Category: Tools

Transcription: Ohio Death Records, Kirby – Kirk, Page 871

Transcription: Ohio Death Records, Kirby – Kirk, Page 871

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The following is my transcription of the Ohio Death Records for Kirby – Kirk, page 871.

 

John Wesley Kirk Death Record
Ohio death records index listing John Wesley Kirk.

OHIO DEATH RECORDS, Page 871, Kirby – Kirk

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Page No. 871
OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
DEATH INDEX
NAME OF DECEASED   /   COUNTY/CITY  /  CO.  CITY CODE   /  VOL. NO.   /   CERTIFICATE  /  DATE OF BIRTH  (Mo./Day/Yr.)
Kirby Ada M            Twp        100        10317        21845        4/13/3
Kirby Anne I            Cleve        181        10500        67531        11/16/3
Kirby Blanche B            Cleve        181        10498        67147        11/4/3
Kirby Bridget            Cleve        181        10528        74747        12/21/3
Kirby Bruce            Warren        781        10490        65198        10/25/3
Kirby Cynthia Ann        Twp        880        10312        20642        3/19/3
Kirby Edwin       Elyria       472       10509      69842      11/27/3
Kirby James W Galpols 271 10444 53602 8/8/3
Kirby Lawrence H Lakewd 182 10501 67957 11/22/3
Kirby Rachael Jane Vil 830 10449 53156 8/26/3

Kirby Webster L        Twp        830        10255        6261        1/8/3
Kirchdorfer Elmer O        Twp        570        10388        39609        6/24/3
Kirchenhauer Edwin F        Twp        810        10315        21340        3/28/3
Kirchendorfer Evelyn        Cleve        181        10493        65886        10/29/3
Kirchner Anna E        Akron        771        10253        5809        1/5/3
Kirchner Emma            Cleve        181        10319        22348        4/3/3
Kirchner George Mason    Stebvil        411        10540        77543        12/22/3
Kirchner Hazel F        Akron        771        10489        64970        10/17/3
Kirchner Herman Geo        Cols        251        10238        2093        1/5/3
Kirchschlager Fredrick        Twp        450        10420        47638        7/21/3
Kiriakidis Stiliano        Cleve        181        10527        74388        12/11/3
Kirian William            Toledo        481        10483        63257        10/1/3
Kirk Alice Lee            Cols        251        10452        55704        9/2/3
Kirk Andrew S            Toledo        481        10483        63257        10/1/3
Kirk Anna L            Salem        152        10447        54391        9/11/3
Kirk Benjamin            Cleve        181        10499        67446        11/13/3
Kirk Cilla            Cleve        181        10349        29993        5/20/3
Kirk Cora Bee            Cinti        311        10455        56414        9/16/3
Kirk Cordelia            Akron        771        10552        80540        12/13/3
Kirk Effie Anne            Twp        300        10240        2682        1/1/3
Kirk Genevieve Theresa    Lakewd        182        10237        1827        1/10/3
Kirk Harold E            Toledo        481        10359        32440        5/31/3
Kirk Harriet A            Cleve        181        10426        49015        8/13/3
Kirk Henry Reigle        Vil        10        10421        47890        8/23/3
Kirk James Thos        Bexley        252        10240        2501        1/19/3
Kirk John Wesley        Twp        120        10443        53476        8/17/3
Kirk Mary Eleanor        Vil        230        10476        61546        10/31/3
Kirk Patrick F            Oakwood    572        10306        19105        3/24/3
Kirk Phoebe            Cols        251        10404        43729        7/27/3
Kirk Richard            Vil        310        10256        6682        1/25/3
Kirk Roy E            Cosh        161        10525        73806        12/23/3

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription – Death Certificate of Rebecca Ann Ott

Transcription – Death Certificate of Rebecca Ann Ott

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The following is my transcription of the death certificate of Rebecca Ann Ott, wife to Samuel G. Ott, of Canal Fulton, Ohio.

DEATH CERTIFICATE OF Rebecca Ann Ott

Death Certificate of Rebecca Ann Ott
Death Certificate of Rebecca Ann Ott

STATE OF OHIO
BUREAU OF VITAL STATISTICS
CERTIFICATE OF DEATH

1    PLACE OF DEATH
County   Portage    Registration District No.   1058        File No.
Township                                     Primary Registration District No.   8415    Registered No.   44255
or Village           No.     ,                                      St.,                                                  Ward
or City of   Kent, Ohio    (If death occurred in a hospital or institution, give its NAME  instead of street and number)

2    FULL NAME   Rebecca Ann  Ott
(a)    Residence.    No.              St.,                                            Ward
(Usual place of abode)                    (If nonresident, give city or town and State)
Length of residence in city or town where death occurred                 yrs.             mos.             ds.    How long in  U.S., if of foreign birth?                 yrs.              mos.            ds.

PERSONAL AND STATISTICAL PARTICULARS

3    SEX                               4    COLOR OR RACE                          5    SINGLE, MARRIED, WIDOWED or DIVORCED (write the word)                          5a    If married, widowed or divorced
Female                                 White                                                      Married                                                                                                                                           HUSBAND of    Samuel G. Ott
(or) WIFE of

6    DATE OF BIRTH (month, day, and yer)    Jan. 2nd, 1846
7    AGE                Years                Months                 Days        If LESS than 1 day               hrs. or                 min.
8    OCCUPATION OF DECEASED
(a)    Trade, profession or particular kind of work         Housewife
(b)    General nature of Industry, business, or establishment in which employed (or employer)
(c)    Name of employer
9    BIRTHPLACE (city or town)        Canal Fulton        State or country    O
PARENTS
10    NAME OF FATHER    Joseph Kirk
11    BIRTHPLACE OF FATHER (city or town)                    (State or country)    Unknown
12    MAIDEN NAME OF MOTHER            Unknown
13    BIRTHPLACE OF MOTHER (city or town)        Canal Fulton        (State or country)    Ohio
14    Informant    Samuel G. Ott
(Address)    Canal Fulton, O
15    Filed     8/19, 1922        Frank Bechiter   Registrar

MEDICAL CERTIFICATE OF DEATH

16    DATE OF DEATH (month, day and year)    Aug. 16,  1922
17                                      I HEREBY CERTIFY, that I attended deceased from             , 1917, to Aug. 16th, 1922
that I last saw her alive on July 15th, 1922 and that death occurred, on the date stated above, at 8oo P.m.
The CAUSE OF DEATH* was as follows:    Myxedima     (duration)           yrs.            mos.         ds.
CONTRIBUTORY (secondary)         Unknown        (duration)                     yrs.            mos.         ds.
18    Where was the disease contracted if not at the place of death?
Did an operation precede death?     No        Date of
Was there an autopsy?        No
What test confirmed diagnosis?        Physical exam
(Signed)     Hiram Bessinger, M.D.
Aug. 17th, 1922    (Address)    Canal Fulton, O
State the Disease Causing Death, or in deaths from Violent Causes, state (1) Means and Nature of Injury, and (2) whether Accidental, Suicidal or Homicidal. (See reverse side for additional space.)
19    PLACE OF BURIAL, CREMATION OR REMOVAL            DATE OF BURIAL
Union Cemetery, Canal Fulton, O                                            Aug. 19, 1922
20    UNDERTAKER, License No.                            ADDRESS
The Finefrock Bros. Co.                                     Canal Fulton, O.

____________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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4 stories of hidden treasures you can still look for today.

4 stories of hidden treasures you can still look for today.

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There’s reason to believe you could find a major treasure horde.  After all, there are quite a few still out there just waiting to be unearthed!  Here are just 4 stories of hidden treasures you can still look for today as long as you have a metal detector.

For most metal detectorists, the thrill of the hunt is the driving force behind their metal detecting.   You never know when that signal goes off what you’ll unearth. 

stories of hidden treasures
4 stories of hidden treasures and hordes you can still look for today.

The Treasure of Little Bighorn

During the Battle of Little Bighorn in June 1876 in eastern Montana, a steamboat called the Far West was leased by the government and sent up the Bighorn river to resupply General Custer and his men.

It is said that while Captain Grant Marsh had anchored the ship at the confluence of the Bighorn and Little Bighorn rivers to wait for soldiers to come and unload the supplies, two freighters from Bismark, North Dakota stopped and asked him for help.  They requested that the Far West take on the $800,000 in gold they were carrying because they had just narrowly averted capture by Native Americans several times and were worried if they didn’t hide the gold somewhere it would be stolen.  Although the Captain didn’t want to take on the gold, he did.  Then, he continued to wait for Custer’s soldiers to come and unload the supplies.

As he waited, captain Marsh became nervous about having so much gold on board so he headed upriver to a safer anchorage.  He then took the gold ashore and buried it.

He then returned to the confluence of the two rivers to see if he’d be able to rendezvous with the soldiers.  Unfortunately, instead he received word of Custer’s defeat and was asked to transport the wounded to safety.  With this, the gold was forgotten until the Captain contacted the freighting company several years later.  He even led them to the place he had remembered burying the gold but, the landscape had changed during the time he’d been away and, that $800,000 in gold hasn’t ever been recovered.

Yamashita’s Gold

During WWII Japanese General Tomoyuki Yamashita and his men stole a great deal of gold and other riches from the countries they invaded.

It is also said that even top officials including the Emperor himself participated in looting during the war.

As the story goes, all of the treasure these high ranking Japanese officials found was stored in Singapore, then relocated to some caves in the Philippines.  The goal was to then transport the treasure from the Philippines to Japan after the war was over, but that was never accomplished.

Some of the treasure is said to have stayed in the Philippines while other portions of it were lost at sea when the merchant ships it was being smuggled in were sunk by Allied forces.  Although many scholars say Yamashita’s treasure is a myth, others believe and they’ve been on the hunt ever since.

Forrest Fenn’s Treasure

Forrest Fenn is a writer and art collector in his late 80’s who lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Back in the 1980’s Fenn was diagnosed with cancer.  He was lucky though, and he beat it.

When he recovered, he was inspired to hide somewhere between $3 – 5 million of his personal treasures including gold, jewels, and priceless artifacts somewhere “north of Santa Fe” and “above 5,000 ft”.

He then wrote his memoir “The Thrill of the Chase” and in it included a poem he wrote that will lead readers to his buried treasure – if they can decode it.

Since then he’s also published another book titled “Too Far to Walk” that includes a map of the area where the treasure is hidden but doesn’t give away the exact location.

So far, no one has found it, but maybe you can be the lucky treasure hunter.

Civil War Treasure in Virginia

Stories of treasures buried during the Civil War abound.  One of the more plausible involves a Confederate Commander named John Singleton Mosby.

In the spring of 1863 Commander Mosby had just finished raiding a Union camp and had over 40 prisoners, one of whom was a Union officer.

The officer had a bag that he had been using to store priceless family heirlooms and artifacts, along with some gold and silver pieces he’d stolen from Virginia families.

Commander Mosby took this bag, estimated to be worth over $350,000, and began heading south with the prisoners back toward Confederate territory in Culpeper, Virginia.

Around New Baltimore, Virginia though, a scout spotted a group of Union soldiers.  To avoid them the scout led the group through the woods.

It is at this point that Commander Mosby became nervous about the heirlooms returning to Union hands so, he and Sergeant James Ames buried them between two trees.  He then marked the two trees with an “X” and they rejoined the group which successfully returned to Confederate territory.

After some time, Commander Mosby asked Ames to return to the site with six of his best men to recover the treasure.

While there, the men were all captured and subsequently hung.

Mosby never returned to claim the treasure though he did speak about it to friends and family on his death bed, saying he wished he could have recovered the treasure so he could return the heirlooms to the families they belonged to.

As you can see with these four stories alone, there’s enough treasure out there for everyone!  

So, grab a professional deep seeking metal detector and head out treasure hunting.

As always, be sure to check the local and national laws before you get started. When metal detecting on private property always obtain written permission from the land owner. You never know what you might dig up – maybe you’ll even find one of these treasures!

____________________

About the author

Michael Bernzweig manages MetalDetector.com in Southborough, MA. He has written extensively on the subject of metal detecting since the mid 1980’s. He has traveled world-wide in his pursuit of educating, exploring and advising others in the proper use of metal detectors. Outside of the business he enjoys mentoring students, being involved in the community and spending time with his family.

photo credit: dad1_ via photopin cc


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Genealogy obsession in Iceland opens academic doors.

Genealogy obsession in Iceland opens academic doors.

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As I’ve written in previous posts, much of human history has involved the management of relationships, marriages, etc. to safeguard against incestuous relationships, and has resulted in an impressive genealogy obsession in Iceland.
Genealogy obsession in Iceland
Genealogy obsession in Iceland opens academic doors.

Iceland, with its population of only 320,000, is one small corner of the globe that still deals with the issues of living in the shallow end of the gene pool, manifesting in today’s Icelanders’ preoccupation with genealogy and family history.

In one instance, a group of students from the University of Iceland engineering department created a smart phone app, allowing users to simply bump phones to see if they have a common ancestor, as well as if there’s a relationship and just how close it is.

Prior to the smart phone app, the “Book of Icelanders” (Islendingabok), has been the receptacle of genealogy records. Kári Stefánsson, an Icelandic neurologist, created a web-based version of the “Book of Icelanders” to provide constant access to its users. Kári Stefánsson and Fridrik Skulason claim to have documented 95% of Icelanders of the past three hundred years.

A benefit of the impressive job Icelanders have done tracing their family genealogies, is the extensive collection of data available for studies and experiments in many  disciplines including science, social studies, health and genetics.

Another example of the benefits of pursuing genealogy was described in my previous post “Owning a home: Military least likely and fire fighters more likely to own”. In this case, a statistical analysis of census data by Ancestry.com provided data to study home ownership trends over the past century.

Although the thoughts of the current and future benefits of genealogical study are pleasant ones, consider the negative – how would such caches of genealogical information have been used during WWII in Germany? The thought is truly frightening.

Previous posts about this topic are:

Icelandic Ancestry: the Icelandic genealogy database is now available online. 

Ingenius incest prevention app created by University of Iceland students.

The Science of husbandry on a human scale.

photo credit: Stuck in Customs via photopin cc


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Ingenius incest prevention app created by University of Iceland students.

Ingenius incest prevention app created by University of Iceland students.

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I previously wrote an article about my fascination with the ‘science of husbandry on a human scale‘.

My interest in this subject was piqued by my own Acadian ancestry and the Acadians’ practice of ‘managing’ biological relationships through the church in order to safeguard against close relatives marrying and having children. This has been a necessity through the centuries as a result of people living in small communities that were widespread. The modes of transportation were primitive and substantially increased the possibility of relationships and marriages within family lines. The Acadians recognized these relationships as existing within levels of ‘consanguinity’ or ‘closeness of biological relationship’.

The culture that shares the this Acadian practice to the greatest degree is that of Iceland. They have taken their management of these relationships to a different and greater level through consultation with the Íslendingabók database, a national database of ancestral lines and family trees reaching back several centuries, with their incest prevention app.

Students of the University of Iceland in Reykjavík won a contest for apps run by the Íslendingabók database. With their Android incest prevention app called ‘Sifjaspellsspillir’ or ‘Incest Spoiler’, two people with the app just tap their phones and if they share a grandparent, they will receive an alert. The creators are hoping to make it able to alert regarding common great grandparents in the future.


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I’d like to see an open and free exchange of genealogical data.

I’d like to see an open and free exchange of genealogical data.

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Ideally, I’d like to see an open and free exchange of genealogical data.

I’ve long been a proponent of the open and free exchange of genealogy data to ensure ready access to information for everyone researching their family history.

This morning, however, I read “Cooperation Makes Records Available for Free” at FamilySearch.org and it made me think.

As much as I’d like all genealogical data to be free, I can understand someone wishing to recover their costs of researching the data.

Database profile for Isaac Shelby, Governor of Kentucky, including references to numerous images, documents and sources. (Click on the image to see in full size.)

Although the costs of genealogy research have reduced considerably over the past two decades due to computers and the increasing availability of records, images and data online, we’re seeing a correlating increase in sites online offering valuable data for a fee of some kind, making free data harder to find.

FamilySearch.org is one of the few sites still offering data for free.

In my case, ALL of my data (including images, sources and documents) is available online for free download. I do not charge for anything. I do, however, make revenue from ad clicks and sponsored posts on my sites. The end result is that, at least at present, I can offer all of my data for free as the ads pay for the upkeep and maintenance of my sites – for the most part.

There is a delicate balance here, though. As long as I can afford to offer this information free of charge it will remain so. If there comes a point where I have to recover my costs, I will have to either charge for downloads or remove the site from the internet altogether. Rest assured that this is not anywhere in the foreseeable future.

I’ve also seen a marked increase in the amount of personal genealogy data online that is ‘locked’ or marked ‘private’. I have contacted the owners of such data and in most cases they have been very forthcoming and willing to exchange information. In a few cases, however, the owner can be very protective of their data and will not make it available. Luckily, these appear to be few and far between at present.

I welcome the exchange of data offered by anyone doing genealogy research. It is important that this information remain available. One caveat, however, is to ALWAYS categorize the data as it appears when received. If there are no sources attached, it is questionable at best and it is important to use this information as ‘clues’ to further finds. Do not take this information at face value.

I have a very large database and about half of the data is sourced, while about half is not. I am constantly actively seeking and adding sources to prove the data.

I have received some criticism for this. One researcher contacted me about a particular line of information because it was claimed I had a place name incorrect. Little did this person know I had lived in the area for 21 years and knew it very well. To say this person was hostile is putting it mildly. I couldn’t believe it when it was demanded that I remove the lines pertaining to HER RESEARCH as she was the researcher of this family and I had no business researching it since our connection was only by remarriage, adoption and the birth of half-siblings. She also demanded that I remove anything that was not sourced or proven. To do as she demanded would break up lines and create gaps, leaving me without clues to search for sources to prove the information I do have and fill the gaps.

As I stated above, a good portion of my data is accumulated through free exchange of information, including the import of gedcoms of other peoples’ research. The sources (or lack thereof) remain as they have cited them, but I do search for actual copies of listed sources to attach where possible. I leave unsourced data as I receive it until I can research it further and I categorize any sources I have confirmed or added.

It is important to realize that cooperation and goodwill among researchers is essential to keeping the lines of communication and free flow of information open. Once we start becoming territorial and protective of our data, we contribute to the scarcity of information and increased costs for all.

Again, although such data can be invaluable as clues to further research, it is important to note that all sources are only as good as the attachments and assessed quality.


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My top ten: Best world-wide genealogy and ancestry websites.

My top ten: Best world-wide genealogy and ancestry websites.

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    Shares

After almost twenty years of genealogy research, there are certain sites that have become my ‘go to’ sites for certain aspects of my genealogy research. I thought it might be helpful for me to post my list of my top ten genealogy and ancestry websites.
Internet Archive
Internet Archive Search

I have also included a description of the reasons why these sites have proved invaluable to me. If you’re looking for information in these areas, be sure to check out these sites.

The headings are links to the sites described and paid sites are indicated by ($) following the heading.

1.  FamilySearch.org

Maintained and updated by the LDS (Latterday Saints) Church, this site has been invaluable for all of my time researching my family’s genealogy. In the past few years in particular, the databases have expanded substantially as the LDS organization works to digitize more and more information. Recently, the search feature has become much more effective and accurate. No matter what country, region or time frame you are researching, this is a wonderful site. Best of all, it is free.

2.  Ancestry.com

Ancestry.com is a favorite for all of the reasons listed for FamilySearch.org, the only difference being that a paid subscription is required. Although I do use Ancestry.com a great deal, I plan my research so I don’t have to remain subscribed all of the time. As I research and find gaps, I keep a ‘to do’ list and when it is large enough to warrant the cost, I will subscribe for as long as I think is necessary, tackle my list, and cancel the subscription when I have completed my list. It has been almost a year since I last subscribed because I’ve been finding a substantial amount of information elsewhere. I am due to subscribe pretty soon to tackle my current ‘to do’ list.

If you’re looking for one paid site that provides extensive data from around the world, this is the one.

3.  Cyndi’s List

Cyndi’s List is the largest site that offers extensive links to genealogy sites and resources on the internet. Cyndi has worked tirelessly for decades creating this site of over 300,000 links – sorted, categorized and constantly updated to maintain currency and functionality.

Recently, however, Cyndi’s List has been the target of a hacker who stole her entire site, making minor changes to ‘make it their own’ and attempting to divert revenue to themselves. Be sure the site you’re visiting is actually Cyndi’s List and help protect her extensive investment and our valuable resource.

4.  Olive Tree Genealogy

Olive Tree Genealogy is an extensive portal of links to valuable data and genealogy research information around the world. Although I do find this site somewhat confusing and difficult to navigate, my investment of time and effort has proved valuable as I have found wonderful, obscure data that I was unable to find elsewhere.

5.  Foundation for Medieval Genealogy

You should have seen my surprise when my husband’s ancestry connected directly to nobles and royalty in the medieval period. For the longest time this was a vast brick wall for me as there is very little quality data available online for researching this time.

I can’t remember how I found this site, but it’s an amazing resource as it’s extensively researched and sourced. The sources are described in detail and where there are questions about the data, they make it clear so we can note these gaps and questions in our own research. Where they have drawn conclusions from the existing evidence they examine the evidence and describe their conclusions.

6.  Directory of Royal Genealogical Data: University of Hull

This is another well researched site about royal genealogy from the University of Hull in England that also covers the medieval period, but they are not as clear about the quality of their sources, the evidence they’ve used to form their conclusions and the reasons they formed the conclusions leading to the published genealogy.

7.  Internet Archive

Besides finding and sourcing dates and events, I also enjoy finding the details of the lives of our ancestors through written accounts. Access to these publications has helped immensely with writing this blog by enabling me to understand the circumstances and times in which our ancestors lived.

Internet Archive tops Google E-Books on this list because it is totally free.

8.  Google E-Books

Google E-Books is essentially a site offering paid and free access to public domain written materials and books with a very accurate, intuitive search feature. If you use the link in the heading, however, it is possible to search only titles available for free access and download. To find free titles, be sure to check ‘Full View’ when conducting a search.

9.  Rootsweb

This is a free site offered by Ancestry.com . It’s a valuable resource for providing free access to user input data and family trees. Although I don’t entirely trust the data offered on this site for the simple reason that it is made up from ‘user input’, it has been very valuable to me when encountering those frustrating brick walls. I use the information here as ‘clues’ which have helped me break through those brick walls.

This data is recognizable in my Blythe Database because I do not enter sources or indicate very poor quality sources. Those using my database should interpret these facts as questionable at best.

10.  GeneaBloggers

GeneaBloggers was the genius idea of offering a directory of genealogy blogs. When I have some time on my hands and just want to explore what others are doing and saying, I start at GeneaBloggers.

Have fun checking out these sites!


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DNA, archaeology, anthropology and genealogy open eyes to the past.

DNA, archaeology, anthropology and genealogy open eyes to the past.

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It seems that every time I turn on my computer to view the internet, I find new articles and posts about discoveries made in DNA, archaeology, genealogy and even science, that shed new light on our search into the origins of our own family and heritage, and the origins of our ethnic groups.

Today I stumbled upon the article “Discovered 2.3 k-yr-old human skeleton throws light on our ancestry,” on the ANINews website.

According to this article, “DNA from the complete 1.5 metre tall skeleton is one of the ‘earliest diverged,’ oldest in genetic terms, found to-date in a region where modern humans are believed to have originated roughly 200,000 years ago.”

The DNA evidence pointed to this man being from a branch that is the most closely related to ‘Mitochondrial Eve’ and now presumed to be extinct.

Reading about these new discoveries points out something very intriguing to me. In the past, the discoveries were made based on exploration, experimentation, and finding something new, affecting and changing the future.

Today, the discoveries one hears of most are those delving into the past, using all disciplines of social studies including genealogy, anthropology and archaeology; and the sciences including DNA and chemical analysis.

Today’s most well known and talked about discoveries are looking to the past and where we came from; individually, as a family, and as part of a broader ethnic group.

This suits me fine as this is my area of interest and fascination. I can’t help but feel excitement with each new discovery in my own genealogy, as well as reading and hearing about the discoveries made with a much broader, more global impact.

It all matters and sheds light on who we are and where we came from.


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Transcription: Obituary for Charles G. Blythe

Transcription: Obituary for Charles G. Blythe

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This is my transcription of the obituary for Charles G. Blythe (2nd great grandfather to Mark) from The Hoosier Genealogist, Indiana Historical Society, June 2001, Vol. 41, No. 2.

 

Obituary for Charles G. Blythe
Obituary for Charles G. Blythe.

Blythe, Charles G.

Birthplace: England
Occupation: Farmer
Entry into service: 1861, Pvt. 8th Btry
Final discharge: May 1864; Cause: End of war
Length of service: 4 months [sic]
Mustered into GAR. Mar. 1911
Died. 13 Jan. 1914

Obituary “C. G. Blythe Dies at Daughter’s Home,” Covington Friend, Jan. 1914, p. 1, col. 1: Blythe Was born in Lincolnshire, England, on 12 July 1840. He was the youngest son of Thomas and Mary Blythe. Charles came to America when he was fifteen years of age with his parents and three older brothers. At first they Went to Chicago. The father’s goal was to see his three sons started Well in life in this country and then the father planned to return to his native land. Unfortunately the father became ill and soon died. The boys were scattered to different parts of the country Charles Went to Wisconsin about the time of the Civil War. He enlisted 21 Nov 1861 in the light artillery. He received a bayonet Wound in his arm at Lookout Mountain, Which made him nearly an invalid for the rest of his life. He was honorably discharged in Aug. 1865. After the War he returned to his farm in Wisconsin and was married to Mary Elizabeth Keefer. They had four sons and two daughters, who all survive him. They are: Jennie M. of Urbana, Ill., Charles E. of Danville, Ill. Robert of Newell, S. Dak., Olive L. of lsanti, Mich. [Ipsilanti, Mich. or lsanti, Minn.‘?], and Clayton W. and Wesley E. of Covington. He died in Urbana on 15 Jan. 1914 after having been an invalid for more than a year. Rev E. W Strecker of the Methodist [Episcopal] Church officiated. He is buried at Mount Hope Cemetery.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Obituary for Mary Foulke (née Underwood)

Transcription: Obituary for Mary Foulke (née Underwood)

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Following is my transcription of the obituary for Mary Foulke (nee Underhill), published Monday, June 3, 1935 on page 2 of the Noblesville Daily Ledger.

MONDAY, JUNE 3, 1935

MARY FOULKE DIED SUNDAY NEAR ARCADIA

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The Funeral Services Will Be Held Tuesday Afternoon

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LONG RESIDENT OF JACKSON TOWNSHIP

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Death of Charles C. Crouch, Indianapolis, Came as a Surprise

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Obituary for Mary Foulke (nee Underwood)
Obituary for Mary Foulke (nee Underwood) – Noblesville Daily Ledger – Mon 3 June 1935, page 2.

Mrs. Mary Frances Foulke, widow of George Foulke, passed away at an early hour Sunday morning in the home of her daughter, Mrs. Grace Robbins, seven miles east of Arcadia. Mrs. Foulke has been in poor health for several years and her death was not unexpected. The body was taken to the Shaffer funeral home at Arcadia, where it will lie in state until Tuesday afternoon. Funeral services will be held in the Shaffer parlors and burial will take place in the cemetery near Sheridan.

Mrs. Foulke was the daughter of Lewis and Sarah (Statton) Underwood and was born Dec. 4, 1853, on the old homestead west of Arcadia, where she resided until less than a year ago when the daughter and family moved to east of Arcadia and she went to live with them. The husband has been dead for several years. Just a year ago, June 6th, the tragic death of her son, Arthur Foulke, of Arcadia, was a great shock to her.

She leaves besides the daughter at whose home she died, two other daughters, Mrs. Alice Phillips, of west of Arcadia, and Mrs. Sarah Ross, residing on road 31, and stepson Alvin Foulke, west of Cicero. She also leaves several grandchildren.

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The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Baptism record for Jacques Labelle (and others).

Transcription: Baptism record for Jacques Labelle (and others).

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Following is the baptism record for Jacques Labelle (1688) and other records from the same page of entries. Unfortunately, the image is of very poor quality and a good portion of the page is indecipherable.

 

Feel free to forward any new information and/or corrections to help with this transcription.

Parish records for Mere Ste. Eglise, Lachenaie, Quebec

De Marain qui ons declare ???????? ?????? ni liguer du ????????????? Liliane Bord???????

Baptism record of Jaques Labelle (1688)..
Baptism record of Jaques Labelle (1688)..

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J. Penan et JB Bourgeois
Le ?????????? du Mars 1688 apres les ????????? ?? lapublication du bane faire d’autre Jean Penan dit la fleur soldat dela Compagniedes Mr. de Vergois age de vint cinq ans fils de Mathurin Penan et de MarieRobert les pere ???? dela ville le quint??? Eusebe de Cournouaille d’une pereest Francoise Bourgeois agee de quatorze ans fille de M?????? Bourgeois et de???????? Clire Carpentier de lisle de Jefrey Eusebe de que ??? d’autre ???? ne??? ???? ?????? aucun?????????? Legitime le sousigne juristre Cure Lachenay ai ???? leur ?????? ??????????? pere ??????? de present ?? leur ?? donne laCanad????? Nuptiale ????? la forme det????? Mere Ste Eglise en presence de JeanChevalier et de Nicolas Bourgeois pere Julie Bourgeois et Guillaume Label -??????? ???? le de ??? ?? qui ons ???? declare ???????? ????? ???????? ???????????????? ??? ???? Lord ??????.
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Louis Froger et Elizab. Estier
Les deuxieme ???? de Mars 1688 apres les ????????? et lapublication des banes faire d’entre Louis Froger age ????????? an fils dedessimes Nicolas Froger et Marie Madeleine Martin les pere et mere delaparoisse de la Chenay, courche de quatre June pere et Elizabeth Estier fillesde Leonard Estier et de Elizabeth Gaud??? Les pere et mere des meme paroisse et ??????? ?? ?????? ?????? ????? ????????????.
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Jean Miloin
Le septieme de mois de mars dela 1688 en ????? dans la Commission ??????? Mere Ste Eglise Jean Million ??????? dela Chenay, apre avoir ???? ??? les ???????? ?? ??? ?????? dans le ?????????? ?? ?? ?? paroisse lejour suivant en presence de Laurent Estier et Jacques Froger ??? ????? qui onsdeclare ne ??????? ????? ???????? ???? ????? ?????? ???????????.
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Baptism of Jacques Labelle
Le vint deuxieme du Mars 1688 ???? ??? pretre Cure De la Chenay, ????? baptize Jacques fils de Guillaume Labelle est Anne Charbonneau,la femme nai les ?????????? de meme, mais ?? ??. ????? ??? ????? Jacques de Castellane ??????? ???? de ??????? ?????? ???? Compagne du ?????????? ???? marine, la Maraine Marguerite Minson et le ? parain signe ? pere et Madame ondeclare ne ??????? ?????? ?? signer ??? ??????????? ?????? ??????? ????legitime ?? soussigne paroisse Cure de la Chenay ?? pris leur ????????????????? par para???? De ??????? et leur aid donne la Canadi????? Nuptial ????la forme du ???? Mere Ste. Eglise en presence de Francois Cottineau lui dela et??? ? Jean Froger pere And. Froger ?? ????? ??????? ?? de Leonard Estier pere??? Francois Estier on le dela ?. Estier qui ??? ???? declare ????????? ???????? signer ???? ??????????? Susanne Cordonnaire.

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You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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A Primer on Cemetery Research to Find Ancestors

A Primer on Cemetery Research to Find Ancestors

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Cemetery research absolutely is one of the most valuable tools for genealogy research.
Although I’m pretty much housebound and don’t get out much now, there was a time when I did venture out and do research in places such as cemeteries. As a matter of fact, I previously wrote about one experience at an old Catholic cemetery in Nova Scotia where I and my family spent the better portion of a day checking out the burial sites of our ancestors – and there were bunches of ’em.

By Jillynn Stevens, Ph.D., MSW

Grave Tombstone of Marguerite Melanson.
Cemetery research led to the discovery of Marguerite Melanson’s burial site.

When you’re working on researching distant generations of ancestors, cemetery research is one of the most satisfying, hands on forms of genealogical exploration you can do. It’s one way to connect with a tangible reminder of particular ancestors, which is often an elusive feeling. Finding a tombstone or other sign of the resting place of an ancestor can give you insights into who they were. Is their tombstone humble or grand? Does it contain an inscription that speaks of a simple life, of one that hints at a great love story, or a somber and religious disposition? What dates are inscribed? The information source is rich, yet locating cemeteries and navigating the research process isn’t always straightforward. Here’s how to get started with genealogical cemetery research.

What can I expect to learn from a cemetery?

It’s important to note that cemeteries and grave markers can be excellent sources of information about the deceased. While they are not primary information sources, they can clarify details such as:

An ancestor’s name, including obscure details like maiden names and middle names or even occasionally pet names, but most often:

  • date of birth
  • date of death
  • the names of family members including parents, spouses, and children
  • religion
  • military service
  • fraternal order membership

Cemeteries are a wonderful source of information that can confirm what you’ve learned from earlier research. In other cases, you’ll garner information that you didn’t know. For example, there may be symbolism on a tombstone suggesting that your ancestor was a member of the Masonic Lodge or perhaps they are buried in a Catholic burial ground. Each of these small clues can open up new avenues for research and exploration.


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Transcription: Obituary of Anna Margaret Ganske

Transcription: Obituary of Anna Margaret Ganske

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Following is my transcription of the obituary of Anna Margaret Ganske as published in the Beaver Dam Argus.

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Anna Margaret Ganske - Beaver Dam obituary

Beaver Dam Argus, Thursday, June 7, 1900, p. 5.

GANSKE—-At the Ganske homestead three miles north of Beaver Dam, Wis., June 4, 1900, Mrs. Anna Margaret Ganske, the beloved wife of August Ganske, in the 57th year of her age.

Mrs. Ganske was in her usual good health until Sabbath morning, about 1 o’clock she was seized with distress in her stomach from which she never recovered, although she had the best of care and medical skill. She died on Monday, at 12:30 p. m.

Mrs. Ganske was the daughter of John and Anna Rosena Kraus and was born in Northampton, Mass., August 18, 1843, where her early life was spent. She came west with her parents and was united in marriage to Mr. August Ganske, who had been honorably discharged from the Army, at Oak Grove, October 18, 1863.

Six children were born to them all of whom are living to mourn the loss of their loving mother. These are William, John and Albert Ganske, and Mrs. Charles Waddell of Trenton, and and Miss Anna Rosena, and Charles living at. home.

The funeral of Mrs. Ganske is at 1:30 p. m. today and. her burial in the Old Cemetery, Beaver Dam.

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The image of the image of the obituary for Leonard Scott Keefer above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for Leonard Scott Keefer and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson (nee Johnson)

Transcription: Obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson (nee Johnson)

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Following is my transcription of the obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson (nee Johnson), who died in Cairns, Australia. A memorial service was held in Bethel Lutheran Church in Brush Prairie, Washington on August 27, 1995.

Carolyn Alma Hodgson ObituaryCarolyn Alma Hodgson

A memorial service will be at 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 27, 1995, in Bethel Lutheran Church in Brush Prairie, Wash. Mrs. Hodgson died of a ruptured aorta Aug. 19 in Cairns, Australia, at age 52.

She was born March 14, 1943, in Becker County, Minn. Her maiden name was Johnson. She moved to the Northwest in 1957 and graduated from Central Washington State College. She married Donald L. Hodgson on June 18, 1966. They lived in Beaverton, and she taught at Oregon Episcopal School and worked for ‘Timberline Lodge.

They moved to Papua New Guinea in 1982.

Surviving are her husband; sons, Eric of Dallas, Texas, and Fernando of Gresham; daughters, Anaka of Bradleboro, Vt., and Leyla Bartruff of Troutdale; mother Esther Johnson of Battle Ground, Wash; sister, Alice Olsen of Battle Ground; brothers, Stanley Johnson of Arlington, Wash., and Arvid Johnson of Battle Ground; and four grandchildren.

Disposition by cremation.

Remembrances: Lae Hospital Save the Children Fund, in care of Bethel Lutheran Church, 12919 N.E. 159th, Brush Prairie, Wash. 98606.

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The image of the obituary for Carolyn Alma Hodgson above links directly to the transcription of the document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Obituary for Margaret Ducharme (Peggy Ducharme).

Transcription: Obituary for Margaret Ducharme (Peggy Ducharme).

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Transcription: Obituary of Margaret Ducharme
Transcription: Obituary of Margaret Ducharme

Following is the obituary for Margaret Ducharme, who died 1998 in Jaffrey, New Hampshire. Unfortunately, I have no indication of which newspaper published this obituary.

 

She has also been known as Peggy Ducharme, Margaret Bourgeois, Peggy Bourgeois, Margaret Y. Bourgeois, and finally, Marie Marguerite Yvette Bourgeois.

Margaret Y. Ducharme

Margaret Y. “Peggy” Ducharme, 82, of Manchester, died July 21, 1998, in her daughter’s Jaffrey home after a lengthy illness.

Born in Canada on Aug. 4, 1915, she was the daughter of Emile and Marie (Turmel) Bourgeois. She lived most of her life in Manchester.

Mrs. Ducharme worked 15 years for Hillsborough County Home. In addition. she worked for Pandora.

She was a communicant of St. Raphael Church.

Family members include two daughters. Muriel Ducharme of La Prairie, Quebec, Canada, and Mrs. Michael (Sylvia) McElhinney of Jaffrey; a sister, Antoinette Marois of Manchester; a brother, Albert Bourgeois of Andover; nieces and nephews.

SERVICES: A calling hour is Friday from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. in Lambert Funeral
Home. 1799 Elm St. corner of North Street, Manchester.

A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated Friday at ll am. in St. Raphael Church. Burial will be in Mount Calvary Cemetery.

Memorial donations may be made to Hospice at HCS, Community Lane. Peterborough 03-158.

______  Accessing Original Documents and Data ______

The image of the “Obituary for Margaret Ducharme” links directly to the document transcribed. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, click on the name link, or search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Obituary for Yvonne (Bisson) Boily

Transcription: Obituary for Yvonne (Bisson) Boily

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Following is my transcription of the obituary for Yvonne (Bisson) Boily

 

Yvonne (Bisson) Boily
Yvonne (Bisson) Boily

A son domicile le 4 mars 1995, à l’âge de 85 ans et 8 mois, est décédée dame Yvonne Bisson, épouse de feu Léo Boily. Elle demeurait au 229 rue Principale, Vallée-Jonction. Les funérailles auront lieu mardi le 7 mars à 15h. Départ du funèrarium de la

Maison funéraire
Nouvelle Vie
Vallée-Jonction
à compter de 14h45 pour l`église de Vallée-Jonction et de là au cimetière paroissial. La famille recevra les condoléances au funérarium de la
Maison funéraire
Nouvelle Vie
139 ru Principale
Vallée-Jonction
lundi le 6 mars de 13h30 à 16h30 et de 19h à 22h, mardi, jour des funérailles à compter de 13h.

Elle laisse dans le deuil ses enfants: Louiselle (Clermont Faucher), Yvette (Arthur Vachon), Bibiane (Claude Champagne), Lauréanne (Jean Dumoulin), Guymond (Denise Giguere), Jean (Louise Vachon), Jacques (Desneiges Longchamps), Simone, Pierre (Suzanne Rhéaume); ses frères et soeurs: feu Aurèle Bisson (Blanche Poulin), feu Armand Bisson (Béatrice Trahan), Bernadette Bisson (Wellie Bergeron), feu Emilien Bisson (Laurence Goulet), Valerien Cloutier (Fernande Poulin); ses beaux-frères et belles-soeurs: Marie-Anna Boily (feu Camil Vachon), Lucia Boily (feu Donat Lehouillier), Angéline Boily (feu Aurèle Turmel), Alida Boily (Antonio Turmel), Carmel Boily (feu Emile Ferland), Paul Boily (Claire Girard), feu Emilien Boily (Gisèle Arsenault), feu Clermont Boily (Thérèse Breton), ainsi que dix-neuf petits-enfants, sept arrière petits-enfants, neveux, nièces, cousins, cousines et beaucoup d’amis (es). Toute marque de sympathie peut se traduire par un don à la maison Catherine-de-Longpré. Direction des funérailles:

Maison funéraire
Nouvelle Vie
239 rue Principale
Vallée-Jonction
Pour renseignements: 418-39704000 Fax: 418-397-?
___________

Yvonne ( Bisson )
At home March 4, 1995 , at the age of 85 years and 8 months , died lady Yvonne Bisson, wife of the late Leo Boily . She lived at 229 Main Street , Valley Jonction . The funeral will be held Tuesday, March 7 at 15h . Departure of the funeral

New Life Funeral Home
Valley Junction
from 14:45 to the church of Valley Junction and thence to the parish cemetery. The family will receive condolences at the funeral
New Life Funeral Home
139 Main ru
Valley Junction
Monday, March 6th from 13:30 to 16:30 and from 19h to 22h Tuesday day of the funeral after 13h .Valle

She is survived by her children : Louiselle ( Clermont Faucher ) , Yvette (Arthur Vachon) , Bibiana ( Claude Champagne ) Lauréanne (John Dumoulin) Guymond (Denise Giguere ), Jean (Louise Vachon) , Jacques ( Desneiges Longchamps) Simone , Pierre ( Suzanne Rheaume ) ; his brothers and sisters: the late Aurèle Bisson (Blanche Poulin ) , the late Armand Bisson ( Beatrice Trahan ) , Bernadette Bisson ( Wellie Bergeron ) , fire Emilien Bisson ( Laurence Goulet ) , Valerian Cloutier ( Feernande Poulin ) ; his brothers- and sisters- Marie- Anna Boily (late Camil Vachon) , Lucia Boily (late Donat Lehouillier ) Angeline Boily ( late Aurèle Turmel ) Alida Boily (Antonio Turmel ) Carmel Boily ( late Emile Ferland ) Paul Boily ( Claire Girard) , the late Emilien Boily ( Gisèle Arsenault) , fire Clermont Boily ( Thérèse Breton ) and nineteen grandchildren, seven great grandchildren , nephews, nieces , cousins and many friends ( es ) . Any brand of sympathy may result in a donation to the house Catherine de Longpre . Funeral :

New Life Funeral Home
239 Main Street
Valley Junction
Contact: 418-39704000 Fax: 418-397 -?

____________________

The image above links directly to the transcription of the document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data on this site is available for free access and download.

 

 


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Erik IX, King of Sweden

Erik IX, King of Sweden

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Saint Erik IX, King of SwedenErik IX, King of Sweden, is 26th great grandfather of my children on their father’s side.

The odd thing about this ancestry is that it is not through my husband’s mother’s Swedish ancestry, but through his father’s Welsh, and Royal ancestors.

Saint Erik "the Saint, den Helige" Jedvardsson IX, King of SwedenKeeping in mind the quality of sources going back that far, I have sourced this line through the best, highly regarded sites available to researchers, such as Foundation for Medieval Genealogy and the Directory of Royal Genealogy of Hull University, among others.

Today, I read a USAToday story about scientists opening the coffin of Erik IX, King of Sweden, who was murdered near Uppsala, Sweden in 1160. The identity of the murderer of Erik is speculation, one possibility being Emund Olvbane, an assassin, and another being Magnus Henriksson, who some say succeeded Erik IX briefly. Erik was made a saint later in his life.

There is excitement surrounding the ability to study King Erik’s bones because there is so little known about him. They will be using DNA and x-rays to examine and investigate, hoping to learn details about his ancestry, health, diet and residence locations. There has been disagreement over his place of origin, some believing he was from Uppsala, and some believing he was from the west coast.

Uppsala CathedralEvidence of a sword strike has been noted and may have contributed to his death. Some believe he died from a blow to the head, while others  believe he was captured and later beheaded. Either of these theories is plausible because of the mark on the collar bone from a sword. Hopefully, these studies will provide answers.

Among artifacts to be studied is the gilded copper crown adorned with semi-precious stones, worn by Erik and being the oldest existing medieval royal crown in existence.

The crown of Erik IX, King of Sweden, will go on exhibit at the Uppsala Cathedral in June, along with several artifacts from other churches. Uppsala Cathedral is believed to have been built to house the remains of King Erik IX.


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Transcriptions: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson – II.

Transcriptions: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson – II.

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Transcriptions: Documents relating to the marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson.

 These documents are a continuation of Part I of this post.

—————-

No. 1462

MARRIAGE LICENSE

—————-

PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA

D. MacKeen

Lieutenant-Governor

BY HIS HONOUR

The Honourable David McKeen

Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia.

Whereas, Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson  have determined to enter into the holy estate of Matrimony, and are desirious of having their Marriage publicly solemnized ; in order that such their honest desires may the more speedily have due effect, and that they may be able to procure the same to be lawfully solemnized without publication of banns. I do hereby, for good causes, give and grant the License and Faculty, as well to them the said parties contracting, as to all or every Minister or Clergyman resident in the Dominion of Canada and duly ordained or appointed according to the rights and ceremonies of the Church or Denomination to which he belongs, to solemnize and perform the same with the Province of Nova Scotia ; provided always, that by reason of any Affinity, Consanguinity, Prior Marriage, or any other lawful cause, there be no legal impediment in this behalf ; otherwise if any fraud shall appear to have been committed at the time of granting this License, eight by false suggestions, or concealment of the truth, that then this License shall be null and void to all intents and purposes whatsoever.

Given, under my hand and Seal at Arms, at Halifax,

By his Honour’s Command

F. F. Mathers

Deputy Provincial Secretary

Issued this 16th day

May 1916

A. J. MacCuish

Issuer of Marriage Licenses at St. Peters

In the County of Richmond


Marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

I Hereby Certify, That the within named persons, Clifford Carter of Sampsonville and Elizabeth Sampson of Sampsonville were married under the within License at Sampsonville on the twentieth day of  May 1916, according to the rites and Ceremonies of the Catholic Church

By me, (undecipherable)

St. Peters

In presence of Vernon Sampson at Sampsonville in the County of Richmond Mattie Samspon of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond


marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

Province of Nova Scotia

—————-

MARRIAGE REGISTER

Date of Marriage ; May 20th 1916

Place of Marriage ; Sampsonville

County ; Richmond

How Married ; by License or Banns;License

Dates of Publication, if by Banns ; 

Full name of Groom ; Clifford Carter

Age ; 20 years

Condition (Bachelor or Widower) ; Bach

Religious Denomin ; Catholic

Occupation ; Farming

Residence ; Sampsonville

Where Born ; 

Names of Parents ; Finlay Carter, Mary Fougere

Occupation of Parent ; Farming

____________________;

—————-

Full name of Bride ; Elizabeth Sampson

Age ; 16 years

Condition (Spinster or Widow) ; Spinster

Religious Denomin ; Catholic

Her Place of Residence ; Sampsonville

Where Born ; Sampsonville

Names of Parents ;  Vernon Sampson, Eliza Lawry

Occupation of Parent ; Farming

Names of Witnesses          Maphis Sampson, Vernon Sampson

Signature of Parties Married          Clifford Carter, Elizabeth Sampson

Officiating Clergyman         ???? L. McDonald

Denomination of Clergyman          Catholic

I Certify, That the marriage of the persons above named was duly celebrated by me at the time and place and in the manner stated in this Register.

???? L. McDonald

Officiating Clergyman

When a marriage is celebrated by License or Certificate, this Register filled up and signed by the officiating clergyman, must be returned with the License or Certificate, to the issuer from whom the said License or Certificate was obtained, and the issuer will pay to the clergyman 25 cents for License, or Certificate, and Register, not 25 cents for each, repaying himself from the money in his hands belonging to the Department and including amount so paid in his Quarterly Returns.

Issuers must return all License, Certificates, Affidavits and Registers to the Provincial Secretary’s Office, with their Quarterly Accounts.

marrage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

The complete original scans of any documents clips linked above can be accessed by clicking the images. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, search using the linked names above or the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link, both in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on these sites is available for free access and download.


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Transcription: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson of Cape Breton – Part I.

Transcription: Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson of Cape Breton – Part I.

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Transcription: Documents related to the marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson of Cape Breton.

____________________________________________________

The following are transcriptions from photographic images of approximately half of a collection of documents related to the marriage of Elizabeth Sampson and Clifford Carter of Sampsonville, County of Richmond, Nova Scotia, Canada. The second half of the transcriptions and links to the actual document images will be published either tomorrow or the day after.

Fine print in the margins was indecipherable due to image quality.

—————-

Sampsonville CB
May 16th 1916

I consent to the marriage of my son Clifford Carter (who is within twenty one years) to Elizabeth Sampson.

his
Philip  X  Carter
mark

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

Sampsonville CB
May 16th 1916

I consent to the marriage of my daughter Elizabeth Sampson (who is within the age of twenty one years) to Clifford Carter.

Mr. Vinny Sampson
his
X
mark
Witness

Laura Sampson

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

29/

May 20/16

No……………………191

Clifford Carter

AND

Elizabeth Sampson

MARRIAGE LICENSE AFFIDAVIT

Rich

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

—————-

(There is indecipherable fine pring text in the left 1″ margin, due to image quality.)

FORM OF AFFIDAVIT

I, Clifford Carter
of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond
labourer make oath and say as follows :

I, and Elizabeth Sampson
of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond
are desirous of entering into the contract of
marriage, and of having our marriage solemnzed at Sampsonville
in the County of Richmond.

I am the age of nineteen and eleven months years, and the said
Elizabeth Sampson, is
under twenty one years.

I am a bachelor and the said Elizabeth
Sampson is a spinster.

Philip Carter & Vin Sampson of Sampsonville in the County of Richmond labourers, both whose consent to such marriage is required, has consented thereto in writing

(Two lines of ‘struck-through’ text that is unreadable.)

I believe that there is no affinity, consanguinity, prior marriage or other lawful causes or legal impedment to bar or hinder the solemnization of our marriage.

Sworn to at St. Peters in the
County of Richmond
this 16th
day of May 1916.

Clifford Carter
Signature of Deposed

Before me,
A. J. MacCuish
Issuer of Marriage License

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

Marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

___________

V 29

Richmond – 1916

Carter, Clifford

Sampson, Elizabeth

—————-

marriage of Clifford Carter and Elizabeth Sampson

Here are more documents related to this marriage.

—————-

The complete original scans of the document clips above can be accessed by clicking the image. To access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, click on the name link above, or search the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar. It is recommended to search using both methods as the results do sometimes differ. All data on this site is available for free access and download.


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View history through time lapse mining from internet archived photos.

View history through time lapse mining from internet archived photos.

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Just imagine what it would be like to see historical changes in our world occur over time.
One site that gives us the ability to view history through time lapse mining from internet archived photos is a reality.

 

Lombard St., San Francisco
Lombard St., San Francisco

Ricardo Martin-Brualla of the University of Washington and David Gallup and Steven M. Seitz of Goggle Inc. have devised a method of mining photos of a particular subject from the numerous free archives online, piecing them together chronologically, setting them around a median, and stabilizing the result, creating a time-lapse video.

The video below shows the results of this process using images spanning several years of oft photographed landmarks such a Butchart Gardens in Victoria, Lombard Street in San Francisco, glaciers in Alaska and Norway, the World Trade Center and major cityscapes.

The process has been tested and improved upon using subjects that are frequently photographed by the general public and saved to free photo storage and sharing sites such as Picasa, Panoriamio and Flickr.

This process they call time-lapse mining takes millions of photos available online, sorting chronologically, and creating a 3D time lapse video of the subject. Once the photos have been overlapped to document the very slow changes over time, the images are stabilized.

According to the researchers:

The scale and ubiquity of our mined time-lapses creates a new paradigm for visualizing global changes. As more photos become available online, mined time lapses will visualize even longer time periods, showing more drastic changes.

 

So far, the researchers have created 10,728 time lapses of 2,942 landmarks, the majority of which are in Europe. The quantity and subject matter of these videos is dictated solely by the availability of images online.

I find this new technology fascinating and can’t wait to see how this progresses.


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My Ideal Setup for Genealogy Research

My Ideal Setup for Genealogy Research

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Over fifteen years of genealogy research, I have added to, adjusted and tweaked my setup until I have achieved what I believe to be the ideal setup for genealogy research.

In the Beginning

archives

When I started, I had only an early personal computer operating Windows 94 and Microsoft Office, a basic scanner, small black and white printer, and for media I used floppies and a zip drive.

There were a lot of negatives about operating in those early years. Although the internet was beginning to open doors for researchers, there was not much data transcribed for online access, even if it was free. This meant a good portion of my research had to be done the old fashioned way using ‘snail mail’, the telephone and the fax machine. The internet helped me locate the resources and organizations to whom I should correspond and what specifically was available to be accessed.

I used the original free Ancestry Family Tree software that was available prior to Ancestry.com taking over Family Tree Maker. Although I had tried Family Tree Maker, I hadn’t like it at all because it was primitive and the interface was rather unattractive and ‘clunky’. Had Ancestry.com decided to work with and improve the original Ancestry Family Tree software, I’d probably still be using it.

Learning and Adapting

During the years following until about seven years ago, I operated with the same equipment, becoming much more proficient and knowledgeable. The software, however, was another matter. I was never happy with Family Tree Maker and after doing some research, I switched to RootsMagic. I loved the smooth interface, reports, charts, source cataloging, and data entry features including the flexibility handling unorthodox formats for dates, etc.

By this time, I had become very dissatisfied with the image editing quality in Windows software. I had long been considering switching to a Mac, and soon after moving to British Columbia, my Windows computer crashed and I took the opportunity to switch. I immediately realized how much better the Mac was for working with documents and images, but there was one huge drawback – there was no Mac version of RootsMagic.

I diligently researched all Mac software available and wasted a lot of money trying several. The first one I tried was the Mac version of Family Tree Maker. I didn’t like it any better than the Windows version. In order to continue with my genealogy research and input, I tried two virtual environments, Parallels, VMWare and VirtualBox,  so I could operate RootsMagic on the Mac. Parallels caused a lot of performance issues on the computer, ranging in severity from system slowdowns to outright crashes. VMWare was only slightly better. I finally tried and liked VirtualBox and although it wasn’t as smooth and seamless as I like, I continued using it. (RootsMagic has since released a Mac version that I have never tried.)

Stumbling Along

During the next couple of years, I tried Mac Family Tree, Reunion, MyBlood and Legacy. While using all of these, I missed RootsMagic horribly and ended up purchasing a NetBook so I could operate RootsMagic on the required Windows operating system.

Then I heard about Heredis, a new software that operated on a Mac. I purchased it because the free trial would only allow working with a small, limited quantity of individuals, leaving lots of areas in my database of 115,000+ individuals where I was unable to assess its suitability. I loved this software, but there was one huge drawback I couldn’t live with. It did not provide the flexibility and variety of date formats I needed. I’m a stickler for observing the ‘record dates exactly as they appear in the original source and only use the calculated date for the sort’ camp. My husband’s ancestry is deeply rooted in the Welsh Quaker culture and therefore I frequently find, use and interpret the Quaker date formats like ‘3d mo. 17 1682’. In Heredis, this had to be translated to a more standard date format and left a great deal of room for error.

I installed RootsMagic once again, and I still use it today. I use the Mac for the more intricate and detailed image editing and everything outside my genealogy pursuits. I would still love for RootsMagic to release a Mac version, but after years of requesting they do so, I’ve given up.

Another issue I’ve experienced through the years is ensuring the security, storage and portability of data. I tried everything up to and including CDs, DVDs, and flash/thumb drives. All of these options have notoriously short shelf lives and are vulnerable to malfunction, corruption and damage. Instead, I invested in an external hard drive a couple of years ago and it has worked out very well. I still keep my files on my computers and back up frequently to the external hard drive. This drive is easily ejected and inserted for portability and is not nearly as vulnerable as the other storage media choices.

The result is, unless RootsMagic is ever offered in a Mac version, I feel I have the best system possible for my genealogy research, data input, graphic and image editing, file storage and backup, and portability of data.

computer cubicleMy Ideal Setup

Mac computer

  • Its resident image editing software is much more intuitive and gives higher quality results, especially when trying to improve poor images.

Windows notebook computer

  • RootsMagic software requires Windows.
  • For portability when traveling or away from home.
  • Photoscape free software for backup image editing. Although not as good quality, it’s a great backup when away from the Mac or travelling.
  • Sticky Notes is great for quick saving of notes and ‘cut and paste’ of data.
  • Wordpad for working with and quick editing of longer strings of text before inputting into software.

External Storage

  • 1T external hard drive for backup and secure storage of genealogy data and files.
  • CDs for portable storage and mailing of data and files.
  • Flash/thumb drives for immediate, short term, portable storage of files and data.

High Resolution Smart Phone or Digital Camera

  • To take high resolution digital images of publications pages and documents in libraries and archives, especially where there are restrictions on photocopying and scanning.

Software

Mac
  • RootsMagic (is now available for the Mac)
  • iPhoto and Preview
  • Grab
Windows
  • RootsMagic (paid)
  • Photoscape (free)
  • Sticky Notes (free with Windows)
  • Wordpad (free with Windows)
  • Snipping Tool

photo credit: archie4oz via photopin cc


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Transcription: Obituary for Harold Everett Redetzke; 1935 – 2002

Transcription: Obituary for Harold Everett Redetzke; 1935 – 2002

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Harold Everett Redetzke+ + + + OBITUARY – HAROLD EVERETT REDETZKE + + + +

May 18, 1935 – October 12, 2002

Harold Everett Redetzke, age 67, died on Saturday, October 12, 2002 at his home in rural Sebeka, MN. Harold was born to Elmer and Margaret (Kimball) Redetzke on May 18, 1935 in Butler Township, MN. Harold was united in marriage to Norma Eckert on June 8, 1957 in Sebeka, MN. They lived in Foxhome, MN for several years and then moved beck to Sebeka where Harold tanned until retirement. Harold served on the Red Eye Township Board for a few years and was a member of Our Saviour‘s Lutheran Church. Harold underwent heart transplant surgery on September 27, 1987 at the University of Minnesota Hospital.

Redetzke, Harold Everett; MemorialHarold is survived by his wife Norma Redetzke of Sebeka, MN, to their union were born five children; two daughters, Diane Steinkraus and her husband Ronnie of Sebeka, MN, Debbie Redetzke of Lincoln, Nebraska; three sons, Myron Redetzke and his wife Pam of Sebeka, MN, Marvin Redetzke and his wife Lori of Sebeka, MN, Calvin Redetzke and his wife Joni of Sebeka, MN; seven grandchildren, Lacey Eckman and her husband Justin, Shawn Redetzke, Jeremy Redetzke. Levi Steinkraus, Evette Steinkraus, Reid Redetzke, and Logan Redetzke; five sisters, Delilah Hasbargen of Frazee, MN, LaVern Milbradt of Sebeka, MN, Donna Super and her husband George of Menahga, MN, Joyce Slininger and her husband Bill of St Cloud, MN, Darlene Hought and her husband Konnie of Foxhome, MN; two brothers, Marlyn Redetzke and his wife Joyce of Sebeka, MN, Donald Redetzke and his wife Roseann of Ely, MN; and many nieces, nephews and cousins. He is preceded in death by his parents, brother Gordon, infant sister Mavis and nephew Corey Hought.

[Handwritten: ‘Herbert Redetzke (Bro.)’]

Memorial Services were held on Wednesday, October 16, 2002 at 1:30 P.M. at Our Saviour‘s Lutheran Church in Sebeka, MN with Reverend Mark Manning officiating. Organist was Hilda Mary Schoon and congregational hymns were “In the Garden,” “Precious Lord, Take My Hand” and “Softly and Tenderly Jesus is Calling.” Honorary Pallbearers were Glen Kimball, Randy Redetzke, Daniel Besonen, Ryan Milbradt, Larry Huotari, Benny Olson and Gerald Olson. lnurnment will be at Green Hill Cemetery at a later date. Arrangements by Cardini — Behrens Funeral Homes of Sebeka and Menahga, MN.

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.

 


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The Discovery Service at the National Archives in Great Britain

The Discovery Service at the National Archives in Great Britain

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The UK National Archives  has a free online search, but there are problems. Some knowledge has always been necessary to search the catalogue with any success.

The Discovery Service makes it easier for everyone – novice to expert – to search and use the collection.

The user is able to search the collection, explore and browse, whether for genealogy research and/or scholastic purposes.

Discovery is a digitized document delivery service that will make it easier to search for genealogy records such as wills and testaments, court proceeding transcription and order digitized genealogy records.

To experience Discovery, visit the Labs section of the National Archives website, the place they release new online services for customers for testing and to provide feedback. New features are being added to Discovery regularly and the latest release includes advanced search and fixes existing problems in previous versions.

The Discovery service will be fully tested and approved before it replaces any other services.

The National Archives holds over 22 million historical government and public records, doubling in just over two years and making it one of the largest archive collections in the world. From Domesday Book to modern government papers and digital files, the collection includes paper and parchment, electronic records and websites, photographs, posters, maps, drawings and paintings.

The old catalogue offered a free search of the collection, but had its problems. A minimum knowledge level was necessary to be able to effectively search the collection. This required level of knowledge made it difficult for new users to take advantage of the search.

The National Archives Discovery Service implemented a system that makes it easier for users of all levels.


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Tombstone: Anna E. Blythe (nee Murray)

Tombstone: Anna E. Blythe (nee Murray)

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Tombstone of Anna E. Blythe
Tombstone of Anna E. Blythe

The following is a transcription of the tombstone of Anna E. Blythe. Anna died August 9, 1925 in Danville, Vermilion, Illinois, USA.

Anna E. Murray

wife of

Charles E. Blythe

1873 – 1925

___________________

The image above links directly to the original document. You can access sources, data, images and documents for these and other individuals, by clicking on the name link, or searching the Blythe Genealogy database site using the surname search link and the ‘All Media‘ search link in the left sidebar.

It is recommended to search using both methods as the results can differ greatly due to a glitch in the software that doesn’t connect all images from the bio.

All data for this and numerous others on this site is available for free access and download.


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