr. Shelby belongs is one of the oldest and most prominent in American history, beginning with the period of the Revolutionary war, and continuing through all the successive decades of our national existence. William Read Shelby was born in Lincoln, Kentucky, December 4. 1842. The name is a household word in Kentucky, the first govemor of which state was the great-grandfather of the Grand Rapids railroad man. The Shelby family was founded in America by Evan Shelby, who came from Cameron, Wales, about 1730,  and located near North Mountain in the vicinity of Hagerstown, Maryland, Evan, a son of Evan, was noted both as a hunter and Indian trader, and rose to the grade of brigadier general, under appointment by the state of Virginia, in 1779 for services tendered in lndian warfare. He was the first officer of that grade who saw service west of the Alleghany Mountains. Isaac Shelby, son of Brigadier General Evan Shelby, was born December 11. 1750, on the old homestead near Hagerstown, Maryland. He was one of the pioneers to the “dark and bloody ground”  of Kentucky, where he founded an estate in Lincoln county, to which he gave the name “Travellers Rest.” Isaac Shelby was elected the first governor of Kentucky, and reelected in 1812. His record in the Revolutionary War gave him distinction which will be found noted in  all the larger and more comprehensive accounts of that struggle, and he was one of the chief heroes of the battle of King’s Mountain. In  the war of 1812 again, at the head of a brigade of four thousand Kentuckians, General Shelbv marched to the aid of General Harrison, and  participated in the battle of the Thames. ln 1817 President Monroe offered General Shelby a seat in his cabinet as Secretary of War. This honor was declined. lsaac Shelby died at Travellers Rest in Kentucky, July 18, 1826. Evan Shelby, son of Governor Isaac, was bom July 27, 1787, inherited a portion of his father’s estate, and named his share  “Millwood,” and was a wealthy land and slave owner. The military services continues through Evan Shelby. who was a soldier in the war of 1812. His death occurred at Seguin, Texas, April 19, 1875.
John Warrcn Shelby, fathcr of .Mr. W. R. Shelby. was a son of Evan Shelbv. He was horn at Millwood, Kentucky, November 11, 1814, and having later obtained a portion of his father’s estate, gave it the name of “Knightland.” in compliment to his wife. On the breaking out

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William Read Shelby biography

of the Civil war it was characteristic of the Shelby family that they never forgot their allegiance to the country which their early ancestors had helped to establish, and John Warren Shelby espoused the Union cause, and lost all his extensive properties, consisting of a valuable estate, stock and slaves. In 1875. his residence was established in the Pewee Valley, where he died Fcbruary 25, 1881. On January 16, 1840, John W. Shelby married Mary Humphrey Knight, a daughter of Dr. Joseph W. and Ann Catherine (Humphrey) Knight. Her grandfather was Dr. John Knight, a surgeon in the Revolutionary army, and descended from the family of the Scottish Earl, John Graham, of Clavcrhouse. In the history of the American Revolution, as it was fought on the western slope of the Alleghany Mountains, the name of Dr. Knight is familiar to all who have read of the specific accounts of the campaigns in the upper Ohio Valley. It was Dr. John Knight who was a companion of Col. Crawford on the expedition from the upper Ohio against the Indians about Sandusky, Ohio, towards the closing years of the Revolution. Dr. Knight and Col. Crawford were both captured by the Indians, and the doctor was forced to witness the burning of Col. Crawford at the stake, one of the barbarities committed by the western Indians, which has had a part in every historical account concerning those  times. A similar torture was to be inflicted on Dr. Knight on the following day, but in the meantime he managed to make his escape and his recital of the event has been the source of the only authentic account of the end of Col. Crawford. William Read Shelby was educated at Center College in Danville, Kentucky, until his sophomore year in 1861. The outbreak of the Civil war tcrminated his studies, and as a loyal Unionist he became a member of the home guard and rendered valuable aid to the Union cause. in enlisting and recruiting men for the Federal army. During 1863-64-65 his service consisted in supplying wood to the steamers on the Mississippi River at Island No. 37, under the protection of United States gun boats. His business career began in 1865 when he entered the employ of the Adams Express Company in their ofice at Louisville. Several years later, in 1869, he moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, aml took the position of secretary and treasurer of the Continental lmpr0vemcnt Company, a  company composed of such eminent financiers as General G. W. Cass, Thos. A. Scott, William Thaw, of Pennsylvania; Hon. S. J. Tilden and F. J. D. Lanier of New York; Hon. John Sherman and Reuben Stringer of Ohio. This company was organized under a charter from Pennsylvania for the purpose of building railroads. His service as secretary and treasurer continued from 1869 to 1877.
From I870 to I873 Mr. Shelby was secretary and treasurer of the Southern Railway Security Company, a company which operated in East Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia roads, the Memphis & Charleston and other southern railroads. in I869 Mr. Shelby was elected secretary and treasurer of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Company. To look after his duties in this connection he moved his residence in 1871  to Grand Rapids, and that city has ever since been his home. His connection as secretary and treasurer continued until 1887, when he was promoted to vice president and treasurer of the same corporation. At the reorganization of the company, beginning with 1893. and during the reorganization period from 1893 to 1896, Mr. Shelby was acting president. At the completion of the reorganization in 1896, he became vice president and treasurer of the new company, under the name of the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway Company. This position belonged

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William Read Shelby biography

to Mr. Shelby until January 1. 1913. at which date he retired on a pension after forty-four years of continuous service. His work as a railway man includes other important positions. From October 24, 1899, to January 1, 1913, he served as president of the Cincinnati, Richmond & Fort Wayne Railroad Company; was president of the Muskcgon, Grand Rapids & Indiana Railroad Company, from October 16. 1899, to January 1, 1013; was president of the Traverse City Railroad Cmnpany from 1899 to the first of 1913.
His work as a railroad man has not absorbed all his energies, and the development of farming interests in diferent sections of the country has been a matter in which he has long been keenly interested. Since I875 Mr. Shelby has been manager of the “Cass Farm,” a portion of which is more generally known as “The Great Dalrymple Farm” in North Dakota. He is president of the “Lake Agriculture Company,” owners of twenty thousand acres of land in what is known as the Kankakee Valley about fifty miles south of Chicago, the land being situated in both Indiana and lllinois. On this large project of reclamation from conditions of an original swamp more than two hundred thousand dollars have been expended by this company.
Mr. Shelby was a member of the executive committee and the national committee of the national Democratic party in 1896. His name is found among those of the forty original Gold Democrats at the Chicago conference, a conference which led to the Indianapolis convention of the Gold Democrats, and the nomination of the Palmer and Buckner ticket and the subsequent defeat of W. J. Bryan. lt was Mr. Shelby who offered the original resolutions resulting in what has since been known in political history as the Gold Democrat Campaign of 1896. Mr. Shelby was chairman of the State Central Committee of Michigan for the gold wing of the party in 1896.
Among other relations with the business and civic community of Grand Rapids, Mr. Shelby is a director in the Old National Bank of Grand Rapids, and was also a director in its predecessor, the First National Bank. For many years he was a member of the board of education at Grand Rapids, and chairman of its committee on grounds, and to his efforts and work may be credited the establishment of the beautiful play grounds now to be found in this west Michigan metropolis. Another public service that is well remembered for its efficiency and public spirit was his membership and presidency of the board of public works in Grand Rapids from May, 1888, until May, 1893.
At Sewickley, Pennsylvania, on June 16, 1869. Mr. Shelby married Miss Mary K. Cass, daughter of General George W. Cass of Pittsburg. Seven children were born to them, five of whom survive, namely: Cass Knight, born September 18, 1870; Charles Littleton, born August 9, 1872; Walter Humphrey. born March 1, 1875, and died in 1902; Ella Dawson, bom February 20. 1876; George Cass, born December 5, 1878; William, born April 30. 1881. and died in infancy; Violette. born April 23, 1882. The Shelby home in Grand Rapids is at 65 Lafayette Avenue, N.E.

MOORE, C.   History of
Michigan.   v.2-4.   1915.

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Transcription: Biography of Jehu Burkett and Family

Transcription: Biography of Jehu Burkett and Family

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The following is a transcription of a biography of Jehu Burkett and his family, taken from the publication, “BURKHART — BURCKHARDT — BURKET — BURKETT.”

Burket Family Bio
Burket Family Bio – Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery; Page 1

 

Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery 2
Burket Family Bio – Wogaman, Burkett, Holdery; Page 2

lt has been said that Emanuel Burkhart whose home was in one of the Swiss Cantons, probably Berne, had two sons who came to America, sometime between 1742 and 1754. One of these is said to have been Jonathan and the other Christian. Rupp’s records no persons by either of these names, until the arrival on November 22, 1752, on the ship St. Michael, of Johann Burckhard, and on September 24, 1753, the arrival on the ship Neptune, of Johannes Burkhart. There is listed, however, the arrival on the ship Rosanna, on September 26, 1745, of Heinrich Burckhart. This person so nearly fits in with the known facts of the case, as to lead to the belief that this Henry, to use the English equivalent of his first name, was the progenitor of the family under discussion, in America. There is not much support to the traditional name of Jonathan, and it could easily be the case, in any event, that like thousands of others, there was the first name “Johan”, by which he might have been known, but omitted from the registration. It is stated that the immigrant’s wife died at sea, and that the father died four years after arrival. There were four children, Salome, probably the eldest, born August 14, 1734, Jehu, Nathaniel, and probably another boy said to have been named Christian. Salome, according to well authenticated statements, was seven years of age upon arrival, and this fact, as well as her marriage in 1759, she being then of marriageable age, seems to be controlling in fixing the approximate time of the arrival in America, that is at about the time of the arrival of Henry as above stated. Jehu married Madalene (Motlene) Croll or Kroll, who was the daughter of Ulric Croll, of Elizabeth township, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, who came to America on August 19, 1729, aged 27 years, on the ship Mortonhouse. The brothers moved to Frederick county, Maryland, residing and working there at their trade, as well as farming, from about 1768 to 1775, after which Jehu and family moved to Reedy creek on the Yadkin, Rowan county, North Carolina. About 1809, Jehu moved to Montgomery county, Ohio, and became the owner of a 112-acre tract located on Salem pike, a few miles north of the city of Dayton, opposite the Brethren church at Ft. McKinley. ]ehu died in 1823, and his wife a few years before. He was the first Bishop or Elder of the church of the Brethren (Dunkard) in this vicinity, and assisted in the organization of the Lower Stillwater church of that denomination (still flourishing at Ft. McKinley) and out of which church sprung the church at “Happy Corners.” Despite his connection with one of the peace loving sects,.Jehu seems to have served in the North Carolina troops in the Revolution, as there is an entry in the Army accounts “of that state which would indicate that he was paid a fairly large sum presumably for military services. Again, in a muster roll of Capt. Andrew Long’s company of Col. Samuel Miles’ rifle regiment of Pennsylvania troops, taken on June 4, 1776, appears the name of “Jehu Burket”. This company came from western Bucks county, and there is authority for the statement that Jehu’s wife’s people were, or had been, formerly residents of that region. It could easily be possible that Jehu had returned to Pennsylvania before finally settling in North Carolina, and enrolled for a short time only as the records of that company would indicate, after which he returned to Maryland or North Carolina. From the extreme infrequency of the name Jehu, and the singular fact of it being attached in this case to the last name “Burket”, it appears to the writer as more than a coincidence. This conclusion might be further justified from the fact of the somewhat roving disposition of the person in question, who in the course of his life, removed three or four different times, and to distant points. Jehu and Motlene had nine children, Henry being the fourth. He, Henry, was born on May 13, 1771, in Maryland. On December 25, 1793, Henry married Elizabeth Rinker, in North Carolina,“ who was born on June 22, 1772, and who died on February 9, 1836. About 1815 or 1816 this family came to Montgomery county, where Henry’s father had already located. Henry acquired 400 or more acres of land on the so-called Stringtown pike, in Madison township, about a mile or so north of the village of Trotwood, and about the same distance west of the settlement on the Salem pike formerly known as Taylorsburg. He died in September 1817, leaving a will which was probated in due course. Henry and Elizabeth had the following children, all born in North Carolina: Mary (sometimes called Mollie) born October 27,1794; John, born December 27, 1795; George, born November 23, 1797; Elizabeth, born September 7, 1801; Isaac, born February 3, 1803; Charles, born March 13,1805; Amelia, born December 8, 1807; Anne, born December 8, 1809; Martin, born October 5, 1811; and Barbara, born April 20, 1815.

As previously stated in this narrative, Mary the first child of Henry and Elizabeth, married John Wogaman the second, on August 18, 1818, and their child was George, who married Catherine Hilderbrick on June 15, 1843. She was born on July 17, 1824, the daughter of David and Mary Hilderbrick, and Mary was the daughter of George and Elizabeth Holtry.

In connection with what has been said as to Jehu Burket, it should be mentioned that the material is based somewhat on a History of the Burgner family, published in 1892. This narrates an interview, in 1889, with a granddaughter of Salome Burket. This granddaughter well remembered Salome the sister of Jehu. She had married a Burgner, and after her husband’s death lived in Maryland near Frederick. Also, a pamphlet on the Burket family, prepared by Mr. John M. Burkett of Washington, D. C., has been useful and most essential in establishing some of the important facts of the story of this family. lt should also be mentioned that the family migrated in large numbers to Indiana in the early part of the nineteenth century, and many members have achieved prominence both in civil and professional walks of life, including farming and other lines of business.

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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