Tag: World War II

Transcription: US WWII Draft Registration Card for Albert Rascher

Transcription: US WWII Draft Registration Card for Albert Rascher

Transcription: US WWII Draft Registration Card for Albert Rascher.

Albert Rascher WWII Draft Card
Albert Rascher WWII Draft Card

REGISTRATION CARD — (Men born on or after April 28, 1877 and on or before February 16, 1897)

Line 1
SERIAL NUMBER: U827
NAME: Albert Rascher
ORDER NUMBER:

Line 2
PLACE OF RESIDENCE: R.F.D. No. 1 – Arlington Heights Cook Illinois
(The place of residence given on the line above will determine local board jurisdiction; line 2 of registration certificate will be identical)

Line 3
MAILING ADDRESS: Same
(Mailing address if other than line 2. If same, insert word same)

Line 4
TELEPHONE: None

Line 5
AGE IN YEARS: 47; DATE OF BIRTH: August – 14 – 1894

Line 6
PLACE OF BIRTH: Palatine Illinois

Line 7
NAME AND ADDRESS OF PERSON WHO WILL ALWAYS KNOW YOUR ADDRESS: Mrs. Meta Rascher, Same

Line 8
EMPLOYER’S NAME AND ADDRESS: Roselle Country Club

Line 9
PLACE OF EMPLOYMENT OR BUSINESS: Roselle – Illinois  Cook
(Number and street or R. F. D. number) (Town) (State)

I AFFIRM THAT I HAVE VERIFIED ABOVE ANSWERS AND THAT THEY ARE TRUE.

D. S. S. FORM 1 16-21630-2    Albert Rascher
(Revised 4-1-42)      (over)        (Registrant’s Signature)

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

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Remembrance Day: A civilian’s responsibility?

Remembrance Day: A civilian’s responsibility?

Today being Remembrance Day, I was thinking about a recent post in which I quoted an article exploring how Canadians need to do more for Remembrance Day.

Since then, while watching all the usual Remembrance Day coverage on television, I saw a news report about the increasingly troubled Canadian Legions. Several have closed or are slated to close because of low memberships and revenue.

What really surprised me, was to learn that civilians can become members and reap the same benefits enjoyed by military members and veterans.

Acccording to Toronto.com, “The legion has been losing members at a rate of about 8,000 a year. Part of that is due to death – the largest cohort of members are veterans of the Second World War, a conflict that ended more than 70 years ago – but it has been a challenge to attract and retain veterans of more recent conflicts.”

The Royal Canadian Legion was founded in 1926 to lobby for the needs of veterans returning from the first world war.  That service expanded to include other veterans, including those who’ve never been to war.

Some believe the Canadian Legion has become outdated and no longer represents the military and veterans as they exist in today’s world.

Mark and Stuart in Remembrance Day Parade.
Mark and Stuart in Remembrance Day Parade. c 2000.

A discussion on the subject between my husband, Mark and I caused me to immediately say, “Why don’t we register and get memberships for the kids as Christmas gifts?”

Mark is a veteran, but the others would be civilian memberships.

Then, while researching the subject, I discovered this Global News article about how the veterans themselves feel. I was shocked at how out of touch I have been, especially being the wife and daughter of military veterans.

According to those interviewed for the article:

One of the biggest complaints they have is the number of civilians who are now members. Though most of them mean well, they’re not making the Legion enough of a home for those who’ve served Canada because they don’t understand the military culture.

“There’s a very strict disconnect between what they do, and what we do …”

Also, because of this disconnect, they don’t always provide the services that veterans need — like enough support for those who suffer from PTSD.

Erin in her Air Cadet Uniform
Erin in her Air Cadet Uniform c 2007.

Surely there are ways to include civilians in some of the programs, increasing understanding on both sides? Although a civilian, I am a sufferer of PTSD and a program I could access that is separate from the woefully inadequate mental health system might be a place to start.

I never considered myself out of touch because of my background in the military and veteran cultures. However, as different as veterans and civilians are, there are indeed common circumstances and obstacles we all struggle with.

These articles caused me to doubt my idea of giving civilian memberships as gifts.

Then again, isn’t that a good place to start?

Civilians becoming members would enable learning more about our veterans, and increasing our understanding of each other.

At the very least, some if not all of the endangered legion branches may be saved. This could actually buy time for the legions to update and adapt to today’s veteran and their families.

My genealogy research into the extensive military history of both sides of our family has taught me a great deal and enabled me to become aware of how important it is for civilians to support our veterans – and never forget the sacrifices made in all conflicts, including World War I and World War II.

Related articles:

 

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Transcription: Draft Board Delinquents, Arlington Heights Herald, January 29, 1943

Transcription: Draft Board Delinquents, Arlington Heights Herald, January 29, 1943

Following is the transcription of a newspaper article listing draft board delinquents printed in the Arlington Heights Herald on January 29, 1943.

 

Blythe, Clayton William - 1943 Newspaper
Blythe, Clayton William – 1943 Newspaper

Arlington Heights Herald

Volume 16, Number 23

Friday, January 29, 1943

 

List more delinquents of draft board

The following men, registered with Selective Service Local Board No. 1, are classified as suspected delinquents. Any person whose name appears upon the list should report immediately to this board, for correction of records. Failure to do so will cause the board to turn the name over to the United States Attorney for investigation.

John Paul Gasior, 255 N. Brockway, Palatine, Ill.

Walter Wilbert Simila, 634 Brainard st., Detroie, Mich.

John Jack Greschner, 33 N. W. 9th st., Miami, Florida.

Fred Edward Weaver, R. 1, Elgin, Ill.

Robert Loyd Wilt, Wheeling, Ill.

Peter Bose, Bartlett, Ill.

Walter Ladislaw Simo, Box 31, Clearfield, Utah.

Richard Eugene Mosher, General Delivery, Milton Jct., Wisc.

Herman Henry Kleeberg, R. 1, Box 2707, Des Plaines, Ill.

Clayton William Blythe, Palatine rd., Box 471, Arlington Heights, Ill.

Stephan Fritz, R. 1, Roselle, Ill.

Paul August Peske, R. 1, c/o Magnus, Arlington Heights, Ill.

George F. H. Rieckenberg, 3960 Elston ave., Chicago, Ill.

Roy E. Wilson, 502 S. Wapella ave., Mt. Prospect, Ill.

Martin Edward Nelson, R. 4, Elgin, Ill.

Thomas Parker, R. 1, Box 153, Dundee, Ill.

Herbert David James, R. 2, Otis rd., Barrington, Ill.

Ed. W. Hayes, R. 2, Palatine, Ill.

Carl Mendelsky, Karsten Farm, Arlington Heights, Ill.

Henry Mores Johnson, 15 N. State st., Elgin, Ill.

Joseph J. Hajny, R. 4, Box 4298, Elgin, Ill.

Joe Lapsansky, R. 1, Bartlett, Ill.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to December 12, 2013

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to December 12, 2013

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and AdditionsAncestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions” src=”http://www.emptynestancestry.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/Hannah-Stone-Will-small.jpg” alt=”Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions” width=”400″ height=”220″ />

 

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