Tag: genealogy

Genealogy obsession in Iceland opens academic doors.

Genealogy obsession in Iceland opens academic doors.

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As I’ve written in previous posts, much of human history has involved the management of relationships, marriages, etc. to safeguard against incestuous relationships, and has resulted in an impressive genealogy obsession in Iceland.
Genealogy obsession in Iceland
Genealogy obsession in Iceland opens academic doors.

Iceland, with its population of only 320,000, is one small corner of the globe that still deals with the issues of living in the shallow end of the gene pool, manifesting in today’s Icelanders’ preoccupation with genealogy and family history.

In one instance, a group of students from the University of Iceland engineering department created a smart phone app, allowing users to simply bump phones to see if they have a common ancestor, as well as if there’s a relationship and just how close it is.

Prior to the smart phone app, the “Book of Icelanders” (Islendingabok), has been the receptacle of genealogy records. Kári Stefánsson, an Icelandic neurologist, created a web-based version of the “Book of Icelanders” to provide constant access to its users. Kári Stefánsson and Fridrik Skulason claim to have documented 95% of Icelanders of the past three hundred years.

A benefit of the impressive job Icelanders have done tracing their family genealogies, is the extensive collection of data available for studies and experiments in many  disciplines including science, social studies, health and genetics.

Another example of the benefits of pursuing genealogy was described in my previous post “Owning a home: Military least likely and fire fighters more likely to own”. In this case, a statistical analysis of census data by Ancestry.com provided data to study home ownership trends over the past century.

Although the thoughts of the current and future benefits of genealogical study are pleasant ones, consider the negative – how would such caches of genealogical information have been used during WWII in Germany? The thought is truly frightening.

Previous posts about this topic are:

Icelandic Ancestry: the Icelandic genealogy database is now available online. 

Ingenius incest prevention app created by University of Iceland students.

The Science of husbandry on a human scale.

photo credit: Stuck in Customs via photopin cc


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DNA, archaeology, anthropology and genealogy open eyes to the past.

DNA, archaeology, anthropology and genealogy open eyes to the past.

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It seems that every time I turn on my computer to view the internet, I find new articles and posts about discoveries made in DNA, archaeology, genealogy and even science, that shed new light on our search into the origins of our own family and heritage, and the origins of our ethnic groups.

Today I stumbled upon the article “Discovered 2.3 k-yr-old human skeleton throws light on our ancestry,” on the ANINews website.

According to this article, “DNA from the complete 1.5 metre tall skeleton is one of the ‘earliest diverged,’ oldest in genetic terms, found to-date in a region where modern humans are believed to have originated roughly 200,000 years ago.”

The DNA evidence pointed to this man being from a branch that is the most closely related to ‘Mitochondrial Eve’ and now presumed to be extinct.

Reading about these new discoveries points out something very intriguing to me. In the past, the discoveries were made based on exploration, experimentation, and finding something new, affecting and changing the future.

Today, the discoveries one hears of most are those delving into the past, using all disciplines of social studies including genealogy, anthropology and archaeology; and the sciences including DNA and chemical analysis.

Today’s most well known and talked about discoveries are looking to the past and where we came from; individually, as a family, and as part of a broader ethnic group.

This suits me fine as this is my area of interest and fascination. I can’t help but feel excitement with each new discovery in my own genealogy, as well as reading and hearing about the discoveries made with a much broader, more global impact.

It all matters and sheds light on who we are and where we came from.


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Icelandic Ancestry: the Icelandic genealogy database is available online.

Icelandic Ancestry: the Icelandic genealogy database is available online.

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Previously, I wrote about the Incest Prevention App called ‘Sifjaspellsspillir’ or ‘Incest Spoiler’. It was created by University of Iceland students for a contest by the Íslendingabók database and its purpose is to alert two people of a possible familial connection when they tap their phones.

Later, in a related story, the “Icelandic Roots: Genealogy, Heritage, & Travel” website announced its release of the Icelandic genealogy database through their site.

The database is available with a monthly or yearly subscription. Access is also available to organizations and researchers by contacting them.

While continuing to add names and other great features, the database also links you to events, dates, occupations, cemetery records and burials, photos and more.

They will assist with your genealogy research by helping you find your family tree, connecting you with family members, and  providing ancestry charts and reports. All this is possible through their popular “Cousins Across the Ocean” project or you can complete their online request form for more information.

If you’re interested in finding out more, there are tips for using the database, and they also explain its history. If you have Icelandic research to do, this site and database are well worth checking out.


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Debate about numbers, percentages and odds in genealogy fascinates.

Debate about numbers, percentages and odds in genealogy fascinates.

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inbreedingThere will always be debate about numbers, percentages and odds in genealogy.

I am so lucky that we have such a wide range of ancestries and national origins in my husband’s and my family trees. Those who have read my posts before are already well aware that our ancestries branch off from four (or five) distinct groups, and marriage between these groups is rare.

The groups containing our ancestries are:

MY ANCESTRY

  • Acadians

French Huguenots escaping religious persecution in France in the mid to late 17th century relocated to the Atlantic coast of Canada and the United States, giving birth to the Acadian and Cajun cultures.

  • French Canadians

You would think, since the origins of French Canadians are essentially the same as the Acadians, there would be more intermarriage between the two, but I have found very few connections between the two groups in our family tree – at least so far. Most French Canadians descended from French explorers and pioneers involved in the fur trade and colonizing what is now part of Ontario and Quebec, although Acadians did find their way up the St. Lawrence River after the great expulsion (grand dérangement) of the French settlers by the British colonists.

MARK’S ANCESTRY

  • Scandinavian

Although the majority of the ancestry of my husband on his mother’s side is Swedish, the other Scandinavian nations and cultures are represented as well.

  • Welsh Quaker

Mark’s ancestry on his father’s side originates from Welsh immigrants who were also escaping religious persecution for their puritan beliefs at the hands of the Welsh and British nobility and clergy.

  • British Royalty and Nobility

The interesting point to make here is that Mark’s connections to British royalty and nobility occur through his Welsh Quaker ancestry.

I decided to touch on this subject after reading the post on Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter entitled, “Man Traces Ancestry to 1st English King – So What?.”

Mathematically, Dick Eastman’s calculations of the numbers of ancestors and/or descendants in a family based upon an average number and length of generations, as well as an average number of children in families appear to make sense. However, there are so many variables affecting the numbers, that it is almost impossible to make accurate estimations, much less calculations.

These variables include:

  1. Individuals who remained single and bore no children.
  2. Individuals who died young and were never married, much less had children.
  3. Mass deaths due to war, disease and poverty wiping out most or all of a generation or two.
  4. Variations in sizes of families as influenced by tradition or custom, health and fertility, relationships, economics, etc.

One major point made by Dick is his belief that everyone can eventually trace their ancestries back to royalty, but by my experience, this appears to be flawed.

As illustrated in the diverse groups outlined above in our ancestries, we originate from several unique national, ethnic, and socio-economic groups. Examining our family tree makes it apparent that intermarriage between these groups was almost impossible due to geography, economics, politics and custom. Most people, no matter where they were from or how wealthy and socially prominent they were, usually married within their own group.

The interesting point illustrated by our ancestry is that although my husband’s and my ancestries are quite separate and rarely intermarried, the fact that he and I married and had our two children now combines our ancestries for all future generations. Therefore, it’s easy to assume that intermarriage occurred (and will occur) much more as the world became smaller through technology, multi-culturalism, etc., which are more modern phenomena of the last hundred years or so.

In previous posts, I touched on this subject as it relates to our ancestry and evolving cultural methods of managing relationships and marriages to ensure as little inbreeding as possible. These posts are “The Science of Husbandry on a Human Scale” and “Ingenius incest prevention app created by University of Iceland students.

I must thank Dick Eastman as his is one of the few blogs I do read that routinely challenge my thinking and assumptions. I like that.

photo credit: wonker via photopin cc


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The largest family tree ever may help with research into genetic traits.

The largest family tree ever may help with research into genetic traits.

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I was amazed to read on the “nature” blog that a genome hacker has discovered what is believed to be the most extensive family tree ever, consisting of 13 million linked individuals.

This family tree was constructed with data from online genealogy sites, and the researchers plan to analyse genetic traits and how they pass from generation to generation. These traits include longevity and facial features.

This ‘largest family tree ever’ will be presented by Yaniv Erlich, a computational biologist at the annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics. The data has been stripped of identifying information to protect privacy and has been made available to other researchers.

Nancy Cox, a human geneticist at the University of Chicago states, “We’ve really only begun to scratch the surface of what these kinds of pedigrees can tell us.”

The ability to measure the change in frequency of traits over generations may help to understand to what extent traits are dictated by genetics.

There is concern by some regarding the quality of the largest family tree ever; about using self-reported genealogical data, as pedigrees stretching to royalty and beyond a certain date are not believed to be valid. There is also the problem of quality of sources and simple errors in the entering of data.

Although it is unclear just how useful and accurate these huge pedigrees will be, some enthusiasm and eagerness is being expressed by scientists and they are working to create a specific experiment that could produce useful results.


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Tips for using Google Goldmine for Genealogy | BYU

Tips for using Google Goldmine for Genealogy | BYU

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James Tanner of Brigham Young University Library (BYU) teaches us how to use the all features Google has to offer to help you do your family history using the Google Goldmine for Genealogy.

With this advice, you can make the most of and get the greatest results from all of your genealogy and ancestry research online.

For more information on upcoming webinars visit his website.

Read on . . .

http://sites.lib.byu.edu/familyhistory/classes-and-webinars/online-webinars/


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Genealogy Jargon Defined | Ancestry

Genealogy Jargon Defined | Ancestry

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When you first take a DNA test or start building a family tree, it can feel like you are trying to learn a new language. Join Crista Cowan for a quick look at some common genealogy and family history words, phrases, and acronyms. Learn their meanings so you can continue your family history journey with confidence.

Subscribe: http://po.st/AncestrySubscribe

About Ancestry:
Bringing together science and self-discovery, Ancestry helps everyone, everywhere discover the story of what led to them. Our sophisticated engineering and technology harnesses family history and consumer genomics, combining billions of rich historical records, millions of family trees, and samples from almost 10 million people in the AncestryDNA database to provide people with deeply meaningful insights about who they are and where they come from.

We’ve pioneered and defined this category, developing new innovations and technologies that have reinvented how people make family history discoveries. And these discoveries can give everyone a greater sense of identity, relatedness, and their place in the world.

Connect with Ancestry:
Visit Ancestry’s Official Site: https://www.ancestry.com/
Like Ancestry on Facebook: http://po.st/AncestryFacebook
Follow Ancestry on Twitter: http://po.st/Ancestry_Twitter
Follow Ancestry on Instagram: http://po.st/AncestryInstagram

Genealogy Jargon Defined | Ancestry
https://www.youtube.com/user/AncestryCom


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 May 2018.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 May 2018.

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The following are the most recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 May 2018.

Featured image: Stonehenge, Wiltshire, England

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 30 May 2018.

 

Benin

Bolivia

Colombia

Denmark

France

Germany

Honduras

Hungary

India

Italy

Kentucky

Liberia

Luxembourg

Peru

Poland

Portugal

South Africa

Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

Venezuela

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions to 30 May 2018.

 

Australia

Brazil

Canada

Germany

Italy

Mexico

New Zealand

Norway

Poland

Romania

Sweden

United Kingdom

United States

Worldwide

 


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Indian slavery once thrived in New Mexico. Latinos are finding family ties to it. | The New York Times

Indian slavery once thrived in New Mexico. Latinos are finding family ties to it. | The New York Times

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Lenny Trujillo made a startling discovery when he began researching his descent from one of New Mexico’s pioneering Hispanic families: One of his ancestors was a slave.

 

“I didn’t know about New Mexico’s slave trade, so I was just stunned,” said Mr. Trujillo, 66, a retired postal worker who lives in Los Angeles. “Then I discovered how slavery was a defining feature of my family’s history.”

 

Mr. Trujillo is one of many Latinos who are finding ancestral connections to a flourishing slave trade on the blood-soaked frontier now known as the American Southwest. Their captive forebears were Native Americans — slaves frequently known as Genízaros (pronounced heh-NEE-sah-ros) who were sold to Hispanic families when the region was under Spanish control from the 16th to 19th centuries. Many Indian slaves remained in bondage when Mexico and later the United States governed New Mexico.

The revelations have prompted some painful personal reckonings over identity and heritage. But they have also fueled a larger, politically charged debate on what it means to be Hispanic and Native American.

A growing number of Latinos who have made such discoveries are embracing their indigenous backgrounds, challenging a long tradition in New Mexico in which families prize Spanish ancestry. Some are starting to identify as Genízaros. Historians estimate that Genízaros accounted for as much as one-third of New Mexico’s population of 29,000 in the late 18th century.

Photo

Floyd E. Trujillo, 83, right, swabbed the inside of his mouth for a DNA sample as his son Virgil spoke with Miguel A. Tórrez, a genealogist. Credit Adria Malcolm for The New York Times

“We’re discovering things that complicate the hell out of our history, demanding that we reject the myths we’ve been taught,” said Gregorio Gonzáles, 29, an anthropologist and self-described Genízaro who writes about the legacies of Indian enslavement.

Those legacies were born of a tortuous story of colonial conquest and forced assimilation.

New Mexico, which had the largest number of sedentary Indians north of central Mexico, emerged as a coveted domain for slavers almost as soon as the Spanish began settling here in the 16th century, according to Andrés Reséndez, a historian who details the trade in his 2016 book, “The Other Slavery.” Colonists initially took local Pueblo Indians as slaves, leading to an uprising in 1680 that temporarily pushed the Spanish out of New Mexico.

The trade then evolved to include not just Hispanic traffickers but horse-mounted Comanche and Ute warriors, who raided the settlements of Apache, Kiowa, Jumano, Pawnee and other peoples. They took captives, many of them children plucked from their homes, and sold them at auctions in village plazas.

The Spanish crown tried to prohibit slavery in its colonies, but traffickers often circumvented the ban by labeling their captives in parish records as criados, or servants. The trade endured even decades after the Mexican-American War, when the United States took control of much of the Southwest in the 1840s.

Seeking to strengthen the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery in 1865, Congress passed the Peonage Act of 1867 after learning of propertied New Mexicans owning hundreds and perhaps thousands of Indian slaves, mainly Navajo women and children. But scholars say the measure, which specifically targeted New Mexico, did little for many slaves in the territory.

Many Hispanic families in New Mexico have long known that they had indigenous ancestry, even though some here still call themselves “Spanish” to emphasize their Iberian ties and to differentiate themselves from the state’s 23 federally recognized tribes, as well as from Mexican and other Latin American immigrants.

Photo

Brienna Martinez performed the Matachines dance in Alcalde, N.M. Credit Adria Malcolm for The New York Times

But genetic testing is offering a glimpse into a more complex story. The DNA of Hispanic people from New Mexico is often in the range of 30 to 40 percent Native American, according to Miguel A. Tórrez, 42, a research technologist at Los Alamos National Laboratory and one of New Mexico’s most prominent genealogists.

Read on . . .

Source: Indian Slavery Once Thrived in New Mexico. Latinos Are Finding Family Ties to It. – The New York Times

 


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‘Terry Fox was Métis’: Fox family joins growing number of Canadians claiming Métis heritage​ | The Globe and Mail

‘Terry Fox was Métis’: Fox family joins growing number of Canadians claiming Métis heritage​ | The Globe and Mail

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Like a growing number of Canadians, the family of Terry Fox has explored and claimed its Métis heritage.

Marian Gladue was deeply involved in the lives of her grandchildren, including the most famous one: Terry Fox. She was around for his birth in 1958, and visited him when he was diagnosed with cancer years later.

In 1980, when illness forced Mr. Fox to end his Marathon of Hope, a cross-country run to raise money for cancer research, the young athlete’s maternal grandmother quickly left her Manitoba home and traveled to B.C. to support him.

But despite their closeness, she was evasive with her family members about a part of her ancestry that they have now begun to explore. Years after she died in 2001, family research has confirmed that Marian Gladue was Métis. While Ms. Gladue was apparently reluctant to talk about it, her descendants have embraced the once-hidden issue, with many now declaring they are also Métis.

In effect, says Terry Fox’s younger brother, Darrell, “Terry Fox is Métis.”

Darrell Fox says members of his family are now intent on exploring “this interesting part of our lives” and what it means for Terry Fox’s legacy. Darrell Fox attended the closing ceremonies of the North American Indigenous Games in Toronto in July, and declared the Fox family “very proud” of its Métis heritage.

Métis Nation BC, which describes itself as a self-governing nation, has confirmed the status of Darrell Fox and his daughter Alexandra based on criteria that include self-identification, being of historic Métis Nation ancestry, acceptance by the Métis community and submitting an application with the correct documentation.

Métis Nation British Columbia is proud, as it is with all Métis people in the province of B.C., that the Fox family was able to discover their Métis ancestry and made the decision to register,” the organization said in a statement.

“It is not uncommon for Métis people to discover their ancestry later in life and have the same sense of pride, curiosity and interest in who their ancestors were as the Fox family.”

An estimated 450,000 Canadians self-identify as Métis, people who trace their origins to early unions between First Nations people and European settlers. In marking Louis Riel Day this year, the B.C. government noted that the province has 90,000 self-identified Métis people, up from about 30,000 since 2006. In April, 2016, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that Métis are one of three constitutionally recognized Indigenous groups, along with First Nations and Inuit.

Metis leaders and historians have noted that more Canadians are embracing their Métis heritage. “It’s certainly a trend that I would say is happening right now,” said Jean Teillet, a treaty negotiator and adjunct professor of law at the University of British Columbia, who wrote a book on the history of the Métis nation.

Ms. Teillet, the great-grandniece of Métis icon Louis Riel, says it seems to her that many Canadians want to be connected to the country’s Indigenous people, which she finds striking as people who have been part of the “settler society” find an element that casts a new light on their history. “I think it’s a fascinating trend. I think it is odd,” she said.

How much more Canadian can you get? The Métis created a culture of their own that was truly, uniquely Canadian. They were strong people who helped make this country.

Carrie Shaw, cousin of Darrell and Terry Fox

But Darrell Fox and his cousin Carrie Shaw, who did much of the research about Ms. Gladue, describe their interest as an effort to understand their past and set the record straight for future generations. And they say they are proud to be associated with Métis culture.

Now in his mid-50s, Darrell Fox says he is newly reflective about aspects of his life, including his maternal grandmother. “When you reach this point, maybe for others it’s earlier, but you reflect a bit more and you’re interested in your history and where you come from.” Mr. Fox said. “I am always interested in filling gaps and finding out more.”

Marian Gladue was the mother of Terry Fox’s mother, Betty. Marian’s great-grandmother was Madeleine Poitras, a Métis. The family believes her husband, Charles Gladue, was a buffalo hunter who also had Métis heritage. Around 1878, Charles and Madeleine moved to North Dakota after the Canadian military occupied the Red River district. Marian Gladue’s parents were born in North Dakota, and Marian Gladue was born in 1910 in Dunseith, N.D. Her family eventually returned to Manitoba.

In 1928, Marian Gladue married John Wark. They had five children, including Betty Wark, who was born in Boissevain, Man. In 1956, Betty married Rolland Fox. They had four children. Fred, followed by Terry, Darrell and Judith. In 1966, the family moved from Winnipeg to Surrey, B.C. and then to Port Coquitlam in 1968.

It was Carrie Shaw, who lives in Cochrane, Alta., who decided after Marian Gladue’s death to try sorting out her grandmother’s past. Ms. Shaw is the daughter of Betty Fox’s brother John Wark. “I have always loved history, family history, my history, where do I come from, why do I do some of the things I do, or like to do,” she said in an interview.

Read on . . .

Source: ‘Terry Fox was Métis’: Fox family joins growing number of Canadians claiming Métis heritage​ – The Globe and Mail


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Creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records and images.

Creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records and images.

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The first consideration when starting to research your genealogy is creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records and images.

 

Creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records.
The importance of creating and safeguarding a digital library of genealogy records.

I have been a computer user from the day of the old single-use word processors. Therefore, I tend to digitize everything into my own digital library of valuables from family photos, tax documents, bills, bank records, correspondence – and of course, genealogy records, genealogy databases and data.

I’m not a novice. I’m well aware of the pitfalls of relying on a digital library, but I’m as guilty as the next person for procrastination and rationalization.

When it comes to doing the tasks necessary to ensure my genealogy records are secure and permanent, I tend to think, “It’s OK, I’ll do it later.”

There are, however, some very serious pitfalls of putting these things off.

Some of the compelling reasons for digitizing records include:

  • Immediacy of sending genealogy records digitally over the internet.
  • Ease of organization, storage, searching and reproduction.
  • Ability to share family genealogy records between yourself and others.
  • Retain genealogy records in condition at the time of scanning to safeguard against the inevitable ravages of time on physical documents, etc.
  • More and more genealogy records are “born-digital”, never having been in physical form at all.

The digital backup we are used to is not sufficient to safeguard and archive records. The process required includes:

  • Storing with background, technical and descriptive information.
  • Storing records in several locations.
  • Archiving for a very lengthy period of time.
  • Saving genealogy data at a very high resolution.
  • Periodically backing up stored genealogy records to new media to prevent loss of data.
  • Converting file formats and media to new ones to avoid obsolescence.
  • Ensuring access to the digital genealogy records collection.

For my own digital archive storage, I am using a 1 terabyte hard drive and save all important genealogy documents and photos to it. If my sum total of research at this point wasn’t as large as it is, I would use the ‘cloud’ as a backup. But there are limits to the quantity of data it will hold.

All of my original genealogy files and data are on my computer.

I also transfer the files periodically to a new backup using the newest technology and format.

I don’t believe in using CDs, DVDs or even flash drives for permanent storage at all as I’ve had too many fail.

photo credit: Sean MacEntee via photopin cc


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If today’s political environment existed in the past, would we be citizens in our own countries?

If today’s political environment existed in the past, would we be citizens in our own countries?

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Those who became citizens of our countries today, were the immigrants of the past, whether illegal or legal. They were the explorers, pioneers and settlers we learn about today with so much pride.

 

As a matter of fact, if there were a ‘law of historical possession’ everyone except the first nations and natives in North America could be considered descendants of illegal immigrants.

 

Immigration

In today’s society, we have the knowledge and foresight to manage immigration through our laws, ensuring every immigrant has the same opportunity to work hard to achieve a comfortable life, make friends and raise families – and be considered citizens.

Our laws are also in place to ensure everyone is treated equally, whether an immigrant or full citizen.

Every aspect of our lives has been impacted by the traditions handed down through the generations.

Researching and studying our family’s collective genealogies made me realize what a boring, milk-toast group of people we’d be without the multicultural mix created by the intermarriage of cultures and ethnicities through the generations.

In 2013, Vice President Joe Biden was quoted, “My parents, my great grandparents, my great-great grandparents came to escape the famine and they didn’t all come here legally… So listen, the existence of the system wasn’t as nearly as truncated as it is now. A lot went to Canada. Came down. So, I’d check your ancestry to make sure they did come in legally, if that’s a concern to you.”

For all of us, our roots in North America originated with those immigrants seeking the promise of their futures in a new land. Who are we to judge others seeking a better future amongst us today?


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I’ve learned of more positive benefits from teens’ family history knowledge.

I’ve learned of more positive benefits from teens’ family history knowledge.

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One day, I logged onto my Facebook to see a link posted by Cyndi’s List to the Washington Post article by Michael Alison Chandler, “Study: Teen’s knowledge of family history a sign of social-emotional health.”

 

…and I couldn’t agree more.

 

Through my own dedicated genealogy research and experience, I have learned of the benefits from teens’ family history knowledge.

 

Positive benefits from teens' family history knowledge.
Positive benefits from teens’ family history knowledge.

I’ve written in the past about my belief that teaching our kids about their heritage and family history enhances their learning experience in school and makes them more active in their studies, obtaining better results.

It also can act as a way to instill basic tools for success in low income families and individuals, minorities, and the disengaged.

Between Mark’s and my ancestries, we have had a broad and rich heritage to draw from to engage our kids.

It was evident throughout their school years as their family history knowledge (and questions) provided real interest in the work they were doing, and I do believe it improved their performance and marks.

Although Mark will sometimes roll his eyes when I discuss my latest find in our genealogy, when we watch any of the history shows we like on the educational and public television channels, he can’t help asking questions when the subjects or characters are familiar from our family histories.

It has also affected me in the sense that history has become more real and emotional to me.

Before my genealogy research, I had no interest at all in war, soldiers, and military history. I’m sure I rolled my eyes a few times, until I started researching our ancestors who perished in (or survived) war – and we had ancestors who were active in every major war throughout history.

This personal connection has instilled a sense of pride in me and I am actually the one to suggest watching historical war programs, before Mark even has a chance.

Now, this is a major turn-about for me and a much more personal example of how learning about our genealogy broadens our horizons.

 


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Dates and details: Keep a genealogy resource file.

Dates and details: Keep a genealogy resource file.

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Everyone knows that Portland is in Oregon, don’t they, but what year did that area develop?

 

Did you know that in earlier times, it was in the Oregon Territories?

 

Hmm.

 

And when did Saskatchewan become a province, eh?

 

These details about states, provinces, counties, and other events, can be overwhelming if you try to remember them all.

 

Don’t.

 

keep a genealogy resource file

Start to develop and keep a genealogy resource file; or you could file papers in your family Genealogy folders or create a computer folder in your Genealogy master folder with specific dates and places to keep track of.

For example, you may need to know when your ancestors emigrated into the USA, in order to determine where to research their entry. Although you may think you know a great deal about Ellis Island and immigration, it was used for screening immigrants from these dates only – January 1, 1892 to 1924.

However, during those years over 400,000 immigrants were screened via the Barge Office (at the tip of Manhattan) in 1891 before the official immigration office was opened. Those dates, 1892-1924, would be useful to have in a handy form, wouldn’t they?

Before that time, Castle Garden (Castle Clinton) at the southern tip of Manhattan, NY City, was an immigrant receiving center from August 1,1855 to April 18, 1890 – more good dates to know.

Search “US immigration, timeline” for more information, including how to search both Ellis Island and Castle Garden records.

Did your ancestors come to North America from another country?

Ireland, for instance?

It would help to know dates of the major famine periods in Ireland, (search “famines, Ireland”) as well as where most emigrating Irish families landed in Canada or the United States.

Or, if they crossed the sea to England, where might they have landed there?

ArchivesIf you are searching censuses in England, many counties changed boundaries several times, particularly after the 1974 Boundary Changes, but some changed prior to that time.

One line of my family lived in the Black Midlands, and their town (Dudley) changed counties several times between Staffordshire and Worcestershire. I was sure that others must have recorded the county incorrectly, until I found an article detailing the various changes in boundaries!

Search online for “British counties, changes” and you will find several excellent sites with details.

You can imagine how important this information could be when searching through Censuses! I’ve learned to check on maps, and look in nearby counties, states, provinces, when researching an ancestor’s residences over time.

We are used to registering every life event with the government, but such was not the case in our ancestors’ days.

For example, passenger lists were not required to be recorded and filed until 1865 in Canada, 1820 in the USA, 1837 in much of England.

In Germany, some vital statistic registrations began in 1792, others not until 1876, varying by state, and they were not kept in a central repository. In general, birth, marriage, death registrations were not required until a state/county or province was formed and had a center for records.

This date of “vital statistics” is remarkably varied throughout the world, and you will need to have the details for each place, in order to search successfully and efficiently for your ancestors.

My personal Genealogy Resource File includes the following (based on my particular ancestors):

  1. Canadian Provinces/Territories, dates of Confederation and Civil Registration – and maps!
  2. Canadian ships passenger lists source (at Library & Archives)
  3. Border Crossings dates, and Passport requirements for both US and Canada
  4. Canadian land grants periods
  5. U.S. States (PA, CT, NY, MA, ME, WA, OR) and county borders, history of formation
  6. Immigration dates for Ellis Island, Crystal Garden
  7. US cities receiving immigration ships; dates
  8. Dates of US wars from 1600-1945
  9. UK Civil registrations, where held
  10. UK counties, border changes, where to find details
  11. Scotland, Ireland church registrations, census dates
  12. The German Palatine emigration paths
  13. Blank Census forms for Canada, USA, UK

…and much more! Pensions, social insurance records, railway historical maps – there is no end to the variety of resources available to help you.

I also have old and current maps of all sorts including of villages, land grants, towns, county borders, plus details of various historical events which might have impacted on my ancestors’ lives.

All of these resources in a genealogy resource file would make your research more efficient and accurate, plus these resources will allow you to provide correct citations of the sources you find.

Enjoy your research and build up your own personalized Genealogy Resource File!

Now that you understand some of the common issues of internet genealogy, you may want to look at other helpful resources.

____________________

About the Author

Celia Lewis, MA, is a Genealogy Consultant who loves both mysteries and families, finding Genealogy research a perfect fit! Now retired, she enjoys having the time to pursue her passions, along with spending time with her five grandchildren.

photo credit: waterlilysage via photopin cc


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Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 20 Apr 2015.

Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 20 Apr 2015.

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The following are the recent Ancestry.com and FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions to 20 Apr 2015.

 

FamilySearch.org Updates and Additions

 

find free genealogy databases
Finding free genealogy databases.

Canada

Belgium

Brazil

Czechoslovakia

England

Indonesia

Jamaica

Philippines

South Africa

United States

 

Ancestry.com Updates and Additions

 

Canada

England

United States


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MyHeritage, EBSCO to provide genealogy services for institutions.

MyHeritage, EBSCO to provide genealogy services for institutions.

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This press release brings great news for genealogy researchers. We’ve seen this in the past with Ancestry.com in libraries and Family Search through local LDS Family History Centers, and now MyHeritage will be partnering with EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) to provide genealogy services for worldwide institutions and libraries.
Ancestry and genealogy services for institutions
Providing genealogy services for institutions.

PRESS RELEASE
October 7, 2014

MyHeritage, the popular family history network, today announced a significant expansion into the institutional education market, with the launch of a dedicated, high-performance family history genealogy service for worldwide institutions and the signing of a strategic partnership with EBSCO Information Services (EBSCO) to distribute it exclusively.

As the leading provider of online research content for libraries and other institutions, EBSCO’s partnership with MyHeritage reaffirms its commitment to providing first-class content to libraries at affordable prices.

EBSCO Senior Vice President of Product Management Michael Laddin, said: “MyHeritage brings to the table an unparalleled offering of a vast, content-rich database and innovative, easy-to-use technologies. With a proven track-record of supporting customers across the globe, we are very excited about this partnership and the value it will bring to libraries and other educational centers worldwide.”

The new, state-of-the-art MyHeritage Library Edition™ MyHeritage Library Edition™ empowers people to discover more about their family history and the lives led by their ancestors. It’s the first product servicing libraries that offers a one-stop-shop of global content, powerful technologies and remote access.

The MyHeritage Library Edition™ provides access to a vast collection of U.S. and international documents online, with images of original documents to enhance research and encourage critical thinking.

Key highlights include:

Vast Global Content

Educational institutions that deploy the MyHeritage Library Edition™ will be able to offer their patrons access to billions of historical documents, millions of historical photos and other resources in thousands of databases that span the past 5 centuries. Available in 40 languages, the MyHeritage Library Edition™ is the industry’s most multilingual family history search engine, breaking down geographical and language barriers in research. The data repository, one of the largest and most internationally diverse of its kind, includes birth, death and marriage records from 48 countries, the complete US and UK censuses, immigration, military and tombstone records and more than 1.5 billion family tree profiles. The database grows at an average pace of more than 5 million records each day.

Powerful Technology

The MyHeritage Library Edition™ builds upon MyHeritage’s deep investment in innovation. Its search engine’s automatic handling of translations, synonyms and spelling variations of millions of names in multiple languages is unparalleled. Its unique Record Detective™ technology takes research one step further by recommending additional records for each record discovered. This enhances research and helps users discover a lot more in less time.

Remote Access

Library members can use the MyHeritage Library Edition™ either at their local library or in the comfort of their own home using remote access.

photo credit: San José Library via photopin cc


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Relatives of adopted adults are now able to trace family tree.

Relatives of adopted adults are now able to trace family tree.

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Press release: Relatives of adopted adults now able to trace family tree.

Children, grandchildren and other relatives of adopted adults can now trace back through their ancestors’ lives – helping them to unearth their family history, discover more about their medical background and reach out to long-lost relatives under new rules introduced today.

Previously, only the person adopted and their birth relatives were able to use specialized adoption agencies to help shed light on their family history and make contact with their biological family members.

The new rules will extend this right to all relatives of adopted adults, from children and grandchildren to partners and adoptive relatives, allowing greater openness in adoption while ensuring adopted people have the right to a private, family life.

For example, those who have lost a parent to cancer or a heart problem will be able to discover whether their grandparents or other birth relatives suffered from the same condition, giving them the chance to seek advice and support.

Children and Families Minister Edward Timpson, who has 2 adopted brothers, said:

It’s right that descendants and other relatives of adopted adults are able to access important information, such as medical records or genetic health conditions, which could impact upon how they live their life today.

They should also be able to find out about important events from their past, as well as make contact with family members if they wish.

This positive change will help thousands of people discover their place in history, while keeping important safeguards in place to protect the right to a private family life for those who were adopted.

Julia Feast OBE, from the British Association for Fostering and Adoption (BAAF) said:

The British Association for Adoption and Fostering is delighted that the government’s consultation about extending intermediary services to descendants of adopted people has now been published.

We are very pleased that the government has extended the rights of descendants and other relatives to access an intermediary service whilst ensuring that the adopted person’s rights are not overlooked and will be at the centre of the decision making.

Today’s announcement (25 September 2014) is just the latest milestone in the government’s plan to overhaul support for adopted families.

We have announced plans to introduce a £19.3 million fund to help adopted children settle into their new families by accessing crucial support services as and when they need it, and have extended entitlements so that adopted children have access to priority school admissions, the pupil premium, and eligibility for free early education for 2-year-olds.

In addition, we have also published the Adoption Passport which sets out in one place all the rights and entitlements of adoptive parents, alongside new online maps which allow potential adopters to find out more information about services in their area. We have also set up First4Adoption, the government funded information service for people interested in adopting a child.

Notes to Editor

The government has today published new rules to make provision for intermediary services to facilitate contact between ‘persons with a prescribed relationship’ and the birth relatives of a person adopted before 30 December 2005.

The regulations will define ‘persons with a prescribed relationship’ as anyone related to an adopted person by blood (including half-blood), marriage or civil partnership or by virtue of the adoption. This will include all relatives of the adopted person, including but not limited to the children and grandchildren of adopted persons.

The regulations will ensure that that the consent of the adopted person is obtained before contact or information sharing is facilitated between persons with a prescribed relationship and birth relatives, other than:

where a person with a prescribed relationship seeks non-identifying medical information from birth relatives of the adopted person and this can be shared by the intermediary agency without sharing identifying information
where a person with a prescribed relationship wishes to make contact with a birth relative and the adopted person cannot be found, despite all reasonable steps having been taken
where the adopted person has died or lacks capacity

The ‘Intermediary services for relatives of adopted people’ consultation is now available.

The new rules will come into force by November 2014.
DfE enquiries

Central newsdesk 020 7783 8300

General enquiries 0370 000 2288

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FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates – 29 Sep 2014

FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates – 29 Sep 2014

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The following is the list of FamilySearch.org and Ancestry.com Additions and Updates to date, September 29, 2014.

FamilySearch.org and <a href=Ancestry.com Additions and Updates” width=”373″ height=”313″ />

FamilySearch.org Additions and Updates

Belgium

China

Finland

France

Czechoslovakia

India

Indonesia

Italy

Korea

Nicaragua

Portugal

Spain

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

Ancestry.com Additions and Updates

Canada

England

photo credit: WA State Library via photopin cc


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The benefits of storing your DNA for future use.

The benefits of storing your DNA for future use.

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Assisting with legal issues, future comparison for accuracy, investigation of family histories, and verification of paternity and maternity are only a few of the benefits of storing your DNA for future use.
storing your DNA for future use.
The benefits of storing your DNA for future use.

As of June 2013, it has been legal for law enforcement officers to obtain DNA samples from people who have been arrested but not convicted of a serious crime. The purpose of this collection process is to enable the police to easily scan DNA evidence that has been collected from other crime scenes with the intention of helping them solve more cases. Although this was a controversial Supreme Court decision, it has also opened the door for individuals to consider protecting their rights by storing their own DNA samples. After all, evidence is not always as tamper-proof as it should be, and it could be extremely beneficial to have a professionally collected and stored sample for comparison’s sake.

What are the perks of storing DNA samples?

There are many reasons that an individual could decide to store their DNA. For example, it can provide an easily testable record of their family line for future genealogy enthusiasts, and it can also speed up the process of determining paternity. From a legal standpoint, being able to conclusively verify whether or not someone is the parent of a child can be imperative in certain cases. It is also important to consider the implications of DNA on criminal cases. The Justice Project has helped people become exonerated years after a conviction by comparing DNA samples, and now everyone has the opportunity to make sure that a reliable sample of their DNA will be available if they find themselves accused of a crime they did not commit.

How will stored DNA impact a legal case?

It is necessary for a DNA sample to be properly processed and stored in order for it to provide reliable results during a legal case. Any tampering or improper storage of DNA could cause the results to be skewed. Additionally, it is important to note that prosecutors do not always use DNA as evidence. In these cases, having properly stored DNA could very easily help lead to an acquittal, especially if any DNA that was found on the scene does not match the samples that are provided by the accused. Even if someone does get convicted, their stored sample could end up getting them exonerated in the future if new DNA evidence is found.

What happens if the DNA samples do not match?

If a prosecutor claims that an individual’s DNA links them to a crime but their sample does not match the one that the accused has in storage, it will typically become necessary for law enforcement officers to obtain a second sample. Going through this process can help erase any doubts about improper storage and processing, and it can make the difference between an acquittal and a conviction. With this in mind, it makes perfect sense for everyone to protect themselves by storing a sample of their DNA with a professional collection company.

Article Source

photo credit: Spanish Flea via photopin cc


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Genealogy News Bites to July 19, 2014.

Genealogy News Bites to July 19, 2014.

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Following are the most recent genealogy news bites and headlines up to July 19, 2014.
Genealogy news bites
Genealogy news bites to July 19, 2014.

National Archives

CSV validator – a new digital preservation tool

Today marks the official release of a new digital preservation tool developed by The National Archives, CSV Validator version 1.0. This follows on from well known tools such as DROID…

Olive Tree Genealogy

Who Do You Think You Are is Back!

Who Do You Think You Are? is launching on July 23rd at 9/8c with an outstanding cast on TLC. Ancestry.com is the main sponsor. If you aren’t familiar with the show, it features stars uncovering secrets and learning their histories as they travel the world in search of their family histories…

Help Return WW2 Soldier Edwin Manktelow Dog Tag – Case #22

Steve is asking for help finding a WW2 soldier or his family. Here’s his email to Olive Tree Genealogy: While out with my metal detector here in England yesterday I found my first American dog tag, although it is in 3 pieces it very clearly reads…

Fergus Falls Daily Journal

Henning woman donates genealogy collection to state society

Ginny Swartz has been gathering genealogical information for more than three decades. She finally decided it was time to share her work. Swartz donated her collection to the Minnesota Genealogy Society, according to a report in the Citizen’s Advocate...

NARAtions

Have Your Say: Revising the Digitization Strategy

In September 2007, the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) requested public input on a Draft Plan for Digitizing Archival Materials. Incorporating feedback from the public, NARA issued the Strategy for Digitizing Archival Materials for Public Access, 2007-2016 in May 2008…

Fold3

Access the Revolutionary War Collection

As we celebrate the founding of America this month, learn more about the people who made it possible by exploring Fold3’s Revolutionary War collection for free July 14–31…

Endocrinetoday

Genetic ancestry data could improve PCOS classification, treatment

Genetic ancestry data could help avoid polycystic ovary syndrome misclassification that can occur through self-reported ethnicity, according to research published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Verifying genetic ancestry in patients with PCOS could particularly help…

Utah Health and Wellness

Ancestry, Location, Outdoor Rec. Pushes Utah’s Skin Cancer Rate Higher

Utah has officially entered the dog days of summer, and with the heat comes the risk of burns. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 in 40 males and 1 in 50 females in the state will develop melanoma, one of three common types of skin cancer…

The Champaign County News-Gazette

Illinois Ancestors: Mennonite ancestry in database

The California Mennonite Historical Society has created The GRANDMA database (Genealogical Registry And Database of Mennonite Ancestry) with information on over a million individuals, “most of whose ancestral lines can be traced to Mennonite communities in Prussia (now Poland)…

photo credit: sjrankin via photopin cc


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Genealogy News Bites to May 26, 2014

Genealogy News Bites to May 26, 2014

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Following are the recent Genealogy News Bites and Headlines to May 26, 2014

 

Genealogy News Bites

Genealogy News Bites and Headlines

National Archives

The National Archives at St. Louis thanks WWII Navy veteran Paul Wittmer

The National Archives at St. Louis staff extended a special thanks to World War II U.S. Navy Veteran Paul Wittmer on April 14. During World War II, Wittmer served on six war patrols on the USS Tinosa SS-283. He was part of the crew responsible for the capture of the famed Japanese I-401 submarine taken at the end of the war and returned to Pearl Harbor from Japan

Green Valley News

Genealogy Today: Historic diseases, epidemics our ancestors faced

Those of us born in the latter half of the 20th century may not realize how many diseases we’re no longer subject to that once affected our ancestors’ lives. Probably the world’s best known epidemic is the Great Plague of London in 1665. The last in a

Genealogy Canada

The Empress of Ireland – May 29, 1914

The sinking of the RMS Empress of Ireland at the mouth of the St. Lawrence River in 1914 had a great affect on the people of Canada, as more than 1,000 people lost their lives when the ship was stuck by the SS Storstad on that fateful foggy morning

Family History Libraries offers FREE scanning

You can now take your photos and other documents to your nearest Family History Library and scan them for FREE! They have recently installed a customized Lexmark multifunction product (MFPs) which quickly scan photos or

Olive Tree Genealogy

Never Before Seen Photographs from World War One Frontline

In keeping with Memorial Day weekend in the United States, here is a link to an interesting story with photos.  A Viscount in the Armoured Cavalry Branch of the French Army  left a collection of hundreds of glass plates taken during World War One that have never been published before. The images show the daily life of soldiers in the trenches, destruction of towns and military leaders

WW2 Collection on Fold3 FREE until May 31, 2014

Find your family heroes in Fold3′s vast collection of WWII documents, records, and images, including draft registration cards, Army enlistment records, Navy muster rolls, “Old Man’s Draft” registration cards, missing air crew reports, casualty lists, and more.  You can also explore records that provide historical context, such as Navy war diaries, submarine patrol reports, naval press

An index to Niagara area Loyalists and their Land Certificates

Image 160 Index of names H 1140 Canadiana.Org has digitized 21 films of the Heir & Devisee Commission Papers (Heir & Devisee Commission papers 1797-1854, found in their Heritage Collection), and that’s a good thing for genealogists

Dallas Morning News

Q&A: Maud Newton on why we’re obsessed with genealogy

Maud Newton’s fascination with charting her family tree puts her very much in line with a renewed American interest in genealogy — a journey that today can be assisted by the apparent precision of DNA analysis and instant online access to centuries of

Ancestry.com Blog

Finding Ocean State Ancestors: Rhode Island Research Guide

The history of Rhode Island is tied to religion and trade. Settlement began with Roger Williams, who in 1636 went to present-day Rhode Island after being banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony for his religious views

Quaker Calendars & Dates: In Just Two Days, Tomorrow Will be Yesterday

There is no doubt about it: Quaker dating in letters and meeting minutes is confusing! When you begin researching Quaker records, you may be tempted to “correct” the dates that you find. You would not be alone in thinking this way. Let’s take a look at the reasoning behind the Quaker calendar and dating practices and how to interpret them

Find A Grave Mobile App for iOS: Update

As we continue to improve the mobile app for iOS, your feedback is crucial—we are constantly checking the comments and requests that come in through mobilefeedback@findagrave.com. In fact, this latest release is in response to a problem we’ve heard a lot of you report, and we think we’ve solved it in a way that will help make things easier

Should You Go Fast and Far? Or Slow and Sure?

For Mother’s Day, I wrote a post about taking your tree back as far as you can go on your matrilineal line:  I Can Take My Tree All The Way Back to Eve. How Far Does Your Matrilineal Line Go? Some who saw the headline for the post thought I meant Adam and Eve from the Bible

Linking AncestryDNA to Trees – Now Even to Shared Ones

You can link your AncestryDNA test results to only one tree, but it can be any tree that you are an editor on. If you would like to link your DNA results to a tree that someone has shared with you, you will need to be an editor on this tree

Genea-Musings

Calling all Genealogy Jamboree Attendees: Ancestry Needs You!

Ancestry depends on user input to help mold the future generation of their offerings. A range of opportunities are being planned here at SCGS for participants to share their impressions of upcoming Ancestry features across multiple products.  These will include both focus groups and individual interviews all four days of the conference

The National Archives Blog

Using WordPress to manage our web content

During our website redesign process, the goal has been to make our site as efficient, effective and satisfying as possible for visitors. The web team has written a series of

The best of Friends

The National Archives – full of national treasures, and a national treasure itself. The Friends of The National Archives is a registered charity and voluntary organisation, dedicated to supporting the

FamilySearch.org Blog

New Online Collection of Civil War Records Released in Observance of Memorial Day

In conjunction with Memorial Day, FamilySearch.org announced today significant updates to its free Civil War historic record collections online. The new FamilySearch.org/civil-war landing page provides a quick overview of the vast array of historic records and aids for those researching casualties and veterans of the Civil War

RootsTech 2015 Call for Presentations

RootsTech 2015 will be held February 11-14, 2015 at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, Utah. We are calling for dynamic presentations that inform and educate both those seeking to begin and those who are seeking to continue discovering their family story through technology

Norway Celebrates Its 200th Anniversary—Online Data Making It Easier to Trace Your Norwegian Roots

If you have family roots in Norway, you have a celebration coming up. The bicentennial of Norway’s independence is May 17th. There are almost as many descendants of Norwegians in the U.S. (4.5M) as there are in Norway today (5M). Norwegians are the 10th largest American ancestry group in the US

NARAtions

Digitization of Alaska Records

Your participation and feedback is essential to the operations of the National Archives. As part of ongoing budget adjustments, the National Archives at Anchorage will close in the coming months, and archival records will be moved to the National Archives at Seattle

Library and Archives Canada

New finding aids available online

Library and Archives Canada has begun an initiative that will see the digitization and transcription of several significant finding aids. Adding these finding aids online will help users find material much more easily. We will continue to add other finding aids throughout the year, but so far

Discover Magazine

Ancient Cave Skeleton Sheds Light on Early American Ancestry

Genetic studies have pointed to a Siberian ancestry for modern Native Americans. Most researchers believe the first Americans (Paleoamericans) migrated from northwest Asia via Beringia, the now-submerged land bridge

photo credit: reinvented via photopin cc


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Genealogy News Bites – May 14, 2014

Genealogy News Bites – May 14, 2014

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Following are the newest ancestry and genealogy news bites and headlines since May 5, 2014.

Genealogy News BitesFamilySearch.org Blog

Discussions: Users Can Now Delete Legacy Disputes

A few years ago, FamilySearch.org copied disputes from new.FamilySearch.org into the Discussions feature in Family Tree. Those disputes are referred to as “legacy disputes.” When they were copied into Family Tree, the contributor of the dispute was listed as FamilySearch, and the comments could not be deleted

FamilySearch Adds More Than 5.1 Million Images to Collections from Belgium, England, India, Italy, Sweden, Ukraine, the United States

FamilySearch has added more than 5.1 million images to collections from Belgium, England, India, Italy, Sweden, Ukraine, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 2,571,405 indexed records and images

FamilySearch Adds More Than 5.4 Million Images to Collections from England, New Zealand, Philippines, Portugal, Russia, Spain, and the United States

FamilySearch has added more than 5.4 million images to collections from England, New Zealand, Philippines, Portugal, Russia, Spain, and the United States. Notable collection updates include the 2,152,718 indexed records

Genealogy and History News

Explore New Records from New Zealand on findmypast

Findmypast, one of the big name companies in the genealogy field, are part-way through their 100 in 100 project (100 new data sets in 100 days). And part of that they have just released a whole bunch of New Zealand

Genealogy Canada

Alberta Quilt Project

The Alberta Quilt Project will be coming to Pincher Creek’s Kootenai Brown Pioneer Village at the end of May and the start of June. The project will index all the quilts either made in Alberta or brought there by the immigration process from the 1800s to the 1960s

Building Personal Archives

The Quinte Branch of the OGS will hold their monthly meeting on Saturday May 17, 2014 at 1 pm at the Quinte West Library, 7 Creswell Dr, Trenton.
Entitled Building Personal Archives, the presentation

Olive Tree Genealogy

100 Years of McGill University Yearbooks Online

If you have an ancestor who attended McGill University in Montreal Quebec you won’t want to miss this new database. The years online are 1898-2000 and you can browse or search by name. For details see Gail Dever’s blog post  More than 100 years of McGill University yearbooks digitized

The Childen’s Home Website Now Online

The first phase of The Children’s Home website by Peter Higginson is now live. According to Peter who also created The Workhouse website: The Children’s Homes website aims to provide information on all of the many and varied institutions that — for whatever reason — became home

Fold3 Blog

Access the World War II Collection

This Memorial Day season, explore Fold3′s World War II Collection for free now through May 31st. Find your family heroes in Fold3′s vast collection of WWII documents, records, and images, including draft registration cards, Army enlistment records, Navy muster rolls, “Old Man’s Draft” registration cards, missing air crew reports, casualty lists, and more…

Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter

National Genealogical Society Gives Awards for Excellence in Genealogy Scholarship and Service

The following was written by the folks at the National Genealogical Society: Arlington, VA, 9 MAY 2014: The National Genealogical Society held its annual banquet on Friday evening, 9 May 2014, at the NGS 2014 Family History Conference in Richmond, Virginia, to present awards that acknowledge and honor genealogical scholarship and service

WebProNews

Genealogy Tool Can Now Pinpoint Ancestry Through Genetics

Genealogy is a fun pastime for many people throughout the world. Tracking down ancestral information and filling out family trees is a way for many to connect with the past. Beyond birth and death records, however, the study of genealogy is now being

Library and Archives Canada

The United Empire Loyalists – Finding their Records

The term “United Empire Loyalists” (often referred to as UEL) refers to the American colonists who remained loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolution, and many of which fought for Britain during that conflict. They fled the United States and settled in what are now the provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Quebec and Ontario

photo credit: North Carolina Digital Heritage Center via photopin cc


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Genealogy News Bites – May 5, 2014

Genealogy News Bites – May 5, 2014

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genealogy news bites picsIn an effort to help ease the load of searching for genealogy news and genealogy events, I prepare a ‘Genealogy News Bites’ post to gather together what I feel are the most important or informative genealogy news headlines from the previous week (or thereabouts). Following are the most recent and relevant genealogy news headlines.

 

Olive Tree Genealogy

Victorian Reform School & Prison Records Online – A Contest!

John Wormald age 11 Reform School 1892 Ancestry.co.uk, Ancestry.ca and Ancestry.com have recently published some fascinating reformatory school and prison records from West Yorkshire

Irish Census Records 1821-1911 online

1821 Census Colebrooke (Aghalurcher, Fermanagh) Irish Census Records from 1821 to 1911 (with gaps 1861 to 1901) are now available online.  The earlier records are scattered and many have not survived but The National Archives of Ireland

Prosapia Genetics – Worth the Money?

Yesterday I decided to check out a website that has the genealogy community buzzing. The Examiner called it a “Groundbreaking GPS tool [that] finds your ancestors, genealogy, family tree and history”  Basically it is being touted as

Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

Panel to discuss genealogy issues in La Verne – Inland Valley Daily Bulletin

The panel sponsored by the Southern California Society of Professional Genealogists will provide members and guests with a special opportunity to meet in a roundtable setting

Beliefnet

Matthew 1:1-17; The Genealogy of Jesus (Cross-Reference Comparison)

Some believe that Matthew’s genealogy focuses primarily on the family tree of Jesus’ adopted father, Joseph, while Luke’s highlights the lineage of his mother, Mary. Another theory

Genealogy Canada

RCMP obituary card index and notices, 1876-2007

Here is an instance which demonstrates the co-operative partnership that exists between Ancestry and Family Search these days with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) obituaries card and notices between 1876 and 2007

OGS announces officers for 2014-2016

The slate of new officers for 2014-2016 was announced today at the OGS Conference. The president is Alan Campbell. Alan is from the Lambton Branch of the OGS.The vice president i…

Eastman’s Online Genealogy Newsletter

Evernote Was Made For Genealogy | Eastman’s Online Genealogy …

Cyndi of Cyndi’s List has started a new section entitled, Evernote Was Made For Genealogy. She writes, “I will admit it. I’m an Evernote junkie. I love this tool and all it has to offer

Ancestry.com Blog

Don’t Let Mold Destroy Your Family History

Mold is a four-letter word. It can destroy your documents and it can make you sick. What do you do when you discover that great-grandpa’s Civil War letters or the family Bible has mold on it? Here are some tips


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