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Common mistakes in genealogy | Ancestry

Common mistakes in genealogy | Ancestry

It doesn’t matter if you are new to genealogy or have been doing this for a while, we’ve all made them — mistakes and assumptions as we climb up our family tree.

Crista will share some of the common family history research mistakes and give tips about how to avoid them.

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About Ancestry:

Bringing together science and self-discovery, Ancestry helps everyone, everywhere discover the story of what led to them. Our sophisticated engineering and technology harnesses family history and consumer genomics, combining billions of rich historical records, millions of family trees, and samples from almost 10 million people in the AncestryDNA database to provide people with deeply meaningful insights about who they are and where they come from.

We’ve pioneered and defined this category, developing new innovations and technologies that have reinvented how people make family history discoveries. And these discoveries can give everyone a greater sense of identity, relatedness, and their place in the world.

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Tips for using Google Goldmine for Genealogy | BYU

Tips for using Google Goldmine for Genealogy | BYU

James Tanner of Brigham Young University Library (BYU) teaches us how to use the all features Google has to offer to help you do your family history using the Google Goldmine for Genealogy.

With this advice, you can make the most of and get the greatest results from all of your genealogy and ancestry research online.

For more information on upcoming webinars visit his website.

Read on . . .

http://sites.lib.byu.edu/familyhistory/classes-and-webinars/online-webinars/

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Genealogy Jargon Defined | Ancestry

Genealogy Jargon Defined | Ancestry

When you first take a DNA test or start building a family tree, it can feel like you are trying to learn a new language. Join Crista Cowan for a quick look at some common genealogy and family history words, phrases, and acronyms. Learn their meanings so you can continue your family history journey with confidence.

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About Ancestry:
Bringing together science and self-discovery, Ancestry helps everyone, everywhere discover the story of what led to them. Our sophisticated engineering and technology harnesses family history and consumer genomics, combining billions of rich historical records, millions of family trees, and samples from almost 10 million people in the AncestryDNA database to provide people with deeply meaningful insights about who they are and where they come from.

We’ve pioneered and defined this category, developing new innovations and technologies that have reinvented how people make family history discoveries. And these discoveries can give everyone a greater sense of identity, relatedness, and their place in the world.

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Genealogy Jargon Defined | Ancestry
https://www.youtube.com/user/AncestryCom

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Staying on their toes: How medieval people walked, ran and fought.

Staying on their toes: How medieval people walked, ran and fought.

 

As a consequence of my 20+ years of genealogy research into our family’s history, I have become fascinated with how medieval people lived, including the flexibility and adaptability of the different times and cultures.

 

Part of life was learning to live and succeed by using our own body mechanics for the best result in adapting to our environment, available materials, etc.

 

This video is particularly fascinating as it illustrates how medieval people walked, ran and fought prior to the invention of hard soled shoes with built in heels.

 

 

On impulse, I took the time to explore some of the comments and found them quite illuminating, educational or funny.

And he isn’t using only the fencing manual illos as evidence, he just happened to toss that one up as an example. You see this ball-first gait and posture in illuminations, illustrations, and tapestries all over the damn place in medieval through early Renaissance artwork depicting all sorts of activities. It’s why so many figures in these look kind of dainty compared to what we might expect.     Xaos Bob

 

I think you’re missing an important distinction here;  walking gaits vs running/athletic gaits. Wear patterns on historical shoes (see the MoL – Shoes and Pattens chapter dedicated to this) and observation of primitive people of today suggest a normal heel to toe walking gait, just as we perform today in modern soled and heeled shoes.  However, when running you do have to forefoot strike in historical shoes just as you do in modern barefoot style running shoes if you value the health of your joints.  Historical people walked just like we do, but they likely ran differently than most modern people do.  You can observe proper mechanics in young children.  They instinctively walk heel-to-toe, but they run with a mid to forefoot strike.  It’s not until years of sitting in a chair (adaptive shortening of the heel-cords, and reduced glute function etc.) and walking with modern footwear that they ‘re-train’ to heel-strike while running.     Knyght Errant

This was quite interesting and it hit close to home. My father was an avid runner for most of his life. At different times I took up jogging to help lose weight but I struggled with it….as my time and distance was difficult to improve. I told this to my father who in turn told me a story.

My father said he had read a book by a man (I don’t remember his name) who was from Europe and was a long distance runner. Long story short, he said that we should run as ancient people ran. These people ran on the balls of their feet. They never let there heels hit the ground first, even when they walked! Heel walking is not how our is designed to function. He also said conventional running shoes with the thick soles under the heel is a horrible shoe and we should run in shoes with little to  no heel at all.

I started ball running after that…and took about 3 days to get used to it and I bought track shoes that had no heel at all. By the end of the week I was easily running twice the distance at a faster pace. It felt like every time I had put my heel down first, I was “breaking” my forward momentum.     POPPASHANGO

Supposedly back in colonial times trackers could differentiate between Native American tracks and European tracks because of the different body mechanics.     Furor Teutonicus
You can’t just trust the word of other reenactors and illustrations of dueling, go back to the artifacts.  Check out “Shoes and Pattens” by Grew & de Neergaard or their source “Interpretation of wear marks seen in footwear” by Swallow, A W.  Fighting, stalking, and other activities certainly start with a ball or toe strike, but not for normal walking.     deadextra

 

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John of Gaunt: Son of Edward III, King of England and Philippa d’Hainault.

John of Gaunt: Son of Edward III, King of England and Philippa d’Hainault.

John of Gaunt (also known as John Plantagenet), is 24th great grandfather to our kids, and was born March 2, 1340 at the Abbaye de St. Bavon, Ghent, Flandre-Orientale, Belgium to Edward III, King of England and his second wife Philippa d’Hainaut.

This post could be considered an experiment as it’s my first attempt at using Microsoft’s Sway program to create interesting presentations and embedding them in my posts.
SCROLL BAR: To view the presentation, go to the featured image at the top, hover you cursor over the right edge, and you’ll see a vertical scroll bar. Click on the scroll bar to be able to scroll through the presentation.
FULL SCREEN: It can also be viewed full screen by clicking on the icon in the upper right corner. Right click anywhere on this page or in the presentation to download full size documents or images.

Here’s a pdf of Mark’s direct lineage to John of Gaunt.
Here’s a pdf of the Family Group Sheet for John of Gaunt’s family.

John of Gaunt
Ruins of John of Gaunt’s castle.

Creative Commons

He married three times and had one known mistress.

John’s wives were, in chronological order:

  • Blanche of Lancaster;
  • Constance of Castile; and
  • Katherine de Roët.
    (See video for details of his wives.)

His mistress was:

  • Marie de St. Hilaire.

He was granted several honors during his life, including:

  • 20 Sep 1342 he was created Earl of Richmond;
  • 1360 was a Knight of the Garter;
  • 1361 was Seigneur de Beaufort et de Nogent in right of his wife;
  • 14 Aug 1361 was summoned to parliament as Earl of Lancaster and Richmond;
  • 13 Nov 1362 was created Duke of Lancaster;
  • 8 Oct 1370 was created Seigneur de Bergerac et de Roche-sur-Yonne;
  • aft 1371 was King of Castile and Leon by right of his wife;
  • 2 Mar 1390 was created Duc d’Aquitaine by English parliament; and
  • bef 1399 he was Earl of Richmond; and bef 1399 he was Earl of Derby.

John and his wife Blanche had seven children, including:

  • Philippa (1360 to 1415);
  • John (1362, died young);
  • Elizabeth (1363 to 1425);
  • Edward (1365 to 1365);
  • John (1366, died young);
  • Henry (1367 to 1413); and
  • Isabella (1368, died young).

John and his second wife Costanza had two children:

  • Katherine (1372 to 1418)
  • John ‘of Gaunt’ (abt 1375, died young)

John and his third wife Katherine had four children:

  • John Beaufort (abt 1373 to 1410);
  • Joan Beaufort (abt 1379 to 1440);
  • Henry Beaufort ( – to 1447); and
  • Thomas Beaufort ( – to 1426).

And finally, John and his mistress Marie had one child:

  • Blanche (abt 1359 to 1389).

John died 3 or 4 Feb 1399 in either Leicester Castle or Ely Place, Holborn, London.

He was subsequently buried at Old St. Paul’s Cathedral, London, England.

I’d love to hear what you think!

john of gaunt

Creative Commons

(The above is just a summary of the facts of his life. More biographical details are available in the excerpts quoted in the video.)

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